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Search results - "ptolemaic"
coin619.jpg
20 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #619
cars100
coin618.jpg
27 views Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF Coin #618
cars100
coin617.jpg
21 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #617

cars100
57314q00~0.jpg
15 Hadrian71 viewsHADRIAN
BI tetradrachm, Alexandria mint, 11.1g, 25.1mm
29 Aug 125 - 28 Aug 126 A.D.
ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ Α∆ΡΙΑ CΕΒ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis, from behind / L ∆Ε KATOV (year 10), Canopus jar of Osiris, ornamented with figures, wearing crown of horns, uraei disk, and plumes
Kampmann-Ganschow 32.351; Geissen 903; Dattari 1326; Milne 1154; BMC Alexandria p. 75, 630; Emmett 827
Choice gVF
Purchased from FORVM

Note that at some point in this coin's history, it seems to have been used a host for very poor quality fakes. After discussion on the FORVM board, I am comfortable that this coin is indeed the original. Shame on the former owner that used it for copies!

During the mummification process, large organs, such as the liver, lungs, stomach and intestines were extracted and placed in four jars. In the Ptolemaic period, the Greeks called these jars "canopic jars," relating them to the deity of the old city Canop (now a village in Abu Kyr). The heart was left in the body because it held the spirit, understanding and senses and would be needed on the Day of Judgment in the underworld. -- FORVM
RI0073
3 commentsSosius
Ptolmaic_Egypt_.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom13 viewsHellenistic coinage of the Ptolemies, after Alexander the Great. Principal mints include Alexandria in Egypt, Paphos and Sidon in Cyprus, and Sidon and Tyre in Phoenicia. 1 commentsAnaximander
rhodos_ae12.jpg
AE 12; Zeus/ Hibiscus15 viewsRhodos, Caria, c. 225 B.C. Bronze AE 12, SNG Cop 797, nice F, Rhodos mint, 1.967g, 11.7mm, 0o, c. 225 BC; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse PO, rose, sun-disk behind; rare. Based on the unusual Zeus obverse, this small bronze could be connected to Ptolemy III of Egypt. A devastating earthquake struck Rhodes in 226 B.C. It knocked down the Colossus of Rhodes and destroyed the city. Polybius records that Ptolemy III promised the Rhodians '300 talents of silver, a million artabae of corn, ship-timber for 10 quinqueremes and 10 triremes, consisting of 40,000 cubits of squared pine planking, 1000 talents of bronze coinage, 180,000 pounds of tow (for ropes), 3000 pieces of sailcloth, 3000 talents (of copper?) for the repair of the Colossus, 100 master-builders with 350 workmen, and 14 talents yearly to pay their wages. Beside this, he gave 12,000 artabae of corn for their public games and sacrifices, and 20,000 artabae for victualling 10 triremes. The greater part of these goods were delivered at once, as well as one-third of the money named.' This issue shows perceived harmony with, or thanks to Ptolemaic Egypt. -- J. Ashton, Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Earthquake of 229. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Alexandria.jpg
Alexandria11 viewsAlexandria was one of the most famous cities in the world. It was founded around a small pharaonic town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great. It remained Egypt's capital for nearly a thousand years, until the Muslim conquest of Egypt in AD 641, when a new capital was founded at Fustat (Fustat was later absorbed into Cairo). Alexandria was known because of its Lighthouse of Alexandria (Pharos), one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World; its library (the largest library in the ancient world); and the Catacombs of Kom el Shoqafa, one of the Seven Wonders of the Middle Ages. Ongoing maritime archaeology in the harbor of Alexandria, which began in 1994, is revealing details of Alexandria both before the arrival of Alexander, when a city named Rhacotis existed there, and during the Ptolemaic dynasty.ancientone
antiochos_IV.jpg
Antiochos IV Epiphanes, Eagle17 viewsSeleukid Kingdom. Antiochos IV Epiphanes. 175-164 B.C. Æ drachm (34 mm, 34.01 g, 1 h). Antioch on the Orontes, 169-168 B.C. Laureate head of Serapis right, wearing Osiris cap / Eagle standing right on thunderbolt. SC 1413; SMA 59; CSE 118. VF, green patina, porous. This coin belongs to a larger series of "Egyptianizing" coins struck by Antiochos IV at Antioch between his two campaigns in Egypt. Unlike regular Seleukid coinage they employ the large size and Egyptian types used in the closed circulation zone of Ptolemaic Egypt. It has been suggested that they commemorated his first Egyptian victory in 169 and were intended to conserve Seleukid silver stores. It is also possible that the "Egyptianizing" series was struck with an eye towards adopting an Egyptian style coinage system following the planned annexation of Egypt to the Seleukid Empire. Any such plan was never realized as the Romans forced Antiochos IV to evacuate Egypt in 168 B.C. 
Ex. Frank L. Kovacs (Vauctions) . Podiceps
Antiochus_XII.jpg
Antiochos XII 87-84 BC21 viewsAntiochus XII 87–86/5 BC, Damascus mint Ae 22mm, Weight 7.1g. Obv: Beardless diademed bust of Antiochus XII right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΙΝΙΚΟΥ – Tyche standing left with palm branch in right hand and cornucopia in left, dotted border. Reference: SC 2, 2476; SNG Israel I, Nos. 2900–2902. SPAER 2897

Antiochus XII Dionysus (Epiphanes/Philopator/Callinicus), a ruler of the Greek Seleucid kingdom who reigned 87–84 BC, was the fifth son of Antiochus VIII Grypus and Tryphaena to take up the diadem. He succeeded his brother Demetrius III Eucaerus as separatist ruler of the southern parts of the last remaining Seleucid realms, basically Damascus and its surroundings.

Antiochus initially gained support from Ptolemaic forces and was the last Seleucid ruler of any military reputation, even if it was on a local scale. He made several raids into the territories of the Jewish Hasmonean kings, and tried to check the rise of the Nabataean Arabs. A battle against the latter turned out to be initially successful, until the young king was caught in a melee and killed by an Arab soldier. Upon his death the Syrian army fled and mostly perished in the desert. Soon after, the Nabateans conquered Damascus.

Antiochus' titles - apart from Dionysos - mean respectively (God) Manifest, Father-loving and Beautiful Victor. The last Seleucid kings often used several epithets on their coins.
ddwau
H12.jpg
ANTIQUITIES, Egypt, Terracotta head of Hellenistic woman, 3rd C. B.C.22 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom/Terracotta head of Hellenistic woman.
Tanagra Style, 3rd Century B.C.
4.4 cm (1 3/4") tall; broken from a figure; mold made with hand tooling; very attractive.
Ex FORVM.
superflex
anubis.JPG
Anubis59 viewsEgyptian Faience
late or ptolemaic period
H: 3 cm
1 commentsfrederic
Ptolemy2Phil.jpg
AP Monogram262 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
10785. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 714, SNG Cop 506-507, aVF, 14.08g, 26.5mm, 0o, Phoenicia, Sidon mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis, small D behind ear; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, SI left, AP countermark right; slightly frosty; $125.00
whitetd49
01035AB.jpg
Arsinoë II Philadelphos - 1st daughter of Pharaoh Ptolemy I Soter324 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA, 253 - 252 BC, Struck under Ptolemy II.
AV Octodrachm (Mnaïeion) - 27mm, 27.69 g, 12h

O - Arsinoë II head right, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped scepter in background, Θ to left
R - APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet.

Svoronos 460; Troxell, Arsinoe, Transitional to Group 3, p. 43 and pl. 6, 2-3 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 134.

Arsinoe II married Lysimachus at the age of 15. After Lysimachus' death in battle in 281 BC, she fled to Cassandreia and married her paternal half-brother Ptolemy Keraunos. As he became more powerful, she conspired against him leading to the killing of her sons, Lysimachus and Philip. After their deaths, she fled to Alexandria, Egypt to seek protection from her brother, Ptolemy II Philadelphus; whom she later married. As a result, both were given the epithet "Philadelphoi" ("Sibling-loving (plural)") by the presumably scandalized Greeks.

Arsinoe II Philadelphos, died 270-268 BC.
4 commentsrobertpe
arsinoe_II.jpg
Arsinoe II; Head of Arsinoe right/ Eagle; Svoronos 35118 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Arsinoe II, c. 273 - 268 B.C. Bronze AE 16, 1/16th drachm?, Svoronos 351; Weiser -; SNG Copenhagen 100, Fair, edge broken, uncertain mint, 2.772g, 15.9mm, 0o, c. 264 BC; obverse veiled and diademed head of Arsinoë II right; reverse PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings open, “DI” above monogram before; rare. Arsinoe II (316 B.C. - July 270 B.C.) was the daughter of king Ptolemy I Soter, the founder of the Hellenistic state of Egypt, and his second wife Berenice I., As the wife of King Lysimachus, she was queen of Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. Later she was co-ruler of Egypt with her brother and husband Ptolemy II. Ex FORVMPodiceps
PtolemyREX.jpg
AUGUSTUS & PTOLEMY OF NUMIDIA AE semis174 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head of Augustus right

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, REX PTOL (Ptolemy, King) within diadem

Carthago Nova, Spain, under sole 'duovir quinqunennales' C Laetilius Apalus.

18.5mm, 5.3g.
RPC 172.

Ex-Incitatus

Ptolemy of Numidia was the son of King Juba II of Numidia and Cleopatra Selene II. He was also the grandson of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII on his mohter's side. He was named in honor of the memory of Cleopatra VII, the birthplace of his mother and the birthplace of her relatives. In choosing her son's name, Cleopatra Selene II created a distinct Greek-Egyptian tone and emphasized her role as the monarch who would continue the Ptolemaic dynasty. She by-passed the ancestral names of her husband. By naming her son Ptolemy instead of a Berber ancestral name, she offers an example rare in ancient history, especially in the case of a son who is the primary male heir, of reaching into the mother's family instead of the father's for a name. This emphasized the idea that his mother was the heiress of the Ptolemies and the leader of a Ptolemaic government in exile.

Through his parents he received Roman citizenship and was actually educated in Rome. Amazingly he grew up in the house of his maternal aunt, and Antony's daughter Antonia Minor, the youngest daughter of Mark Antony and the youngest niece of Augustus. Antonia was also a half-sister of Ptolemy's late mother, also a daughter of Mark Antony. Antonia Minor's mother was Octavia Minor, Mark Antony's fourth wife and the second sister of Octavian (later Augustus). Ptolemy lived in Rome until the age of 21, when he returned to the court of his aging father in Mauretania.

Ptolemy was a co-ruler with his father Juba II until Juba's death and was the last semi-autonomous ruler of Africa. On a visit to Rome in 40 AD he was seen by the Emperor Caligula in an amphitheather wearing a spectacular purpal cloak. A jealous Caligula had him murdered for his fashionable purple cloak.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
augustus_86a.JPG
Augustus RIC I, 86a175 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.74g, 19mm
Colonia Patricia(?), ca. 19 BC - 18 BC
obv. CAESAR AVGVSTVS
bare head r.
rev. SIGNIS above, RECEPTIS under round shield inscribed with CL.V between
eagle l. and standard r. S.P.Q.R. at the corners of the shield
RIC I, 86a; BMCR 417; RSC 265
good VF, toned

The eagle standards were introduced by Marius similar to the Ptolemaic eagle to each of his legions. This issue celebrates the recovery of the 3 eagle-standards 20 BC by Augustus, which were lost by Crassus 53 BC at the battle of Carrhae against the Parthians. The 3 eagles thereafter were erected in the new temple of Mars Ultor on the Forum of Augustus. The day of recovery was determined public holiday.
5 commentsJochen
augustus_86a~0.JPG
Augustus RIC I, 86a1416 viewsJochen's Augustus RIC I, 86a
Augustus, 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.74g, 19mm
Colonia Patricia(?), ca. 19 BC - 18 BC
obv. CAESAR AVGVSTVS
bare head r.
rev. SIGNIS above, RECEPTIS under round shield inscribed with CL.V between
eagle l. and standard r. S.P.Q.R. at the corners of the shield
RIC I, 86a; BMCR 417; RSC 265
good VF, toned

The eagle standards were introduced by Marius similar to the Ptolemaic eagle to each of his legions. This issue celebrates the recovery of the 3 eagle-standards 20 BC by Augustus (by negotiations), which were lost by Crassus 53 BC at the battle of Carrhae against the Parthians. The 3 eagles thereafter were erected in the new temple of Mars Ultor on the Forum of Augustus. The day of recovery was determined public holiday.
11 commentsJochen
CLEO I.jpg
Cleopatra I, wife of Ptolemy V (Epiphanes).306 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Æ (28.4 mm, 18.84 g), before 176 BCE.
Obv: Diademed head of Cleopatra I as Isis, r.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, wings open.
Svoronos 1235; Sear Greek 7880; BMC 6.94,72; SNG VIII 1175; Forrer 80.
EmpressCollector
Cleo_III.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Alexandria, 19.8 mm, obol21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426, F, Alexandria mint, 6.557 g, 19.8 mm, 315o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM

Podiceps
cleoIII.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Paphos, 30,7 mm, diobol13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, c. 116 - 104 B.C. Bronze diobol, Paphos II #315, Svoronos -, Poor/Fair, Paphos mint, 17.088g, 30.7mm, 0o; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU”?, two eagles standing left, star and “S” before; weak strike, rough; very rare. The flan is typical for the Paphos Mint. The two eagles indicates two rulers on the throne. The weight is double the more common c. 8.5 grams obol of this period. ex FORVM

Podiceps
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Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, AE 21.653 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426 var (Alexandria), gVF, Paphos mint, 8.369g, 21.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
cleo_III_ja_pojat.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons, Zeus Ammon, 30.1 mm21 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. 32188. Bronze triobol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305 ff., SGCV II 7900 (all Ptolemy VI), VF, dark brown patina, 22.037g, 30.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, side by side, double cornucopia left. Among the most common of Ptolemaic coins, struck during the joint reign of Cleopatra III and her sons, Ptolemy IX then Ptolemy X. Svoronos 1424 has two very distinct varieties. The earlier 29 gram variety was found in quantity in the c. 160 B.C. CoinEx Hoard. In that hoard, there were none of this later, common, c. 23-24 gram variety. The two types are separated by about 50 years. ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo_paphos.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, dichalkon; Paphos, Cyprus14 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, gF, Paphos mint, 1.570g, 11.8mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; nice green patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, Paphos mint, 1.190 g, 10.9 mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons. Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVMPodiceps
25363_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_F.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, attractive patina, Paphos mint, 1.254g, 11.5mm, 270o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; crude, flan flaw. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
25389_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_aF.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus13 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, aF, Paphos mint, 1.498g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; green patina. FORVM. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus (2)10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, VF, obverse off center, 1.660g, 13.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII~0.JPG
Cleopatra VII41 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, 13mm, 1.7g, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus
OBV: diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure
REV: Double cornucopiae, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Kreuzer p. 44 first illustration, Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV), SNG Cop 649,

Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus,
assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.
1 commentsRomanorvm
cleo___poika.jpg
Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, Paphos19 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, 44 - 30 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1842 (Ptolemy XII), F, Paphos mint, 5.575g, 24.4mm, 0o, 44 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, headdress of Isis before; rough. The two eagles on the reverse symbolize harmony between the two rulers, in this case the mother and son, Cleopatra VII and Caesarion. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cyprus.png
Cyprus8 viewsRoman Cyprus was a key spot for important political and religious functions. It was also a strategic base for trade in the Mediterranean. Consistently occupied throughout history, Cyprus has been home to several strong and competing powers such as the Assyrians, Egyptians, Macedonians, and in particular the Romans. Cyprus was annexed by the Romans in 58 B.C., but until 22 B.C. when Cyprus became an official senatorial province, control over the island fluctuated between the Romans and the Ptolemaic Empire.[1] Yet, from the Battle of Actium in 31 B.C. to the Byzantine Empire in the 4th century, Cyprus was controlled by the Romans. And in 293 AD, Cyprus officially became part of the Eastern Roman Empire.ancientone
CLEOPATRA_VII_ZEUS_REV.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII17 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
cleopatra_vii_ZEUS_REV_2.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII15 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
17256_Late_Ptolemaic_Cyprus,_Unstruck_Blank.jpg
Cyprus, Unstruck Blank. Bronze diobol10 viewsLate Ptolemaic Cyprus, Unstruck Blank. Bronze diobol, apparently unpublished, dark patina, Paphos mint, 13.907g, 24.4mm, obverse blank, with dimple where the limestone mold was drilled; reverse, blank, with signs of casting, sprue cut where the planchet was disconnected from the casting tree. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Dora_pan.jpg
Dora, Phoenicia, 1st Century A.D.65 viewsBronze AE 22, (Rosenberger 19), Weight 10.015g, Max. diameter 21.3mm, Dora mint, 68 - 69 AD; Obv. bearded head of Doros right; Rev. ΔWPEITWN, Astarte, wearing turreted crown, holding standard and cornucopia, AΛP in left field; rare city. Dark brown and desert patina.
EX. Forvm Ancient Coins

Background info, courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins;

Dora, on the coast eight miles north of Caesarea, was a Canaanite city. It fell to the Philistines early in the 12th century B.C. Solomon appointed the son of Abinadab as overseer of Dor (I Kings 4:11). In the Persian period Dor was a Sidonian colony. In Hellenistic times it was a Ptolemaic seaport and royal fortress, once besieged by Antiochus VII, (1 Macc. 15. 11-14). Under the Romans, Dora was a free city. See also Josh 11:2, 17:11; and Judg 1:27.
1 commentsSteve E
EB0156b_scaled.JPG
EB0156 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle8 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LI (year 10) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1671.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 13.083g.
EB
EB0157b_scaled.JPG
EB0157 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle4 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, with aegis at neck.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LC (year 6) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1667.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 14.108g.
EB
EB0231b_scaled.JPG
EB0231 Berenike II / Eagle7 viewsPtolemy III, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AE 22, 246-221 BC.
Obverse: [BEΡENIKHΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ or abbreviated], head of Berenice II right, hair in a bun.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed.
References: Svor. 1055.
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 8.772g.
EB
EB0233b_scaled.JPG
EB0233 Apollo / Eagle9 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of Magas in Kyrene, AE 17, 276-249 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head (Ptolemy as Apollo?) right.
Reverse: [ΠTOΛEM BAΣIΛ], eagle left, with wings open, MAΓ (?) monogram left.
References: Cf. Svoronos 328; BMC Ptolemies p. 39, 27-28.
Diameter: 17.5mm, Weight: 3.297g.
EB
Ptolemy_III_Euergetes.png
Egypt , Ptolemaic Kingdom: Ptolemy III / AE Obol.18 viewsAE Obol. Alexandria Mint , between 246-222 BC. 11 Gr.

Obverse: Deified head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopia over shoulder; E between legs.
References: Svoronos 976; SNG Copenhagen 232. Super Rare.
Sam
coin288.JPG
Egypt, Alexandria127 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), c. 170 - 164 B.C.

Two eagles in the reverse may symbolize joint rule
ecoli
c30.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria42 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. Æ Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 260 BC. Deified head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.ecoli
ptolbrzOR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemaic 2nd-1st C. B.C., Svoronos 184329 viewsPtolemaic 2nd-1st C. B.C. AE, 25mm 5.99g, Svoronos 1843; Weiser -; Noeske 388; SNG Copenhagen 684
O: Bust of Zeus, r.
R: Two eagles facing l., crown of Isis before
It's a late, perhaps Cypriot origin, Ptolemaic bronze. there is some ambiguity about precisely which ruler, but that really doesn't matter much. it's an interesting type that fits in with later (2nd-1st C. BC) crudely made bronzes. the Isis headdress on reverse to the left is also found on a series of tetradrachms (which have only 1 eagle, though). you could form an interesting collection of just these late 2-eagle types - there's one with isis headdress, one with a thunderbolt, one 'plain', etc. not sure what the various symbols mean, but they do all seem to fit together as a group that more or less look alike and I believe they all lack any 'leg monograms'. part of what makes these interesting is that you can see in them, their crude art and manufacture compared to the finely crafted coins of a century earlier, the decline of the Ptolemaic state.

PtolemAE
casata137ec
ptomlemy1_copy.jpg
EGYPT, Ptolemaic Kingdom19 viewsAE 30, Ptolemaic Kingdom, ca. 280 BC, Obv: Zeus right; Rev: Eagle stg. left, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around border, nice obverse details on an otherwise rough coin, Average Fine.Molinari
2_eagles_k.jpg
EGYPT, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII8 viewsAE30, 24g, 12h; Alexandria mint, 170 - 164 B.C.,
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right,
Rev.: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ; Two eagles standing left, side-by-side on thunderbolt, double cornucopia left.
Reference: Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 306 ff.
Ex-FORUM / 17-69-110
John Anthony
berptolOR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III (Berenike), Svoronos 105637 viewsSvoronos 1056, Ptolemy III. Depicting Berenike (wife of Ptolemy III) and an open-wing eagle on the reverse. It should have an inscription on the obverse, a little unusual for Ptolemaic coins, possibly too worn or corroded to see clearly on this one. These are thought to be issues of a short-lived mint in Northern Syria, possibly during the 3rd Syrian war of ca. 246-241BC early in the reign of Ptolemy III (partly a mission to rescue his doomed sister who married into the Seleukid royal family). There is a 'family' of about 10 bronze types which depict Berenike, different sizes variations. This type would have some letters to the left of the eagle, off the flan on this specimen. (Info from PtolemAE)casata137ec
Ptolemy_VI_Svoronos_1383.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy VI12 viewsPTOLEMAIC EGYPT
PTOLEMY VI PHILOMETOR
AE30, Cyprus Mint (21.5g)
181-174 BC

O: Zeus Ammon, right

R: 2 eagles with closed wings, double cornucopia in l. field

Svoronos 1383
Sosius
PtolemySm.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy II9 viewsA Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy II, minted in Alexandria in 282 BC. 20mm, 7.8g.

Obverse: Alexander wearing elephant trunk headdress.

Reverse: an eagle with spread wings facing left, with the inscription BASILEWS [PTOLEMAIOY] = "[Coin] of King [Ptolemy]", and a hard to see oval shield and small monogram at the left. There's also a delta between the eagle's legs,

Attribution: Svoronos 565
chuy1530
PtolemyBig.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy III14 viewsA massive Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy III, minted in Alexandria between 246-221 BC. 38mm, 44.4g.

Obverse: horned head of Zeus-Ammon.

Reverse: an eagle standing on a thunderbolt with an E between its legs, with the inscription PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS = "King Ptolemy".

Attribution: Svoronos 974
chuy1530
ushabti1.jpg
Egyptian Ushabti. 26th dynasty. 685-525 BC80 viewsUshabti (also called shabti or shawabti, with a number of variant spellings) were funerary figurines used in Ancient Egypt. They were placed in tombs among the grave goods and were intended to act as substitutes for the deceased, should he/she be called upon to do manual labor in the afterlife. They were used from the Middle Kingdom (around 1900 BC) until the end of the Ptolemaic Period nearly 2000 years later.4 commentsancientone
Elis,_AE_2Assaria_30__s_BC_.jpg
Elis, Civic Issue, ca. 30’s BC, Æ 2 Assaria17 viewsHead of Hera wearing stephane right.
F-Eagle with wings closed standing right on thunderbolt, MY monogram to right.

BCD Peloponnesos 695 (this coin); HGC 5, 544 (this coin) (S); BCD Olympia 307-313; SNG Copenhagen (Phliasia) 429; Wroth p. 335, 6.

(24.5 mm, 13.32 g, 1h).
Edward J. Waddell, June 2011; ex- BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8-9 May 2006, 695; ex- B. Kritt collection - acquired from Kritt in 1987 for $1,800 per BCD note in LHS 96 catalogue.

One of the best examples of the type known - Alan Walker in the LHS 96 catalogue noted that this coin is ‘Very well struck and of unusually good style for this normally fairly dreadful issue.’

Warren connects this issue with the presence of Marc Antony in Elis and sees the eagle standing on a thunderbolt as being a reference to the standard Ptolemaic reverse type (the eagle at Olympia never seems to grasp the thunderbolt of Zeus) and thus an allusion to Cleopatra.
n.igma
IMG_2494.JPG
Faience Eye of Horus Amulet (Wedjat), VI Dynasty to Ptolemaic Period 28 viewsFaience Eye of Horus Amulet (Wedjat), VI Dynasty to Ptolemaic Period

Eye of Horus Amulet, Light blue Faience, no black detail, looking right, 15mm.
The 'sound' eye that restores life. Petrie 138
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
LarryW8026.jpg
GG, Ptolemaic, Arsinoe II, died c. 268 BC87 viewsGold oktadrachm, 28mm, 27.7g, VF
Postumous strike by Ptolemy Philadelphos at Alexandria, c. 268 - 250 BC
Veiled head of Arsinoe right, wears stephane and cow's horn, holds sceptre; K behind, circle of dots around / APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornuacopiae with fillets; circle of dots around
Svoronos 475
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Ptolemy_II_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Greek Ptolemaic kingdom. Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285-246 BC. AR tetradrachm (26mm, 12.70 g). Tyre mint.114 viewsDiademed bust of Ptolemy I r. wearing aegis
Legend PTOLEMAIOU SOTHPOS around eagle standing l. thunderbolt; mint mark above club to l. and monogram to l. Date to r. Struck in regnal year 30 (256/5 BC).
Svoronos 658. _17100
Antonivs Protti
GAE898a_O.jpg
Greek, Alexander Ptolemaic Bronze269 viewsBronze Hemiobol of Ptolemy I ca. 290BC
Portrait of Alexander the Great with Ammon horn
Svoronos 172. 17.4mm 4.58gm 11.5h (345deg)
Stylistic elegance on early Ptolemaic bronze.
PtolemAE
FotorCreated~97.jpg
Greek, Cleopatra I, Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy 6th circa 180-176 BC Ae 28114 viewsHead of Cleopatra 1st as Isis. Rev eagle standing on thunderbolt left.
EX NFA
Grant H
Ptolemy_XIII_-_XV_and_Cleopatra_VII,_c__51_-_39_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. 83 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. Bronze diobol, 10.340g, 29.5mm. VF. Attributution by Matt Kreuzer, author of "The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus." The two eagles symbolize two rulers on the throne of Cyprus, in this case Cleopatra VII and one of her two successive brother-husbands, Ptolemy XIII or XIV, less likely her son Ptolemy XV. The round, thin flan and weight standard is correct for the very late Ptolemaic Kingdom. The palm branch appears on obols (c. 6 grams) across the eagles, RPC 3903. Obv: diademed head of Zeus right, of Cypriot style, star before? Ref: unstruck Greek legend, presumably PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, palm branch before. Unpublished in major references: SNG Cop -, BMC -, Svor -, Paphos II -, RPC -, Noeske -. Exstremely rareBard Gram O
5__Bronze_Ptolémée_IV.jpg
Greek, Egypt, Ptolemaic, Ptolemy IV73 views- Grand bronze, Ptolémée IV, Alexandrie, 244-203 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Tête laurée de Zeus à droite.
Revers : Aigle debout à droite sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
Roger D2
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
GREEK, EGYPT, PTOLEMAIC, Ptolemy XII, 80-58 BC.49 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy XII, 80-58 BC.
AR Tetradrachm (14.28 gm; 24 mm).
Alexandria mint, year 8[74/3 BC].
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy right
Rev: Eagle on thunderbolt left. LH (Date) on left field; PA monogram on right.
Ref: BMC 6.118,13; S. 7945.
Nicely struck on a good metal. Choice Good VF. Very Pleasing Example.
1 commentsJorge C
Late_Ptolemaic,_c__2nd_-_1st_Centuries_B_C_.jpg
Greek, Late Ptolemaic period, c. 2-1 cent. B.C. UNIQUE? 251 viewsBeirut/Bervtus mint? Late Ptolemaic period, c. 2-1 cent. B.C. Bronze quarter-obol, VF, 1.922g, 12.5mm, 90o.Obv: double cornucopia. Rev: BASIL..., eagle standing left. The style of the flan and the eagle is similar to some late Berytus pieces. The flan is not Cyprus, Kyrene or Alexandria. Ref: Svoronos -; BMC -; SNG Cop -; Paphos II -. UNIQUE? 1 commentsBard Gram Okland
cleo_diobol.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE Diobol, 51-30 B.C.82 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Æ Diobol of Alexandria, Egypt. 51-30 BC.
Obv: Diademed and draped bust right
Rev: KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae to left, Π to right.
Svoronos 1871; Weiser 183; SNG Copenhagen 419-21; Noeske 380-2. 20.60g, 27mm, 12h.
1 commentschance v
cleo_obol.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE Obol, 51-30 B.C.59 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Thea Neotera Æ Obol - 40 Drachmai. Alexandria, 51-30 BC.
Obv: Diademed and draped bust right
Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATPAΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to left, M to right.
Svoronos 1872; Weiser 184-5; SNG Copenhagen 422–4; Noeske 383. 16.26g, 25mm, 11h.
Very Fine. Very Rare.
chance v
newer_ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, AR Tetradrachm, c.300-285 B.C.56 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Alexandreia, circa 300-285 BC.
Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck, small Δ behind ear / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram.
Svoronos 265; SNG Copenhagen 73;
14.31g, 26mm, 1h.
1 commentschance v
PT1or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2269 viewsObv: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin facing right.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS Eagle standing left, wings spread.
gparch
PtolemyIAE26or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2676 views305-285 BC
AE 25.6x26.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, laureate
Rev. PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, A over X in left field.
Svoronos Pl. 10b no. 16; Sear 7763
gparch
ptolemy_drachm.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AR Drachm, c.311-305 B.C.95 viewsPtolemy I Soter, 323-305 as satrap. Alexandria Drachm circa 311-305, AR 16mm., 3.68g.
Obv: Head r., wearinh elephan-skin.
Rev: Athena standing r., holding shield and spear.; in r. field, eagle on thunderbolt.
Zervos Issue 68. Svoronos 34.
2 commentschance v
ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AR Tetradrachm, 305-282 B.C.60 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.21 g, 12h). Alexandria mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC.
Diademed head right, wearing aegis; small Δ behind ear / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram.
Svoronos 256; Noeske 29.
chance v
PtolemyIIFORVM.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE1965 viewsObv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, diademed.
Rev. PTOLOMEOY BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, oval symbol between legs.
Alexandria mint
285-246 BC
Svoronos 468
gparch
AE28PtolemyII.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE2875 viewsAE 27.6x28.4mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, laureate.
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, sigma and shield at left.
2 commentsgparch
GAE583.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, Alexander in Elephantskin257 viewsAE25 12.83gm 12h
Ptolemy II ca 270-260BC
Sidon Provincial Mint - Obol
Svoronos 763
Unusually nice condition and portrait style for the Alexander-in-Elephantskin type. Wear ordinarily obscures the Ammon horn which here is visible through the skin headdress. Unusual type that appears to conform to post-260BC weight categories but lacks central depressions, a bit of a conundrum in this type.
5 commentsPtolemAE
GAE660.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy III Large Bronze567 viewsPtolemy III - ca 240BC - Alexandria - Drachm
Bronze - 43.1-43.9mm - 73.2gm - 11h
CHI/RHO monogram in eagle's legs
Svoronos 964, SNG Cop. 172
Not especially rare type, but always rare this nice. A real monster, too.
10 commentsPtolemAE
6198661089_bc575456b8_b~0.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy III, Medium Bronze172 viewsPtolemy III Eugertes
Alexandria Mint, 246-241BC
AE hemidrachm, 40.38mm 42.75g
Svoronos 1166
crawforde
PtolemyIVOBREVb.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopator104 viewsAE 38
222-204 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Eagle standing L. on thunderbolt,
looking back over shoulder,
cornucopia on shoulder,
E monogram between legs.
1 commentsgparch
Sv1381_GAE916_AE22_7x114g_12h.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Kleopatra I198 viewsRare middle-size bronze of the series that has unusual name of Queen Kleopatra I (BASILISES KLEOPATRAS) on the *obverse* in addition to the usual BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY on the reverse. Svoronos 1381. Full sharp inscriptions, centered. Nice.
Portrait of 'Alexandria' on obverse, open-wing eagle on reverse with PI/A monogram to left.

22mm - 7.114 gram - 12h

Kleopatra I was the daughter of Antiochos III, married off to Ptolemy V at the end of the 5th Syrian war ca 195BC, tying up the turnover and permanent loss of all of Phoenician Ptolemaic territory (Tyre, Sidon, Ake-Ptolemais, etc.) to the Seleukid kingdom. Mother of Ptolemy VI who assumed the throne at age 5 upon the death of Ptolemy V, Kleopatra I was his regent until her death in 176 BC. An unusual series of three sizes of bronze coins (Svoronos 1380, 81, 82) bear her name on the obverse where most Ptolemaic bronzes have no inscription at all. When Antiochos IV attacked Egypt ca. 170 BC and captured Ptolemy VI, ruling for a time with him, it was all in the family. Antiochos IV was the young Egyptian king's uncle, through the earlier marriage of Kleopatra I into the Lagid court of Alexandria. Interesting and historic coin type, unusual layout of inscriptions for a Ptolemaic bronze.
5 commentsPtolemAE
AE20Twoeagles.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and VIII, AE20110 viewsAE 20
Joint reign, after 169 BC (169-145 BC)
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Two eagles Standing L.,
on thunderbolts, wings closed,
cornucopia in L. field
2 commentsgparch
gae681_pair.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI Medium Bronze - Isis Head Type372 viewsPtolemy VI - Alexandria - Diobol - 180/145BC
AE 25.0-25.7mm : 15.962gm : 11h
OBV - Goddess Isis with hanging curls, headdress with with corn wreath, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing facing left on thunderbolt with PI-ALPHA monogram at left
REF - Svoronos 1384
NOTE - Early sole reign of Ptolemy VI.
7 commentsPtolemAE
Picture_33.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor764 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.

Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265

8 commentsmihali84
06869p00.jpe
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, 204-181 B.C851 viewsMasterpiece portrait. SNG Cop lists a simliar coin in the same year, with an owl in the left field, for the mint of Citium, Cyprus (SNG Cop 588). At Salamis, the owl was also used in the left field on a coin of the Selukid king, Antiocus IV, 170-168 B.C. Our coin is unpublished in references held by FORVM.7 commentssalem
pt2.png
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt29 viewsBronze. Nice blue, Patina.
Dimension: 13 mm Weight: 8.65 g
superflex
cleo_1.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE1121 viewsCleopatra VII

ae 11mm
seaotter
cleo_2.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE1225 viewsCleopatra VII
AE 12mm
seaotter
bpGS1T1Ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II112 viewsTetradrachm, 14 gm, 26.5 mm, 285-246 BC, Svoronos 373
Obv: Anepigraphic with diademed head of Ptolemy I, right. Countermarks.
Rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ to left. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right. In left lower field, the monogram ΑΧΡ over ΔΙ. Countermarks.
Comment: Multiple countermarks are common on coins of Ptolemy II. Many thanks to the members of Forum for attribution.
Massanutten
Ptolemy2tridentor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II AE 2739 viewsca. 285-265 BC
AE 26.2x27.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon, right
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, shield at left.
Inscription not readable. Trident countermark.
Sear 7779

A. Davesne (1987) states that the trident countermark was applied in Cyprus to revalidate bronzes demonetized by the reform of ca. 265 BC.
gparch
PtolomeoIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos AE 2437 viewsAE 22.3x24.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev. PTOLOMEUS BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club at left.
285-246 BC
gparch
AE20PtolemyIIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III31 viewsAE 20
247-222 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Eagle standing L.
wings spread, on thunderbolt,
PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
edge chipped.
gparch
Ptolemy3bOBREV.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes34 viewsObv. Head of Zeus-Ammon, right
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
wings closed, cornucopia at left.
gparch
Ptolemy3aOBREV.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes43 views247-222 BC
AE 35
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS.
eagle on thunderbolt L.,
chi-rho monogram between legs,
cornucopia in L. field
1 commentsgparch
Ptolemy III AE33 temp~0.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III, AE3359 viewsobv: head of Zeus right
rev: Eagle standing on thunderbolt
Jericho
ptolemy III AE19.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III, Evergetes AE1939 viewsobv: Bust of Ptolemy III right
rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field
Struck 246-221 B.C.
Jericho
PtolemyIVOBREVa.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy IV, AE3832 views222-204 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
Eagle standing L. on thunderbolt,
looking back over shoulder,
cornucopia on shoulder,
E monogram between legs
gparch
Ptolemy IV AE40 black.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy IV, AE4098 viewsobv: head of Zeus right
rev: eagle standing on thunderbolt
Jericho
AE29PtolemyVI+VIII.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VI and VIII AE2947 viewsgparch
inhandpt1.png
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), c. 170 - 164 B.C.79 viewsBronze triobol, Svoronos 1424 (type I, heavier var)
SNG Cop 306 ff., Noeske 212 ff., Hosking 75, Weiser 142 (Ptolemy V, 180 - 176 B.C.), SGCV II 7900, gF
Alexandria mint, weight 31.520g, maximum diameter 32.1mm, die axis 0o, c. 170 - 164 B.C.
Obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon
Reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, double cornucopia left;
big, heavy 32 mm bronze (Ex FORVM)
superflex
PTOLEMAIC_KINGDOM,_Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II27 viewsTetradrakme 14,07g 24,9mm. Kition mint. This coin you can ex. date . The letter LN = year 50 is 120/121 BC .
Svoronos 1611 Noeske 226var. (date)
Karsten K
24848q00.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Gold tetradrachm19 viewsSH24848. Gold tetradrachm, Svoronos 604; BMC Ptolemies p. 40, 4 - 5; SNG Cop 133; SGCV II 7790, superb aEF, weight 13.813 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 265 - 260 B.C.; obverse A∆EΛΦΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy II Philadelphos, diademed and draped, and Arsinoe II, diademed and veiled, shield behind; reverse ΘEΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy I Soter, diademed and wearing aegis, and Berenike I, diademed and veiledJoe Sermarini
FotorCreated~96.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Ptolemy 12th Neos Dionysos {Auletes} restored 55-51 BC89 viewsAlexandreia mint dated RY 28 {54-3} Diademed head of Ptolemy right wearing aegis. Rev eagle standing left on thunderbolt LKH date and headdress of Isis in left field.
Nicknamed Auletes the flute player .
Grant H
GAE404_O.jpg
Greek, Zeus, Syracusan Imitation Ptolemaic Diobol of Hieron II ca. 265BC216 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos - Syracuse Issue of Hieron II - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 26.9-28.4mm : 14.736gm : 2h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field, N control letter behind eagle tail at right. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 619
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
1 commentsPtolemAE
57314q00.jpg
Hadrian Tet with Canopus Jar33 viewsHADRIAN
BI tetradrachm, Alexandria mint
11.1g, 25.1mm
29 Aug 125 - 28 Aug 126 A.D.

ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ Α∆ΡΙΑ CΕΒ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis, from behind / L ∆Ε KATOV (year 10), Canopus jar of Osiris, ornamented with figures, wearing crown of horns, uraei disk, and plumes

Kampmann-Ganschow 32.351; Geissen 903; Dattari 1326; Milne 1154; BMC Alexandria p. 75, 630; Emmett 827
Choice gVF
Purchased from FORVM

Note that at some point in this coin's history, it seems to have been used a host for very poor quality fakes. After discussion on the FORVM board, I am comfortable that this coin is indeed the original. Shame on the former owner that used is for copies!

During the mummification process, large organs, such as the liver, lungs, stomach and intestines were extracted and placed in four jars. In the Ptolemaic period, the Greeks called these jars "canopic jars," relating them to the deity of the old city Canop (now a village in Abu Kyr). The heart was left in the body because it held the spirit, understanding and senses and would be needed on the Day of Judgment in the underworld. -- FORVM
2 commentsSosius
Unidentified.jpg
I sense an African theme...24 viewsTop left: Can I sing some U2? "I stillllll haven't found... what I'm looking forrrrrr..."

Top and bottom right: Ptolemaic, not sure exactly which Ptolemy. Gorgeous though.

Bottom left: Carthaginian.
Bronze, 17 mm at widest, 4 grams (by my terrible kitchen scale)
Head of Tanit left, obverse
Prancing (or rearing?) horse right, reverse
60-75 degree die axis (ish)
EvaJupiterSkies
kyrene_magas.jpg
Kyrene; Magas; horned head of Apollo Karneios left/ ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of the Magas in Kyrene, c. 276-249 B.C. Bronze AE 12, BMC -, VF, Kyrene mint, weight 2.220g, maximum diameter 12.3mm, die axis 180o, 276 - 250 B.C.; obverse horned head of Apollo Karneios left; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides; rough reddish patina; rare. Magas was half-brother to Ptolemy II and son of Berenike, the Macedonian second wife of Ptolemy I. He tried repeatedly to gain independence from Ptolemaic control. In 276 B.C he crowned himself King, married the daughter of Antiochos I and staged a double invasion of Egypt. But the Seleukid army was defeated by Ptolemy II and Magas also faced an internal revolt of Lybian nomads. Still, Kyrene remained independent as long as Magas lived; Ex ForumPodiceps
PhilipIIMacedonLifetimeTet.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Lifetime Issue131 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Le Rider 233 (D130/R188); SNG ANS 385 ff., VF, Pella, 14.163g, 25.4mm, 225o, 342 - 336 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse "FILIPPOU", naked youth on horse pacing right on horseback holding palm, thunderbolt below; ex CNG 214, 82; very high relief sculptural portrait, nice style, lifetime issue. Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

According to the Greek historian Theopompus of Chios, Europe had never seen a man like king Philip of Macedonia, and he called his history of the mid-fourth century BCE the Philippic History. Theopompus had a point. Not even his better known son Alexander has done so much to change the course of Greek history. Philip reorganized his kingdom, gave it access to the sea, expanded its power so that it could defeat the Achaemenid Empire, and subdued the Greek city-states, which never regained their independence again. To achieve this, he modernized the Macedonian economy, improved the army, and concluded several marital alliances. The result was a superpower with one weakness: it was as strong as its king. When Philip's son Alexander died, the institutions were too weak, and Macedonia never recovered.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
http://www.livius.org/phi-php/philip/philip_ii.htm
Ed. by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
ISL_Mamluks_Balog_245b_al-N_#257;s_#803;ir_N_#257;s_#803;ir_al-D_#299;n_Mu_#7717;ammad.jpg
Mamluk (Bahri). Muhammad I (al-Nasir Nasir al-Din Muhammad) (1st reign, 693-694 A.H. = 1293-1294 A.D.; 2nd reign 698-708 A.H. = 1299-1309 A.D.; 3rd reign, 709-741 A.H. = 1310-1341 A.D.)12 viewsBalog 245b, Plate X No. 245b; SNAT Hamah 394-395; Album 922.

AE fals; Hamah mint, undated (3rd reign); 3.26 g., 20.20 mm. max., 90°

Obv.: Border on both sides, dotted circle between two linear circles; الماك (al-Malik) / الناصر (al-Nasir) in two rows in field.

Rev.: Shield divided by horizontal band into three horizontal segments (fesse). The central band is bendy of eleven pieces. Upper and lower segment contains a floral arabesque.

Muhammad I, the ninth Bahri Mamluk sultan, was the youngest son of Sultan Qala'un (of Turkic origin from the Kipchak tribe) and a mother of Mongol origin, and the brother of Sultan Khalil. After the assassination of Khalil in December 1293 by a faction lead by Lajin, Muhammad became sultan at age nine. In December 1294 Muhammad's regent, Kitbugha, deposed Muhammad with the support of Lajin and installed himself as sultan. In 1296 Kitbugha was deposed by Lajin, who then ruled as a sultan until he was murdered in 1299. Muhammad was recalled and reinstated as sultan at age 14, although power was held by Baybars. In 1309 Muhammad, who sought to free himself from the domination of Baybars, withdrew from Egypt and attempted to have Baybars arrested. This failed and Baybars installed himself as sultan, ending Muhammad's second reign. His second reign was dominated by Mongol threats in the Levant. After only ten months an Egyptian mob forced Baybars to flee and Muhammad was reinstated. at age 24. He reigned until his death 31 years later. His third reign was the apogee of Mamluk power and the high-water mark of culture in Egypt since Ptolemaic Alexandria. Eight of his sons and four of his grandsons would be enthroned as sultans.
Stkp
IS_Mamluk_Balog_236_Muhammad_I.jpg
Mamluk (Bahri). Muhammad I (al-Nasir Nasir al-Din Muhammad) (1st reign, 693-694 A.H. = 1293-1294 A.D.; 2nd reign 698-708 A.H. = 1299-1309 A.D.; 3rd reign, 709-741 A.H. = 1310-1341 A.D.)7 viewsBalog 236; Album 922.

AE fals; Halab/Aleppo mint, undated (3rd reign); 3.04 g., 19.95 mm. max., 180°

Obv.: Circular line border; صر (= sir [?]) / الملك النا (=al-Malik al-Nasir) / الملك المنصور بن (=al-Malik al-Nasir bin) in three lines.

Rev.: Circular band with rigid cable to left border; بحلب (= bi-Halab) in center.

Muhammad I, the ninth Bahri Mamluk sultan, was the youngest son of Sultan Qala'un (of Turkic origin from the Kipchak tribe) and a mother of Mongol origin, and the brother of Sultan Khalil. After the assassination of Khalil in December 1293 by a faction lead by Lajin, Muhammad became sultan at age nine. In December 1294 Muhammad's regent, Kitbugha, deposed Muhammad with the support of Lajin and installed himself as sultan. In 1296 Kitbugha was deposed by Lajin, who then ruled as a sultan until he was murdered in 1299. Muhammad was recalled and reinstated as sultan at age 14, although power was held by Baybars. In 1309 Muhammad, who sought to free himself from the domination of Baybars, withdrew from Egypt and attempted to have Baybars arrested. This failed and Baybars installed himself as sultan, ending Muhammad's second reign. His second reign was dominated by Mongol threats in the Levant. After only ten months an Egyptian mob forced Baybars to flee and Muhammad was reinstated. at age 24. He reigned until his death 31 years later. His third reign was the apogee of Mamluk power and the high-water mark of culture in Egypt since Ptolemaic Alexandria. Eight of his sons and four of his grandsons would be enthroned as sultans.
Stkp
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Mark Antony105 viewsMark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR 190, and RSC I 27 ff., Fair, Patrae?, 2.818g, 17.7mm, 180o, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots Ex Forvm


The silver for this issue may have come from the Ptolemaic treasury, and this coin may have been present at the Battle of Actium.

"The Battle of Actium was the decisive confrontation of the Final War of the Roman Republic. It was fought between the forces of Octavian and the combined forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII. The battle took place on 2 September 31 BC, on the Ionian Sea near the city of Actium, at the Roman province of Epirus vetus in Greece. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, while Antony's fleet was supported by the ships of Queen Cleopatra of Ptolemaic Egypt.
Octavian's victory enabled him to consolidate his power over Rome and its dominions. To that end, he adopted the title of Princeps ("first citizen") and some years after the victory was awarded the title of Augustus by the Roman Senate. This became the name by which he was known in later times. As Augustus, he would retain the trappings of a restored Republican leader; however, historians generally view this consolidation of power and the adoption of these honorifics as the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire."
3 commentsrandy h2
overstrike_flip.jpg
Nabataean Kingdom, Anonymous9 viewsProto-Nabataean Overstrike
AE16, 2.69g; Unknown mint, struck over Ptolemaic bronze.
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev.: Nike standing left, holding wreath.
Reference: cf. Schmitt-Korte 6
Notes: These are typically overstruck in the same orientation as the host coins. This example is an exception: obverse to reverse, reverse to obverse, and rotated 180 degrees.
John Anthony
proto1.jpg
Nabataean Kingdom, Anonymous9 viewsProto-Nabataean Overstrike
AE17, 3.81g, 12h; Unknown mint (Gaza?)
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev.: Nike standing left, holding wreath. Λ to left.
Reference: cf. Schmitt-Korte 6
Note: These coins were overstruck on Ptolemaic hosts. The undertype in this example may be Svoronos 417, 969, or 970. Ex-Zurquieh, electronic sale, 3/27/13, 56.
John Anthony
neopaphos_cleoVII.jpg
Neopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII9 viewsNeopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII. Bronze hemiobol, Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35; Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, RPC -, F, Neopaphos mint, 2.291 g, 12.5 mm, 0o, c. 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse, statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right and scepter in left, star above. While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Neopaphos. ex FORVMPodiceps
Nilus.jpg
NILUS152 viewsPtolemaic Bronze ca. 180BC - Ptolemy V - VI
Svoronos 1378 (K control letter in eagle's legs)
Rare type with expressive portrait of Nilus rather than typical Ptolemaic Zeus.
AE20 5.98gm 11h
Part of scarce series of coins with 'K' control letter, 5 sizes each with different designs.
Few specimens known in books, museum collections.
Some thought that the K might represent Kleopatra I, mother of Ptolemy VI. Exact date unknown but likely ca. 190-170BC. Apparently the only Ptolemaic bronze type with a representation of the 'River God', Nilus.
PtolemAE
38515q00.jpg
Octavian148 viewsOctavian, Triumvir and Imperator, Augustus 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D

Silver denarius, Fair, rough, Italian (Rome?) mint, weight 3.495g, maximum diameter 18.5mm, die axis 270o, c. 29 - 27 B.C.; obverse IMP CAESAR, Octavian, holding olive branch, driving triumphal quadriga right; reverse Victory standing right on prow, wreath in right, palm over shoulder in left

RIC 264, RSC 155 - RSC 115?, sear5 1555 ex Forvm


"This coin commemorates Octavian's victory at Actium and his triumph. The silver for this issue may have come from the Ptolemaic treasury"
7 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Octavian_denarius_prow.jpg
Octavian AR Denarius Prow & Quadriga, circa 30BCE50 viewsAR Denarius
Octavian, 27BCE - 14CE
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.52 grams, Die axis: 8h

Obverse: Anepigraphic, Victory standing on prow to right, holding palm branch over her left shoulder and extends laurel wreath in right hand.

Reverse: IMP. CAESAR
Octavian standing in triumphal quadriga to right, holds reigns in left hand and extends (olive or laurel) branch in right hand.

Mint: Either Brundisium or Rome.

Notes:
- This historically fascinating denarius celebrates the Battle of Actium in which Agrippa and Octavian triumphed over Antony and Kleopatra. The obverse die is the first of the entire IMP CAESAR series of Octavian; the die is shared with the last of the CAESAR DIVI F denarii of the same design. The reverse may refer to Octavian’s entry into Alexandria following the battle of Actium (31/30 BCE), or the triple triumph subsequently awarded to him in Rome (29BCE) – the dating of the type is still not precisely known.
- After the great struggles between the triumvirs, many soldiers from the vast standing armies needed to be de-commissioned and paid. It is possible that this early type was minted using silver from the Ptolemaic treasury seized by Octavian following the Battle of Actium.
- Brundisium (modern day Brindisi) in southern Italy was Octavian’s naval base, which is where this type may have been minted to pay the soldiers. Alternatively the mint may have been Rome.
- Obverse and reverse die match to LHS Numismatik Auction 103, lot 333, 2008.

Ex Praefectus Coins 2015, Ex Nomos Obolos 2 lot 204, 2015

Thank you to Mr Curtis Clay for confirming the die link and providing the published reference to this fact: C.H.V. Sutherland, 1976, Octavian’s Gold and Silver Coinage from c. 32 to 27 B.C.
3 commentsPharsalos
Side.jpg
Pamphylia, Side (Circa 145-125BC)32 viewsAR Tetradrachm

29 mm, 15.94 g

Kleuch-, magistrate.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.

Reverse: ΚΛΕ - ΥΧ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath; pomegranate to left.

SNG BN 697.

In 333 BC, Alexander the Great occupied Side and introduced the population to Hellenistic culture, which became the dominant tradition until the 1st century BC. Ptolemy later overtook the city when he declared himself king of Egypt in 305 BC. Side stayed under Ptolemaic control until it was captured by the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BC. In 190 B.C., however, a fleet from Rhodes, supported by Rome and Pergamum, defeated the Seleucid fleet, which was under the command of the fugitive Carthaginian general, Hannibal (who was unskilled in naval warfare, but to his credit still almost won the battle). The Seleucid defeat solidified by the Treaty of Apamea (188 BC), left Side in an uncertain state of autonomy during which it minted its own money. This lasted until 36 BC when the city came under the rule of the Roman client King of Galatia, Amyntas.
2 commentsNathan P
Paphoscyprusae14.jpg
Paphos, Cyprus. Ae1427 viewsObv: Zeus head facing right (common Ptolemaic design) on the obverse.
Rev: Zeus standing head to left, holding ears of grain in his left hand and a scepter in his right hand.

Generic small change coin type from 1st C. BC, time of Cleopatra VII and others.

BMC Ptolemies -; Svor. 1842; SNG Cop. -; RPC -; RPC Supplement mentions Paphos II; Cox, Excavations at Curium, 128
ancientone
Paphoscyprusae18.jpg
Paphos, Cyprus. AE1826 viewsObv: Zeus head facing right (common Ptolemaic design) on the obverse.
Rev: Zeus standing head to left, holding ears of grain in his left hand and a scepter in his right hand.

Generic small change coin type from 1st C. BC, time of Cleopatra VII and others.

BMC Ptolemies -; Svor. 1842; SNG Cop. -; RPC -; RPC Supplement mentions Paphos II; Cox, Excavations at Curium, 128
ancientone
IMG_0593.JPG
Paphos. Arsinoe III9 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Arsinoe III, wife of Ptolemy IV Philopator. 222-205/4 B.C. AE dichalkon (12.2 mm, 1.78 g, 1 h). Paphos. Diademed and draped bust right / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, double cornucopia tied with fillet. Svronos 1161; Wieser 96; SNG Cop 650. ecoli
Ptolemy_eagle_rev.jpg
Ptolemaic Eagle211 viewsPen & ink sketch of my Ptolemy VI Tetradrachm Eagle reverse and legend. 2"x 2"5 commentsmihali84
g~3.jpg
Ptolemaic Egypt - Ptolemy I Soter (305-282 BC)35 viewsAR tetradrachm (14.21 gm). Alexandria. Diademed head right, wearing aegis / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; monogram to left. Svoronos 248. SNG Copenhagen 68. A couple of banker's marks, as is typical on this type.RobertBohn
ptolemy_vi_AND_viii.JPG
PTOLEMAIC EGYPT - Ptolemy VI Philometer & Ptolemy VIII72 viewsPTOLEMAIC EGYPT - Ptolemy VI Philometer & Ptolemy VIII - 170-164 B.C.E. AE 31. Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field. 31.4 mm 29.115 g., Alexandria mint. Reference: Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 340 ff., Noeske 212 ff., Hosking 75, Weiser 142 (Ptolemy V), SGCV II 7900. Ex-FORVM. Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother.dpaul7
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27.3g.jpg
Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I33 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC
30 mm, 27.27 g
Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field
Sear 7900var
ex Bart Lewis
areich
Ptolemy_VI_180-145_BC.jpg
PTOLEMAIC EMPIRE.EGYPT.ALEXANDRIA.Ptolemy VI Philometor 180-145 BC, 1st period of reign 180-170 BC.AR.Tetradrachm.106 viewsPTOLEMAIC EMPIRE.EGYPT.ALEXANDRIA.Ptolemy VI Philometor. 180-145 BC, 1st period of reign 180-170 BC.AR.Tetradrachm.
( 13.10g, 26mm, 12h )
Diademed bust of Ptolemy I Soter ( founder of the dynasty )
Reverse. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed.
Ref:Sv.1489, SNG Cop 262-268.
Obverse porus purface from water corrossion.
Antonivs Protti
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_Cleopatra_51-30_BC_AR_Tetradrachm_Yr__17_(36_to_35_BC_).jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). ISIS HEADDRESS SYMBOL102 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). Diademed head of Ptolemy I
PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing, headdress of Isis before and palm branch at shoulder.
Size: 23 mm 13.24 grams SOLD
Antonivs Protti
Ptolemy II.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt62 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

Sidon is mentioned by the prophets Isaiah (e.g. Isaiah 23:2,4,12), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:22, 27:3, 47:4), Ezekiel (Ezekiel 27:8, 28:21, 32:30) and Joel (Joel 3:4). Jesus visited Sidon on (Matthew 15:21, Mark 3:8, Mark 7:24, Luke 6:17). Paul sailed for Rome from Sidon (Acts 27:3,4).

Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 713, SNG Cop 506, aVF, Sidon mint, 14.39g, 27.0mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.



1 commentsDumanyu2
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Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII with Ptolemy XV, AR tetradrachm, Year 11 (42/1 BC)36 views44-30 BC
12.6 Grams
Obv.: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm over shoulder; date LIA (Yr 11) to left, ΠA to right.
Purchased on eBay
Grade: XF; Strike 5/5; Surface 3/5
Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned jointly with his mother Cleopatra VII of Egypt, from September 2, 47 BC. Between the death of Cleopatra, on August 12, 30 BC, and his own death on August 23, 30 BC, he was nominally the sole pharaoh. He was killed on the orders of Octavian, who would soon become the Roman emperor Augustus. He was the eldest son of Cleopatra VII, and possibly the only son of Julius Caesar, for whom he was named.
2 commentsRichard M10
0523172.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, 367-283 BCE10 viewsBronze Obol, Svoronos 377, SNG Cop -, Cyprus, Kition mint,
8.8g, 21.4mm, 0°, obverse head of Alexander right,
wearing elephant skin headdress;
reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ,
eagle standing left, thunderbolt in talons, EY, KI and X monogram left;
NORMAN K
Ptolemy_II_Ae.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos53 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C, AE Hemiobol , choice quality

17mm , 3.78 gm
2 commentsPhiloromaos
Ptolemy_Bronze.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246-222 B.C. Diobol47 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-222 B.C. Diobol. OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right. REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, E between legs, wings open, head facing left, cornucopiae in left field.  PTOLEMAIOY to the left. BASILEOS to the right, 26mm 14.39gm

1 commentsPhiloromaos
37103.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Alexandria. Ptolemy I Soter (Circa 305-282 BC)34 viewsAR Tetradrachm

26.5 mm, 13.25 g

Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right

Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed; P / AΠP monogram.

Svoronos 255
2 commentsNathan P
Egyp_0030_Ns.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra I - 011026 viewsBust of Isis right
PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, Eagle left
16.37 gr, 25 mm
Ref : Sear # 7880
1 commentsPotator II
Ptolemaic_1b_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm53 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1b_img~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm36 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
maridvnvm
cleopatra_vii.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII50 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
CLEOPATRA VII THEA NEOTERA
51 - 30 BC
AE 80 drachms 27mm 15.47g
O: DIADEMED HEAD OF CLEOPATRA VII RIGHT, HAIR IN BUN
R: EAGLE STANDING LEFT ON THUNDERBOLT, DOUBLE CORNUCOPIA IN LEFT FIELD
SVORONOS 1871, SNG COP. 419-21
ALEXANDRIA
(ex Sayles & Lavender)
laney
neopaphos.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII29 views51- 30 BC (Time of Cleopatra VII)
AE Hemiobol 17 mm max., 3.55 g
O: Laureate head of Zeus to right
R: Statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right hand and scepter in left, star above.
Cyprus, Neopaphos;
Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35
laney
cleopatra_vii_bk_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII48 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
CLEOPATRA VII THEA NEOTERA
b. 69 BC d. 30 BC
(Queen of Egypt 51-30 BC)
AE 80 drachms 27mm 15.47g
O: DIADEMED HEAD OF CLEOPATRA VII RIGHT, HAIR IN BUN
R: EAGLE STANDING LEFT ON THUNDERBOLT, DOUBLE CORNUCOPIA IN LEFT FIELD
SVORONOS 1871, SNG COP. 419-21
ALEXANDRIA
(ex Sayles & Lavender)
2 commentslaney
Screenshot_2018-07-11_21_14_31.png
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, AR Tetradrachm.8 viewsTyre Year 36 = 250-249 B.C. 13.59g - 26.2mm, Axis 12h.

Obv: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ - Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis around neck.

Rev: Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; TYP monogram for Tyre and club in left field. AC above A in right field, M between the eagle's legs.

Svoronos 692; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2015-09-06_14_21_01.png
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, AE22 Hemiobol.5 viewsAlexandria 180-145 B.C. 7.32g - 22mm, Axis 11h.

Obv: Head of Zeus Ammon right.

Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ - Double eagle standing on lightning bolt, cornucopiae in left field.

SNG Cop. 313; Svoronos 1426.
Christian Scarlioli
paphos_ptolemaiosIII_Svoronnos1008.jpg
Ptolemaic kingdom, Paphos, Ptolemaios III Euergetes, Svoronos 100821 viewsPtolemaios III Euergetes, 246-221 BC
AE - Dichalkon (AE 16), 2.44g, 16.43mm, 315°
obv. head of Zeus-Ammon, horned and with taenia, r.
rev. PTOLEMAIOV - BACILEWC
Cult statue of Aphrodite, wearing high polos, stg. frontal on base, r. hand before breast, holding
unknown object (girdle?) in lowered l. hand; braids bound in several thick knots and reaching to the
shoulders
ref. Svoronos 1008; SNG Copenhagen 647
about VF, black-green patina

This type is now assigned to Ptolemaios V Epiphanes and dated to about 204-201 BC (W. Weiser, Katalog Ptolemäischer Bronzemünzen der Sammlung ... Universität Köln, S. 70, Nr.111). Thanks to Arminius!

The famous Aphrodite Paphias was aniconical, probably a baetyl. So we have here another, probably Hellenistic, cult statue.
Jochen
Egyp_0010_Ns.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemee II - 009017 viewsHead of Zeus right
PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle left, shield in field
17.29 gr, 27 mm
Ref : Sear #7779
Potator II
Egyp_0020_Ns.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemee IV - 012016 viewsHead of Zeus right
PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle left, cornucopia in field
36.11 gr, 34 mm
Ref : Sear #7841
Potator II
Ptolemaic_1a_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 236107 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1a_img~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 23652 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

A toned but wonderfully detailed reverse.

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 23670 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.

Updated image using new photography setup.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemy_tyre_tet.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Tyre, Phoenicia170 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Svoronos 626 var (no monogram) or Svoronos 644 var (D behind ear), VF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, weight 14.076g, maximum diameter 27.4mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, Tyre monogram and club left; rare;

Ex Forvm

Svoronos' description for tetradrachm 626 is the "same as the gold pentadrachm." In the notes for the pentadrachm he notes the type sometimes has a Tyre monogram, but the notes for the tetradrachm 626 discuss only countermarks and not a monogram. The monogram is absent on the plate coin.

Svoronos 644 is be marked with a tiny D behind Ptolemy's ear. On this coin the mark appears to be absent.
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1e_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Soter (285 - 246 B.C.), Tetradrachm, Svoronos 77436 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY [SOTERWS], eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed, PT and ME monograms left, date AL and Q right
Minted in Galilee, Ake Ptolemais, Year 31. B.C. 255
Reference:– BMC.112 var. Svoronos 774 pl. XXV/10 (4 ex.) SNG Cop.470. Delepierre- Gülnar 2/4074 pl. 129(6 ex.)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
ptolemy-3-eagle-4-30-2019=1.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes 246-222 B.C. AE20, Tyre mint10 viewsAncient Greek, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes 246-222 B.C. AE20, Tyre mint, Struck ca. 242/1-222 B.C.

Obverse: Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia.

Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; club to left.

Reference: Svoronos 709; SNG Copenhagen 496

Ex: Musa Ali - VCoins - Holyland Ancient Coin Corporation
Gil-galad
Ptolemy_III_hemidrachm.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 220 B.C.104 viewsBronze hemidrachm, (Svoronos 965, Weiser 71; Hosking 31; Weber 8260), VF, pitting, 26.014g, 34.6mm, 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse BAΕIΛΩΕ ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's legs; Olive base color with light desert patina, with a few green, yellow and red spots.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

Photo by Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolemaic_1c_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246-221 B.C., AE4234 viewsAE42
Obv:– Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed, GreeK_Sigma between legs
Minted in Alexandria under Ptolemy III Euergetes or Ptolemy IV
Reference:- Svoronos 992

70.23g, 41.93mm, 0 degrees.

At this size it is potentially a drachm.
maridvnvm
Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_II .jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. 39 viewsObverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right, circle of dots around.
Reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, tripod in left field.
VF , Bronze , Ptolemais Ake mint.
Svoronos 793 (Ptolemy II).


From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
PtolemyIV42mm.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE4227 views221-205 B.C.
AE42, 67.86gm
Obv: Head of Zeus Ammon right with ram's horn, wearing taenia diadem
Rev: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ BΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; Σ between legs; Cornucopiae left decorated with royal diadem
Ref: Svoronos 992
TIF
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1f_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator (221 - 204 B.C.), AE Hemidrachm , Svoronos 112768 viewsBronze hemidrachm
Obv:- Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia;
Rev:- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ∆Ι between eagle's legs
Minted in Alexandria
References:- Svoronos 1127; SNG Cop 202; Noeske 145; BMC Ptolemies p. 57, 109 - 110; Weiser 50 (Ptolemy II, 253 - 249 B.C.)

33.40 g. 33.72 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
o_027.JPG
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. 67 viewsBronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF,
Alexandria mint,
7.899g, 20.5mm, 0o,
170 - 163 B.C.;
obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right;
reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left
ex forvm



"The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII."

new pic
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Ptol_VI_pan.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, 170 - 164 B.C.118 viewsBronze AE 31, SGCV II 7900, (Svoronos 1424), (SNG Cop 306 ff.), (Noeske 212 ff.), (Hosking 75), (Weiser 142) ~Ptolemy V, 180 - 176 B.C.), 29.102g, 33.4mm, Alexandria mint, Obv. diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; Rev. PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field, Olive patina with earthen deposits, surface a little rough.

Background info courtsey Forvm Ancient coins

Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins
Steve E
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1d_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180-145 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 1489150 viewsObv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 180-145
Reference:– Svoronos 1489, SNG Cop 262

Ex Forum

14.031g, 27.3m, 0o

Additional comments from Forum - "Ptolemy VI became king in 180 B.C. at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra I, until her death in 176 BC. From 170 to 164 B.C., Egypt was ruled by Ptolemy, his sister-queen and his younger brother Ptolemy VIII Physcon. In 170 BC, the Seleukid King Antiochus IV invaded and was even crowned king in 168, but abandoned his claim on the orders from Rome. In 164 Ptolemy VI was driven out by his brother. He went to Rome and received support from Cato. He was restored the following year. In 152 BC, he briefly ruled jointly with his son, Ptolemy Eupator, but his son probably died that same year. In 145 B.C. he died of battle wounds received against Alexander Balas of Syria. Ptolemy VI ruled uneasily, cruelly suppressing frequent rebellions."
9 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemy_X_pan.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.142 viewsAR Tetradrachm, (Sovornos 1868~Cleopatra VII), (SNG Cop 391), Weight 14.1g, Max. diameter 24.15mm, Paphos mint (Alexandria mint in some refs.) year 21 (60/61 B.C.), Obv. Diademed head of Ptolemy Soter right, wearing aegis, Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt (off flan); L KA (date) before; ΠA behind, Background toning with some pitting on obv.


There is some disagreement between references as to which ruler it is assigned to. And the mint.

Background info courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

In 80 B.C., Ptolemy XI was removed from the throne by the Egyptian people after he killed his coregent and step-mother Berenice III. Since he had no male heir, the oldest (illegitimate) son of Ptolemy IX was made King Ptolemy XII. Ptolemy XI had left the throne to Rome in his will, but Rome did not challenge Ptolemy XII's succession because the Senate did not want an Egyptian expansion.

Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

Ex. Aegean Numismatics
Ex. CNG auction 91 lot 75

Pictured on Wildwinds
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_II.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom- Ptolemy II, Philadelphos48 viewsAR Tetradrachm
285-246 B.C.
27mm, 14.12g
GCV-7771var

Obverse:
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis. Δ behind ear.

Reverse:
ΠTOΛEMAIOY
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
EY
KΛE (mongrammed)
Eagle standing left on a thunderbolt.
1 commentsrubadub
ptol_eagle.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I or II37 viewsca. 295 - 260 BC
AE 19 mm 8.02 g
OBV: DEIFIED ALEXANDER WEARING ELEPHANT SKIN HEADDRESS R
REV: EAGLE STANDING L, HEAD L, WINGS OPEN, MONOGRAM IN L FIELD
EGYPT
(both Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II had issues of this type during the period 295 - 260 BC)
laney
ptol_HP_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I or II9 views280 - 265 BC (pre-reform)
AE 12.5 mm max.; 1.41 g
O: Head of Alexander right
R: Eagle with wings open, HP monogram to left
Alexandria and other mints; Sv239
laney
ptol_soter_a.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I SOTER18 views367 - 283 BC
struck 310 - 306 BC
AE 20 mm 6.99 g
O: HEAD OF APHRODITE WEARING ORNAMENTED STEPHANOS, R
R: EAGLE WITH CLOSED WINGS STANDING L ON THUNDERBOLT
[PTO]LEMAI[OU] TO R
PAPHOS, CYPRUS
laney
ptol_i_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I SOTER16 viewsAE 15.5 mm, 3.75 g
367 - 283 BC
minted ca. 305 BC
O: Head of Alexander wearing elephant skin headdress and horn of Ammon, right
R: Eagle, wings open, standing left on thunderbolt; monogram/crested helmet in left field
laney
ptol_11_eleph_b_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS33 views285-246 BC
struck ca. 260 BC (Post-Reform)
AE 23 mm, 9.76 g
O: Head of Alexander the Great wearing elephant-skin headdress, right
R: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head right, wings open; D monogram between legs
Alexandria mint; Svoronos 439; Weiser 34; SNG Copenhagen 158
laney
kyrene_b.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II OR III (KYRENE)23 viewsca. 283 - 240 BC
Late Ptolemy II or early Ptolemy III
AE 20.5 mm 7.5 g
O: HEAD OF PTOLEMY I, R
R: HEAD OF LIBYA, R, CORNUCOPIAE AT CHIN
KYRENE MINT
Svoronos 871
laney
ptol_ii_res_b.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS16 views285 - 246 BC
AE 28 mm; 17.08 g
O: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right;
R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, monogram over shield left.
Alexandria mint
laney
ptol_ii.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS16 viewsca 260 BC
(Post-Reform, Series 3)
AE 19 mm; 5.83 g
O: Head of Zeus right
R: BASILEWS - PTOLEMAIOY Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, L monogram between legs
Alexandria mint
laney
ptol_iii_club.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III EUERGETES21 views246 - 222 BC
AE 18.5 mm; 4.83 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, within border of dots;
R:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, within border of dots
Tyre mint
laney
ptolemy_tyre.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III EUERGETES15 views246 - 222 BC
AE 23.5 mm; 11.87 g
O: diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right;
R: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, no control letters
Phoenicia, Tyre mint; Svoronos 708, SNG Cop 495, Weiser 55 - 56 (all attributed to Ptolemy II),
laney
ptol_iii_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III, EURGETES I26 views247 - 222 BC
AE 25 mm 12.10 g
O: Head of Zeus Ammon right
R: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's leg
Alexandria mint
laney
PTOLEMY_IVresized.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY IV PHILOPATER52 viewsAE 44 mm 68.94 g
221 - 204 BC
OBV: DIADEMED HEAD OF ZEUS, R
REV: EAGLE STANDING L

ALEXANDRIA SEAR 7841v
2 commentslaney
ISIS_EAGLE_PTOL_RES_2.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY VI PHILOMETOR18 views180-145 BC.
Æ 26.5 mm, 13.21 g
O: Wreathed and draped bust of Isis right /
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, with wings spread; monogram to left
Alexandria mint
laney
ptolemy_viii_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY VIII EUERGETES II (PHYSCON)22 views145 - 116 BC
AE 1/4 Obol 9 mm; 2.95 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon right;
R: Eagle standing half left with wings open

Kyrene mint;cf. Svoronos 1655, SNG Cop 658
laney
50116LG.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy III Euergetes.40 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy III Euergetes. 246-222 B.C. Æ drachm (43 mm, 60.36 g, 11 h). Alexandria. Head of Zeus Ammon right wearing taenia and Osiris cap / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, cornucopia; between legs, XP monogram. Svoronos 964; SNG Copenhagen 171-2. VF, multihued rough brown, black and green patina. ecoli
307_Greek.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy III Euergetes. Bronze drachm 245-222 BC15 viewsAlexandria, circa 245-222 BC.

Reference.
Köln 71; SNG Copenhagen 171-172; Svoronos 964.

Obv. no legend.
Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia with basileion

Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (PTOLEMAIOU-BASILEWS)
Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, filleted corncuopia in
left field, XP monogram between legs

66.85 gr
43 mm
12h.
1 commentsokidoki
029_50.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt30 views Ptolemy V Epiphanes or Ptolemy VI Philometer
205-180 B.C. or 181/0-145 B.C.
Æ Obol
10.31 gm, 23.5 mm
Obv.: Head of bearded Herakles right, wearing lion skin, dotted boarder
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around Eagle with closed wings
standing left on thunderbolt, monogram to left
Cyprus mint
Svoronos 1385; SNG Cop 288-290; Weiser 148;
BMC 6, p.68,7
Jaimelai
278654_50.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt46 viewsPtolemy III Euregetes
247/6-221/20 B.C.
Æ Obol
10.29 gm, 24.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant skin, dotted boarder
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, head right,
filleted cornucopia to right, Ε between legs, dotted boarder
Alexandria mint
Svoronos 976; SNG Cop 232; BMC 6, p.66, 41-2; Sear 7819
1 commentsJaimelai
88000548.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA, 253 - 252 BC158 viewsAV Octodrachm (Mnaïeion) - 27mm, 27.69 g, 12h

Arsinoe II Philadelphos, died 270-268 BC. Struck under Ptolemy II,

O - Arsinoë II head right, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped scepter in background, Θ to left
R - APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet.

Svoronos 460; Troxell, Arsinoe, Transitional to Group 3, p. 43 and pl. 6, 2-3 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 134; Boston MFA -; Triton XII, lot 386 (same obv. die); CNG 76, lot 875 (same obv. die); CNG 87, lot 698 (same obv. die).
3 commentsrobertpe
Egypt,_Mamphis_Mint,_Alexander_tetradrachm.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter as Satrap, 323-305 BC - Memphis Mint61 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress; test cut applied to top of the head.
AΛΕΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and scepter; rose before, ΔI beneath throne, O between throne and scepter.

Price 3971; Muller 124; SNG Copenhagen 853; Dewing 1180.
Memphis mint ca. 323-316 BC.

(27 mm, 16.92 g, 12h).
ex- Barry P. Murphy.

Amongst the first Egyptian issues of Alexandrine tetradrachms, minted shortly after Ptolemy took control of Egypt as Satrap.
3 commentsn.igma
greek72.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes Æ Oktobol (47mm, 83.04 g)42 viewsAlexandreia mint. Phase 1. (246-222 BC).
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; E between legs.
Svoronos 446; Weiser 19-21 (Ptolemy II); SNG Copenhagen 142; Noeske 64 (Ptolemy II).
Minos
FotorCreated~58.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt,Ptolemy 1st Soter as satrap 323-305 BC AR Tetradrachm 28mm 15.90g 6h31 viewsPtolemaic standard,in the name of Alexander 3rd of Macedon,Alexandreia mint,struck circa 311/0-305 BC.Diademed head of the deified Alexander right wearing elephant skin headdress.Rev Athena Alkidemos advancing right,Corinthian helmet,monogram and eagle standing on thunderbolt.Grant H
FotorCreated~111.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt,Ptolemy 3rd AE Drachm 41 circa 246-222 BC 41 mm 66.97g 12h 25 viewsDiademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.Rev eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt,filleted cornucopia to left XP monogram between legs.
Alexandreia mint series 5, struck 230-222 BC'
Thick red and brown patina
Grant H
Ptolemy_I_Soter,_as_satrap.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, 323-305 BC. Tetradrachm72 viewsTetradrachm (Silver, 26mm, 16.30 g 12), Alexandria, circa 313-312.

Head of the deified Alexander III to right, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant skin headdress, with aegis around his neck, and with horn of Ammon on his forehead.
Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Athena Alkidemos advancing right, hurling spear with her right hand and with shield over her extended left arm; to right, eagle with closed wings standing on thunderbolt to right with ΔΙ below. SNG Copenhagen 14. Svoronos 33. Zervos Issue XIII. Minor corrosion, otherwise, good very fine.

Extremely rare with tiny K on obverse, Zervos notes only 9 examples from 2 obverse dies.

While the small Δ is commonly found on Ptolemy’s obverse dies, the appearance of the K is extremely rare. It is tempting to assume these are die engraver signatures, but Zervos notes that this is far from proven. Given the diversity of styles found with the Δ mark, it does appear unlikely.
2 commentsLeo
Svoronos_34.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Drachm22 views15mm, 3.72 g, 12h
Uncertain standard. In the name of Alexander III of Macedon. Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 311/0-305 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin / Athena Alkidemos advancing right; to right, ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt. Svoronos 34; Zervos Issue 68; SNG Copenhagen –; Noeske –; BMC 15. VF, toned, a hint of porosity. Very rare denomination.
1 commentsLeo
Price_3971c.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Tetradrachm15 views28mm, 16.92 g, 11h

In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Memphis or Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 323/2-317/1 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; rose in left field, ΔI below throne, O to left of scepter. Svoronos –; Zervos Issue 2C; Price 3971c; SNG Copenhagen 7. Good VF, toned, some roughness at edge.

From the collection of José Miguel Márquez del Prado.
Leo
2c.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Akko mint. Dated RY 33 of 'Ozmilk, king of Tyre (317/6 BC)66 viewsObv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, Phoenician 'K (for 'Ozmilk) and ||| –= (date). 
References: Price 3279 (Ake); Newell, Dated 37.
24mm, 15.61 grams.
3 commentsCanaan
ptolemy~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt. Ptolemy III Euergetes. 246-222 BC.16 viewsÆ Triobol, 34mm, 34.07g, 12h; Alexandreia mint. Series 5. Struck 230-222 BC.
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia to left, XP monogram between legs.
Reference: Svoronos 965; Weiser 72; SNG Copenhagen 173-5; Noeske 120-2.
Notes: ex-CNG, ex-Andy Singer (Baltimore Expo), 3/28/15, 150.
John Anthony
334_Greek_SNG_Cop311-4_.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy IX to Ptolemy XII. 116-51 BC. Æ Alexandreia(?) mint. Series 9.12 viewsReference.
Svoronos 1426 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and VIII); Weiser 143 (Ptolemy V); SNG Copenhagen 311-4 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII); Noeske 216-20 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII); cf. Lorber & Faucher Series 6E.

Obv.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.

Rev.
Two eagles with their wings closed standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to left.

8.90 gr
20 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes_II_(Physcon).jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon). 145-116 BC. 16 views26mm, 13.92 g, 12h
Paphos mint.
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis around neck
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; LΛ (date) to left, ΠA to right
Svoronos -; Paphos Hoard 6; SNG Copenhagen
JBGood
chalkous_k.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Time of Ptolemy VIII-X. 145-88 BC. 10 viewsÆ Chalkous, 14mm, 1.7g, 12h; Uncertain mint in Cyprus (or Alexandria?).
Obv.: Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia.
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Reference: Svoronos 1715 (Ptolemy X); Noeske 389; SNG Copenhagen 669 / 17-102-127
John Anthony
Svoronos-965.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt: Ptolemy III Euergetes (246-222 BCE) Æ Triobol, Alexandreia (Svoronos 965; SNG Copenhagen 173-5)28 viewsObv: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia to left, XP monogram between legs
Quant.Geek
combined~1.jpg
Ptolemaic Zeus/Eagle33 viewsGREEK COINS

Bithynia. Dia. Circa 85-65 BC. (9,8 g, 23,65 mm.). Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev. ΔΙΑΣ Eagle, with spread wings and head turned back to right, standing left on a thunderbolt; to left, monogram.

Flamur H
Ptolemaic_CleopatraVII_SNGcop419_gf.jpg
Ptolemaic, Cleopatra VII. 14 viewsPtolemaic, Cleopatra VII. 51-30 BC. AE26 80 Drachmai (15.46 gm) of Alexandria. Draped and diademed bust of Cleopatra VII r. / Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt. ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ | ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ, Π to r (value). Fine. Pegasi 130 #671. SNG Cop 8 #419-421; Svoronos 1871, pl. 63 #3-6; Hazzard c1153.Anaximander
Ptolemaic_AE34_35_9g.jpg
Ptolemaios IV. Philopator 221-205/204, AE3427 views34 mm, 35.9 g
obv: head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia
rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia tied with fillet before, ΔI between legs
Svoronos 1127
2 commentsareich
ptolemy_I.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter66 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I, 323-283 BC. Bronze.
Obverse- Deified Head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress.
Reverse- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle with open wings standing on thunderbolt to left.; between legs E.
Svoronos 439, SNG Cop 158, 24mm, 11.94gm.
2 commentsb70
image.jpg
Ptolemy I Sotor53 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt
Ptolemy I Sotor (323-283 BCE)
AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 15.05g)
Alexandria mint, as Satrap, c 310-305 BCE

O: Head of Alexander the Great right wearing elephant skin headdress
R: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Athena advancing right brandishing spear and shield; to right; eagle on thunderbolt, helmet, and monogram.

SNG Cop-29; Svoronos-162
1 commentsSalaethus
IMG_3978.jpg
Ptolemy II58 viewsPtolemy II, 285/4-246 BC PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
AR Tetradrachm 14.09 g.
NGC Grade
Ch XF Strike: 4/5 Surface: 2/5

obv. Diademed bust right of Ptolemy Soter wearing aegis around neck
rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, in left field TYP monogram above club

Ref:Sv.644, SNG Cop 482-483, BMC.-, Meydancikkale 4206-4353, Noeske 84.
5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Ptolemaic.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos38 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 BC Egypt, AE271 commentsareich
GAE246_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Obverse123 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE246
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - Alexandria Mint - 285/246BC
AE 40.9-42.2mm : 72.8gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Twin eagles standing on thunderbolts facing left, RHO monogram between legs. BASILEOS on right, PTOLEMAIOY on left. Denomination B. Svoronos identifies the 'two eagles' type as struck after the death of Arsinoe.
REF - Svoronos 497 Noeske 66 (with RHO monogram, like this coin)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE087_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Obverse92 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE087
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 44.1-45.0mm : 100.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE246_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse126 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE246
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - Alexandria Mint - 285/246BC
AE 40.9-42.2mm : 72.8gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Twin eagles standing on thunderbolts facing left, RHO monogram between legs. BASILEOS on right, PTOLEMAIOY on left. Denomination B. Svoronos identifies the 'two eagles' type as struck after the death of Arsinoe.
REF - Svoronos 497 Noeske 66 (with RHO monogram, like this coin)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE099_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse101 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
PtolemAE
GAE087_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse42 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE087
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 44.1-45.0mm : 100.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
PtolemAE
GAE072_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC - Diobol - Obverse98 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE072
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC
AE 30.2-31.0mm : 22.900gm
OBV - Zeus with taenia, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, no cornucopia, wing at left slightly opened, DELTA monogram between legs. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.
REF - Svoronos 438 (denom. D - Plate 17 #11) SNGCop 156
PtolemAE
GAE072_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC - Diobol - Reverse37 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE072
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC
AE 30.2-31.0mm : 22.900gm
OBV - Zeus with taenia, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, no cornucopia, wing at left slightly opened, DELTA monogram between legs. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.
REF - Svoronos 438 (denom. D - Plate 17 #11) SNGCop 156
PtolemAE
GAE233_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC - Obverse98 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE233
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 25.8-26.6mm : 17.462gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE233_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC - Reverse64 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE233
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 25.8-26.6mm : 17.462gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
PtolemAE
2300158.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 B.C AR Tetradrachm, Sidon Mint80 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 14.02 g, 1h). Sidon mint. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; c/m: pellet with radiating lines / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; ΣI before. Svoronos 713; SNG Copenhagen 506. VF, toned.
Ex CNG Sale 230 Lot: 158
1 commentsPhiloromaos
GAE244_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Obverse134 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE244
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 45.1-46.5mm : 100.4gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE099_O~0.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Obverse237 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE244_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Reverse147 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE244
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 45.1-46.5mm : 100.4gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
4 commentsPtolemAE
svoronos_838.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 17.0mm, Zeus, Gaza, Svoronos 83820 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Svoronos 838, VF, Gaza mint, 6.745g, 17.0mm, 30o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, double cornucopia across shoulder, club left. The club mintmark usually indicates Tyre. The absence of central depressions may indicate this type was struck c. 280 - 265 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptole-x.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 30.3 mm; Ake11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Ake mint. Bronze AE 30, Svoronos 790, 18.990g, 30.3mm, 0o, Ptolemais Ake mint, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right, circle of dots around; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, double cornucopia across shoulder, Ake monogram in field, ex FORVM

Podiceps
Ptolemy_II_s838.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Bronze AE 18.5, Svoronos 838, Tyre10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 838, F, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 5.179g, 18.5mm, 0o, 285 - 260 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club left; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
42838_Ptolemy_II_s709.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Tyre, hemiobol; Svoronos 70946 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 709, SNG Cop 496, BMC 70-1, SNG Milan 138-140; Hunter 49; Köln 57, F, rough, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 4.569g, 20.0mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club left; beautiful desert patina. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
nios_ptolemy_II.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos/ Ptolemy Nios15 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C. Bronze quarter-obol, Svoronos 839 (attributed to Ptolemy III, Berytos); BMC p. 54, 80 ff., aVF, Lycian? mint, 2.145g, 15.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, trident left; green patina. The trident symbol is found on this Ptolemaic bronze and its half-denomination (Svoronos 840) in Asia Minor. The weight standard places the issue after the bronze reform of Ptolemy II, c. 268 B.C. Issued by or for Ptolemy Nios, who was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268-259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency following a 259 B.C. rebellion, but remained as ruler of Telemessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C. ex FORVMPodiceps
svoronos840.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos/ Ptolemy Nios; AE12, Svoronos 8409 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 840 (attributed to Ptolemy III, Berytos), F, Lycian? mint, 1.607g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, trident left; very rare. The trident symbol is found on this Ptolemaic bronze and its double-denomination (Svoronos 839) in Asia Minor. The weight standard places the issue after the bronze reform of Ptolemy II, c. 268 B.C. Issued by or for Ptolemy Nios, who was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268-259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency following a 259 B.C. rebellion, but remained as ruler of Telemessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolem-x.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos; 30.6 mm; Sidon11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 30, Svoronos 760, F, 21.330g, 30.6mm, 0o, Sidon mint, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, double cornucopia across shoulder; rare, ex FORVMPodiceps
4237_4238.jpg
Ptolemy II, AE17, ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ6 viewsAE17
Ptolemaic Kingdom
Egypt
Ptolemy II
17.0mm 4.22gr
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle standing left, wings open.
zurqieh_dubai 291121770624
10/30/14 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
ptolemy_II_s635.jpg
Ptolemy II, Alexander, AE 15.3, Svoronos 6355 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 635, early type, with no central depression, Fair, Alexandria mint, 3.815g, 15.3mm, 0o, c. 283 - 260 B.C.; obverse head of deified Alexander the Great with horn of Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, H over club left, no symbol between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_II_s467.jpg
Ptolemy II, Alexander, AE 23, Svoronos 46712 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 467, Weiser 33, SNG Cop -, Fair, rough, Alexandria mint, 7.520g, 23.0mm, 0o, post-reform, c. 260 B.C., with central depression; obverse head of Alexander the Great, in elephant scalp headdress, right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, no cornucopia, “Q” between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
svoronos_450.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Bronze obol, Alexander; Svoronos 45014 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great. Bronze obol, Svoronos 450, SNG Cop -, Weiser 31, aF, Alexandria mint, 10.508g, 22.2mm, 0o, post reform, c. 260 B.C. (with central depression); obverse head of Alexander the Great, in elephant scalp headdress, right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, E between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptole_II_svor_627.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Svoronos 627, AE 1524 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 627 (1 example known to Svoronos), Fine, dark patina, Tyre mint, 4.310g, 15.6mm, 0o, 285 - 284 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left, thunderbolt in talons, club and A left; rare. ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy2.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Svoronos 976, AE 2421 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 976, VF, brown patina, 8.172g, 24.1mm, 0o, obverse head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, wearing lion scalp headdress; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, heard turned right, cornucopia across shoulder, E between legs. ex FORVM Podiceps
sidon.jpg
Ptolemy II, Sidon14 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 762, SNG Cop 191, Weiser 45, aVF/F, Sidon mint, 5.562g, 18.3mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia across shoulder; scarce. ex FORVM Podiceps
ptolemy_II_s581.jpg
Ptolemy II, Zeus, AE 25.7, Svoronos 58123 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 581, SNG Cop 124, Weiser 12, VF, 14.640g, 25.7mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left, with spread wings, “ΣΩ” monogram above shield over “ΧΑΡ” left, “Λ” between legs; nice style. The pre-reform coinage of Ptolemy II with Galatian shield was probably minted between 275 B.C. and 262 B.C. No central depressions appear on these coins. This type with a XAP monogram under the shield has been found in Greece and may have been used to pay troops during the Chremonidean war, during which Ptolemy II supported Athens. ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy II AE27.JPG
Ptolemy II. AE27. Alexandria.40 viewsAE27. Alexandria mint.
Obv. Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev. Eagle
Svoronos 586; Weiser 11; SNG Copenhagen 123

EF
1 commentsLordBest
GAE289_O~0.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - 246/221BC - Rare Denomination - Obverse164 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE289
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Diobol - 246/221BC
AE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE289_R.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - 246/221BC - Rare Denomination - Reverse59 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE289
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Diobol or Hemicrachm - 246/221BC
AE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
PtolemAE
GAE070_O.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC - Obverse129 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE070
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC
AE 37.4-37.8mm : 50.3gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt to left, head reverted to right of coin, head facing a filetted cornucopia ascending from right (on coin) shoulder, EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - SGCV 7815 BC222-04 Svoronos 974 (Plate 29 #12) Noeske 155-158
NOTE - Attributed by Lorber as Ptolemy III hemidrachm of heavy weight standard
PtolemAE
GAE070_R.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC - Reverse120 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE070
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC
AE 37.4-37.8mm : 50.3gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt to left, head reverted to right of coin, head facing a filetted cornucopia ascending from right (on coin) shoulder, EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - SGCV 7815 BC222-04 Svoronos 974 (Plate 29 #12) Noeske 155-158
NOTE - Attributed by Lorber as Ptolemy III hemidrachm of heavy weight standard
PtolemAE
ptolemy_III_s975.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Zeus, AE 26, Svoronos 97517 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C. Bronze AE 26, Svoronos 975, SNG Cop 230, nice F, Alexandria mint, 14.133g, 26.4mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle, wings open, standing half left atop fulmen, head right; cornucopia left, E between legs. ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_III_s1166.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Zeus, AE 40.2, Svoronos 116624 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C. Bronze hemidrachm, Svoronos 1166, SNG Cop 220 - 221, Weiser 87 - 88, F, Alexandria mint, 39.0534g, 40.2mm, 0o, c. 246 - 230 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing half left on fulmen, wings closed, head right, filleted cornucopia ascending behind from shoulder, “L” between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
PTOLEMY_III_-_GREEK.JPG
Ptolemy IV83 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom - Ptolemy IV, Philopator I - Alexandria Mint - Hemidrachm

O: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia

R: ΠTOΛΣMAIOY BAΣIΛΣΩΣ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, ΔI between eagle's legs

Ref: Svronos 1127, SNG Cop 201

36.3g, 33.7mm, 0 degree die axis, 222-204BC
7 commentsBiancasDad
ptolemyIV.jpg
Ptolemy IV AE3543 views`Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV,221-205 BC, AE 35 (32.21g). Obv: Head of Zeus-Ammon right. Rev: Eagle stg. left clutching thunderbolt.1 commentsancientone
GAE095_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Obverse101 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE095
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 41.2-41.6mm : 73.1gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), LAMDA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE026_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Obverse137 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE026
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 42.3mm : 73.52gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), DELTA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE095_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Reverse85 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE095
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 41.2-41.6mm : 73.1gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), LAMDA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE026_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Reverse42 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE026
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 42.3mm : 73.52gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), DELTA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE025_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC - Obverse136 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE025
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC
AE 32mm : 35.7gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle on thunderbolt cornucopia L BASILEOS PTOLEMOY SIGMA IOTA or SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 993 (Plate 35 #9 - Ptolemy III) SNGCOP 212
NOTE - Recent reattribution by Lorber as later issue hemidrachm of Ptolemy IV
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE025_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC - Reverse31 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE025
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC
AE 32mm : 35.7gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle on thunderbolt cornucopia L BASILEOS PTOLEMOY SIGMA IOTA or SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 993 (Plate 35 #9 - Ptolemy III) SNGCOP 212
NOTE - Recent reattribution by Lorber as later issue hemidrachm of Ptolemy IV
PtolemAE
sistertiii_163.JPG
Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC. 224 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC.
O: Head Zeus with Horn of Ammon r, centering dimple evident.
R: Eagle with closed wings stg. l., Filleted Cornucopia in l. field, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around, LI symbol between legs.
Svoronos 1126, SNG Cop 200v(DI between legs).
32500
6 commentsAntonio Protti
Egypt_Bronze_Zeus_Eagle.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC76 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC.
O: Head Zeus with Horn of Ammon r, centering dimple evident.
R: Eagle with closed wings stg. l., Filleted Cornucopia in l. field, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around, LI symbol between legs.
Svoronos 1126, SNG Cop 200v(DI between legs).
32500 sold

Ptolemy IV Philopater reigned 221–205 BCE, son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II of Egypt was the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt. Under the reign of Ptolemy IV, the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began.
His reign was inaugurated by the murder of his mother, and he was always under the dominion of favourites, male and female, who indulged his vices and conducted the government as they pleased. Self-interest led his ministers to make serious preparations to meet the attacks of Antiochus III the Great on Coele-Syria including Judea, and the great Egyptian victory of Raphia (217), where Ptolemy himself was present, secured the northern borders of the kingdom for the remainder of his reign.

The arming of Egyptians in this campaign had a disturbing effect upon the native population of Egypt, leading to the secession of Upper Egypt under pharaohs Harmachis (also known as Hugronaphor) and Ankmachis (also known as Chaonnophris), thus creating a kingdom that occupied much of the country and lasted nearly twenty years.

Philopator was devoted to orgiastic forms of religion and literary dilettantism. He built a temple to Homer and composed a tragedy, to which his favourite Agathocles added a commentary. He married (about 220 BC) his sister Arsinoë III, but continued to be ruled by his mistress Agathoclea, sister of Agathocles. In late c. 210 BC, Agathoclea may have given birth to a son from her affair with Ptolemy IV, who may had died shortly after his birth.

Ptolemy is said to have built a giant ship known as the tessarakonteres ("forty"), a huge type of galley. The forty of its name may refer to its number of banks of oars. The only recorded instance of this type of vessel, in fact, is this showpiece galley built for Ptolemy IV, described by Callixenus of Rhodes, writing in the 3rd century BCE, and by Athenaeus in the 2nd century AD. Plutarch also mentions that Ptolemy Philopater owned this immense vessel in his Life of Demetrios. The current theory is that Ptolemy's ship was an oversize catamaran galley, measuring 128 m 420 ft.

Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes purported events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria.
3 commentsAntonivs Protti
GAE255_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopatros - Alexandria - 221/205BC - Tetrobol - Obverse87 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE255
Ptolemy IV Philopater - 221/205BC - Alexandria - Tetrobol
AE 36.3-37.0mm : 39.6gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head turned right over open wing, SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs, square/rectangular countermark of cornucopia at position where typically the device (engraved into die) is found on Ptolemy III issues. Possibly transitional issue or early issue of Ptolemy IV. Lorber (AJN, Second Series #12, pp.67-92, 2000) notes that the countermark may represent re-establishment of monetized value of this type by Ptolemy IV during a time of monetary reform and demonetization of earlier types.
REF - Svoronos 1149 (not illustrated this size, rev. similar to #1150 - Plate 37 #11) SNGCOP 211
PtolemAE
GAE255_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopatros - Alexandria - 221/205BC - Tetrobol - Reverse88 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE255
Ptolemy IV Philopater - 221/205BC - Alexandria - Tetrobol
AE 36.3-37.0mm : 39.6gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head turned right over open wing, SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs, square/rectangular countermark of cornucopia at position where typically the device (engraved into die) is found on Ptolemy III issues. Possibly transitional issue or early issue of Ptolemy IV. Lorber (AJN, Second Series #12, pp.67-92, 2000) notes that the countermark may represent re-establishment of monetized value of this type by Ptolemy IV during a time of monetary reform and demonetization of earlier types.
REF - Svoronos 1149 (not illustrated this size, rev. similar to #1150 - Plate 37 #11) SNGCOP 211
PtolemAE
PtolemyIV_1148.jpg
Ptolemy IV, Svoronos 1148, AE 3821 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy IV. 221-205 BC. Æ 38mm (47.42 g). Alexandria mint. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt with open wings, head turned right; SE monogram between legs. Svoronos 1148; Weiser 97 var. (monogram); SNG Copenhagen 207 var. (monogram). ex VAuctionsPodiceps
PTOLEMY_III__DEALERS_REDUCED_BOTH.jpg
Ptolemy lll AE Reduced Drachm9 viewsOBS: Head of Zeus Ammon
REV: Eagle facing left on thunderbolt.
Cornocopia with fillets in Left Field
ΧΡ Chrestogram between legs
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ
Sv 964
40mm 73.9gm
cicerokid
Ptolemy_V.jpg
Ptolemy V 204-180 B.C.9 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes(?). 204-180 B.C. Æ Hemiobol (17mm, 4.14g & 16mm. 2.75g.). Kyrene mint. Obv:Diademed head of Ptolemy V right, aegis around neck Rev:Draped bust of Libya right,
wearing tainia; double cornucopia below chin.
ddwau
GAE309_O.jpg
Ptolemy V - Alexandria - Obverse99 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE309
Ptolemy V Philometer 205/181BC
AE 19.1-19.5mm : 5.978gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing f/L on thunderbolt with head reverted, KAPPA monogram between legs, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1378 (Plate 47 #7) Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC - SNGCOP 273
PtolemAE
GAE309_R.jpg
Ptolemy V - Alexandria - Reverse93 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE309
Ptolemy V Philometer 205/181BC
AE 19.1-19.5mm : 5.978gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing f/L on thunderbolt with head reverted, KAPPA monogram between legs, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1378 (Plate 47 #7) Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC - SNGCOP 273
PtolemAE
tetradrachm.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes Tetradrachm10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy V Epiphanes. 205-180 B.C. AR tetradrachm (26.4 mm, 13.83 g, 12 h). Alexandria, ca. 204 B.C. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings closed. Svoronos 1231; Noeske 176-7; SNG Cop 244Holding_History
41117_Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_V_Epiphanes,_205_-_180_B_C_S1238.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE17, Isis, Svoronos 123811 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 - 180 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos 1238, SNG Cop 256, F, Alexandria mint, 3.856g, 17.0mm, 0o, 180 B.C.; obverse head of Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_V_libya.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Cyrene, Bust of Libya; Svoronos 87114 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy V Epiphanes. 205-180 B.C. 21mm. Cyrene. Diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis / Diademed bust of Libya right; before, cornucopia. SNG Copenhagen 442-445; Svoronos 871; Buttrey, Demeter Sanctuary 268-74. Podiceps
41108_Ptolemy_V_obol,_Svoronos_1494.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Obol, Svoronos 14947 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 - 180 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1494 (Ptolemy VIII), SNG Cop 339 ff. (Ptolemy VIII), Weiser 126, BMC Alexandria p. 69, 9 - 10 (Paphos?), Noeske -, Hosking -, aF, encrustation, corrosion, Alexandria mint, 9.216g, 24.0mm, 0o, 200 - 197 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right wearing lion-scalp headdress; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head left; scarce. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_V_s1253.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Tyre; 13.6mm; Zeus. Svoronos 125310 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C. Bronze AE 14, Svoronos 1253, gF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 2.334g, 13.6mm, 180o, obverse head of Zeus Ammon right, border of dots; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with closed wings standing left atop fulmen, cornucopia with fillet on left shoulder, AP monogram between legs, large club in left field, border of dots around; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
41476_Ptolemy_V_S1234.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes; Alexandria; Isis; Svoronos 123435 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205/4 - 180 B.C. GB41476. Bronze AE 20, Svoronos 1234, SNG Cop 247, Alexandria mint, 15.302g, 27.2mm, 0o, obverse wreathed head of Isis right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
711365.jpg
Ptolemy V. Tetradrachm. Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. 204-180 BC.11 viewsAlexandria mint. (25mm., 13,03g.)

Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis around neck / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, no control marks.

Svoronos 1231; SNG Copenhagen 244-5.
1 commentsRuslan K
p121.jpg
PTOLEMY VI 118 viewsPtolemy VI Philometor
180-145 b.c
AE 44
Obverse:Head of Ammon Zeus to right
Reverse:Eagle with closed wings standing to left,lotus flower ,PTOLEMAIOY
One of the largest Ptolemaic bronze

Cyprus mint
44.67mm 90.56g

SVORONOS 1403,TZIAMPAZIS 46/50
maik
Ptolemaic_Isis_Eagle_AE27_15_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Cleopatra I as Isis, AE 2814 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 28. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Zeus, AE 3012 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC. 30 mm, 27.27 g. Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field. Sear 7900var. ex Bart Lewis & areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
isis_cleo.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27. Cleopatra I as Isis13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27, 17,37g. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var.Podiceps
41113_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor_and_Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes,_170_-_163_B_C__S_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, diobol, Svoronos 142610 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, F, Alexandria mint, 7.926g, 21.4mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41083_Ptolemy_VI___VIII_diobol,_Svoronos_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, Diobol, Svoronos 14268 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF, Alexandria mint, 7.371g, 20.6mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left; nice centering. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
42053_Ptolemy_VI___VIII_S1424.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, obol, Svoronos 142416 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, 170 - 164 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305, SGCV II 7900, F, 22.556g, 29.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field. Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41065_Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C_,_Cleopatra_I_Thea_as_Regent_S1384.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Tetrobol, Svoronos 138412 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1384, SNG Cop 286, Fair, Alexandria mint, 13.790g, 28.1mm, 0o, 180 - 177 B.C.; obverse head of (Cleopatra I as) Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing half left, wings open, head left, monogram left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemyVI.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Herakles/ Eagle, 25 mm, "K"18 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1376, SNG Cop 270, VF, obverse weak in places, 11.427g, 25.0mm, 315o, c. 180 - 168 B.C.; obverse Bearded head of Herakles right wearing lion's scalp; circle of dots around; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing half left, head turned back right, long transverse caduceus behind, K below; rare. The bearded Herakles obverse occurs on three different series of Ptolemaic bronzes identified by Svoronos. Our coin type has an average obol weight of 10.93 g. The style and weight connect it to the reign of Ptolemy VI. Similar issues with a transverse scepter have “EUL” between the legs of the eagle, for Eulaios an advisor to young Ptolemy VI. The K may refer to Cleopatra I, senior co-ruler between 180 and 178/7 BC, while Ptolemy VI was a young child. Alternatively, K may stand for either Komanos or Kineas, who took the advisor-roles of Eulaios and Lenaios. Diobols (Svoronos 1375) exhibit a different eagle but the same K between the legs. The relative scarcity of the K-issues suggests that they may be for Komanos or Kineas. ex FORVM

Podiceps
24845_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C__obol_svoronos_1397.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, obol, Cyprus, Svoronos 139715 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Bronze obol, Svoronos 1397; BMC Ptolemies p. 80, 18 - 19, VF, Cyprus mint, weight 13.015g, maximum diameter 24.6mm, die axis 0o, 174 - 171 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, lotus symbol before, ΕΥΛ between legs; ΕΥΛ probably refers to Eulaios, regent with Lenaios during part of the minority of Ptolemy VI. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Ptolemy VI, AE21, ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ7 viewsAE Diobol
Ptolemaic Kingdom
Egypt
Ptolemy VI
King: 180 - 164BC
Issued: 180 - 176BC
21.0 x 20.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Diademed bust of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae before.
Good Fine
SNG Cop 315; Svoronos 1426; Sear SG 7901.
CIVITAS Galleries CICF 2015
4/12/15 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
4233_4234.jpg
Ptolemy VI, Diobol, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ7 viewsAE Diobol
Greek Provincial
Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemy VI
Issued: 180 - 145BC
21.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae before.
SNG Cop 311cf
ECIN Associates
11/18/14 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
Ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria mint24 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria mint

Metal: AR likely low-percentage (debased) silver alloy
Diam: 25 mm.
Weight: 10.5 gr.
OBV: Laureate Head of Ptolemy I Facing right
Most Ptolemaic tetradrachms are said to depict Ptolemy I, though the style changes over time. some folks say that particular Ptolemaic rulers had their own features put onto these tetradrachm portraits but I don't know how anyone could really support that contention. One of the mysterious, but interesting, aspects of most Ptolemaic coinage is that is largely is 'fixed' over long periods of time with little that allows us to tell which coins came from which rulers by looking at the coins. This coin is later with a date that helps narrow it down, but many don't. The analysis of hoards and such is the best data we have for many types to help us try and determine which ruler(s) may have made them. The main design features are fairly 'constant' for many of the types for hundreds of years
OBV-LEGEND: Not Visible
Marks-OBV: None
REV: Standing eagle facing Left, with closed wings
REV-LEGEND : Not Visible
Marks-REV: On Left of eagle ‘s back what appears to be mint marks ( PA or πA ) and date marks on the Right in front of eagle chest (4i ?? )
It does appear to be a late era Ptolemaic Tetradrachm; the overall look is consistent with that identification
Source : Alexandria, Egypt Catacombs when was young
Age: Somewhere around that time, late 2nd C. to 1st C. BC. Mostly around 64 B.C
Mint: Alexandria ( Egypt)

Ref : Svoronos 1520 is REally Similar
http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/egypt/ptolemy_VIII/t.html
Michel C2
Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II28 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes II (145-116 BC), the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, AR tetradrachm (25 mm, 14.01 g) minted in Kition, Cyprus, 138-137 BC. Obverse: diademed head right. Reverse: eagle standing left on thunderbolt, regnal year 33 over crested helmet in left field, KI in right field. References: Svoronos 1587; SNG Cop. 599.Jan
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Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, AE 27, Svoronos 14938 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze AE 27, Svoronos 1493, SNG Cop 335, Weiser 174 (Ptolemy X, c. 101 B.C.), Noeske 253, Hosking -, Fair, Alexandria mint, 16.813g, 26.1mm, 0o, obverse head of Alexander right wearing elephant-skin head-dress; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ”, eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt. Ptolemy VIII's nickname was Physcon, which means potbelly. Weiser assigns the type to Ptolemy X Alexander, presumably because Alexander would favor his namesake as a type, but notes the attribution is hypothetical. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C. Zeus/ two eagles & silphium plant26 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C., Bronze AE 17, SNG Copenhagen 455; Svoronos 1158 (Ptolemy IV), 6.87g, Kyrene mint, head of Zeus Ammon right with ram's horn, wearing taenia and uraeus; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΩΣ, two eagles with closed wings standing left on two thunderbolts, silphium plant in left field; The date and reign of issue for this type are uncertain. Svoronos attributed it to Ptolemy IV but noted it may `belong to a later reign.` Recent attributions span from Ptolemy VIII to Ptolemy X. Kreuzer suggests it is similar to Svoronos 1426, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
Ptolemy_IX_Soter_II_AR_Tetradrachm.JPG
Ptolemy X Soter II, 116-80 BC. AR Tetradrachm Paphos, Cyprus Mint, yarr 14 = 103 BC. PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. 41 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy X Soter II, 116-80 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Paphos, yr. 14 (103 BC). Diademed head of Ptolemy X right wearing aegis /PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, LID on left, PA on right. _16501
Svor.1674. SNGCop.363. 13.0 gram sold
Antonivs Protti
cleoptol.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes [53 BC] AR Tetradrachm29 views Svoronos 1837, SNG Cop 395. Paphos Mint, 11.9 grams

Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I with feminine features.
Reverse:Eagle standing left with thunderbolt in claws and Isis crown to left, palm branch over its right shoulder. In the left field 'LKH' (=year 28); in right field 'PA' (=Paphos)/ BASILEWE PTOLEMAIOY (of King Ptolemy)


In 54 BC, Ptolemy XII returned to Egypt from a 3-year exile and issued new Tetradrachms for the last 27-30th years of his rule. They show the crown of Isis in the eagle's claw that recognized Cleopatra as his heir and likely co-regent. The Isis crown remained the symbol of Cleo VII on her coins following Ptolemy's death in 51 BC. This pattern remained unchanged for all of Cleopatra's tetradrachms though the quality of coins became very bad owing to the huge bribes that had to be paid for Roman "protection". For a great discussion of these attributions and coin history see the link: http://www.ptolemaic.net/cleopatra/4coin-isis.htm#p5bydelay.

This coin was issued by Ptolemy XII in his 28th regnal year (53 BC) when his daughter, Cleopatra was about 15.

1 commentsdaverino
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII Silver Tetradrachm47 viewsPtolemy XII, Silver tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 14.577g, 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 58 - 57 BC, Noeske 356, Svoronos -, SNG Cop -,
OBV: diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
REV: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, LKD left (year 24), PA right; struck with a worn obverse die; scarce;

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.
Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player.
Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance.
His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsRomanorvm
ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII, tetradrachm71 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Neos Dionysos, 80 - 51 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1839; BMC 117, 35; SNG Cop 396, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, 13.683 g, 25.9 mm, 0o, 52 - 51 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I or XII? right, wearing aegis; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, date “IKQ” (year 29) and crown of Isis left, “PA ” right. Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Disposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt. Minted under Roman supervision. About 33% silver. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
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Revolt of the Provinces, Time of Ptolemy X Soter II47 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of the Provinces, Time of Ptolemy X Soter II, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze AE 34, Svoronos 1917, obverse encrustation, 17.991g, 34.5mm, 0o, c. 86 - 84 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse barbarous imitation of “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, very crude. A large and very crude imitation of common Zeus obverse, two-eagles reverse type. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
CNG_63_lot_1112__Large_(002).jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, AE 28 - Crawford 23/1 - RARE20 viewsRome, The Republic.
Anonymous (circa 240 BCE).
AE 28 (17.05g; 28mm).
Sicilian Mint.

Obv: ROMANO; Head of Roma facing left in crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin; cornucopia symbol behind nape of neck.

Rev: ROMA-NO; Eagle standing left on thunderbold, head turned right, sword before.

References: Crawford 23/1; Sydenham 30 (R8); Burnett & McCabe O5/R5:2 (this coin illustrated); Manganaro (1981-82) pl. 16 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Tony Hardy Collection [CNG 63 (21 May 2003) Lot 1112].

Burnett and McCabe recently published a paper regarding this issue in which they conclude that it was likely small (only 6 obv and 8 rev dies identified) and minted in Sicily circa 240 BCE. This would have been about the time that the inscription on Roman coins was changing from ROMANO to ROMA. The reverse was based on a Ptolemaic bronze octobol and the obverse likely depicts an early rendering of the goddess Roma (in Corinthian, rather than Attic, helmet). Three obverse symbols have been identified (helmet, plough and cornucopia) and a fourth is uncertain.
Carausius
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Roman Republic, M. Aemilius Lepidus, 61 B.C.55 viewsSilver denarius, RSC Aemilia 24, Sydenham 832, Crawford 419/2, RBW Collection -, F, rough, burnished, both sides off center, Rome mint, weight 3.435g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 180o, 61 B.C.; obverse head of Alexandria right, wearing turreted crown, ALEXANDREA below; reverse M. Lepidus, togate, standing facing, head left, crowning the young figure of Ptolemy V, standing facing, holding scepter, S·C above, TVTOR·REG downward on left, PONF·MAX· upward on right, M LEPIDVS in exergue; this is the first example of this rare type ever handled by Forum; rare;

This coin records an alleged guardianship of the moneyer's ancestor, Marcus Lepidus, over the young king of Egypt, Ptolemy V. Neither Polybius nor Livy make any mention of it. The story is likely an exaggeration, invented by the later Lepidi. In 201 B.C., Lepidus was sent to deliver the ultimatum to Philip ordering him to cease attacking his Greek neighbors, and return the Ptolemy's possessions. He was also a member of the embassy sent to Ptolemy V (and Antiochos III) to gain support should Rome and Macedonia declare war. But Lepidus was a junior member of the embassy, which included two ex-consuls, thus it is unlikely he would have been a guardian of the Ptolemaic king.

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
1 commentsSam
c13.jpg
Sardes, Lydia24 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochos III, 223 - 187 B.C., Sardes, Lydia

obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair in corkscrew curls down neck;
reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ, Apollo standing left, naked, examining arrow in right, resting left on tripod

Antiochus' victory at the Battle of Panium in 198 B.C. transferred control of Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt to the Seleukid Kingdom. When Antiochos conquered Asia Minor, however, the Romans responded. Antiochos' losses were so great that the whole of his empire was shattered and he was forced to content himself with the region that he had held in the beginning, Syria.
ecoli
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Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Æ 20 - Antioch on the Orontes17 viewsWinged head of Medusa right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKY (sic) Indian humped bull butting right, control mark Ξ in exergue.

SC 21.2(b); CSE 9; WSM 925; SNG Spaer 23; HGC 9, 92a; Sear GCV 5852.
Struck ca. 286-281 BC at Antioch on the Orontes.

(20 mm, 7.06 g, 2h).
Note the misspelled legend, missing the letter O in the genitive of the king's name; the only known example of this apparently unrecorded error.

This coin type was produced at many mints across the Seleukid Empire in the last years of Seleukos’ reign. The bull on the reverse is an allusion to a story about Seleukos’ prowess related to us in Appian: "He (Seleukos) was of such a large and powerful frame that once when a wild bull was brought for sacrifice to Alexander and broke loose from his ropes, Seleukos held him alone, with nothing but his bare hands, for which reason his statues are ornamented with horns."

On the frequency with which this coin type appeared at mints across the Seleukid Empire in the final years of Seleukos I, Newell commented that "Such a widespread coinage of a single type would seem to hint at some effort on the part of the central government, towards the end of the reign, to coordinate what had hitherto been a remarkably diverse selection of types on the bronze coinage of the empire. If such an effort was really made, it proved to be but of short duration. For under Antiochus I and his immediate successors, the bronze types again became extremely varied as between mint and mint. Apparently the authorities in charge of several mints were at liberty to select such types for the minor coins as appeared the most appropriate to them. This is one of the reasons why the Seleukid coinages possess so strong an appeal; in contrast, for instance, to the tiresomely narrow range of Ptolemaic types, with their eternal Ammon, Zeus or Isis heads and their never ending eagle reverses.
1 commentsn.igma
SelElephant.jpg
Seleukos I Nikator / Quadriga of Elephants12 viewsSeleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 17.13 g, 4h). Seleukeia on the Tigris II mint. Struck circa 296/5-281 BC.
O: Laureate head of Zeus right
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) left, Athena, brandishing spear and shield, in quadriga of elephants right; anchor above,ΣEΛEYKOY (Seleukos), two monograms in exergue.
- SC 130.20c corr. (monogram); ESM – (but obv. die A42); HGC 9, 18a; NFA XXII, lot 339 (same dies); CNG 96 lot 530 (Same Dies).

For this variety, 130.20c, SC cites NFA XXII, lot 339, but the monogram is not clear in the photograph. The present coin, from the same dies as the NFA piece, clearly shows that the diagonal line in the lower left of the monogram is not present.

Seleucus I was the founder of the Seleucid dynasty. His kingdom at its highest point extended from Thrace and Asia Minor in the West to Bactria in the East and from the Black Sea in the north to the borders of Egypt in the South. Out of all of the Successors of Alexander the Great, he was the one who came closest to restoring the entirety of the Macedonian Empire. Although Seleucus had been appointed satrap of Babylonia by an assembly of Alexander’s former generals in 321 BC, Antigonos, who was made strategos of Asia at the same time sought to remove the satraps that he could not control and thereby become the new master of Alexander’s Empire. Realizing the danger, Seleucus escaped from Babylon to the Egyptian court of Ptolemy. With Ptolemy’s assistance, Seleucus was able to return to Babylon and reclaim his satrapy in 312 BC. In 306/5 he embarked upon an eastern campaign to gain control of the Upper Satrapies.

This series of tetradrachms served as a reminder of the 500 war elephants Seleukos received in settlement with Chandragupta in the Peace of 303. The treaty is celebrated on the reverse which depicts a militant Athena being pulled by four elephants equipped with horned headdresses.

Elephants were the equivalent to the tank of the ancient Greek world. The elephants of Chandragupta had a pivotal role to play in Seleucus’ reign. Thanks to their timely arrival at the Battle of Ipsos (301 BC), it was possible for Seleucus and his allies to defeat and kill Antigonos, thereby ending an ever-present threat to his security. With Antigonos gone, Seleucus could safely rule his eastern kingdom. In 281 BC Philetairos and other cities and rulers of western Asia Minor invited Seleucus to march west and destroy his sometime ally, Lysimachos, who had made himself very unpopular in the region. Seleucus acquiesced to this request, defeating and killing Lysimacus at the Battle of Korupedion. This victory gained for Seleucus all of Lysimacus’ former territory in Asia Minor and Thrace, but he was not able to savour this triumph for long. Later in the year, as he marched through Thrace, Seleucus was murdered by a refugee from the Ptolemaic court.
1 commentsNemonater
coin181.JPG
Sidon41 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. Æ Obol (23mm, 11.34 g). Sidon mint. Struck 256-249 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; double cornucopia before. Svoronos 761; Weiser 44; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, attractive black patina.

ecoli
GAE404_O~1.jpg
Syracusan Imitation Ptolemaic Diobol of Hieron II ca. 265BC169 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos - Syracuse Issue of Hieron II - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 26.9-28.4mm : 14.736gm : 2h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field, N control letter behind eagle tail at right. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 619
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
1 commentsPtolemAE
Battle_of_Actium.jpg
The Battle of Actium, by Lorenzo A. Castro, 1672.29 viewsThe Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between Mark Antony and Octavian (Caesar Augustus). It was fought on September 2, 31 BC, near the Roman colony of Actium in Greece (near the modern-day city of Preveza), on the Ionian Sea. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, Antony's fleet was supported by the fleet of his lover, Cleopatra, queen of Ptolemaic Egypt. The battle was won by the forces of Octavian, whose victory led him to be titled the Princeps Augustus, and eventually to be considered the first Roman Emperor; for this reason the date of the battle is often used to mark the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire.

Cleisthenes
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-FoVTANMmEFe7O1M-Julian_II_the_apostate.jpg
ulian II (Augustus) Coin: Bronze Double Maiorina5 viewsD N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG - Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Julian right
SECVRITAS REIPVB - Apis bull standing right, two stars above horns
Exergue:



Mint: Sirmium (361-363AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 7.95g / 28mm / 360
References:
RIC VIII 106
Acquisition/Sale: xcelatorx Ebay $0.00 7/17
Notes: Oct 13, 18 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

While the coinage of Julian is most remarkable for its depiction of the Apis bull, historians are uncertain of what the emperor actually intended to portray through this coinage. Was it an effort to link the emperor to the mysterious power of the bull common amongst the Egyptians? Was it an attempt to portray the ritual sacrifice of bulls that Julian re-instated after decades of Christian-sympathizing rule? Or was it something else, perhaps a representation of the astrological sign Taurus? The chronicler Ammianus Marcellinus is the primary source on Julian's reign and unfortunately never commented on the coinage, whilst mostly praising Julian's actions, personality, and character. [1]

More on the Apis Bull:

The Apis bull was an important sacred animal to the ancient Egyptians. As with the other sacred beasts Apis' importance increased over the centuries. During colonization of the conquered Egypt, Greek and Roman authors had much to say about Apis, the markings by which the black calf was recognized, the manner of his conception by a ray from heaven, his house at Memphis (with a court for his deportment), the mode of prognostication from his actions, his death, the mourning at his death, his costly burial, and the rejoicings throughout the country when a new Apis was found. Auguste Mariette's excavation of the Serapeum of Saqqara revealed the tombs of more than sixty animals, ranging from the time of Amenhotep III to that of the Ptolemaic dynasty. Originally, each animal was buried in a separate tomb with a chapel built above it.

According to Arrian, Apis was one of the Egyptian deities Alexander the Great propitiated by offering a sacrifice during his seizure of Ancient Egypt from the Persians. After Alexander's death, his general Ptolemy I Soter made efforts to integrate Egyptian religion with that of the new Hellenic rulers. Ptolemy's policy was to find a deity that might win the reverence of both groups, despite the curses of the Egyptian religious leaders against the deities of the previous foreign rulers (i.e. Set, lauded by the Hyksos). Without success, Alexander had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but that deity was more prominent in Upper Egypt and not for those in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. Since the Greeks had little respect for animal-headed deities, a Greek statue was created as an idol and proclaimed as an anthropomorphic equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and later was said to represent Osiris fully, rather than just his Ka.

The earliest mention of a Serapis is in the authentic death scene of Alexander, from the royal diaries. Here, Serapis has a temple at Babylon, and is of such importance that he alone is named as being consulted on behalf of the dying Alexander. The presence of this temple in Babylon radically altered perceptions of the mythologies of this era, although it has been discovered that the unconnected Babylonian deity Ea was entitled Serapsi, meaning king of the deep, and it is Serapsi who is referred to in the diaries, not Serapis. The significance of this Serapsi in the Hellenic psyche, however, due to its involvement in Alexander's death, also may have contributed to the choice of Osiris-Apis as the chief Ptolemaic deity during their occupation of Ancient Egypt.

According to Plutarch, Ptolemy stole the statue from Sinope, having been instructed in a dream by the Unknown God to bring the statue to Alexandria, where the statue was pronounced to be "Serapis" by two religious experts. Among those experts was one of the Eumolpidae, the ancient family from which the hierophant of the Eleusinian Mysteries traditionally had been chosen since before any historical records. The other expert supposedly was the scholarly Egyptian priest Manetho, which increased acceptability from both the Egyptians and the Greeks.

Plutarch may not be correct, however, as some Egyptologists assert that the Sinope in Plutarch's report is the hill of Sinopeion, a name given to the site of an existing Serapeum at Memphis. Also, according to Tacitus, Serapis (i.e. Apis explicitly identified as Osiris in full) had been the tutelary deity of the village of Rhacotis, before it suddenly expanded into the great capital of "Alexandria".

Being introduced by the Greeks, understandably, the statue depicted a fully human figure resembling Hades or Pluto, both being kings of the Greek underworld. The figure was enthroned with the modius, which is a basket or a grain-measure, on his head, a Greek symbol for the land of the dead. He also held a sceptre, indicating rulership, and Cerberus, gatekeeper of the underworld, rested at his feet. It also had what appeared to be a serpent at its base, fitting the Egyptian symbol of sovereignty, the uraeus.

With his (i.e., Osiris') wife, Isis, and their son (at this point in history) Horus (in the form of Harpocrates), Serapis won an important place in the Greek world, reaching Ancient Rome, with Anubis being identified as Cerberus. The cult survived until 385, when Christians destroyed the Serapeum of Alexandria, and subsequently, the cult was forbidden by the Edict of Thessalonica.[2]

[1] Lewis, Will. Taking the Bull by the Horns, Ancient World Magazine, March 16, 2018
[2] The Apis Bull, Wikipedia online encyclopedia
Gary W2
unattr_ptolemaic.jpg
Unattributed Ptolemaic Bronze?28 views19.9mm, 7.2g, 0°areich
GAE099_O.jpg
ZEUS324 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
4 commentsPtolemAE
GAE099_O~1.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria262 viewsAE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON control letter between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right.
REF - Svoronos 446 SNGCOP 142
2 commentsPtolemAE
GAE289_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Diobol - 246/222BC212 viewsAE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE566_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/222BC193 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/222BC
AE 33.5-34.1mm : 32.9gm : 11h
OBV - Zeus Ammon f/R
REV - Eagle with closed wings standing on thunderbolt facing left w/cornucopia at left, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 965 (Plate 29 #20) SNGCOP 173-5 Weiser 72 Sear 7817
PtolemAE
GAE505_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy IV Philopater - 221/205BC - Alexandria - Tetrobol161 viewsAE 37.2-38.1mm : 41.8gm : 12h
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head turned right over open wing, SIGMA control letter between legs, no symbol in left field
REF - Svoronos 1148 - no countermark or symbol in left field
PtolemAE
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE
Phil2AE21.jpeg
[103b] Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C.54 viewsMacedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C. Bronze AE 21, Heavy or Double Unit, SNG ANS 833, aVF, 8.40g, 21.2mm, 0o, lifetime issue. Obverse: head Apollo right, wearing tania; Reverse: FILIPPOU, young male rider right, right hand raised, E right.
Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Struck in commemoration of Philip's Olympic victory. This is one of his earliest issues in bronze.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of his Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

While Alexander was a bold and charismatic leader, he owes much of his success to his father.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Phillip2Ae.jpg
[103c] Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C.43 viewsBronze AE Unit, SNG ANS 896, SNG Cop 589, F, 5.554g, 16.8mm, 0o, Macedonian mint, c. 359 - 336 B.C.; lifetime issue. Obverse: head Apollo right wearing tania; Reverse: FILIPPOU, young male riding horse prancing to right, AI below. Ex FORVM.


Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of his Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

While Alexander was a bold and charismatic leader, he owes much of his success to his father.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Antiochos1ARTetPhiletairos.jpg
[2400c] Pergamene Kingdom: Attalid Dynasty: Philetairos: 282-- 263 B.C. 51 viewsPergamene Kingdom, Attalid Dynasty; AR Tetradrachm (17.10 gm, 29 mm), VF, Struck in Pergamon under Philetairos, in the name of Seleukos I, circa 279-274 BC. Obverse: head of Herakles right, wearing lion's skin headdress; Reverse: Zeus seated left, holding eagle and sceptre; helmeted head of Athena in left field; crescent under throne. SC 308a. Nicely toned and scarce. Ex Eukratides. Photo by Eukratides.

Philetairos first struck in the name of Lysimachos, then posthumous Alexander types under Seleukos I (such as this specimen), then Seleukos portrait types under Antiochos I, and lastly a type with his own portrait.

The Attalid dynasty was a Hellenistic dynasty that ruled the city of Pergamon after the death of Lysimachus, a general of Alexander the Great. The Attalid kingdom was the rump state left after the collapse of the Lysimachian Empire. One of Lysimachus' officers, Philetaerus, took control of the city in 282 BC. The later Attalids were descended from his father, and they expanded the city into a kingdom. Attalus I proclaimed himself King in the 230s BC, following his victories over the Galatians. The Attalids ruled Pergamon until Attalus III bequeathed the kingdom to the Roman Republic in 133 BC to avoid a likely succession crisis.

On the interior of the Pergamon Altar is a frieze depicting the life of Telephos, son of Herakles, whom the ruling Attalid dynasty associated with their city and utilized to claim descendance from the Olympians. Pergamon, having entered the Greek world much later than their counterparts to the west, could not boast the same divine heritage as older city-states, and had to retroactively cultivate their place in Greek mythos.

The Attalid Dynasty of Pergamum

Philetaerus (282 BC–263 BC)
Eumenes I (263 BC–241 BC)
Attalus I Soter (241 BC–197 BC)
Eumenes II (197 BC–158 BC)
Attalus II Philadelphus (160 BC–138 BC)
Attalus III (138 BC–133 BC)
Eumenes III Aristonicus (pretender, 133 BC–129 BC)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Attalid_dynasty


The Relationship between the Attalids and the Seleucids

September 281 A.D.: death of Seleucus I; accession of Antiochus I; Philetaerus of Pergamon buys back the corpse of Seleucus I (the father of Antiochos I and a member of the Diodochi: the period of the Diadochi is said to end with the victory of Seleucus I over Lysimachus at the battle of Corupedion in 281, fixing the boundaries of the Hellenistic world for the next century).

Antiochus I Soter (Greek Ἀντίoχoς Σωτήρ, i.e. "Saviour"; 324/​323-​262/​261 B.C.), was an emperor of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire. He reigned from 281 - 261 B.C. He was half Persian, his mother Apama being one of the eastern princesses whom Alexander the Great had given as wives to his generals in 324 B.C. In in 294 B.C., prior to death of his father Seleucus I, Antiochus married his step-mother, Stratonice, daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. His elderly father reportedly instigated the marriage after discovering that his son was in danger of dying of lovesickness.

On the assassination of his father in 281 B.C., the task of holding together the empire was a formidable one, and a revolt in Syria broke out almost immediately. Antiochus was soon compelled to make peace with his father's murderer, Ptolemy Keraunos, abandoning apparently Macedonia and Thrace. In Asia Minor he was unable to reduce Bithynia or the Persian dynasties that ruled in Cappadocia.

In 278 BC the Gauls broke into Asia Minor, and a victory that Antiochus won over these hordes is said to have been the origin of his title of Soter (Gr. for "saviour").

At the end of 275 B.C. the question of Coele-Syria, which had been open between the houses of Seleucus and Ptolemy since the partition of 301 B.C., led to hostilities (the First Syrian War). It had been continuously in Ptolemaic occupation, but the house of Seleucus maintained its claim.

About 262 B.C. Antiochus tried to break the growing power of Pergamum by force of arms, but suffered defeat near Sardis and died soon afterwards. His eldest son Seleucus, who had ruled in the east as viceroy from 275 BC(?) till 268/267 BC, was put to death in that year by his father on the charge of rebellion. He was succeeded (261 BC) by his second son Antiochus II Theos

263 A.D.: Eumenes I of Pergamon, successor of Philetaerus, declares himself independent.

262 A.D.: Antiochus defeated by Eumenes.
http://www.livius.org/am-ao/antiochus/antiochus_i_soter.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
ptolemy1soterLG.jpg
[301a] Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 283 B.C.184 viewsPTOLEMY I SOTER AR silver tetradrachm. Alexandria, 290-289 BC. Eagle standing on thunderbolt.

PTOLEMY I SOTER AR silver tetradrachm. 27mm, 13.9g. Struck at Alexandria, 290-289 BC. VF. Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right; Reverse; PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, P and PTY monogram to left. Svoronos 259, SNG Cop 72. Banker's mark and some graffito in the reverse fields. Ex Incitatus.

Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaios Soter, i.e. Ptolemy the Savior, 367 BC—283 BC) was a Macedonian general who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC—283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. In 305 BC he took the title of king.
He was the son of Arsinoe of Macedonia - either by her husband Lagus, a Macedonian nobleman, or by her lover, Philip II of Macedon (which would make him the half-brother of Alexander the Great if true). Ptolemy was one of Alexander the Great's most trusted generals, and among the seven "body-guards" attached to his person. He was a few years older than Alexander, and his intimate friend since childhood. He may even have been in the group of noble teenagers tutored by Aristotle. He was with Alexander from his first campaigns, and played a principal part in the later campaigns in Afghanistan and India. At the Susa marriage festival in 324, Alexander had him marry the Persian princess Atacama. Ptolemy also had a consort queen in Thaïs, the famous Athenian hetaera and one of Alexander's companions in his conquest of the ancient world. Thaïs became his queen in Egypt, and even after he divorced her, she reportedly remained his friend, and kept the title of queen while in Memphis.

When Alexander died in 323, Ptolemy is said to have instigated the resettlement of the empire made at Babylon. Through the Partition of Babylon, he was now appointed satrap of Egypt, under the nominal kings Philip Arrhidaeus and the infant Alexander IV; the former satrap, the Greek Cleomenes, stayed on as his deputy. Ptolemy quickly moved, without authorization, to subjugate Cyrenaica.

By custom, kings in Macedonia asserted their right to the throne by burying their predecessor. Probably because he wanted to pre-empt Perdiccas, the imperial regent, from staking his claim in this way, Ptolemy took great pains in getting his hands on the body of Alexander the Great, placing it temporarily in Memphis (a major element for The First War of The Diodochi) . Ptolemy then openly joined the coalition against Perdiccas. Perdiccas appears to have suspected Ptolemy of aiming for the throne himself, and maybe decided that Ptolemy was his most dangerous rival. Ptolemy executed Cleomenes for spying on behalf of Perdiccas — this removed the chief check on his authority, and allowed Ptolemy to obtain the huge sum that Cleomenes had accumulated.
In 321, Perdiccas invaded Egypt. Ptolemy decided to defend the Nile, and Perdiccas's attempt to force it ended in fiasco, with the loss of 2000 men. This was a fatal blow to Perdiccas' reputation, and he was murdered in his tent by two of his subordinates. Ptolemy immediately crossed the Nile, to provide supplies to what had the day before been an enemy army. Ptolemy was offered the regency in place of Perdiccas; but he declined. Ptolemy was consistent in his policy of securing a power base, while never succumbing to the temptation of risking all to succeed Alexander.

In the long wars that followed between the different Diadochi, Ptolemy's first goal was to hold Egypt securely, and his second was to secure control in the outlying areas: Cyrenaica and Cyprus, as well as Syria, including the province of Judea. His first occupation of Syria was in 318, and he established at the same time a protectorate over the petty kings of Cyprus. When Antigonus One-Eye, master of Asia in 315, showed dangerous ambitions, Ptolemy joined the coalition against him, and on the outbreak of war, evacuated Syria. In Cyprus, he fought the partisans of Antigonus, and re-conquered the island (313). A revolt in Cyrene was crushed the same year.

In 312, Ptolemy and Seleucus, the fugitive satrap of Babylonia, both invaded Syria, and defeated Demetrius Poliorcetes ("sieger of cities"), the son of Antigonus, in the Battle of Gaza. Again he occupied Syria, and again—after only a few months, when Demetrius had won a battle over his general, and Antigonus entered Syria in force—he evacuated it. In 311, a peace was concluded between the combatants. Soon after this, the surviving 13-year-old king, Alexander IV, was murdered in Macedonia, leaving the satrap of Egypt absolutely his own master. The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy personally commanded a fleet that detached the coastal towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus, then crossed into Greece, where he took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308 BC). In 306, a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother Menelaus was defeated and captured in another decisive Battle of Salamis. Ptolemy's complete loss of Cyprus followed.
The satraps Antigonus and Demetrius now each assumed the title of king; Ptolemy, as well as Cassander, Lysimachus and Seleucus I Nicator, responded by doing the same. In the winter of 306 BC, Antigonus tried to follow up his victory in Cyprus by invading Egypt; but Ptolemy was strongest there, and successfully held the frontier against him. Ptolemy led no further overseas expeditions against Antigonus. However, he did send great assistance to Rhodes when it was besieged by Demetrius (305/304),. Once rescued, the Rhodians instituted a festival to worship Ptolemy as Soter ("saviour").

It is widely accepted by modern scholars that as a result of lifting the siege of Rhodes, Ptolemy I had the name Soter ("saviour") bestowed upon him by the grateful people but this account is found only in the writings of Pausanius who has proven to be inaccurate on other points related to the Ptolomies. Rhodian inscriptions related to the cult of king Ptolemy do not mention it until the first century BC and Diodorus' writings, which are favourable to Ptolemy, do not either. The first mention of the title Soter is by Ptolemy II in 256 BC when he issued coins calling himself “King Ptolemy, son of Ptolemy Soter”. Prior to this date coins had read “King Ptolemy son of Ptolemy”. It is speculated that he used the title Soter as propaganda after a series of defeats prior to its first use.

When the coalition against Antigonus was renewed in 302, Ptolemy joined it, and invaded Syria a third time, while Antigonus was engaged with Lysimachus in Asia Minor. On hearing a report that Antigonus had won a decisive victory there, he once again evacuated Syria. But when the news came that Antigonus had been defeated and slain by Lysimachus and Seleucus at the Battle of Ipsus in 301, he occupied Syria a fourth time.

The other members of the coalition had assigned all Syria to Seleucus, after what they regarded as Ptolemy's desertion, and for the next hundred years, the question of the ownership of southern Syria (ie, Judea) produced recurring warfare between the Seleucid and Ptolemaic dynasties. Henceforth, Ptolemy seems to have mingled as little as possible in the rivalries between Asia Minor and Greece; he lost what he held in Greece, but reconquered Cyprus in 295/294. Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas.

In 285, Ptolemy abdicated in favour of one of his younger sons by Berenice - Ptolemy II Philadelphus, who had been co-regent for three years. His eldest (legitimate) son, Ptolemy Ceraunus, whose mother, Eurydice, the daughter of Antipater, had been repudiated, fled to the court of Lysimachus. Ptolemy I Soter died in 283 at the age of 84. Shrewd and cautious, he had a compact and well-ordered realm to show at the end of forty years of war. His reputation for bonhomie and liberality attached the floating soldier-class of Macedonians and Greeks to his service, and was not insignificant; nor did he wholly neglect conciliation of the natives. Ptolemy also founded the cult of Serapis, an Egyptian god who was "recreated" in such a fashion that he was acceptable to the Greeks and Macedonians. Ptolemy initiated the building of the lighthouse off the coast of Alexandria on the island of Pharos. This was to become one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

He was a ready patron of letters, founding the Great Library of Alexandria. He himself wrote a history of Alexander's campaigns that has not survived. This used to be considered an objective work, distinguished by its straightforward honesty and sobriety. However, Ptolemy may have exaggerated his own role, and had propagandist aims in writing his History. Although now lost, it was a principal source for the surviving account by Arrian of Nicomedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptolemy_I_Soter

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
2 commentsCleisthenes
Ptolemy_I_Soter.jpg
[301b] Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 305 - 283 B.C.105 viewsBronze AE 30, cf. Svoronos 271, et al., VF/F, Alexandria mint, weight 12.946g, maximum diameter 30.3mm, die axis 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse [PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS], eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, unidentifiable monogram(s) in left field; nice style Zeus. Ex FORVM.

Ptolemy I Soter (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος Σωτήρ, Ptolemaios Soter, i.e. Ptolemy the Savior, 367 BC—283 BC) was a Macedonian general who became the ruler of Egypt (323 BC—283 BC) and founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty. In 305 BC he took the title of king.
He was the son of Arsinoe of Macedonia - either by her husband Lagus, a Macedonian nobleman, or by her lover, Philip II of Macedon (which would make him the half-brother of Alexander the Great if true). Ptolemy was one of Alexander the Great's most trusted generals, and among the seven "body-guards" attached to his person. He was a few years older than Alexander, and his intimate friend since childhood. He may even have been in the group of noble teenagers tutored by Aristotle. He was with Alexander from his first campaigns, and played a principal part in the later campaigns in Afghanistan and India. At the Susa marriage festival in 324, Alexander had him marry the Persian princess Atacama. Ptolemy also had a consort queen in Thaïs, the famous Athenian hetaera and one of Alexander's companions in his conquest of the ancient world. Thaïs became his queen in Egypt, and even after he divorced her, she reportedly remained his friend, and kept the title of queen while in Memphis.

When Alexander died in 323, Ptolemy is said to have instigated the resettlement of the empire made at Babylon. Through the Partition of Babylon, he was now appointed satrap of Egypt, under the nominal kings Philip Arrhidaeus and the infant Alexander IV; the former satrap, the Greek Cleomenes, stayed on as his deputy. Ptolemy quickly moved, without authorization, to subjugate Cyrenaica.

By custom, kings in Macedonia asserted their right to the throne by burying their predecessor. Probably because he wanted to pre-empt Perdiccas, the imperial regent, from staking his claim in this way, Ptolemy took great pains in getting his hands on the body of Alexander the Great, placing it temporarily in Memphis (a major element for The First War of The Diodochi) . Ptolemy then openly joined the coalition against Perdiccas. Perdiccas appears to have suspected Ptolemy of aiming for the throne himself, and maybe decided that Ptolemy was his most dangerous rival. Ptolemy executed Cleomenes for spying on behalf of Perdiccas — this removed the chief check on his authority, and allowed Ptolemy to obtain the huge sum that Cleomenes had accumulated.
In 321, Perdiccas invaded Egypt. Ptolemy decided to defend the Nile, and Perdiccas's attempt to force it ended in fiasco, with the loss of 2000 men. This was a fatal blow to Perdiccas' reputation, and he was murdered in his tent by two of his subordinates. Ptolemy immediately crossed the Nile, to provide supplies to what had the day before been an enemy army. Ptolemy was offered the regency in place of Perdiccas; but he declined. Ptolemy was consistent in his policy of securing a power base, while never succumbing to the temptation of risking all to succeed Alexander.

In the long wars that followed between the different Diadochi, Ptolemy's first goal was to hold Egypt securely, and his second was to secure control in the outlying areas: Cyrenaica and Cyprus, as well as Syria, including the province of Judea. His first occupation of Syria was in 318, and he established at the same time a protectorate over the petty kings of Cyprus. When Antigonus One-Eye, master of Asia in 315, showed dangerous ambitions, Ptolemy joined the coalition against him, and on the outbreak of war, evacuated Syria. In Cyprus, he fought the partisans of Antigonus, and re-conquered the island (313). A revolt in Cyrene was crushed the same year.

In 312, Ptolemy and Seleucus, the fugitive satrap of Babylonia, both invaded Syria, and defeated Demetrius Poliorcetes ("sieger of cities"), the son of Antigonus, in the Battle of Gaza. Again he occupied Syria, and again—after only a few months, when Demetrius had won a battle over his general, and Antigonus entered Syria in force—he evacuated it. In 311, a peace was concluded between the combatants. Soon after this, the surviving 13-year-old king, Alexander IV, was murdered in Macedonia, leaving the satrap of Egypt absolutely his own master. The peace did not last long, and in 309 Ptolemy personally commanded a fleet that detached the coastal towns of Lycia and Caria from Antigonus, then crossed into Greece, where he took possession of Corinth, Sicyon and Megara (308 BC). In 306, a great fleet under Demetrius attacked Cyprus, and Ptolemy's brother Menelaus was defeated and captured in another decisive Battle of Salamis. Ptolemy's complete loss of Cyprus followed.
The satraps Antigonus and Demetrius now each assumed the title of king; Ptolemy, as well as Cassander, Lysimachus and Seleucus I Nicator, responded by doing the same. In the winter of 306 BC, Antigonus tried to follow up his victory in Cyprus by invading Egypt; but Ptolemy was strongest there, and successfully held the frontier against him. Ptolemy led no further overseas expeditions against Antigonus. However, he did send great assistance to Rhodes when it was besieged by Demetrius (305/304),. Once rescued, the Rhodians instituted a festival to worship Ptolemy as Soter ("saviour").

It is widely accepted by modern scholars that as a result of lifting the siege of Rhodes, Ptolemy I had the name Soter ("saviour") bestowed upon him by the grateful people but this account is found only in the writings of Pausanius who has proven to be inaccurate on other points related to the Ptolomies. Rhodian inscriptions related to the cult of king Ptolemy do not mention it until the first century BC and Diodorus' writings, which are favourable to Ptolemy, do not either. The first mention of the title Soter is by Ptolemy II in 256 BC when he issued coins calling himself “King Ptolemy, son of Ptolemy Soter”. Prior to this date coins had read “King Ptolemy son of Ptolemy”. It is speculated that he used the title Soter as propaganda after a series of defeats prior to its first use.

When the coalition against Antigonus was renewed in 302, Ptolemy joined it, and invaded Syria a third time, while Antigonus was engaged with Lysimachus in Asia Minor. On hearing a report that Antigonus had won a decisive victory there, he once again evacuated Syria. But when the news came that Antigonus had been defeated and slain by Lysimachus and Seleucus at the Battle of Ipsus in 301, he occupied Syria a fourth time.

The other members of the coalition had assigned all Syria to Seleucus, after what they regarded as Ptolemy's desertion, and for the next hundred years, the question of the ownership of southern Syria (ie, Judea) produced recurring warfare between the Seleucid and Ptolemaic dynasties. Henceforth, Ptolemy seems to have mingled as little as possible in the rivalries between Asia Minor and Greece; he lost what he held in Greece, but reconquered Cyprus in 295/294. Cyrene, after a series of rebellions, was finally subjugated about 300 and placed under his stepson Magas.

In 285, Ptolemy abdicated in favour of one of his younger sons by Berenice - Ptolemy II Philadelphus, who had been co-regent for three years. His eldest (legitimate) son, Ptolemy Ceraunus, whose mother, Eurydice, the daughter of Antipater, had been repudiated, fled to the court of Lysimachus. Ptolemy I Soter died in 283 at the age of 84. Shrewd and cautious, he had a compact and well-ordered realm to show at the end of forty years of war. His reputation for bonhomie and liberality attached the floating soldier-class of Macedonians and Greeks to his service, and was not insignificant; nor did he wholly neglect conciliation of the natives. Ptolemy also founded the cult of Serapis, an Egyptian god who was "recreated" in such a fashion that he was acceptable to the Greeks and Macedonians. Ptolemy initiated the building of the lighthouse off the coast of Alexandria on the island of Pharos. This was to become one of the seven wonders of the ancient world.

He was a ready patron of letters, founding the Great Library of Alexandria. He himself wrote a history of Alexander's campaigns that has not survived. This used to be considered an objective work, distinguished by its straightforward honesty and sobriety. However, Ptolemy may have exaggerated his own role, and had propagandist aims in writing his History. Although now lost, it was a principal source for the surviving account by Arrian of Nicomedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ptolemy_I_Soter

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
42576q00.jpg
[303a] Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 280 B.C.119 viewsSilver drachm, Houghton and Lorber 131(8), Newell ESM 91a-b (same obv die), gVF, Seleukeia mint, weight 4.239g, maximum diameter 17.1mm, die axis 270o, obverse laureate head of Zeus; reverse Athena driving quadriga of horned elephants right, anchor above, BASILEWS on left, SELEUKOU in ex; ex CNG auction 82, lot 713. Ex FORVM.

Seleukos (often spelled Seleucus) I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.

In the year 281 B.C., at the age of 77, Seleukos was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus (the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter). All of the "principal" Diadochi; Antigonas Monophthalmos, Antipater, Kassander, Ptolemy, Lysimichus and Seleukos; had now joined their great king, Alexander, in death.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
5 commentsCleisthenes
SeleukosISNGSpaer23.jpg
[303b] Seleucid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 281 B.C.82 viewsBronze AE 19, WSM 925, SNG Spaer 23, VF, Antioch mint, 7.994g, 19.2mm, 225o; Obverse: winged Gorgon head right; Reverse: BASILEWS SELEUKOU, bull butting right, X in exergue.


Seleukos I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
 
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