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Elagabalus_RIC_131.jpg
29 Elagabalus16 viewsELAGABALUS
AR Denarius. 221-222 AD

IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right right / SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, Elagabalus sacrificing right over lighted altar, star in left or right field.

RSC 246, RIC 131, Sear 7542
Sosius
Elagabalus_RIC_146.jpg
6 Elagabalus17 viewsELAGABALUS
AR Denarius. 221-222 AD

IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned and draped bust right / SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left.

RSC 276, RIC 146, Sear 7549
Sosius
00002x00~4.jpg
26 viewsIONIA, Ephesos. Marchos, grammateus of the Boule.
PB Tessera (18mm, 8.88 g)
MAR ΓP BOV, composite head of Silenos facing right and young horned Pan facing left; c/m: bird (stork?) standing right
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç –; Vossen 42 (this coin)

Ex Tom Vossen Collection, 42; Münzzentrum Rheinland 161 (11 January 2012), lot 315; Münzzentrum Rheinland 159 (4 May 2011), lot 357
Ardatirion
postume-salvs-prov.JPG
RIC.87 Postumus: antoninianus (Salvs Provinciarvm)10 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Salvs Provinciarvm (1st emission, 2ond phase, 260-261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.23 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 1h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SALVS PROVINCIARVM; the horned Rhine god recumbent left, right hand on vessel and left hand holding a scepter or a reed

EG.9
Droger
egal_horned.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS40 views218 - 222 AD
Struck 221 AD
AR Denarius 18.5 mm 1.73 g
"YEAR 4 SACRIFICE"
O: UNO ABTIBUBVS OUVS AVG
HORNED LAUR DR BUST R
R: PM TR P IIII COS III P P
EMPEROR STANDING L SACRIFICING OVER ALTAR, STAR TO LEFT
laney
206Hadrian__Starck445b.jpg
0012 Cyrenaica and Crete, Cyrenaica Hadrian 125-28 AD Jupiter Ammon 28 viewsReference.
RPC III, 012; RIC -; C 278; BMC -; Strack 445b; Sydenham 289; Lindgren 947

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
Laureate head right.

Rev. COS III
horned head of Jupiter Ammon, right

2.66 gr
17 mm
6h
okidoki
RI 071u img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 04067 viewsObv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, Elagabalus standing right, holding club and patera over lit altar; star in field right
References:– RIC 131

I believe that this is the only coin to contain the title "ELAGAB" which is how we know this emperor today. A nicely struck example with plenty of detail.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_071ag_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus Denarius - RIC 04924 viewsObv:- IMP ANTONINVS - PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, cuirassed and draped bust right
Rev:- P M TR P IIII COS - III P P, emperor standing l., sacrificing out of patera over altar and holding club on left, star to right, two standards to right.
Reference:- RIC 49. RSC 205.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_071af_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 08828 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing holding a patera over an altar and a club. Star in left field. Bull behind the altar
Minted in Rome. A.D. 220-222
Reference– BMC 209-210. RIC 88. RSC III 61
maridvnvm
RI_071ab_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 14621 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half-left, sacraficing over a patera over an altar and holds a branch. Star in left field
Minted in Rome. A.D. 222 onwards
Reference– BMC 232. RIC 146. RSC III 276.

Remanants of star in right field. The die having been re-engraved to place the star correctly in front of the emperor.
maridvnvm
RI_071ac_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 17727 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Elagabalus standing holding a patera over an altar and a branch. Star in left field
Minted in Rome. A.D. 221
Reference– BMC 339. RIC 177. RSC III 196

Remanants of star in right field. The die having been re-engraved to place the star correctly in front of the emperor.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_071ae_img.jpg
071 - Elagabalus denarius - RIC 8736 viewsElagabalus Denarius
Obv:– IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing holding patera over an altar and branch. Star in right field. Horn on ground to his left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 222
Reference– BMC 209 note. RIC 87 (where it is rated Common citing Cohen). RSC III 58. Cohen 58 (illustrated with star in right field) valued at 50 Fr. No examples in RD.
ex Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG Sale 42, Lot 379, 20th November 2007, ex Barry Feirstein Collection, previously privately purchased from Harlan J. Berk.
Described as Lightly toned and good extremely fine by NAC.
21 mm. 3.11 gms. 0 degrees.

The coin would certainly seem to be scarcer than the "Common" rating given in RIC would imply. No examples in RD, only one example on acsearch (this coin). No examples on Wildwinds (the RIC 87 there would appear to be in error).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
IMG_9261.JPG
1. Seleukos I Nikator 17 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Seleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. Æ Seleukeia II mint. Horned horse head right / Anchor; monogram to right. SC 145.

Seleukos fled from Antigonus the one-eyed in Babylonia on horseback. He credited this animal with saving his life. He then deified the animal on his coinage and in other cult shrines.

He eventually made it to Egypt where Ptolemy sheltered him for a while until he could regroup and begin to definitively establish what would become the Seleucid empire.
ecoli
ElagabDenEleg.jpg
1bz Elagabalus_217 views218-222

Denarius

Laureate, horned & draped bust rightt, IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left, SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG

RIC 146

The Historia Augusta, in the life of Caracalla, notes: Bassianus lived for forty-three years and ruled for six. . . . He left a son, who afterward received, like his father, the name Antoninus Marcus Antoninus Elagabalus; for such a hold had the name of the Antonines that it could not be removed from the thoughts of the people, because it had taken root in the hearts of all, even as had the name of Augustus.

In the life of Macrinus is recorded: Now there was a certain woman of the city of Emesa, called [Julia] Maesa or Varia; she was the sister of Julia, the wife of [Septimius] Severus Pertinax the African, and after the death of Antoninus Bassianus she had been expelled from her home in the palace through the arrogance of Macrinus. . . . This woman had two daughters, [Julia Soaemias] and [Julia] Mamaea, the elder of whom was the mother of Elagabalus; he assumed the names Bassianus and Antoninus, for the Phoenicians give the name Elagabalus to the Sun. Elagabalus, moreover, was notable for his beauty and stature and for the priesthood which he held, and he was well known to all who frequented the temple, and particularly to the soldiers. To these, Maesa, or Varia as she was also called, declared that this Bassianus was the son of Antoninus, and this was gradually made known to all the soldiers. Maesa herself, furthermore, was very rich (whence also Elagabalus was most wasteful of money), and through her promises to the soldiers the legions were persuaded to desert Macrinus. . . .

Finally, when he received the imperial power, he took the name Antoninus and was the last of the Antonines to rule the Roman Empire. . . . He was wholly under the control of his mother [Soaemias], so much so, in fact, that he did no public business without her consent, although she lived like a harlot and practised all manner of lewdness in the palace. For that matter, her amour with Antoninus Caracalla was so notorious that Varius, or rather Elagabalus, was commonly supposed to be his son. . . . In short, when Elagabalus' message was read in the senate, at once good wishes were uttered for Antoninus and curses on Macrinus and his son, and, in accordance with the general wish and the eager belief of all in his paternity, Antoninus was hailed as emperor. . . .

After he had spent the winter in Nicomedia, [218-219] living in a depraved manner and indulging in unnatural vice with men, the soldiers soon began to regret that they had conspired against Macrinus to make this man emperor, and they turned their thoughts toward his cousin Alexander, who on the murder of Macrinus had been hailed by the senate as Caesar. . . . Among the base actions of his life of depravity he gave orders that Alexander, whom he had formally adopted, be removed from his presence, saying that he regretted the adoption. Then he commanded the senate to take away from Alexander the name of Caesar. But when this was announced to the senate, there was a profound silence. For Alexander was an excellent youth, as was afterwards shown by the character of his rule, even though, because he was chaste, he was displeasing to his adoptive father he was also, as some declare, his cousin. Besides, he was loved by the soldiers and acceptable to the senate and the equestrian order. Yet the Emperor's madness went the length of an attempt to carry out the basest design; for he despatched assassins to kill Alexander. . . . The soldiers, however, and particularly the members of the guard, either because they knew what evils were in store for Elagabalus, or because they foresaw his hatred for themselves, formed a conspiracy to set the state free. First they attacked the accomplices in his plan of murdering Alexander. . . . Next they fell upon Elagabalus himself and slew him in a latrine in which he had taken refuge.
Blindado
coin230.JPG
204. Elagabalus29 viewsElagabalus was and is one of the most controversial Roman emperors. During his reign he showed a disregard for Roman religious traditions and sexual taboos. Elagabalus' name is a Latinized form of the Semitic deity El-Gabal, a manifestation of the Semitic deity Ēl. He replaced Jupiter, head of the Roman pantheon, with a new god, Deus Sol Invictus, which in Latin means "the Sun, God Unconquered". Elagabalus forced leading members of Rome's government to participate in religious rites celebrating Sol invictus which he personally led.

He also took a Vestal Virgin as one of a succession of wives and openly boasted that his sexual interest in men was more than just a casual pastime, as it had been for previous emperors.

Elagabalus developed a reputation among his contemporaries for eccentricity, decadence, and zealotry which was likely exaggerated by his successors. This black propaganda was passed on and as such he was one of the most reviled Roman emperors to early Christian historians and later became a hero to the Decadent movement of the late 19th century.

Elagabalus Denarius. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, horned, laureate, and draped bust right / PM TR P IIII COS III P P, Elagabalus standing left sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar & holding branch, star left. RIC 46, RSC 196
ecoli
rjb_elag1_05_06.jpg
218a29 viewsElagabalus 218-222 AD
AR denarius
Obv "IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG"
Horned, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG"
Elagabalus standing left sacrificing at altar
Rome mint
RIC 146
mauseus
rjb_2016_11_11.jpg
2519 viewsHerennius Etruscus 251AD
AE 26mm
Tarsos in Cilicia
Obv: K VIN EPENNIO ETPOVC ΔΕΚION KE
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: TAPCOV MHTPOΠΟΛΕΩC
Pyramidal monument for Sandan over base decorated by horned animal heads (oxen?) and covered by a round canopy supported by two figures wearing large mantle and Phrygian helmet; above eagle.
SNG France 1781, SNG Righetti 1706
mauseus
1335_P_Hadrian_RPC6266.jpg
3266 CILICIA, Tarsus Hadrian Tridrachm Sandan standing25 viewsReference.
RPC III 3266; Prieur 767; SNG BN 1407-9.

Issue Second group

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΤΡΑ ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕ.
Laureate head of Hadrian, r. with drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. ΤΑΡϹΕΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩϹ.
Sandan, wearing tall headdress and long cloak, standing, r., on horned lion; he wears on his l. side bow-case and sword crossing the bow-case; his r. hand is raised and he holds bipennis and wreath in l.

10.20 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
Sandan was a Hittite High God, and like all the High Gods, his feet were believed never to touch the earth. Riding on the back of a powerful mythical animal, as Sandan does here with a horned lion, was an often-used means of transportation for these Gods. Sandan's appearance on a 2nd Century AD Cilician coin shows the lasting impact of the Hittite occupation of Cilicia, which occurred 18 centuries before this coin was struck.
1 commentsokidoki
941_P_Hadrian_RPC3267.jpg
3267 CILICIA, Tarsus Hadrian Tridrachm Sandan standing68 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3267; Levante 996; Prieur 768

Issue Second group

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΘΕ ΤΡΑ ΠΑΡ ΥΙ ΘΕ ΝΕΡ ΥΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ ϹΕ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r. with balteus and drapery on l. shoulder.

Rev. ΤΑΡϹΕΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩϹ
Sandan, wearing tall headdress and long cloak, standing, r., on horned lion; he wears on his l. side bow-case and sword crossing the bow-case; his r. hand is raised and he holds bipennis and wreath in left.

9.94 gr
26 mm
12h

Note.
Sandan (or Sandon or Sandas) was an ancient Anatolian god associated with both war and the weather, and was known in the area of Tarsos from Hittite times (the second half of the 2nd millenium BC). The figure of Sandan on a lion first appears on the coinage of Tarsus in the 2nd century BC, but it was certainly much older. The shrine to Sandan in Tarsus existed at least until the 3rd century AD
6 commentsokidoki
151_P_Hadrian__Emmett_866_r5.jpg
5206 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 119-20 AD Isis18 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5206; Emmett 866.4; Dattari 1396; Kampmann & Ganschow 32.116.;Köln--; Milne 937

Issue L Δ = year 4

Obv. AΥT KAI TΡAI AΔΡIA CEB
Laureate bust r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. L-Δ
Draped bust of Isis right with Isiscrown, wearing her horned solar crown.

12.87 gr
23 mm
12 h.
okidoki
810_P_Hadrian_Emmett866_06.JPG
5440 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Tetradrachm 123-24 AD Isis18 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5440; Emmett 866.8; Dattari 1398 ; Köln 855

Issue L H = year 8

Obv. AΥT KAI TΡAI AΔΡIA CEB
Laureate head of Hadrian right, wearing aegis

Rev. L-H
Draped bust of Isis right with Isiscrown, wearing her horned solar crown

12.11 gr
22 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
310_P_Hadrian_Emmett1196_.jpg
5701 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Dichalkon 126-27 AD Pan left holding pedum/lagobalon18 viewsReference.
Emmett 1196.11; Milne 1238; Köln 972; RPC III, 5701

Issue L ΙΑ = year 11

Obv. no legend.
Laureate head right.

Rev. LI-A (Year 11)
Pan, advancing left holding pedum/lagobalon

2.03 gr
14 mm

Note.
There are two sub-varieties: Pan with pedum (e.g. BMC 700-701, 2879) and Pan of Mendes with club and pedum (BMC 702, 2878).

Half man and half goat, a spritely horned Pan holds one of his usual attributes in his upraised right hand – a throwing stick or lagobolon used for hunting rabbits, one of the god’s favorite animals. In his left hand he carries a small bag, perhaps to secure the quarry. Pan is known for his prowess in hunting smaller rather than larger game, the pursuit of which was presided over by Artemis as ultimate goddess of the hunt.
okidoki
754_P_Hadrian_Emmett1196.JPG
5701 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Dichalkon 126-27 AD Pan of Mendes with club and pedum 15 viewsReference.
Emmett 1196.11; RPC III, 5701; (BMC 702, 2878 Club ); Köln 973

Issue L ΙΑ = year 11

Obv. no legend.
Laureate head right.

Rev. LI-A (Year 11)
Pan of Mendes with club and pedum

2.1 gr
15 mm
12h

Note.
There are two sub-varieties: Pan with pedum (e.g. BMC 700-701, 2879) and Pan of Mendes with club and pedum (BMC 702, 2878).

Half man and half goat, a spritely horned Pan holds one of his usual attributes in his upraised right hand – a throwing stick or lagobolon used for hunting rabbits, one of the god’s favorite animals. In his left hand he carries a small bag, perhaps to secure the quarry. Pan is known for his prowess in hunting smaller rather than larger game, the pursuit of which was presided over by Artemis as ultimate goddess of the hunt.
okidoki
Lg007_quad_sm.jpg
AE provincial, Saitta, Lydia (Sidas Kaleh, Turkey), Senate/River-God (mid-2nd to early 3d century AD) 5 viewsIЄΡA - [CYNKΛHTOC], bare-headed youthful draped bust of Senate right / CAIT[THNΩN] + [ЄPMOC] in exergue, River-God Hermos reclining left, holding reed and cornucopiae, resting arm on urn (hydria) from which waters flow.

Ӕ (base metal yellow, orichalcum?), 22 mm, 5.68 g, die axis 6.5h (coin alignment)

It is difficult to read the name of the river. I think that ЄPMOC is more likely, but VΛΛΟС is also possible, representing the other important local river, Hyllos.

Possible catalog references are BMC Lydia 25 (or 26-27?), SNG Copenhagen 398, SNG München 439.
For the Hyllos reverse, Leypold 1153.

To emphasize the autonomy of certain Hellenistic polises, even under the Roman rule they sometimes used allegorical figures of Senate or Demos on obverses of their coins instead of imperial portraits. Saitta was issuing similar-looking coins with busts of emperors and their family as well, but in this issue the town Senate is honoured as the ruler. IЄΡA CYNKΛHTOC = Holy Senate. CAITTHNΩN = Saitta, ЄPMOC = Hermos, the name of the river and its god.

River-Gods or Potamoi (Ποταμοί) were the gods of the rivers and streams of the earth, all sons of the great earth-encirling river Okeanos (Oceanus) and his wife Tethys. Their sisters were the Okeanides (Oceanids), goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and their daughters were the Naiades, nymphs of springs and fountains. A River-God was depicted in one of three forms: as a man-headed bull; a bull-horned man with the tail of a serpentine-fish in place of legs; or as a reclining man with an arm resting upon a pitcher pouring water, which we see in this case. The addition of cornucopia symbolizes the blessings that a particular river bestows on those who live near it.

Saitta or Saittae (Σαίτται, Ptolemy 5.2.21: Σέτται, Σάετται) was a polis in eastern Lydia (aka Maeonia), in the rivers' triangle between the upper Hyllus (modern Demirci Çayı, c. 12 km to the west) and the Hermus or Hermos (modern Gediz Nehri, c. 20 km to the south). In Roman imperial times it belonged to the "conventus" of Sardis in the Roman province of Asia (conventus was a territorial unit of a Roman province, mostly for judicial purposes).

Now its ruins are known now as Sidas Kaleh or Sidaskale in Turkey, near the village of İçikler (İcikler Mahallesi, 45900 Demirci/Manisa). They were never excavated, so are little known or cared for. Ruins of a stadium and a theatre survive, together with remains of some temples and tombs.

Not much is known about it. It was a regional centre for the production of textiles. In 124 AD the town was probably visited by emperor Hadrianus. During the Roman period the cult of the moon god Mēn Axiottenus was very popular in the city. Because of its reference to "angels" (both literally as the Greek word and by their function as god's messengers) it was possibly close to the more general Asia Minor cult of Theos Hypsistos, Θεος ὕψιστος, "the highest god" (200 BC – 400 AD), which in turn was perhaps related to the gentile following of the Second Temple in Jerusalem.

Known Roman provincial coins issued by this city feature portraits of emperors from Hadrian to Gallienus, thus covering the period from 117 to 268 AD, with the peak around the Severan dynasty. The semi-autonomous issues are usually dated from mid-2nd to mid-3d century AD.

Later Saittae was the seat of a Byzantine bishopric. Bishop Limenius signed the Chalcedon Creed, while Bishop Amachius spoke at the Council of Chalcedon. Although an Islamic area now, Saittae remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.
Yurii P
Aeolis_Larissa_1.PNG
Aeolis, Larissa Phrikonis7 viewsAeolis, Larissa Phrikonis Circa 4th Century B.C.

Obverse: Horned, three-quarter facing female head, turned slightly right, wearing necklace

Reverse: bull's head right

9mm
Macedonian Warrior
Aeolis_Larissa_2.PNG
Aeolis, Larissa Phrikonis Circa 4th Century B.C6 viewsAeolis, Larissa Phrikonis Circa 4th Century B.C.

Obverse: Horned, three-quarter facing female head, turned slightly right, wearing necklace

Reverse:bull's head right

9mm
Macedonian Warrior
aeolis1OR.jpg
Aeolis, Larissa Phrikonis,103 viewsAeolis, Larissa Phrikonis, Circa 4th Century B.C. AE, 9mm 0.85g, Weber 5563
O: Horned, three-quarter facing female head, turned slightly right, wearing necklace
R: ΛA, bull's head right
2 commentscasata137ec
aiolis_larissa_phrikonis.jpg
AIOLIS, LARISSA PHRIKONIS75 views4TH CENTURY BC
AE 10 mm 1.16 g
O: HEAD OF HORNED NYMPH, FACING, SLIGHTLY R
R: FOREPART OF BULL, HEAD TURNED FACING SLIGHTLY R, "LA" ABOVE
Very rare
1 commentslaney
aiol_lar_phrik_res_2.jpg
AIOLIS, LARISSA PHRIKONIS50 views4th century BC.
Æ 10.5 mm 1.16 g
O: Horned female river-god facing slightly right
R: Laureate head of Apollo right.
SNG München 565; SNG Copenhagen 212
Extremely rare
1 commentslaney
BOTH_GONATAS.jpg
Antigonas 11 Gonatas Tetradrachm c 270 / 239 BC6 viewsObv: Head of horned Pan left, wearing goat skin, lagobolon over shoulder, within double solid circle on Macedonian shield decorated with 7 stars with 8 rays within double crescents.
Rev: Ins: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ Athena Alkidemos advancing left, holding shield with Gorgoneion head and hurling thunderbolt. Helmet inner left, Rare MTY monogram inner right
Amphipolis Mint 17.10gm 30.5 mm
cicerokid
Macedon_AntigonosGonatas_SNG-Berry_359o+350r_gf.jpg
Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Amphipolis7 viewsMacedon, Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.11 gm) Amphipolis, Struck after 271/0 BC. Macedonian shield w/ horned head of Pan l. & lagoblon; shield with stars in double crescents. / Athena Alkidemos advancing l. brandishing thunderbolt and holding shield. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ. Crested helmet to l. & HΛ monogram to r.  VF.  SNG Berry 350-352 with obv. die link to 359 (same obv. die); ACNCAC Dewing 1203; AMNG III 3; HGC 3.1 #1042; SNG Alpha Bank 986; Mathiesen ANSMN 26 [1981] plate 21 #36); SNG Cop 2 #1199-1202; SNG Munich 1077-1078; Touratsoglou pg. 94, 25. Anaximander
Macedon_AntigonosGonatas_SNG-Berry_357o+350r_gf.jpg
Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Amphipolis8 viewsMacedon, Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.81 gm) of Amphipolis, Struck after 271/0 BC. Macedonian shield w/ horned head of Pan l. & lagoblon; shield with stars in double crescents. / Athena Alkidemos advancing l. brandishing thunderbolt and holding shield. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ. Crested helmet to l. & HΛ monogram to r.  VF.  CNG EA101 #24. SNG Berry 350-352 with obv. die link to 357-358 (same obv. die); ACNAC Dewing 1203; AMNG III/2 p. 186 #3; Mathisen ANSMN 26 plate 21 #36; HGC 3.1 #1042; SNG Alpha Bank 986-987; SNG Cop 2 #1199-1202; SNG Munich 1077-1078; Touratsoglou p.94 #25. Anaximander
Macedon_AntigonosGonatas_SNG-Cop_1198_gf.jpg
Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Amphipolis 9 viewsMacedon, Antigonos II Gonatas. 277-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm (17.03 gm) of Amphipolis 274-255 BC. Macedonian shield w/ horned head of Pan l. & lagoblon at center and stars in double crescents. / Athena Alkidemos advancing r. brandishing thunderbolt & holding shield decorated w/ aegis. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΓΟΝΟΥ. Kalanthos to l. & AV monogram to r.  gVF.  CNG 63 #207. "Exceptional for issue. Very rare with the right-facing Athena , only 14 specimens recorded by Mathisen!" HGC 3.1 #1043; Mathisen ANSMN 26 [1981] plate 22 #39 = SNG Cop 2 #1198 (same dies); SNG Alpha Bank -; SNG Ashmolean 3257 (same dies); SNG Berry -.
Mathisen contends that the fighting Athena was a traditional symbol of Pyrrhos, Antigonos' vanquished enemy, and Pan symbolizes Antigonos' victory over the Gauls, whose invasions had terrorized Macedon and Thrace for decades.
Anaximander
Antiochus_I~5.jpg
Antiochus I Soter 281 - 261 B.C.21 viewsAntiochus I Soter, 281 - 261 B.C. Ae 18.2mm. 5.96g. Antioch on the Orontes mint. Obv: Macedonian shield with anchor in central tondo. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, horned elephant r., dotted border. Controls: M(arc dot)E and club (upper field), jawbone in ex. SC 339.4ddwau
Antiochus_III~6.jpg
Antiochus III 223 - 187 B.C.13 viewsAntiochus III, 223 - 187 B.C. Ae 25.6~26.1mm., 18.20g. Susiana mint. Obv: Horned and diademed bust of Antiochus 3/4 r.; dotted border. Rev: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ, Apollo standing l., holding arrow and bow. Monograms left and right, dotted border. Houghton 1049.ddwau
arkadianleagueOR.jpg
Arkadia, Megalopolis, BMC Peloponnesus pg 174, 62-6349 viewsArkadia, Megalopolis mint, Arkadian League Trichalkon, c. 330-275 B.C. AE, 19mm 6.04g, BCD Peloponnesus (Megalopolis) 1533, BMC Peloponnesus pg 174, 62-63
O: Horned head of Pan r.
R: Large APk monogram of solid form; A to left, syrinx below
4 commentscasata137ec
x1__Arkadia_Pan.jpg
Arkadian League; 280-234 BC29 viewsAR-Hemidrachm
Obv: Laureate head of Zeus left.
Rev: Naked Pan, horned, seated left on rock, right hand outstretched,
Left arm cradling lagobolon.
to left at knee, eagle with wings spread; Α below; to right, ∆ above Λ.
Size: 16.28mm;2.4 gms
Ref: BMC Peloponnesus, vol.10,XXXIII. Arcadia,Pg 188,No.1-5 var.
Sear-2690
2 commentsBrian L
Tarsos_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Tarsos - Tyche, Sandan, Pyramid21 viewsKilikia, Tarsos
Æ 26, 164-27 BC
Obv: Turreted bust of Tyche right
Rev: TAPΣEΩN, Sandan standing right on horned, winged animal, within a pyramidal monument surmounted by an eagle; to left monograms.
Æ, 26.4mm, 18.3g
SNG Levante 961
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 44, Lot 485
1 commentsshanxi
Baktria_Amyntas_SNG-ANS1243.jpg
Baktria, Amyntas18 viewsAmyntas. 80-65 BC. AR Drachm (2.47 gm). Diademed & draped bust of king r. wearing horned Boiotian helmet ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΑMYΝΤΟΥ. / Radiate Zeus-Mithras enthroned 3/4 l. holding scepter & palm branch, Athena (or Nike) on outstretched arm. Karosthi legend Maharajasa jayadharasa Amitasa (of Great King Amyntas the Victory-bearer). EF. SNG ANS 9 #1243; Bopearachchi Série 6A; Mitchener 3 #389; HGC 12 #418 R3; Sear Greek 7716.Christian T
BCC_LT70_Crab_Animal_.jpg
BCC LT7014 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Roman 1st-4th Century CE
Obv: Horned animal (humpbacked
bull?), or bust? (rotated right 90 deg.)
Rev: Crab? in incuse circle, broken or
partially off-flan.
9 x 7.5 x 1.5mm. Weight: 0.47gm.
Axis:330? cf. Hamburger #21
and #22 (obv), and BCC LT47 (obv).
v-drome
BeFunky-collage_(21).jpg
Caabria Tarentum AR Stater circa 280-272 BC 19 mm 6.42g 35 viewsNaked boy-rider crowning stationary horse right and lifting up fore-leg./Taras seated sideways on dolphin to left,holding out a horned helmet.On either side a twelve - rayed star.Evans the horsemen of Tarentum plate VIII no 6 Pyrrhic Hegemony this type of coin was used to pay Pyrrhus and his army of 20.000 solders in his war against Rome. For a general so renowned in antiquity Hannibal apocryphally,ranked him second behind Alexander.1 commentsGrant H
Caesar_elephant.jpg
Caesar elephant denarius78 viewsCAESAR in exergue, elephant advancing right, trampling horned serpent.

Pontifical implements: simpulum, sprinkler, axe and priest's hat.

49-48 BC. Military mint traveling with Caesar.

3.87g

Crawford 443/1; HCRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49.

Wonderfully struck but was probably bent and straightened at some point

Ex-RCNA coin show; Ex: Charles Euston

Sold Forum Auction Oct 2018
6 commentsJay GT4
IMAG1220_1.jpg
Caesarea Maritima mint HERENNIUS ETRUSCUS 250-251 A.D35 viewsHERENNIUS ETRUSCUS 250-251 A.D
Caesarea Maritima mint AE28
OBV:HERENNIUS ETRUSCUS Caesarea Maritima mint AE27
REV:horned altar behind two trees a palm tree and a fig tree on R
COLPFAVFC CAESMETROPO
Maritima
Caracalla_Iulia_Domna_Makrianopolis_Varbanov_1049.jpg
Caracalla Markianopolis32 viewsAE 29 (13,28g)
obv. ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝOC ΑVΓOVCΤΟC ΙΟVΑ[ΙΑ ΔΟM]NA
Laureate bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left
rev. VΠ ΚVΝΤΙΛΙΑΝΟV ΜΑΡΚΙΑΝΟΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ
Tetrastyle temple with horned roof containing statue of Serapis standing left with right hand raised. Pellet in pediment. E in left field
Varbanov 1049
HG
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Celtic Gaul, Sequani Tribe, Potin 'Grosse tête' type.1 viewsBesançon 70-40 B.C. 4.89g - 22.3mm, Axis 3h.

Obv: Celticized head with double-headband to left.

Rev: Horned animal with S-shaped tail advancing left.

DT 3090; Allen BM, 311-312.
Christian Scarlioli
Tarsosandan.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos Æ21 Pyre of Sandan102 viewsCilicia, Tarsos. After 164 BC. Æ 21mm. Draped, veiled & turreted bust of Tyche right / TARSEWN, Sandan standing right on horned, winged animal, within a pyramidal monument surmounted by an eagle; monograms left.1 commentsancientone
tarsos_GIC5672.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, civic-issue ANG BN 1333-133434 viewsAE 21, 6.54g
struck 1st century BC
obv. Bust of the city-goddess (Tyche), veiled and turreted, r.,
on the face c/m in the shape of a male radiate head (Helios?) in circular incus.
rev. Pyre of Sandan in pyramidal shape, crowned by an eagle with spread wings, stg. r. on a small round base; within cult statue of Sandan wearing polos and holding double axe, stg. r. on a winged and horned lion, r. hand raised; besides l. and r. a baetylus; altogether on a round base decorated with garlandes.
in the r. field from top TAR[C]EWN
in the l. field from top AR / AR / DI / Q
Ref.: SNG BN 1333-1334; Sear GIC 5672
about VF, slight roughness

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
Jochen
sandanOR.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, SNG France 1345 (var.)25 viewsCilicia, Tarsos mint, c. 2nd-1st century B.C. AE, 20mm 6.9g, SNG France 1345 (var.)
O: Draped & turreted bust of Tyche r.
R: TAPΣEΩN to right, Sandan standing on horned lion right, holding branch, bow over shoulder, monograms to left
casata137ec
Tarsosandan2.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. AE22. Sandan on horned lion18 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, Æ22. 2nd-1st century BC. Draped & turreted bust of Tyche right / TARSEWN to right, Sandan standing on horned lion right.ancientone
tarsus_res.jpg
CILICIA, TARSUS55 views2nd - 1st CENTURY BC
AE 21 mm 5.83 g
O: TURRETED BUST OF TYCHE
R: SANDAN, WITH BOW OVER SHOULDER AND HOLDING BRANCH, STANDING ON HORNED LION
CILICIA, TARSUS
SG 5670






laney
tyche_sandan_tarsos_res.jpg
CILICIA, TARSUS39 views2nd - 1st CENTURY BC
AE 16.5 mm 3.99 g
O: TURRETED BUST OF TYCHE
R: SANDAN STANDING R ON HORNED LION-LIKE CREATURE
CILICIA, TARSUS

laney
sandan_lion_2bk.jpg
CILICIA, TARSUS23 views2nd - 1st CENTURY BC
AE 16.5 mm 3.99 g
O: TURRETED BUST OF TYCHE, RIGHT
R: SANDAN STANDING R ON HORNED LION-LIKE CREATURE
CILICIA, TARSUS
laney
sandan_lion_1.jpg
CILICIA, TARSUS34 views2nd - 1st CENTURY BC
AE 21 mm 5.83 g
O: TURRETED AND VEILED BUST OF TYCHE, RIGHT
R: SANDAN, WITH BOW OVER SHOULDER AND HOLDING BRANCH, STANDING ON HORNED LION
CILICIA, TARSUS
SG 5670
1 commentslaney
Clavdivs II consacratio.jpg
Claudius II CONSACRATIO221 viewsAntoninianus 21-23mm 3.59g 270 AD
OBV::DIVO CLAVDIO. Radiated head right with 1 pellet under head
REV::CONSACRATIO. Flaming altar with horned roof. 4 panels on altar each with single pellet
Cyzicus Mint
LaVenera Volume I (10924) ....( single coin listed )
Göbl 288a1 ( 15 specimen listed )

purchased 12/08/2007
1 commentsJohnny
DSCN6934.JPG
Claudius II, AE Antoninianus, 22mm6 viewsClaudius II, AE Antoninianus,

Obv. DIVO CLAVDIO, radiate head right
Rev. CONSACRATIO, Flaming altar with horned roof. 4 panels on altar, dot in each panel.
Lee S
cleoIII.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Paphos, 30,7 mm, diobol13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, c. 116 - 104 B.C. Bronze diobol, Paphos II #315, Svoronos -, Poor/Fair, Paphos mint, 17.088g, 30.7mm, 0o; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU”?, two eagles standing left, star and “S” before; weak strike, rough; very rare. The flan is typical for the Paphos Mint. The two eagles indicates two rulers on the throne. The weight is double the more common c. 8.5 grams obol of this period. ex FORVM

Podiceps
cleo___poika.jpg
Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, Paphos19 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, 44 - 30 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1842 (Ptolemy XII), F, Paphos mint, 5.575g, 24.4mm, 0o, 44 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, headdress of Isis before; rough. The two eagles on the reverse symbolize harmony between the two rulers, in this case the mother and son, Cleopatra VII and Caesarion. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
unkgreekOR.jpg
Cyclades, Syros mint, BMC Crete pg. 123, 1 var. (no wreath)45 viewsCyclades, Syros mint, 3rd Century B.C. AE, 17mm 3.32g, SNG Copenhagen -; BMC Crete pg. 123, 1 var. (no
wreath); Laffaille 404 var. (same); Weber 4719 var. (same), (SG) Number sg3152
O: Horned and bearded head of Pan right
R: ΣVPI, bearded goat standing left; grain ear before, wreath(?) below
casata137ec
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Cyrenaica Cyrene AR Didrachm 300-290 BC 7.73g38 viewsHorned head of Carneius.Rev Silphlum plant.1 commentsGrant H
Macedon_DemPoliorketes_Newell_DP90_gf.jpg
Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm of Pella3 viewsMacedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes. 306-285 BC. AR Tetradrachm (16.78 gm) of Pella. Diademed and horned bust r. / Poseiden Pelagaios stdg l., r. foot on rock, holding trident. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ. Monograms EYP to l., HP to r.  aVF.   Newell DP Series VI #90 (obv. die LXXXI, plate VIII #10); HGC 3.1 #1014a; SNG Cop 2 #1179. Anaximander
demetrios_poliorketes.jpg
Demetrios Poliorketes32 viewsDiademed and horned head right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY, Poseidon Pelagaios standing left, right foot on rock, holding trident; monograms to inner left and inner right. 28mm. 17.11g.
Newell 116
Chance Vandal
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Denarius; "Horned", SACER D DEI SOLIS ELAGAB13 viewsElagabalus Denarius, Obv: M ANTONINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, horned and draped. Rev: SACER D DEI SOLIS ELAGAB - Elagabalus standing right, holding club and patera over lit altar; a star in right field. Rome mint: AD 221-222 = RIC IVii, 131, page 37 - Cohen 246 – SEAR RCV II (2002), 7542Podiceps
elagabal_ric88.jpg
Denarius; INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, RIC 885 viewsElagabalus Denarius. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right / INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar. RIC 88, RSC 61, BMC 212, Sear RCV II: 7518.Podiceps
elagabal_SVMMVS_SACERDOS.jpg
Denarius; SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG; RIC 1466 viewsElagabalus, 218-222 A.D. Denarius. 221-222 A.D. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned & draped bust right / SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left. RIC 146. RSC 276. Sear RCV 7549Podiceps
D251.jpg
Domitian RIC-25183 viewsÆ Quadrans, 3.32g
Rome Mint, 84-85 AD
Obv: (No legend) Rhinoceros stg. l.
Rev: IMP DOMIT AVG GERM; S C in centre
RIC 251 (R). BMC -. BNC 542.
Acquired from Marc Breitsprecher, February 2019.

A few years into Domitian's reign an extraordinary issue of quadrantes were struck featuring a rhinoceros. Although the coins are undated, their production can be narrowed down between late 83 when he assumed the title Germanicus and 85 when the consular date XI appeared on the quadrantes. The type is highly unusual and breaks with the standard obverses that were normally featured on the quadrans. One may ask, why a rhinoceros? Certainly the animal was rare in Rome and most difficult to obtain. The rhinoceros depicted on the coin is the African species, identified by the two horns. Martial in his book 'On Spectacles' tells of such a rhinoceros in the Colosseum. Presumably, these coins were struck with that very 'star performer' in mind. Ted Buttrey wrote about this coin type in his article Domitian, the Rhinoceros, and the Date of Martial's "Liber De Spectaculis": "it is wrong to write off the rhinoceros of Domitian's coin casually, as if the coin were a picture postcard from the zoo: 'This is a rhinoceros'. No, coin types are pointed. Everything has to do with imperial advertisement and with its importance at the moment of issue: 'This is my rhinoceros'. Domitian's rhinoceros, in its supremacy in the arena might well stand as a metaphor for the invincible success of the emperor conquering general who had recently assumed the historically-weighted title of Germanicus." Coming back to Martial, he also speaks of tokens being showered upon the cheering crowds - could these quadrantes struck cheaply and in massive quantities have been gifts to the cheering mob at the arena? In essence, can this coin double as currency and a souvenir from a long ago day at the games in the Colosseum?

This variant of the famous rhinoceros quadrans is somewhat rare (no examples in the BM) because of the obverse legend beginning in the upper right, more commonly it begins in the lower left. Artistically, most of the rhinos depicted on these coins have a lot to be desired. Some look like wild boars with horns added for effect. Happily, the animal depicted on this coin's obverse indeed looks every part the powerful and fearsome beast which awestruck Roman audiences - as a matter of fact, it appears to be charging with its head down. Perhaps the engraver was a witness to the very games martial describes?

As mentioned above, the rhino depicted on the coin is the two-horned African species. In contrast, the Indian rhino has one horn. Pliny in his Natural Histories describes the rhinoceros as a one horned creature (although confusingly he confirms its Ethiopian origins), Martial said it had two. The rhino was so rare in Rome, Pliny had to go all the way back to the games of Pompey the Great in 55 BC to find a reference for the animal on display in the city, apparently it was a one-horned Indian rhino. At any rate, both the numismatic evidence and Martial's description coincide rather nicely to confirm that Domitian, at great expense no doubt, brought to Rome an African rhinoceros for his shows in the new Colosseum. The surviving coins featuring this fantastic beast prove how important a feat this was to the emperor.

Well centred with a lovely green patina and fine style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
EB0178_2b_scaled.JPG
EB0178.2 Gelas / Bull8 viewsGela, SICILY, AE 17 (trias), 420-405 BC.
Obverse: Horned head of river god right, grain ear to left.
Reverse: ΓEΛAΣ [and grain ear] above bull walking right, three dots below.
References: Jenkins 506-508; McClean 2277; BMC 2, 73.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 3.767g.
EB
EB0295b_scaled.JPG
EB0295 Tyche / Monument of Sandan2 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, AE 20, 130-80 BC or later.
Obverse: Veiled and turreted head of Tyche right.
Reverse: TAΡΣEΩN, Monument of Sandan: Sandan standing right on a horned and winged lion, within triangular structure on a garlanded altar; monograms in left field.
References: Cf. SNG Cop 333,340.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 6.871g.
EB
EB0358_scaled.JPG
EB0358 Mars / Q THERM MF, Two warriors18 viewsQ. Minucius Thermus M.f., moneyer, AR Denarius, 103 B.C.
Obv: Head of Mars left, wearing crested helmet ornamented with plume and annulet.
Rev: Two warriors fighting, each armed with sword and shield; the one on the left protects a fallen comrade, the other wears horned helmet; Q THERM MF (THE and M F ligate) in exergue.
References: Crawford 319/1, Syd. 592, Babelon Minucia 19.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.865 grams.
EB
PTOLEMY_II_No3.jpg
EGYPT - Ptolemy II Philadelphos74 viewsEGYPT - Ptolemy II Philadelphos (285-246 B.C.) Year Δ (267 BC) Bronze Denomination E. Obv.: Horned head of deified Alexander in elephant headdress right; dotted border. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ on left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ on right. Eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt, head left. Dotted border. Central depression on reverse. Delta between legs. References: SV-439; SNG Cop. 158. dpaul7
cleo.jpg
EGYPT -- CLEOPATRA VII20 viewsEGYPT -- CLEOPATRA VII (51-30 BC) AE 25, Paphos Mint, Cyprus. Horned head of Zeus/Ammon right. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - Palm Branch through eagle right with closed wings; KPR monogram right. Reference: Svoronos 1875dpaul7
18-ptol_III.jpg
EGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES15 viewsEGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES -- (246-221 BC) AE20. Paphos Mint, Cyprus, Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ , facing cult statue of Aphrodite. Reference: Svoronos 1007.
dpaul7
PtolemyBig.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy III14 viewsA massive Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy III, minted in Alexandria between 246-221 BC. 38mm, 44.4g.

Obverse: horned head of Zeus-Ammon.

Reverse: an eagle standing on a thunderbolt with an E between its legs, with the inscription PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS = "King Ptolemy".

Attribution: Svoronos 974
chuy1530
405_Elagabalus_Sacer_dei_sol.jpg
Elagabalus - AR denarius7 viewsRome
221-222 AD
laureate, horned, draped bust right
IMP ANTONINVS__PIVS AVG
Elagabalus standing right, holding patera and club or cypress branch, sacrificing over lit altar
SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB
*
RIC IV 131, RSC III 246, BMCRE V 225, SRCV II 7542
2,75g
Johny SYSEL
Elagabalus_3.jpg
Elagabalus100 viewsRIC 88, RSC 61.
Elagabalus, denarius.
19 mm 3,12 g.
Obv. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and bearded bust right.
Rev. INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half left, branch in left, offering from patera in right over altar, recumbent bull behind altar, star left.

Elagabalus (c. 203 – March 11, 222), also known as Heliogabalus or Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, was a Roman Emperor of the Severan dynasty who reigned from 218 to 222. This reverse refers to Elagabalus' role as priest of the Syrian god from whom he took his nickname. His religious fanaticism was a primary cause of his downfall.

This coin immediately became one of my favourites, because of the detailed obverse and reverse (watch the bull!) and the history behind the coin. The coin also has a beautiful dark toning.
3 commentsmars1112
015KElagabalus.jpg
Elagabalus8 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Elagabalus

Rome mint, 221 A.D
About Fine, edge chip and crack, grainy and porous.
19.0 mm / 2.150 g / 0°

Obverse: "IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG", laureate, draped and horned bust right.
Reverse: "P M TR P IIII COS III P P", Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit altar, holding club or cypress branch, star in left field.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2015 (76503)
Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2006

RIC IV 46, RSC III 196

MyID: 015K

Traded 2019

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
TenthGen
020HElagabalus.jpg
Elagabalus9 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Elagabalus

Rome mint, 221 - 222 A.D.
gF.
18.0 mm / 2.169 g / 0°

Obverse: "IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG", laureate, horned, draped bust right.
Reverse: "SVMMVS SACERDOS", Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in left field.

RIC IV 146, RSC 276, BMC 232, Sear 7549.

MyID: 020H
TenthGen
CollageMaker_20180531_123207829.jpg
Elagabalus8 viewsAR Denarius, Rome Mint, Struck 220-222 AD
Obverse: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG (no break), Horned, laureate, draped and bearded bust right.
Reverse: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus, in Syrian priestly robes, standing half left, sacrificing holding patera in right hand over lighted altar, a club or cypress in his left hand. A recumbent bull sits behind the altar, star in left field.
References: RIC IV 88b, RSC 61, BMCRE 212
Justin L
ELAGABAL-3.jpg
Elagabalus RIC IV 14628 viewsObv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
laureate, horned & draped bust right
Rev: SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera
over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left
18.5mm 2.9gm
OWL365
ARI-Elagabsalus-3.jpg
Elagabalus "Horned Portrait", AR Denarius RIC 8815 viewsAD 218 - 222
2.80 g

Obv.: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, draped and "horned portrait".

Rev.: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG - Elagabalus standing left holding patera over tripod altar, in background, a fallen bull and star above patera.

NGC - Ch AU - Strike 5/5 - Surface 4/5

I purchased this coin from Heritage Auctions
Richard M10
a21.jpg
Elagabalus (218 – 222 AD). 23 viewsObv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed, horned. Rev: P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Elagabalus standing left, holding cypress branch and patera over altar sacrificing, a star in left field. Rome mint: AD 221= RIC IVii, 46d, page 31 - Cohen 196 – SEAR RCV II (2002), #7536, page 605 (VF $30 – XF $90)2.90g. mestreaudi
Elagabalus_-_summus.jpg
Elagabalus - AR denarius5 views221-222 AD
laureate, draped and bearded bust right
IMP ANTONINVS__PIVS AVG
Elagabalus holding branch and offering from patera over altar, star in left field
SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG
RIC IV 146, RSC III 276c, SRCV II 7549 var (horned)
Johny SYSEL
ric_IV_133a.jpg
Elagabalus AR Denarius "SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB"29 viewsElagabalus Denarius. 220-222 AD Rome Mint

Obv: "IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG", laureate, horned, draped bust right right

Rev "SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB", Elagabalus sacrificing right over lighted altar, holding patera and club

RIC 133a, 2.01g, 18mm
284ad
0230-220.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius 43 viewsRome mint, AD 218-222
IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped and cuirassed bust right.
SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, Elagabalus standing right, sacrificing over lighted altar, holding patera and club; in right field, star.
2.59 g, 18-20 mm
RIC IV, Part 2, 131, RCV # 7542, Cohen # 246
Ex. Pscipio
Potator II
Elagabalus_black1.png
Elagabalus Denarius12 viewsElagabalus 218-222 AD.

Antioch or Rome. AD 218 to AD 222

19mm., 2.49g.

IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right

INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar.

References: RIC 88b (Rome) or 191b (Antioch)

AAHV
RL
Elagabalus_Denarius_Invictus_Sacerdos_1.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius Invictus Sacerdos 128 viewsObv.
IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate, horned & draped bust right

Rev.
INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, holding patera, sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar
ancientdave
Elagabalus_Denarius_Invictus_Sacerdos_2.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius Invictus Sacerdos 221 viewsObv.
IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate, horned & draped bust right

Rev.
INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, holding patera sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar
ancientdave
Elagabalus_denarius_RIC_131.JPG
Elagabalus Denarius RIC 13116 viewsElagabalus, Denarius, Rome, 221 - 222 AD, 18mm, 2.3g, RIC 131, RSC 246, BMC 225, Cohen 246, SEAR 7542
OBV: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right right
REV: SACER D DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, Elagabalus sacrificing right over lighted altar, star in left or right field
Romanorvm
coin537.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius RIC 88 sear5 #751833 viewsRIC 88 sear5 #7518 Elagabalus Denarius. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right / INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left sacrificing over altar and holding club. RSC 61. Coin #537
1 commentscars100
Elagabulus3.jpg
ELAGABALUS Denarius RIC 88, Sacrificing Over Altar17 viewsOBV: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right
REV: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar
3.5g, 19mm

Minted at Rome, 221 AD
Legatus
Elagabalus_Denarius_Summus_Sacerdos.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius Summus Sacerdos42 viewsObv.
IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Horned, draped & cuirassed bust right

Rev.
SUMMVS SACERDOS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left

1 commentsancientdave
elagabalus.jpg
Elagabalus Denarius, RIC 146, RSC 276, BMC 23215 viewsElagabalus Denarius. 221-222 AD. IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned & draped bust right / SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left. RSC 276.
2.38g.
Britanikus
ericiv131ORweb.jpg
Elagabalus denarius, RIC IV 13147 viewsRome Mint, Elagabalus denarius, 218-222 A.D. AR, 19.5mm 2.69g, RIC IV 131
O: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, cuirassed and draped bust right
R: SACERD DEI SOLIS ELABAG, Elagabalus standing right, sacrificing over lighted alter, holding patera and club; in right field, star
3 commentscasata137ec
Elagabalus_Invictus__Sacerdos.JPG
Elagabalus Invictus Sacerdos32 viewsElagabalus Silver denarius, RIC IV 88, RSC III 61, BMCRE V 212, Rome, 2.284g, 19.8mm, die axis 180o, 220 - 222 A.D.
OBV: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, horned, laureate, draped and bearded bust right;
REV: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half left, branch in left, offering from patera in right over altar, recumbent bull behind altar, star left;
From the Prof. Henry H. Armstrong collection, handwritten envelope notes, "Purchase, G.W. Westhorpe, Yankton, S.D., 1909."

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

From the Prof. Henry H. Armstrong collection. In 1909 and 1910, when he purchased this coin, Professor Armstrong lived in Rome working as a Research Associate of the Carnegie Institution in Archaeology teaching at the American School for Classical Studies. From 1918 until his death in 1935 he taught at Beloit College as head of the Department of Romance Languages. Nicknamed "Sparky" by the students, his death after a two-week illness came as a shock to the college. His coins, inherited by his son, sat in a cigar box for the next 74 years.
Romanorvm
Elagabalus_Invictus_Sacerdos.jpg
Elagabalus Invictus Sacerdos21 viewsElagabalus, Silver denarius, Rome, 220 - 222 AD, 19.2mm, 2.772g, RIC IV 88, RSC III 61, BMCRE V 212
OBV: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, horned, laureate, draped and bearded bust right
REV: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing half left, branch in left,
offering from patera in right over altar, recumbent bull behind altar, star left

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins

This reverse refers to Elagabalus' role as priest of the Syrian god from whom he took his nickname.
His religious fanaticism was a primary cause of his downfall.
Romanorvm
Elagabalus.jpg
Elagabalus Siver Denarius57 viewsElegabalus...218-222 AD
Silver Denarius
Minted: 221 AD
Obv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Draped bust right, laureate, horned
Rev: PM TR P IIII COS III P P, Emperor standing left sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar, holding branch in right hand, star in left.
Ric 46 Sear 7536

Blast white with a superb portrait.
4 commentsTravis C
Elagabalus_Possibly_Unique.jpg
Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D. Silver denarius49 viewsPossibly unique! The combination of this reverse legend with a recumbent bull behind the altar is apparently unpublished and this is the only example known to Forum. The bull is present on a similar type with the reverse legend INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG.


Silver denarius, RSC III 213c var. (no bull); BMCRE V 269 var. (same); Hunter III 68 var. (same); RIC IV 52 (S) var. (same, also no horn); SRCV II 7538 var. (same), NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (2412840-011), Rome mint, weight 3.07g, maximum diameter 18.4mm, die axis 0o, Jan 222 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, horned, laureate, draped and bearded bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P V COS IIII P P, Elagabalus standing slightly left, wearing Syrian priestly dress, sacrificing from patera in right hand over flaming altar at feet on left, club (or branch) cradled in left hand and arm, star in upper left field, recumbent bull behind altar; NGC certified (slabbed); extremely rare.

Coins with a horned portrait and the title TR P V were struck in January 222 A.D. After some days or weeks the horn was removed from Elagabalus' portrait. Elagabalus had shocked the public with bizarre behavior including cross dressing and marrying a vestal virgin. Removing the unusual horn from his portrait was probably part of a last ditch effort to show that he had changed, dropping his peculiar Syrian ways. The effort failed. On 11 March 222, Elagabalus and his mother were murdered, dragged through the streets of Rome and dumped into the Tiber.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
Elagabalus_RIC_146_(h)~0.JPG
Elagabalus, 218 - 222 AD12 viewsObv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus, bearded, with horn over forehead, facing right, seen from the front.

Rev: SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus in priestly robes standing left, sacrificing from a patera over a lighted tripod altar, holding a cypress branch in left hand; star in field to left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 222 AD

3.2 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC IVii 146 (horned), RSC 276, S7549, VM 63/1
Matt Inglima
Elagabalus_RIC_88.JPG
Elagabalus, 218 - 222 AD32 viewsObv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust of Elagabalus, horned, facing right and seen from the front.

Rev: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus, in priestly robes, standing left, sacrificing over a lighted altar, holding a patera in right hand and a club in his left, the carcass of a bull lies on the ground behind the altar; star in field.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 221 - 222 AD

3.0 grams, 20.9 mm, 0°

RIC IVii 88, RSC III 61, S7518, VM 36/2
Matt Inglima
3815_3816.jpg
Elagabalus, Denarius, INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG6 viewsAR Denarius
Elagabalus
Augustus: 218 - 222AD
Issued: 218 - 222AD
19.0 x 18.0mm
O: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG; Laureate, horned, draped bust, right.
R: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG; Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing over altar with patera and holding club, bull to left.
Exergue:(Star), left field.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 276: B10, O8, R32, T18, M2.
RSC 61; RIC 88; Sear 7518.
Richard Johnson/Buried Treasures Chillicothe, OH Tinley Park, IL Greater Chicago Coin and Currency Show
2/23/17 2/28/17
Nicholas Z
ELAGABAL-2-ROMAN~0.jpg
Elagabalus, RIC IV-88 Rome9 viewsAR Denarius
Rome mint, 221-222 A.D.
18mm, 1.78g
RIC IV-88

Obverse:
IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Horned-laureate and draped bust right.

Reverse:
INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing over tripod, holding patera and club (upwards); behind tripod, bull lying down; in field, star.
rubadub
elagse01-2.jpg
Elagabalus, sestertius of AD 22139 viewsÆ Sestertius (27.00g, Ø 31mm, 12h), Rome mint, Struck AD 221
Obv.: IMP CAES M AVG ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laurate, draped, cuirassed and horned bust of Elagabalus facing right.
Rev.: PM TR P IIII COS III P P (around edge) S C (in field), Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing over lighted altar, holding cypress-branch in left hand; star in field.
RIC 323 (R); Cohen 198 (fr.20)
ex G. Henzen

This type refers to the emperor in his role as priest of the sun-god Elagabalus. For this, as well as for many other reasons, he was much detested by the Romans and soon murdered by his own troops. His body was thrown down a sewer after having been dragged through the city. Quoting one of the most remarkable and wonderful sentences from the old Dictionary of Roman Coins (see Elagabalus): "Thus perished, on the 11th of March, one of the most cruel, debauched and shameless wretches, that ever disgraced humanity, or polluted a throne, after a reign of three years and nine months, disfigured with every feature of hideous criminality and extravagant folly, not having attained more than the eighteenth year of his age."
1 commentsCharles S
jugateres.jpg
ELAGABALUS--AELIA CAPITOLINA18 views218 - 222 AD
struck 222 AD
AE 22.5 mm 7.54 g
O: Jugate busts of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander (as Caesar) right, both laureate, draped, and cuirassed right
R: Tyche standing left, right foot on helmet, right hand over horned altar (to left), left hand holding scepter (to right); aquila to left, cup in exergue.
JUDAEA, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem)
Meshorer, Aelia 142; Rosenberger 82 Very rare.
laney
4205_(1)_4206_(1)_.jpg
Eukratides I, Obol, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΥΚΡΑΤΙΔ(_)8 viewsAR Obol
Bactrian Kingdom
Eukratides I
King: 170 - 145BC
11.0mm 0.64gr
O: NO LEGEND; Diademed bust of Eukratides I right, wearing horned Boiotian helmet.
R: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΥΚΡΑΤΙΔ(_); Piloi (caps of the Dioskouroi) and palm branches.
Exergue: Monogram, below.
MIG 181a; Bopearachchi Series 9c.1.
zurqieh_dubai 291261729727
11/15/14 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
Gela_DenC_CNG383.jpg
Gela - Onkia25 viewsGela
Onkia
AE (12 - 14 mm)
420 - 405 BC.
Av.: ΓEΛAΣ / bull advancing left, Value mark (dot) in exergue
Rev.: horned head of Gelas right
1,27 Gr.
HGC 2 - 383 (R2)
1 commentsnummis durensis
gela2.jpg
Gela, Sicily. AE Tetras69 viewsTetras, bronze, about 420-405. AE 3.26 g.
Obv: Head of the youthful, horned head of river god Gelas r.; in field l., grain of corn.
Rev: GELAS / Bull with lowered head l., above, olive leaf, in exergue, three pellets.
3 commentsancientone
Larissa_Phrikonis_Aeolis_Very_Rare_Facing_bust.jpg
GREEK, Aeolis, Larissa Phrikonis mint. 4th Century B.C. 58 viewsAeolis, Larissa Phrikonis mint. 4th Century B.C. Bronze AE 11, gVF, 0.946g, 10.2mm. Spots of green corrosion or encrustation. Obv: horned facing female head, turned slightly right. Rev: bull's head right; LA. Ref: Weber 5563, SNG Cop -, BMC -, SNG von Aulock -, Laffaille -. Very rare 1 commentsBard Gram Okland
Sogdiana,_Imitative_Antiochos_I__AR_drachm_.jpg
Greek, Sogdiana, Imitative Antiochos I Soter, 281-261 BC, AR Drachm 106 viewsLaureate head of Antiochos right.
Retrograde legend ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANT[I]OXOY curving from left to below and before a bridled horned horse head right, circled Δ to far right.
SC 461-462 (var. – controls); HGC 9, 136 (var. - controls) (R3).
Sogidana, uncertain mint, mid-third century BC.
A unique and unrecorded variant of SC 461-462.
(17 mm, 2.86 g, 6h)
ex- William K. Raymond Collection

The crude style, the retrograde semi-circular legend, the disposition of the mint control and the low weight of this coin are indicative of a Sogdian imitation of the Antiochos I drachm type that was issued by the mint at Ai Khanoum in Baktria during the period 281-261 BC. Unlike the imitative coin the official issue was struck on the Attic weight standard of 4.3 grams. The style of this coin and the full replication of the Ai Khanoum mint control place it early in the Sogdian imitative series, possibly contemporaneous with the lifetime Antiochos I issue that it imitates. Marcanda/Samarkand and Bukhara are likely candidates for the origin of this coin.
Lloyd T
Thymbra.jpg
GREEK, Troas, Thymbra, 350 B.C. 223 viewsBronze Æ 17
4.73 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Bearded, laurate and horned head of Zeus Ammon left
Rev.: Eight-rayed star with inscription Θ-Y between rays, HP monogram below
Sear 4147; BMC Troas p. 89, 4
3 commentsJaimelai
312432.jpg
Hadrian, 117-138, AE Semis28 viewsHadrian, 117-138, AE Semis, 2.91g,
Cyrenaica, Cyrene mint, struck c.125-128,
Obv: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, Laureate head of Hadrian right;
Rev: COS III, Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right;
Strack 445b; Not in BMC –; Not in RIC –;
Sydenham Caesarea 288-9; Lindgren 947;
Cohen 278 (as Cyrene?).

Edit: RPC Volume III, No.11, now re-attributes this coin to the mint of Cyrene (previously this and related types were attributed to Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebeia mint).
1 commentsOldMoney
88.jpg
Hadrian, AD 117-13821 viewsAR Tridrachm, 26.02 mm (8.93 gm).

AYT KAI ΘE TPA ΠAP YI ΘE NEP YI TPAI AΔPIANOC CE, Laureate head to right, with traces of cuirass, seen from front / TAPCEΩN MHTPOΠOΛEΩC, Sandan, right arm raised, quiver and sword over shoulder and holding bipennis and wreath, standing on horned lion to right. Tarsus mint.

Prieur, 768; SNG Levante, 996.

Ex A. Lynn collection.
socalcoins
Hélliogabale.jpg
Heliogabalus - denarius34 viewsIMP. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG. , laureate, draped and cuirassed bearded bust right, with horn on the top of the head
SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG. , Heliogabalus in High-Priest attire holding a branch and a patera above a tripod altar ; six-pointed star to le left.

RIC 146
Ginolerhino
Caracalla-Tetradrachme-CARRHAE-Preur820.jpg
II-CARACALLA -d- 007 Tetrasrachmon - PRIEUR page99 / 82015 viewsAv) AVT. K. M.A.ANTΩNEINOC CEB
Laureated head right

Rv) ΔHMAPX. EΣ. VΠATO TO Δ
Eagle holding wearth in beak standing in front, turning his head right, standing on a large horned bull skull

Weight: 13,60g; Ø: 28mm; Reference: PRIEUR page:99/820;
mint: MESOPOTAMIA // CARRHAE; struck between 215A.D. - 217 A.D:
sulcipius
FotorCreated~65.jpg
Islands of Thrace Thasos AR Tritemorion circa 411-350 BC 8.63 mm 0.44g37 viewsHead of bald and horned Satyr right with wavy beard.Rev two dolphins swimming left and right one above the other all within incuse square.Grant H
istros_pan.jpg
Istros, Thrace, c. 350 - 250 B.C.111 viewsBronze AE 15, SNG Stancomb 176-online, (BMC Thrace p. 26, 15); (SNG BM Black Sea 260); Weight 3.571 g, max. diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 180o, Istros mint, c. 350 - 250 B.C.; obv. horned head of river-god Istros (Danube) facing slightly right; rev. ΙΣΤΡΙ, sea-eagle grasping dolphin in talons; nice blue-green patina.

Background info. courtesy Forvm Ancient coins;

Istros is probably the oldest Greek colony on the Black Sea, and was founded in 657 - 656 B.C. or sometime between 630 and 620 B.C. by Milesian settlers in a strategic position near the Danube Delta.

Ex. Forvm Ancient Coins
3 commentsSteve E
Juba_I_ae.jpg
Juba I AE 2883 viewsJuba I (60-46 B.C), AE 28
Obv: Horned head of Amon right.
Rev: Elephant walking right. Above punic legend.

Ref.: SNG COP. 529; Müller, 56; Alexandropoulos, 35.

Rare.
Tanit
Juba_I_billon.jpg
Juba I billon60 viewsJuba I (60-46 B.C.), Billon 26 mm ,
Obv: Horned head of Amon r.
Rev: Elephant walking to right. Above punic legend.

Ref.: SNG COP. 529; Müller, 56; Alexandropoulos, 35.
Rare.
Tanit
jugateres~0.jpg
JUDAEA, AELIA CAPITOLINA--ELAGABALUS20 views218 - 222 AD
struck 222 AD
AE 22.5 mm 7.54 g
O: Jugate busts of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander (as Caesar) right, both laureate, draped, and cuirassed right
R: Tyche standing left, right foot on helmet, right hand over horned altar (to left), left hand holding scepter (to right); aquila to left, cup in exergue.
JUDAEA, Aelia Capitolina (Jerusalem)
Meshorer, Aelia 142; Rosenberger 82 Very rare.
laney
Caesar.png
Julius Caesar13 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-48 B.C. AR denarius (18.2 mm, 3.32 g, 7 h). Military mint traveling with Caesar. CAESAR, elephant advancing right, trampling on horned serpent / Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf’s head), and apex. Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49Rob D
Caesar_Elephant.jpg
Julius Caesar - Denarius - Sear Imperators 97 viewsObv: Elephant advancing right, trampling on horned serpent, CAESAR in ex.
Rev: Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis, and apex
Size: 17-18 mm
Weight: 3,61 g
Mint: Military mint traveling with Caesar
Date: April-August 49 BC
Ref: Crawford 443/1; Sear Imperators 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49
vs1969
Julius_Caesar_Elephant_Crawford_443_1.jpg
Julius Caesar - [Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49; Kestner 3515-20; BMCRR Gaul 27-30; RBW 1557]105 viewsSilver denarius, 3.88g, 18.40mm, 90 degree, military mint traveling with Caesar, April-August 49 B.C.

Obv. - Elephant advancing right, trampling on horned serpent, CAESAR in exergue

Rev. - Emblems of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis, and apex

An old tone with a slight rainbow highlight when presented in sunlight. Suspected graffiti in upper left reverse field forming a "X".
___________

Purchased from VCoins seller Ephesus Numismatics (Tom Wood) at the 2013 BRNA Dalton, GA coin show
4 commentsrenegade3220
jc_k.jpg
Julius Caesar, b. 100 BC - d. 44 BC3 viewsAR denarius, 19mm, 3.4g, 9h; Traveling military mint, 49-48 BC
Obv.: Elephant advancing right, trampling horned serpent // CAESAR
Rev.: Symbols of the pontificate: simpulum, aspergillum, securis, and apex.
Reference: Crawford 443/1; CRI 9; Sydenham 1006; RSC 49. 16-188-176
John Anthony
Demetrios_Tet_.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306-283 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Thebes 13 viewsDiademed and horned head right - Demetrios personified as a god.
BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY Poseidon Pelagaios standing left, foot on rock, holding trident; circled ΛY monogram to inner right.

Newell 141; SNG Berry 341; Pozzi 964 = Pozzi (Boutin) 2017; Meydancikkale 2584; “Seleucus I” Hoard 2005 (CH10.265) 281-284. Thebes mint. Struck circa 289-287 BC.

(29 mm, 16.09 g, 11h).
Forum Ancient Coins.
n.igma
antigon_gon_shield.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--ANTIGONUS II GONATAS37 views277 - 239 BC
AR Tetradrachm 16.95 g
O: Horned head of Pan left, lagobolon over shoulder, in the center of a Macedonian shield
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Athena Alkidemos advancing left, holding shield decorated with aegis, preparing to cast thunderbolt; crested Macedonian helmet to inner left, TI to inner right
Amphipolis mint; SNG Cop 1202; Grose 3593
2 commentslaney
antigon_gon_shield~0.jpg
KINGS OF MACEDON--ANTIGONUS II GONATAS21 views277 - 239 BC
AR Tetradrachm 16.95 g
O: Horned head of Pan left, lagobolon over shoulder, in the center of a Macedonian shield
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIΓONOY, Athena Alkidemos advancing left, holding shield decorated with aegis, preparing to cast thunderbolt; crested Macedonian helmet to inner left, TI to inner right
Amphipolis mint; SNG Cop 1202; Grose 3593
laney
333_Greek_SNG_Mun1074-5.jpg
KINGS of MACEDONIA. Antigonos II Gonatas. 277/6-239 BC. AR Tetradrachm Amphipolis mint.47 viewsStruck circa 274/1-260/55 BC.

Reference.
Touratsoglou 8–17; SNG München 1074-5; SNG Alpha Bank 983; SNG Cop. 1202

Obv.
Horned head of Pan left, lagobolon behind, in the center of a Macedonian shield

Rev. ANTIGONOU left, BASILEWS right
Athena Alkidemos advancing left; crested Macedonian helmet to inner left, TI to inner right.

16.75 gr
31mm
5h
2 commentsokidoki
kyrene_magas.jpg
Kyrene; Magas; horned head of Apollo Karneios left/ ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of the Magas in Kyrene, c. 276-249 B.C. Bronze AE 12, BMC -, VF, Kyrene mint, weight 2.220g, maximum diameter 12.3mm, die axis 180o, 276 - 250 B.C.; obverse horned head of Apollo Karneios left; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides; rough reddish patina; rare. Magas was half-brother to Ptolemy II and son of Berenike, the Macedonian second wife of Ptolemy I. He tried repeatedly to gain independence from Ptolemaic control. In 276 B.C he crowned himself King, married the daughter of Antiochos I and staged a double invasion of Egypt. But the Seleukid army was defeated by Ptolemy II and Magas also faced an internal revolt of Lybian nomads. Still, Kyrene remained independent as long as Magas lived; Ex ForumPodiceps
Procilius_Juno.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR serratus denarius10 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat skin
S·C
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear, reins and shield; snake below
L.PROCILI.F
¹Crawford 379/2, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, RSC I Procilia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Juno Sospita offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
Johny SYSEL
L__Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - Thoria-1100 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Thorius Balbus, C.105 BC, Denarius (3.96 gm) Rome mint, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing horned goat skin headdress, I•S•M•R downward behind; reverse bull charging right, H (control letter) above, L•THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, Crawford 316/1, RSC I Thoria-15 commentsBud Stewart
1032_Larissa_Phrikonis.jpg
Larissa Phrikonis - AE12 viewsc. 4th century BC
horned female head of river-god facing slightly right
head of Apollo right
Λ_A
SNG München 565, SNG Cop 212, BMC Troas -
Johny SYSEL
larissa_phrikonis.jpg
Larissa Phrikonis, AE11; Horned female head/ ΛΑ, bull's head right6 viewsAeolis, Larissa Phrikonis, 4th Century B.C. Bronze AE 11, SNG München 564, Weber 5563, SNG Cop -, BMC -, SNG von Aulock -, Laffaille -, SGCV -, aF, pitting and corrosion, Larissa Phrikonis mint, weight 1.058g, maximum diameter 9.8mm, die axis 0o, c. 4th Century B.C.; obverse horned facing female head, turned slightly right; reverse ΛΑ, bull's head right; interesting facing bust; very rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
mytilene2.jpg
Lesbos, Mytilene. AE19. Zeus Ammon / herm of Dionysos.33 views
Obv: Bearded and horned head of Zeus Ammon r.
Rev: M-Y/T-I, herm of bearded Dionysos in himation standing facing on prow of ship; grape bunch to left, apluster to r.
ca 2nd-1st century BC. AE19, 5.8g.
SNG von Aulock -; SNG Cop. 393.
Rare.
ancientone
metapontion_lukania_HNitaly1700.jpg
Lucania, Metapontion, HN Italy 17009 viewsAE 11, 1.59g, 11.2mm, 0°
obv. Horned head of Apollo Karneios r.
rev. META (l. field upward)
Barley ear with leaf to r.
Above leaf fly (control symbol)
ref. Johnston Bronze 64; HN Italy 1700; cf. SNG ANS 587 (control); SNG Copenhagen 156 (same); SNG Morcom 257
(same); Macdonald Hunter 67 (same)
VF, small flan

From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

For more information please take a look at "Mythological interesting coins", article coming soon
Jochen
CaracallaAttaleiaLydiaDionysus_Pan1.jpg
Lydia, Attaleia (Attalia). Caracalla (AD 198–217). SNG Fitzwilliam 4847.30 viewsLydia, Attaleia (Attalia). Caracalla (AD 198–217). Æ 29mm, 13.40g, 5h.
Obverse: [ΑVΤΟ ΚΑΙ Μ]ΑV – Ρ [ΑΝΤΩ]ΝΙΝΟ / C, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of beardless emperor right, seen from behind; oval countermark of eagle with wings open in right field.
Reverse: ΕΠ CΤΡ ΜЄΝЄ – ΚΡΑΙΟΥC Β ΑΤΤΑΛ / Є[ΑΤ]ΩΝ, naked Dionysus facing with head left, resting his left hand on thyrsos and extending his right to the horned Pan, who lies right on the ground with left hand raised.
References: SNG Fitzwilliam 4847 (= Leake, Suppl. p. 27.2 = Tochon, 721); Wroth, N. Chr. 1903, p. 336, no. 28 (Pl. XI, 11). For countermark, see Howgego 328.
Ex Christian Clauß, 5-16-2013.

The same obverse die was also used on coin issues of Silandus and Acrasus. See, for example, CNG E303, Lot 221: http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=234088.
Mark Fox
lydia_lion.jpg
LYDIA, SARDES34 views2nd - 1st CENTURY BC
AE 17 mm 6.41 g
O: HEAD OF DIONYSIOS R
R: HORNED PANTHER STANDING L HOLDING BROKEN SPEAR IN MOUTH, THETA TO LEFT
BMC 44 SNG COP 464
laney
ABB_copy.jpg
LYDIA, Sardes25 viewsLYDIA, Sardes. Circa 133 BC-AD 14. Æ 18mm. Wreathed head of Dionysos right / Horned panther standing left, holding broken spear in jaws; Θ to left, monogram below. Johnston, Greek 235; SNG Copenhagen 464.Molinari
sardes_dionys_panther.jpg
LYDIA, SARDES21 views2nd - 1st Century BC
AE 18.5 mm; 4.77 g
O: Head of Dionysos right, wearing ivy wreath.
R: ΣΑΡΔΙΑΝΩΝ. Horned panther standing left, head facing, holding broken spear in mouth; monogram below.
Lydia, Sardes (Sardeis) mint; cf SNG von Aulock 3127; SNG Copenhagen 465 .
laney
Sardes_Bronze.jpg
Lydia, Sardes Bronze30 viewsBronze coin
Sardes, Lydia
Second - first century BC
Head of Dionysos r.
SARDIANWN
Horned panther l., head facing, holding in mouth and raised forepaw a broken spear.

BMC 241, 40; Aulock 3127.

Philoromaos
Lydia,_Sardes,_AE16,_after-200_BC_Head_of_youthful_Dionysos_right,Club_in_oak_wreath,horned_panther_walking_left,-BMC-44_Q-001_11h_15,5-16,5mm_5,93g-s.jpg
Lydia, Sardes, Autonomous issue (after 200 B.C.), BMC 44, AE-16, ΣAPΔI/ANΩN, Panther walking left, 148 viewsLydia, Sardes, Autonomous issue (after 200 B.C.), BMC 44, AE-16, ΣAPΔI/ANΩN, Panther walking left,
avers:- Head of youthful Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy.
revers:- ΣAPΔI/ANΩN horned panther walking left, head front, holding spear in right paw and breaking it with its jaws, MTΡ monogram in left field, ΦMT monogram below.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-16,5mm, weight: 5,93g, axis: 11h,
mint: Lydia, Sardes, date: after 200 B.C., ref: BMC 44,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
5880LG.jpg
Macedon, Alexander III, 336-323 BC211 viewsAlexander the Great (Greek:Μέγας Αλέξανδρος[1], Megas Alexandros; July 356 BC — June 11, 323 BC), also known as Alexander III, king of Macedon (336–323 BC), is considered one of the most successful military commanders in history, conquering most of his known world before his death; he is frequently included in a list along with Napoleon Bonaparte, Julius Caesar, and Ghengis Khan, as the greatest military strategists and tacticians who ever lived. Alexander is also known in the Zoroastrian Middle Persian work Arda Wiraz Nāmag as "the accursed Alexander" due to his conquest of the Persian Empire and the destruction of its capital Persepolis. He is known as Eskandar in Persian and even acclaimed during the construction of the Great Wall Sadd-e Eskandar by the Parthian Dynasty[citation needed]. He is often identified as Dhul-Qarnayn in Middle Eastern traditions and is called al-Iskandar al-Kabeer in Arabic, Sikandar-e-azam in Urdu, Skandar in Pashto, Dul-Qarnayim in Hebrew, and Tre-Qarnayia in Aramaic (the two-horned one), apparently due to an image on coins minted during his rule that seemingly depicted him with the two ram's horns of the Egyptian god Ammon. He is known as Sikandar in Urdu and Hindi, a term also used as a synonym for "expert" or "extremely skilled".

Following the unification of the multiple city-states of ancient Greece under the rule of his father, Philip II of Macedon, (a labour Alexander had to repeat twice because the southern Greeks rebelled after Philip's death), Alexander would conquer the Persian Empire, including Anatolia, Syria, Phoenicia, Gaza, Egypt, Bactria and Mesopotamia and extend the boundaries of his own empire as far as the Punjab. Alexander integrated foreigners (non-Macedonians, non-Greeks known as the Successors[2]) into his army and administration, leading some scholars to credit him with a "policy of fusion." He encouraged marriage between his army and foreigners, and practised it himself. After twelve years of constant military campaigning, Alexander died, possibly of malaria, typhoid, or viral encephalitis. His conquests ushered in centuries of Greek settlement and rule over distant areas, a period known as the Hellenistic Age. Alexander himself lived on in the history and myth of both Greek and non-Greek cultures. Already during his lifetime, and especially after his death, his exploits inspired a literary tradition in which he appears as a legendary hero in the tradition of Achilles.

Alexander III, 336-323 BC, Bronze AE18, Price-275, struck 336-323BC at Macedonia, 7.09 grams, 17.3 mm. Choice VF

Obv: Head of Herakles with a lion scalp headdress
Rev: Club above legend with bow and quiver below, thunderbolt above club, 'Delta' below quiver

A wonderful bronze issue from the lifetime of Alexander III 'the Great.' Perfectly centered and struck with minimal, if any, actual wear. Highly attractive.
Ex-Glenn Woods g28
ecoli
Gonatas.jpg
Macedon, Antigonos Gonatas, tetradrachm58 viewsAmphipolis, 277/6-239 BC
31 mm, 17.04 g
obv.: horned head of Pan left, lagobolon behind, in the centre of a Macedonian shield
rev.: BAΣIΛEOΣ ANTIΓONOY; Athena Alkidemos advancing left, shield decorated with aegis on left arm, preparing to cast thunderbolt held aloft in right hand; crested Macedonian helmet to inner left, TI monogram to inner right
(AMNG III 2 S. 186 Nr.3; SNG Copenhagen 1202; SNG Oxford 3260)
ex Dorotheum May 2014 Coin Auction (26. May 2014), lot 60
1 commentsareich
cassandrea.jpg
Macedonia, Cassandrea. Hadrian AE22. Zeus-Ammon30 viewsCassandrea, Macedon. Hadrian, 117-138 AD, AE 22 mm.
Obverse: Laureate head right
Reverse: Bearded and horned head of Zeus-Ammon left
Weight: 4.1 gm
Diameter: 21 mm
Ref: Moushmov 6310
ancientone
mars.jpg
Minucius Thermus Mf AR Denarius55 viewsOBV: Helmeted head of Mars left
REV: 2 Warriors Fighting (a Roman and a Gaul); Roman Warrior on left protecting fallen comrade, the other (presumably a Gaul) wears horned helmet
Date: 103BC
3.9g, 14mm
Syd 592, Cr319/1
2 commentsmiffy
g~1.jpg
Mysia, Pergamon AE21. Athena Nicephoros / trophy17 viewsObv: Head of Athena right.
Rev: AQHNAS NIKEFOPOY, Trophy with horned helmet.
200-133 BC.
ancientone
Mythological_creatures_collage_15.jpg
MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURES44 viewsTop row: Agathodaemon; Griffin; Centaur
Row 2: Capricorn; Sphinx; Hippocamp; Kerberos
Row 3: Gorgon; Horned Panther; Phoenix
Bottom row: Pegasos; Pan; Horned Lion; Chimaera
laney
Mythological_creatures_collage_15~0.jpg
MYTHOLOGICAL CREATURES COLLAGE126 viewsTop row: Agathodaemon; Griffin; Centaur
Row 2: Capricorn; Sphinx; Hippocamp; Kerberos
Row 3: Gorgon; Horned Panther; Phoenix
Bottom row: Pegasos; Pan; Horned Lion; Chimaera
(examples from my collection)
2 commentslaney
olbia_k.jpg
Olbia, Sarmatia1 viewsÆ25, 10.5g, 12h; 3rd-2nd centuries BC.
Obv.: Horned, bearded head of river god Borysthenes (Dnieper) left.
Rev.: Bow in case and battle axe; OΛBI to right, API to left.
Reference: SNG Cop 85, 16-272-57
John Anthony
olbia__river_god.jpg
Olbia, Sarmatia, AE2015 viewsOlbia, Sarmatia, AE20. Horned head of river-god Borysthenes (Dnieper) left / OLBIO, battle-axe and bow in case. 3rd Century BC Sear Greek Coins and their Values (SG) Number sg1685 Frolova 718.dpaul7
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert
erf_rp3321.jpg
Pan259 viewsΑV ΚΑΙ ΠΟ ΛΙ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right, large B before / Α[ΡΧ ΙΑ]CΟΝΟC CΙΛΒΟV ΤΑΒΗ / ΝΩΝ, Goat-legged horned Pan, dancing left, playing syrinx.

Tabae in Caria, Æ31, Gallienus, BMC 103
1 commentsflinn
Gotarzes_I_or_Sinatruces_FORVM.jpg
Parthia - Gotarzes I (91-87 BCE) or Sinatruces (93-69 BCE)36 viewsMetal/Size: AR18; Weight: 4.13 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Rhaga; Date: 93-69 BCE; Obverse:Diademed and draped bust of Gotarzes I or Sinatruces left, wearing horned tiara with ear flap and three rows of pellets, stags on crest and diadem with knot and ribbons. Has long beard, earring and torque with single pellet finial along with cuirass. Reverse: 5-line legend (Sellwood type ii) BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOV ΛPΣΛKOV ΘEOΠATPOY NIKATOPOΣ (Of the Great King Arsaces, Divine Father, Conqueror) - archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, holding bow. References: Sellwood 33.4 (Gotarzes I); Shore #113-115 (Gotarzes I); Sunrise #302 & Assar (Sinatruces).2 commentsmuseumguy
Gotarzes_I_or_Sinatruces_FORVM_copy.jpg
Parthia - Gotarzes I (91-87 BCE) or Sinatruces (93-69 BCE)22 viewsMetal/Size: AR 19; Weight: 4.05 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Mint: Rhagae; Date: 93-69 BCE. Obverse: Diademed and draped bust of Gotarzes I or Sinatruces left with medium-length beard and hawk nose wearing horned tiara with ear flap, three rows of pellets and stags on crest. King also wears diadem with knot and ribbons, earring, torque w/single pellet finial and cuirass. Reverse:5-line legend (Sellwood type ii) BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOV ΛPΣΛKOV ΘEOΠATPOY NIKATOPOΣ (Of the Great King Arsaces, Divine Father, Conqueror) - archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, wearing bashlyk and cloak, holding bow. References: Shore #113-115 (Gotarzes I); Sellwood #33.4 (Gotarzes I); Sunrise #302 & Assar (Sinatruces).museumguy
Gotarzes.jpg
Parthia - Gotarzes I (91-87 BCE) or Sinatruces (93-69 BCE)28 viewsMetal/Size: AR19; Weight: 3.6 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Ecbatana; Date: 93-69 BCE; Obverse:Diademed and draped bust of Gotarzes I or Sinatruces left with medium-length beard and hawk nose wearing horned tiara with ear flap, three rows of pellets and stags on crest. King also wears diadem with knot and ribbons, earring, torque w/single pellet finial and cuirass. 5-line legend (Sellwood type ii) BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOV ΛPΣΛKOV ΘEOΠATPOY NIKATOPOΣ (Of the Great King Arsaces, Divine Father, Conqueror) - archer (Arsakes I) seated right on throne, wearing bashlyk and cloak, holding bow. Letters MEΓ above bow on right side which makes this coin a legend ii. References: Sellwood 33.3 (Gotarzes I); Shore #110ff.2 commentsmuseumguy
gotarzes_I.jpg
Parthia, Gotarzes I 95-87 B.C. Drachm6 viewsParthia Gotarzes I 95-87 B.C. Silver Drachm, 20mm. Draped bust in horned tiara/Archer seated holding bow. Sellwood 33.4. Sh. 114v. VF, but with planchet lamination. Ex EcinPodiceps
3940_(1)_3941_(1).jpg
Pergamon, Mysia, Unit, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ8 viewsAE Unit
Pergamon, Mysia
2nd - 1st Centuries BC
21.0mm 5.80gr
O: NO LEGEND; Helmeted head of Athena, right.
R: ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ; Trophy of arms with horned helmet.
SNG Cop 394?
nomismaauctions 132112402330
3/21/17 4/3/17
Nicholas Z
P1190222.jpg
Piakos - Onkia17 viewsPiakos
Onkia
AE (12 - 14 mm)
420 - 40 BC.
Av.: (ΓIAK )/ Horned head of river god left, wreathed with reeds. (Value mark ...)
Rev.: Hound at bay right, Oak Spray above.
1,12 Gr.
CNS III, p. 199, no. 3
HGC 2 - 1102 (R1)
nummis durensis
Capture_00052.JPG
Pitane, Mysia37 viewsFourth century B.C.
Bronze AE 16
3.73 gm, 16 mm
Obverse: Head of Zeus Ammon right,
bearded and horned
Reverse: Pentagram
Π in angle
SNG Copenhagen 530-531
Jaimelai
paphos_ptolemaiosIII_Svoronnos1008.jpg
Ptolemaic kingdom, Paphos, Ptolemaios III Euergetes, Svoronos 100821 viewsPtolemaios III Euergetes, 246-221 BC
AE - Dichalkon (AE 16), 2.44g, 16.43mm, 315°
obv. head of Zeus-Ammon, horned and with taenia, r.
rev. PTOLEMAIOV - BACILEWC
Cult statue of Aphrodite, wearing high polos, stg. frontal on base, r. hand before breast, holding
unknown object (girdle?) in lowered l. hand; braids bound in several thick knots and reaching to the
shoulders
ref. Svoronos 1008; SNG Copenhagen 647
about VF, black-green patina

This type is now assigned to Ptolemaios V Epiphanes and dated to about 204-201 BC (W. Weiser, Katalog Ptolemäischer Bronzemünzen der Sammlung ... Universität Köln, S. 70, Nr.111). Thanks to Arminius!

The famous Aphrodite Paphias was aniconical, probably a baetyl. So we have here another, probably Hellenistic, cult statue.
Jochen
Ptolemy_III_hemidrachm.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 220 B.C.104 viewsBronze hemidrachm, (Svoronos 965, Weiser 71; Hosking 31; Weber 8260), VF, pitting, 26.014g, 34.6mm, 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse BAΕIΛΩΕ ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's legs; Olive base color with light desert patina, with a few green, yellow and red spots.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

Photo by Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1f_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator (221 - 204 B.C.), AE Hemidrachm , Svoronos 112768 viewsBronze hemidrachm
Obv:- Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia;
Rev:- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ∆Ι between eagle's legs
Minted in Alexandria
References:- Svoronos 1127; SNG Cop 202; Noeske 145; BMC Ptolemies p. 57, 109 - 110; Weiser 50 (Ptolemy II, 253 - 249 B.C.)

33.40 g. 33.72 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
o_027.JPG
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. 67 viewsBronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF,
Alexandria mint,
7.899g, 20.5mm, 0o,
170 - 163 B.C.;
obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right;
reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left
ex forvm



"The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII."

new pic
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ptol_iii_club.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III EUERGETES21 views246 - 222 BC
AE 18.5 mm; 4.83 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, within border of dots;
R:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, within border of dots
Tyre mint
laney
ptolemy_viii_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY VIII EUERGETES II (PHYSCON)22 views145 - 116 BC
AE 1/4 Obol 9 mm; 2.95 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon right;
R: Eagle standing half left with wings open

Kyrene mint;cf. Svoronos 1655, SNG Cop 658
laney
307_Greek.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy III Euergetes. Bronze drachm 245-222 BC15 viewsAlexandria, circa 245-222 BC.

Reference.
Köln 71; SNG Copenhagen 171-172; Svoronos 964.

Obv. no legend.
Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia with basileion

Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (PTOLEMAIOU-BASILEWS)
Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, filleted corncuopia in
left field, XP monogram between legs

66.85 gr
43 mm
12h.
1 commentsokidoki
a_103.JPG
Ptolemy II 33 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 B.C
Tyros 284-280 B.C

Obverse:Diademed and horned head of deified Alexander the great
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;Club over monogram at left field

14.94mm 4,39gm

Svoronos 628
maik
ptolemy_III_s708.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 23.9mm, Zeus, Tyre, Svoronos 70812 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-220 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 708, SNG Cop 495, Weiser 55 - 56 (all Ptolemy II), gF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 11.517g, 23.9mm, 0o, c. 230 - 222 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, no control letters. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolomy_IV~2.jpg
Ptolemy III, Eurgetes 246 - 221 B.C.11 viewsPtolemy III, Euergetes ("Benefactor") 246 - 221 B.C. Ae 38.1~38.8mm. 48.76g. Alexandria mint tetrobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia at shoulder right, E (closed loop) monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 974 E(var.). ddwau
PTOLEMY_III_-_GREEK.JPG
Ptolemy IV85 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom - Ptolemy IV, Philopator I - Alexandria Mint - Hemidrachm

O: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia

R: ΠTOΛΣMAIOY BAΣIΛΣΩΣ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, ΔI between eagle's legs

Ref: Svronos 1127, SNG Cop 201

36.3g, 33.7mm, 0 degree die axis, 222-204BC
7 commentsBiancasDad
Ptolemy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV drachm148 viewsBronze drachm

Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia

ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (PTOLEMAIOU BASILWS)
Eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, LI between eagle's legs

Alexandria (or Sidon) mint
220-203 BC

Svoronos 1126, VF, brown patina,
68.751g, 40.9mm, 0o,


Ex-Forum

SOLD!
5 commentsJay GT4
Ptolomy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.11 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 36.0~37.1mm. 48.41g. Alexandria mint tetrobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, cornucopia countermark left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 1149ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~0.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.24 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 41.8~43.5mm. 67.71g. Alexandria mint drachm. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 992.ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~1.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.12 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 35.1~36.2mm. 33.86g. Alexandria mint diobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia countermark left, ΛI monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 1127 ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~3.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.11 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 29.3~31.1mm. 22.63g. Alexandria mint hemiobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia at shoulder right, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 994, Svoronos 1151.ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~4.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.15 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 30.0~30.8mm. 24.32g. Alexandria mint hemiobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, monogram between eagle's legs.ddwau
tyre_Ptolemy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, Bronze hemiobol, 17,5mm. Tyre. Unpublished10 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 205 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Unpublished: Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, Weiser -, et al.; similar to other Tyre issues except for Sigma control letter, Fair, Tyre mint, 4.759g, 17.5mm, 0o, obverse filleted and horned head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, “Σ”between legs, club left; only a few other examples known; extremely rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
42050_Ptolemy_IV_Svoronos_1149,_aVF,_.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, Tetrobol, Svoronos 1149, countermark19 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 220 - 203 B.C. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1149, aVF, rough areas, Alexandria mint, 38.589g, 38.9mm, 0o, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ”, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, head turned back right, “ΣΕ” monogram between eagle's legs, rectangular cornucopia countermark; flaked red patina (stabilized), leaving rough areas where patina is absent. Svoronos 1149 is the same as Svoronos 1148 but with the addition of the countermark. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
s1423.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1423 var (horn)9 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1423 var (horn), SNG Cop -, F, Alexandria mint, 43.565g, 34.9mm, 0o, obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon, unusual variation with large horn protruding high at the top of the head; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΙΑΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, wings closed, no symbols or control letters; thick and heavy flan; scarce. In a 1994 Article, Stephen Huston and C. Lorber noted the existance of this large horned variety in the CoinEx Hoard, dating the coin and the entire hoard to the time of Ptolemies IV and V. This particular variety is attributed to Ptolemy V. Matt Kreuzer and Richard Pincock attribute this type to the joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. They believe Huston and Lorber dated Coinex too early, two eagles always symbolizes joint rule, and the weight of this issue fits a standard used only after 168 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
41113_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor_and_Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes,_170_-_163_B_C__S_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, diobol, Svoronos 142610 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, F, Alexandria mint, 7.926g, 21.4mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41083_Ptolemy_VI___VIII_diobol,_Svoronos_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, Diobol, Svoronos 14268 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF, Alexandria mint, 7.371g, 20.6mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left; nice centering. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
24845_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C__obol_svoronos_1397.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, obol, Cyprus, Svoronos 139715 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Bronze obol, Svoronos 1397; BMC Ptolemies p. 80, 18 - 19, VF, Cyprus mint, weight 13.015g, maximum diameter 24.6mm, die axis 0o, 174 - 171 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, lotus symbol before, ΕΥΛ between legs; ΕΥΛ probably refers to Eulaios, regent with Lenaios during part of the minority of Ptolemy VI. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
S1655.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, Bronze 1/4 obol, Svoronos 165556 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze 1/4 obol, Svoronos 1655, SNG Cop 658, F/VF, Kyrene mint, 2.040g, 13.5mm, 180o, obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “[ΕΤΟΥ] ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ [ΠΤΟΛ]”, eagle standing half left with wings open, grasping fulmen in talons, “ΘΕ” left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Punic3~0.jpg
Punic Mauretania, Iol-Caesarea15 viewsMauretania, Iol-Caesarea:
Æ unit, 3rd-2nd century BC, 10.1gm, 24 mm. Obv: Head of Isis left, wearing vulture crown and horned solar-disk headdress. Rev: Three grain ears; Punic letters in fields.

Muller 286 ; SNG 548

RARE

Mauretania - IOL (CAESAREA)
(III - II century BC)
The city was founded by the Phoenicians and the Carthaginians. Its name comes from the hero Iolaus, nephew of Hercules and guide. The city was one of the two capitals Bocchus. Iol before becoming the capital of the kingdom of Mauretania in the first century BC in Juba II - Caesarea or modern Cherchell - the city was part of the independent Numidia. Iol was the main workshop area.
Tanit
1456_Thermus.jpg
Q. Minucius Thermus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²99 BC
¹103 BC
head of Mars left waring crested helmet ornamented with feather and annulet
Q. Minucius Q.f. L.n. Thermus right fighting barbarian (Ligurian) left wearing horned helmet over Roman soldier kneeling right; everyone holding sword and shield
Q·(THE)RM·(MF)
¹Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, RSC I Minucia 19, BMCRR Italy 653, RBW Collection 1174, SRCV I 197
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Künker
Johny SYSEL
Thermus_denarius.jpg
Q. Thermus M.f Denarius24 viewsAR Serrate Denarius: 19mm, 3.75 grams, Die axis: 9h
Moneyer: Q. Thermus M.f, 104-103 BCE


Obverse: Helmeted head of Mars to left.

Reverse: Two soldiers fighting, the Roman soldier on the left protects a fallen comrade, the Ligurian soldier on the right wears a horned helmet. Q. THERM. MF monogram in exergue.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- The reverse recalls the actions of the moneyer’s ancestor, also Quintus Minucius Thermus, who was a Roman consul in 193 BCE. Assigned the region of Liguria, he fought the Ligurians from his base in Pisa.
- Bankers punch mark to centre head of Mars.

Ex Antiquarius New Zealand, 2013
Pharsalos
Babelon_Minucia.jpg
Q. Thermus M.f. - Minucia-19326 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC. Q. Thermus M.f. 103 BC. Silver denarius (3.86 gm). Head of Mars left / Two warriors fighting, the one on the left protecting fallen comrade, the other wearing horned helmet, Q THERM M F in exergue. Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, Babelon Minucia 19, RCV 19719 commentsBud Stewart
XMAS_079.JPG
Q. Thermus M.f., AR Denarius, 103 BC, Rome38 views(No legend)
Helmeted head of Mars left
(No legend)
Two warriors fighting with swords and shields, warrior on left protects fallen comrade, warrior on right wears horned helmet
Q . THERM (ligate) . M F (ligate) in exergue
18mm x 20mm, 3.99g
Minucia 19; Crawford 319/1; Sydenham 592

Seaby notes: This records the brave deeds of the moneyer's ancestor and namesake, who was consul in 193 BC. He was engaged in a severe contest with the Ligurians and is said to have distinguished himself by his bravery.
1 commentsAntonio Protti
AR_101.JPG
Q. Thermus M.f., AR Denarius, 103 BC, Rome 69 viewsHelmeted head of Mars left
(No legend)
Two warriors fighting with swords and shields, warrior on left protects fallen comrade, warrior on right wears horned helmet
Q . THERM (ligate) . M F (ligate) in exergue
18mm x 20mm, 3.99g
Minucia 19; Crawford 319/1; Sydenham 592; 103 BCE

Seaby notes: This records the brave deeds of the moneyer's ancestor and namesake, who was consul in 193 BC. He was engaged in a severe contest with the Ligurians and is said to have distinguished himself by his bravery.
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
Elagabal_07.jpg
RIC 4b, p.037, 131 - Elagabalus sacrificing21 viewsElagabalus
Denar, Rome
Obv.: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped and horned bust right
Rev.: SACERD DEI SOLIS ELAGAB, Elagabal sacrificing from patera over lit altar right, holding club, star in field
Ag, 19 mm, 3.2g
Ref.: RIC IV 131, RSC III 246, BMCRE V 225
2 commentsshanxi
1314.jpg
ric3247 viewsElagabalus
Orichalcum, Dupondius, Rome

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right, horned, seen from behind.
Rev: P. M. TR. P. IIII. COS III. P. P., S.C. across fields, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera over lighted altar, cypress branch in left arm, star in right field.
24 mm, 10.05 gms

RIC 324
Charles M
1136.jpg
ric3256 viewsElagabalus
AE As, Rome

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped bust right, horned.
Rev: P. M. TR. P. IIII. COS III. P. P., S.C. across fields, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera over lighted altar, cypress branch in left arm, star in right field.
24 mm, 8.91 gms

RIC 325 variant (horn)
Charles M
68a.jpg
ric325var14 viewsElagabalus
AE As, Rome

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, horned.
Rev: P. M. TR. P. IIII. COS III. P. P., S.C. across fields, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera over lighted altar, cypress branch in left arm, star in right field.
25 mm, 9.80 gms

RIC 325 variant (horned), Numismatik Naumann Auction #58, lot 492
Charles M
525c.jpg
ric34211 viewsElagabalus
AE As, Rome

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, horned.
Rev: ADVENTVS AVGVSTI, S.C. in exergue, Elagabalus on horseback riding left, raising right hand and holding scepter.
25.5 mm, 8.10 gms

RIC 342
Charles M
124c.jpg
ric357var10 viewsElagabalus
AE Dupondius, Rome

Obv: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, radiate draped bust right, horned.
Rev: LIBERTAS AVG, S.C. across fields, Libertas standing left, holding pileus and cornucopia, star in left field.
24 mm, 7.20 gms

RIC 357 variant (horned)
Charles M
Roman_Empire__Emperor_Elegabalas.jpg
Roman Empire / Emperor Elegabalas 55 viewsElagabalus AR Denarius.
Obverse : IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, horned, draped bust right.
Reverse : INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG, Elagabalus standing left, holding patera sacrificing over altar and holding club upright, bull lying down behind altar.
Rome Mint. Max Dia., : 19mm , Struck AD 221.
Ref: RIC IV part II, #88, page 34. RSC 61. BMC 212. Sear Roman Coins and their Values (RCV 2000 Edition) Number 7518.

From the Sam Mansourati collection.
2 commentsSam
Elagabalus~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Elagabalus 218-222 AD77 viewsElegabalus...218-222 AD
Silver Denarius
Minted: 221 AD
Obv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Draped bust right, laureate, Horned
Rev: PM TR P IIII COS III P P, Emperor standing left sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar, holding branch in right hand, star in left field.
Ric 46 Sear 7536

Very Lustrous with great details!

2 commentsTravis C
Elagabalus_Possibly_Unique~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D. Silver denarius71 viewsPossibly unique! The combination of this reverse legend with a recumbent bull behind the altar is apparently unpublished and this is the only example known to Forum. The bull is present on a similar type with the reverse legend INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG.


Silver denarius, RSC III 213c var. (no bull); BMCRE V 269 var. (same); Hunter III 68 var. (same); RIC IV 52 (S) var. (same, also no horn); SRCV II 7538 var. (same), NGC XF, strike 5/5, surface 3/5 (2412840-011), Rome mint, weight 3.07g, maximum diameter 18.4mm, die axis 0o, Jan 222 A.D.; obverse IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, horned, laureate, draped and bearded bust right, from the front; reverse P M TR P V COS IIII P P, Elagabalus standing slightly left, wearing Syrian priestly dress, sacrificing from patera in right hand over flaming altar at feet on left, club (or branch) cradled in left hand and arm, star in upper left field, recumbent bull behind altar; NGC certified (slabbed); extremely rare.

Coins with a horned portrait and the title TR P V were struck in January 222 A.D. After some days or weeks the horn was removed from Elagabalus' portrait. Elagabalus had shocked the public with bizarre behavior including cross dressing and marrying a vestal virgin. Removing the unusual horn from his portrait was probably part of a last ditch effort to show that he had changed, dropping his peculiar Syrian ways. The effort failed. On 11 March 222, Elagabalus and his mother were murdered, dragged through the streets of Rome and dumped into the Tiber.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
ARI-Elagabsalus-3~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Elagabalus, AR Denarius25 viewsAD 218 - 222
2.80 g
RIC 88

Obv.: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, draped and "horned portrait".

Rev.: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG - Elagabalus standing left holding patera over tripod altar, in background, a fallen bull and star above patera.
Richard M10
Julius Caesar~0.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Julius Caesar636 viewsR5384
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL: Julius Caesar, as dictator (49-44 BC). Silver denarius (4.04 gm). Mint moving with Caesar, 48–47 BC. Female head (Clementia?) right, wearing diadem, oak wreath and pearl necklace, numeral LII (52) behind / Trophy of Gallic arms consisting of a horned helmet, shield, mail cuirass, and carnyx, axe surmounted by animal´s head to right, CAE-SAR across lower field. Crawford 452/2. Sydenham 1009. CRI 11.

The obverse type, which probably depicts Clementia (clemency), symbolizes Caesar's leniency toward defeated enemies. The LII behind her head may indicate Caesar’s age (52) when these coins were struck. The reverse symbolizes Caesar's long years of campaigning in Gaul, where he cemented his reputation as a military commander of genius.
2 commentsgoldcoin
bararbous-consecratio.jpg
Roman Imperial Barbarous Radiate20 viewsRoman Imperial, Imitative Barbarous Radiate Antoninianus, 0.6g, 11mm

Obverse: Radiate head right.

Reverse: Altar with horned roof, cross above. Five dots on altar, one panel. Dot to left, right and below.

Reference: None

Ex: Holding History Coins +photo

Similar to the official CONSACRATIO issues for Claudius II. Obverse portrait looks like Tetricus I.
Gil-galad
Screenshot_2019-05-11_11_42_46.png
Roman Imperial, Elagabalus as Augustus, AR Denarius.12 viewsRome 218-222 A.D. 3.32g - 19.5mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG - Laureate, horned, draped bust right.

Rev: INVICTVS SACERDOS AVG - Elagabalus standing left holding patera, sacrificing over altar and holding branch downwards; ★ in upper left field, (no bull behind altar).

RIV IV-II 87.
scarli
88379q00.jpg
Roman Republic, Q. Minucius M.f. Thermus, 103 B.C., Silverdenarius13 viewsThe reverse refers to the moneyer's ancestor, Q. Minucius Q. f. L. n. Thermus, consul in 193 B.C., who distinguished himself by his bravery against the Ligurians.
RR88379. Silver denarius, Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, RSC I Minucia 19, BMCRR Italy 653, RBW Collection 1174, SRCV I 197, gVF, attractive style, light marks, some die wear, exergue not fully struck, Rome mint, weight 3.670g, maximum diameter 19.2mm, die axis 60o, 103 B.C.; obverse head of Mars left, wearing crested helmet, side ornamented with feather and annulet; reverse Roman soldier, on the left, fighting a barbarian, on the right, protecting a fallen comrade in center below, each holding a sword and shield, Roman soldier holds oval shield ornamented with a thunderbolt, barbarian wears a horned helmet, Q•TERM•MF in exergue
Mark R1
Q__Minucius_M_f__Thermus_-_2.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Q. Thermus M.f. - Minucia-19184 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC. Q. Thermus M.f. 103 BC. Silver denarius (3.86 gm). Head of Mars left / Two warriors fighting, the one on the left protecting fallen comrade, the other wearing horned helmet, Q THERM M F in exergue. Crawford 319/1, Sydenham 592, Babelon Minucia 19, RCV 1973 commentsBud Stewart
Tiberius_AE_Macedonia.JPG
RPC 1516 Claudius AE20 of Cassandrea, Macedon.30 viewsRPC 1516 Claudius AE20 of Cassandrea, Macedon. TI CLA CAES AVG GERM P M TR P, laureate head right / COL IVL AVG CASSANDR, horned head of Zeus-Ammon right. SNGANS 230. 8.33 gr.
Antonivs Protti
150.jpg
rsc15415 viewsElagabalus
AR Denarius

Obv: IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped bust right with horn
Rev: P M TR P III COS III P P, Sol, radiate, advancing left raising right hand & holding whip, star to left.
18 mm, 3.41 gms

RSC 154 variant --no references found for this reverse with a horned bust obverse
Charles M
sardes_panther.jpg
Sardes, Lydia. AE 17.2, Head of Dionysos/ Horned panther breaking spear in its mouth4 viewsSardes, Lydia. Æ, 6.13g. 17.2mm. Circa 2nd-1st Century B.C. Head of young Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy / ΣΑΡΔΙ/ΑΝΩΝ, horned panther standing left breaking spear in its mouth, XMP monogram below. BMC 241, 40; Aulock 3127. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
Sarmatia,_Olbia,_Black_Sea,_330-250_BC_,_AE-23__Horned_head_of_Borysthenes_(Dniepr)_l__O_#923;BIO,_bowcase_and_axe,_EPI__Frovola_718__Q-001,_0h,_23mm,_11,96g-s.jpg
Sarmatia, Olbia, Black Sea, (330-250 B.C.), Frovola 718(?), AE-23, OΛBIO, Axe, and Bow in Gorytos (Scythian bow case), #167 viewsSarmatia, Olbia, Black Sea, (330-250 B.C.), Frovola 718(?), AE-23, OΛBIO, Axe, and Bow in Gorytos (Scythian bow case), #1
avers: No legend, Horned head of River God Borysthenes (Dniepr) left.
reverse: OΛBIO, Axe, and Bow in Gorytos (Scythian bow case), Monogram (EΠI?) in left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0mm, weight: 11,96g, axis: 0h,
mint: Sarmatia, Olbia, Black Sea, date: 330-250 B.C.,
ref: SNG Cop.85var (monogram ?), Sear SG 1685, BMC 10 (?), SNG BM Black Sea ?, Frovola 718var. ( Monogram ?),
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
olbia_SNGblacksea496.jpg
Sarmatia, Olbia, SNG Copenhagen var.48 viewsAE 21, 12.40g
struck 300-260 BC
obv. Bearded and horned head of the rivergod Borysthenes, l.
rev. OLBIO
Battle-axe (sceptre?) and bow-case
in l. field LE
SNG BM Blacksea 496; SNG Copenhagen 85 var. (monogram); Karyshkovsky cf.41
VF, well centered, brown patina

Borysthenes was the ancient name of the river Dnjepr and the city of Olbia too. Together with the river Bug the Dnjepr flows into the Black Sea through the same liman. In the Latin of the 4th century the river was called Danapris, the origin of the recent name (Ukrainian Dnipro). The orator and philosopher Dion of Prusa draws in his 'Borysthenic oration' a fascinating picture of the city of Olbia and a human society embossed by Stoic and Platonian ideas.
Later the river Dnjepr was one of the most important rivers of the Vikings.

Jochen
Seleucid~1.jpg
Seleucid - Antiochus I (280-261BCE)7 viewsMetal/Size: AE20; Weight: 5.8 grams; Denomination: Bronze Unit; Mint: Antioch-on-the-Orontes; Date: 280-261 BCE; Obverse: Macedonian shield with anchor (Seleucid symbol) in central boss. Reverse: Horned elephant walking right; jawbone below; possible club above - BAΣIΛEΩΣ // ANTIOXOY. Reference: Hoover #148; Sear #6881; BMC #37.museumguy
Seleucid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I_AR_tetradrachm,_Susa.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Susa 19 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY (of King Alexander) Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, wreath above horned horse head in left field; Boeotian shield to right of wreath; BE above strut of throne.

SC 164.4(b); HGC 9, 10g; ESM 286; Price 3865 (same obv. die); Kritt ESMS S-10 Al.11 same dies A7/P2.
Susa Mint, 311-305 BC.

(25 mm, 16.96 g, 11h).

ex- William K. Raymond collection.

This coin is amongst the earliest issues of Seleukos I Nikator from the mint at Susa. With the addition of Seleukid symbols (in this example a horned horse head) it follows the preceding Susa wreath group struck in the interval 316-311 BC by Aspeisas, under the authority of Antigonos Monopthalmos.
1 commentsn.igma
Seleucid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I_AR_Tetradrachm,_Susa__Mint.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Susa29 viewsLaureate head of Zeus right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Athena Promachos brandishing spear and shield in a quadriga of horned elephants right, anchor above IΣO monogram in right field, bee beneath.

SC 178.1; Kritt ESMS S-86 El. 43 dies A11/P-; ESM 327; HGC 9, 18c (R1-2). Susa Mint, 283-281 BC.

(25 mm, 17.17 g, 12h).

Freeman & Sear.

An example of the Susa mint transition from biga to quadriga reverse, using an obverse die previously only recorded in the biga series. This obverse die is not found on any of the previously documented (by Newell and Kritt) elephant quadriga coins of the series. It is the only known example that demonstrates an obverse die link between the biga and quadriga emissions. Moreover, the reverse is struck from a die that has some characteristics that suggest it was re-engraved from an elephant biga to an elephant quadriga. As such this coin is amongst the first of the Susa elephant quadriga chariot issues, probably dated to ca. 282 BC.
2 commentsn.igma
Seleukid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I,_AE19_Antioch_on_Orontes_SC_25.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Æ 19 - Antioch on the Orontes ca. 290 BC 11 viewsMale figure (Dionysos as patron god of war elephants) seated on rock holding ankh (elephant goad).
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Horned elephant head right, [Ξ] in exergue.

SC 25; HGC 9, 78; CSE 12; WSM 929.
Struck ca. 290 BC.

(19 mm, 6.47 g, 12h).

Perhaps a few dozen examples of this coin type have survived to this day. This coin may have come from the same recently uncovered hoard, which saw five examples with identical patina come to market ove a period of eighteen months. Newell in WSM recorded seven specimens of this coin type, which he interpreted to be the last issue under Seleukos at Antioch, struck in celebration of Seleukos' victory over Lysimachos at Korupedion in 281 BC. Recently, Lorber and Houghton in "An Early Seleucid Bronze Hoard" (Israel Numismatc Journal 17, 2009-10, p. 15-33) convincingly re-interpreted the obverse motif with an association to the Battle of Ipsos and a probable dating to ca. 290 BC.
n.igma
Seleukid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I,_AE20.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Æ 19 - Antioch on the Orontes ca. 290 BC10 viewsMale figure (Dionysos as patron god of war elephants) seated on rock holding ankh (elephant goad).
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Horned elephant head right, [Ξ] in exergue.

SC 25; HGC 9, 78; CSE 12; WSM 929.
Struck ca. 290 BC.

(19 mm, 7.09 g, 12h).

Perhaps a few dozen examples of this coin type have survived to this day. This coin may have come from the same recently uncovered hoard, which saw five examples with identical patina come to market ove a period of eighteen months. Newell in WSM recorded seven specimens of this coin type, which he interpreted to be the last issue under Seleukos at Antioch, struck in celebration of Seleukos' victory over Lysimachos at Korupedion in 281 BC. Recently, Lorber and Houghton in "An Early Seleucid Bronze Hoard" (Israel Numismatc Journal 17, 2009-10, p. 15-33) convincingly re-interpreted the obverse motif with an association to the Battle of Ipsos and a probable dating to ca. 290 BC.
n.igma
Apamea_AE_lg.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, Æ 21 - Apamea on the Axios 28 viewsElephant standing right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Bridled horned horse's head left, anchor beneath.

SC 35; HGC 9, 79; CSE 415; WSM 1128; SNG Spaer 50-52; SNG Copenhagen 40; Sear GCV 6850.
Apamea on the Axios Mint 300-281 BC.

(21 mm, 7.86 g, 12h).

Seleukos I established Apamea on the Axios (a tributary of the upper Orontes River) in Syria around 300 BC. Named in honour of his Baktrian wife, Apama, it was developed on the site of the former Macedonian military colony of Pella. It became the primary Seleukid military depot and arsenal. In Apamea, Seleukos maintained his 500 war elephants and more than 30,000 horses to serve the needs of his cavalry, as well as an arsenal of weaponry and facilities for the manufacture of arms. For the next five generations, Seleukid military campaigns were mounted from Apamea.

The coin type is rare, with all known find locations being located in Syria, but with no control, or design linkages to any other emission from the Seleukid Syrian mints of the time. Newell placed this coin as the sole issue of Apamea during the reign of Seleukos I. This attribution was based on the absence of any linkage to any other Syrian mints and the iconography of the coin, which he felt reflected the military role and significance of Apamea. In the obverse he saw the war elephants, which were the pride of Seleukos’ army, while in the reverse he saw a reference to the powerful Seleukid cavalry, both of which were based at Apamea.

The iconography of the coin bears a striking similarity to the tetradrachm issues of Pergamon in Seleukos name in 281 BC, following the defeat of Lysimachos in the Battle of Korupedion. This short-lived emission is unique. Newell believed that it was possibly inspired by the Apamea bronze coinage, suggesting that the latter may have been struck at the time Seleukos was assembling his forces at Apamea for the decisive encounter with Lysimachos. Some of these coins may then have accompanied his soldiers into Asia Minor, eventually to find their way with his soldiers to Pergamon, where the type served as the model for the brief silver emission celebrating Seleukos’ victory at Korupedion.
2 commentsn.igma
Seleukid_Kingdom,_Seleukos_I_312-280_BC_AE_20.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 305-281 BC, Æ Double - Baktria, Uncertain Mint 19 (Baktra ?)19 viewsHead of Dioskouros right, wearing a wreathed pilos, all within dotted border (partially visible).
BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY (barely legible) Forepart of horned and bridled horse galloping right, anchor above, circled ΠYMH monogram to right.

ESM 749d var. (obverse monogram); Kritt SCB 45 variant (monogram detail); SC 269.4 var.; HGC 9, 87.
Struck 290/86-281 BC at Houghton & Lorber's Uncertain Baktrian Mint 19 probably Baktra.

(20 mm, 7.76 g, 7h).

This is one of the first Baktrian bronze coins to bear the name of the Seleukos. Twenty-one bronze coins with this iconography are known. Seventeen of these are listed in Kritt’s Seleukid Coins of Baktria catalogue, all attributed to Mint A (Baktra). Kritt noted that one similar coin (Kritt Group 7, 40) was found in the Ai Khanoum excavations. This specimen he considered to be a Mint A (Baktra ?) product, transported to Ai Khanoum in the pattern of trade of the time. Following Kritt’s reasoning, Seleucid Coins attributed this coin type to Uncertain Mint 19 (Kritt’s Mint A), perhaps Baktra, in the period 290/86-281 BC.
n.igma
1059_Seleukos_I.JPG
Seleukos I - AE7 viewsSeleucie on Tigris
296-280 BC
horned and bridled head of horse right
anchor
BAΣIΛEΩΣ // ΣEΛEYKOY
monogram
SC 146; ESM 46; SNG Spaer 135.
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
SelElephant.jpg
Seleukos I Nikator / Quadriga of Elephants17 viewsSeleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 17.13 g, 4h). Seleukeia on the Tigris II mint. Struck circa 296/5-281 BC.
O: Laureate head of Zeus right
R: BAΣIΛEΩΣ (King) left, Athena, brandishing spear and shield, in quadriga of elephants right; anchor above,ΣEΛEYKOY (Seleukos), two monograms in exergue.
- SC 130.20c corr. (monogram); ESM – (but obv. die A42); HGC 9, 18a; NFA XXII, lot 339 (same dies); CNG 96 lot 530 (Same Dies).

For this variety, 130.20c, SC cites NFA XXII, lot 339, but the monogram is not clear in the photograph. The present coin, from the same dies as the NFA piece, clearly shows that the diagonal line in the lower left of the monogram is not present.

Seleucus I was the founder of the Seleucid dynasty. His kingdom at its highest point extended from Thrace and Asia Minor in the West to Bactria in the East and from the Black Sea in the north to the borders of Egypt in the South. Out of all of the Successors of Alexander the Great, he was the one who came closest to restoring the entirety of the Macedonian Empire. Although Seleucus had been appointed satrap of Babylonia by an assembly of Alexander’s former generals in 321 BC, Antigonos, who was made strategos of Asia at the same time sought to remove the satraps that he could not control and thereby become the new master of Alexander’s Empire. Realizing the danger, Seleucus escaped from Babylon to the Egyptian court of Ptolemy. With Ptolemy’s assistance, Seleucus was able to return to Babylon and reclaim his satrapy in 312 BC. In 306/5 he embarked upon an eastern campaign to gain control of the Upper Satrapies.

This series of tetradrachms served as a reminder of the 500 war elephants Seleukos received in settlement with Chandragupta in the Peace of 303. The treaty is celebrated on the reverse which depicts a militant Athena being pulled by four elephants equipped with horned headdresses.

Elephants were the equivalent to the tank of the ancient Greek world. The elephants of Chandragupta had a pivotal role to play in Seleucus’ reign. Thanks to their timely arrival at the Battle of Ipsos (301 BC), it was possible for Seleucus and his allies to defeat and kill Antigonos, thereby ending an ever-present threat to his security. With Antigonos gone, Seleucus could safely rule his eastern kingdom. In 281 BC Philetairos and other cities and rulers of western Asia Minor invited Seleucus to march west and destroy his sometime ally, Lysimachos, who had made himself very unpopular in the region. Seleucus acquiesced to this request, defeating and killing Lysimacus at the Battle of Korupedion. This victory gained for Seleucus all of Lysimacus’ former territory in Asia Minor and Thrace, but he was not able to savour this triumph for long. Later in the year, as he marched through Thrace, Seleucus was murdered by a refugee from the Ptolemaic court.
1 commentsNemonater
115237LG.jpg
Sicily Akragas circa 400-380 BC AE hemilitron 26mm 17.66g 12h SNG ANS 1097-110120 viewsHorned head of river-god left,wearing taenia/Eagle standing left on Ionic column,head reverted,in left field crab,in right field value mark.Grant H
gela_SNGcop283-285.jpg
Sicily, Gela, SNG Copenhagen 283-28540 viewsSicily, Gela, c.420-415 BC
AE - tetras, 4.81g
obv. Bull with lowered head, l.
above GELAS, beneath three pellets (for 3 onkiai, tetras)
rev. Head of rivergod Gela, diademed and with horns on forehead, r.
SNG Copenhagen 283/5
about VF
Pedigree:
ex Baldwin's 1896, lot 202
ex coll. William C.Boyd (1840-1926)

In early times river-gods are depicted horned because they were equated to bulls due to their wild character. Homer writes how the river Skamandros was roaring like a bull.
Jochen
gela.jpg
SICILY, Gela. 27 viewsCirca 420-405 BC.
Æ Onkia
10x11 mm , 1,1 g
Bull standing right / Horned head of river-god right.
_932
Antonivs Protti
himera_r.jpg
SICILY, HIMERA27 viewsca 470-450 B.C.
AR litra 10 mm, 0.70 g, 12 h
O: Forepart of winged, bearded, and horned male sphinx left
R: IMEPAION, Pan riding goat left, brandishing lagobolon. SNG ANS 172-173; HGC 2, 451.
(ex Triskeles Auction)
1 commentslaney
4PanormosAR.jpg
SICILY, Panormos27 viewsSilver litra, Jenkins Punic 13, SNG ANS 549, aVF, toned, Ziz mint, weight 0.602g, maximum diameter 9.9mm, die axis 315o, c. 410 - 320 B.C.; obverse horned head of young river god left; reverse forepart of man-faced bull rushing right, Punic inscription above: ZIZ; very rare

Ex. Forvm...thanks, Joe!
1 commentsMolinari
211139_l.jpg
Skythia, Olbia. (Circa 260-250 BC)22 viewsAE 19, 7.30 g

Obv: Horned head of Borysthenes left.

Rev: OΛBIO. Axe and bow in quiver; API to left.

SNG BM Black Sea 530

Olbia was founded in the 7th century BC by colonists from Miletus. Its harbor was one of the main emporia on the Black Sea for the export of cereals, fish, and slaves to Greece, and for the import of Attic goods to Scythia.

During the reign of Alexander the Great, Olbia was attacked by the Zopyrion, who had been made a governor either of Thrace or of Pontus by Alexander. For this purpose, he collected a force of thirty thousand men.They marched along the Black Sea coast and besieged Olbia. But the Olbians "gave freedom to their slaves, granted the rights of citizenship to foreigners, changed promissory notes and thus managed to survive the siege". They also made an alliance with the Scythians. Zopyrion, lacking resources to continue the siege, decided to retreat. On his way back, Scythians destroyed his army by constant raids. Defeat was probably accomplished beyond the Danube by Getae and Triballi avenging Alexander's devastation of their lands in 335 BC. Zopyrion perished with his troops in the winter at the end of 331 BC.
Nathan P
19718p00.jpg
Tarsos, Cilicia62 viewsBronze AE 20, SNG Levante 966, VF, 6.218g, 20.9mm, 0o, obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; reverse TARSEWN, Sandan standing right on winged and horned lion-like animal, carries bow and sword, right raised, monogram left

purchased 09/2007 forvm e-bay auctions
Johnny
tarsos_k.jpg
Tarsos, Cilicia10 viewsAE22, 5.7g, 12h; late 2nd - mid 1st centuries BC
Obv.: Veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; countermark: radiate head of Helios within oval punch.
Rev.: ΤΑΡΣΕΩΝ; Statue of Sandan standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by an eagle, ∆P upper left
Reference: cf. SNG BnF 1307 ff.; SNG Levante 933 ff.; SNG Cop 333 ff.; CN
1 commentsJohn Anthony
a_Tarsos.JPG
Tarsos, Cilicia26 viewsAutonomous issue
164-27 BC
AE21 (21mm, 7.39g)
O: Turreted, veiled, draped bust of Tyche right, within dotted border.
R: Pyre of Sandon in the form of a pyramidal structure, containing figure of Sandon standing on a horned and winged lion, surmounting garlanded square basis; eagle perched on apex, M and H monograms to left, TAPΣEΩN to right.
Sear 5672
From the David Cannon Collection. ex Beast Coins
1 commentsEnodia
a_Tarsos_2.JPG
Tarsos, Cilicia29 viewsAutonomous issue
164-27 BC
AE21 (21mm, 7.39g)
O: Turreted, veiled, draped bust of Tyche right, within dotted border.
R: Pyre of Sandon in the form of a pyramidal structure, containing figure of Sandon standing on a horned and winged lion, surmounting garlanded square basis; eagle perched on apex, M and H monograms to left, TAPΣEΩN to right.
Sear 5672
From the David Cannon Collection. ex Beast Coins
2 commentsEnodia
Tarsos_-_Cilicia.jpg
Tarsos, Cilicia c. 164-27 B.C.4 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, c. 164-27 B.C. Ae 19.1~20.1 mm. 6.70 g. Obv: Veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, within dotted border. Rev: TAΡΣEΩN, Monument of Sandan: Sandan standing right on a horned and winged lion, holding grain ear and bipennis within triangular structure on a garlanded altar. Monogram in left field. SNG Cop 340.ddwau
DSCN4952.jpg
Tarsos, Cilicia. 130-80 BC. AE 20mm10 viewsTarsos, Cilicia. 130-80 BC.
Obv. Turreted head of Tyche right.
Rev. ΤΑΡΣΕΩΝ, Sandan standing on a horned winged animal, in a pyramidal monument, surmounted by an eagle.
Lee S
tarsos.jpg
Tarsos, Tyche/ Sandan standing on horned animal10 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, Roman Rule, 164 - c. 30 B.C. (possibly later). Bronze AE 20, SNG Levante 963, Fair, Maroneia mint, 2.610g, 13.8mm, 0o, obverse veiled and turreted bust of Tyche right, bead and reel border; reverse “ASK / GLU”, Sandan standing right on a horned goat-like animal walking right; rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
tarsos_sandan_lion.jpg
Tarsos, Tyche/ Sandan standing on horned lion15 viewsTarsos, Cilicia, Æ22. 2nd-1st century B.C. 5,4 g, 21 mm. Draped & turreted bust of Tyche right / ΤΑΡΣΕΩΝ to right, Sandan standing on horned lion right, holding branch, bow over shoulder, monograms to left. Sear GIC 5670.Podiceps
GRK_Thrace_Olbia_S__1685.JPG
Thrace, Olbia7 viewsSear 1685 var., BMC Peloponnesus p. 4.

AE 20, circa 330 - 300 B.C.

Obv: Head of the River-god Borysthenes, bearded and horned, facing left.

Rev: Bow in its case and a battle-axe;  monogram to left, ΛBIOto right.

Olbia, located in what is now modern-day Ukraine, was a Milesian colony at the convergence of the Hypanis and Borysthenes (Dnieper) rivers, about 15 miles inland from the Northwest coast of the Black Sea. Well located for trade with the Scythian tribes of the interior as well as all the coasts of the Euxine, Olbia was a prosperous trading city.
Stkp
063.JPG
Thymbra, Troas175 views350 B.C.
Bronze Æ 17
4.73 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Bearded, laurate and horned head of Zeus Ammon left
Rev.: Eight-rayed star with inscription Θ-Y between rays, HP monogram below
Sear 4147; BMC Troas p. 89, 4
8 commentsJaimelai
Trajan_Cappadocia_Zeus.jpg
Trajan - AE30 of Cappadocia, Rev. Horned bust of Zeus46 viewsTrajan AE30 of Caesarea, Cappadocia. COS 5 = 103-111 AD. AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANO CEB GEPM DAK, laureate bust right, draped far shoulder / DHMARC EX UPATO e, horned & bearded bust of Zeus Ammon right. Sydenham 2321 commentsmattpat
P5270005.JPG
TRAJAN DECIUS 248-251 A.D. Caesarea Maritima mint AE2852 viewsTRAJAN DECIUS 248-251 A.D. Caesarea Maritima mint AE28
OBV: IMP C C MES Q TRAIDECIVS AVG, bust r, luar cuirassed and wearing
paludamentum
REV:horned altar behind two trees a palm tree and a fig tree on R
COLPRFAVGFCCAESMET ex:R S P
Maritima
3360235.jpg
Trajan Provincial60 viewsTrajan 98-117 AD. AR Hemidrachm . Cyrenaica, Cyrene. 100 AD. (15mm; 1.98g; 6h) Obv: AΥT KAIΣ NEΡ TΡAIAN ΣEB ΓERM, Laureate head of Trajan right. Rev: ΔHMAP X EΞ ΥΠATO · T, Horned head of Zeus–Ammon right
Sydenham, Caesarea 178.

Ex: CNG
3 commentsPaddy
P1010019.bmp
Volusianus 251-253 A.D.65 viewsObv:bust r. radiate wearing paludamentum and cuirass
Rev:horned altar behind two trees a palm tree and a fig tree on r.
Maritima
TisnaiosSNGCop283.jpg
[103tis] Tisna, Aiolis, 350 - 300 B.C.169 viewsBronze AE 17, SNG Cop 283, choice gVF, 3.960g, 16.7mm, 180o; Obverse: horned head of river-god Tisnaios left, slightly facing; Reverse :TIS/NAION either side of one-handled cup; superb and unusual style!; rare. Ex FORVM.


The following research was done by Jochen (Tribunus Plebis, 2006; Procurator Caesaris; Caesar), a member extraordinaire of the FORVM Discussion Boards, and the originator and leading contributor to our Coins of Mythological Interest Board:

"Von Mogens Herman Hansen, Thomas Heine, An Inventory of Archaic and Classical Poleis, Oxford University Press, p.1051: 835. *Tisna (Tisnaia) Map 56. Lat. 38-45, long. 27.05 but see 'infra' C:? The toponym Tisna can be reconstructed from the city-ethnic attested by C4 coin legends (infra). Presumably the community took its name from the river Tisna, a personification of which was depicted on Tisna's coins. Tisna struck bronze coins in C4. Types: obv. beardless male head l., horned (river god Tisnaios); rev. one-handle vase, or spearhead, or sword in sheath; legend TISNAI or TISNAIO or TISNAIOS or TISNAION (Imhoof-Blumer (1883) 275 nos.241-42; Head, HN2 557; Robert (1937) 189; BMC Troas 149; SNG Cop Aeolis 283). The book I found under books.google.de It is the first lexicon of all identifiable Greek city states of the Archaic and Classical period (c. 650-325 BC).

You can see that Tisna must be a small city in Aiolis known only by its coins. It is not mentioned in 'Der kleine Pauly' nor depicted in my Historical Atlas.
[The emphasis is mine, J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.]


Aeolis (Ancient Greek Αιολίς Aiolís) or Aeolia was an area that comprised the west and northwestern region of Asia Minor, mostly along the coast, and also several offshore islands (particularly Lesbos), where the Aeolian Greek city-states were located. Aeolis incorporated the southern parts of Mysia which bounded it to the north, Ionia to the south, and Lydia to the east. In early times, the Aeolians' twelve most important cities were independent, and formed a league: Cyme (also called Phriconis), Larissae, Neonteichos, Temnus, Cilla, Notium, Aegiroessa, Pitane, Aegae, Myrina, Gryneia, and Smyrna.

According to Homer's description, Odysseus, after his stay with the Cyclopes, reached the island of Aeolus, who provided him with the west wind Zephyr.

Aeolis was an ancient district on the western coast of Asia Minor. It extended along the Aegean Sea from the entrance of the Hellespont (now the Dardanelles) south to the Hermus River (now the Gediz River). It was named for the Aeolians, some of whom migrated there from Greece before 1000 BC. Aeolis was, however, an ethnological and linguistic enclave rather than a geographical unit. The district often was considered part of the larger northwest region of Mysia.

By the 8th century BC, twelve of the southern Aeolian city-states were grouped together in a league. The most celebrated of the cities was Smyrna (modern Izmir, Turkey), but in 699 BC, Smyrna became part of an Ionian confederacy. The remaining cities were conquered by Croesus, king of Lydia (reigned 560-546 BC). Later they were held successively by the Persians, Macedonians, Seleucids, and Pergamenes. Attalus III, the last king of Pergamum, bequeathed Aeolis to Rome in 133 BC. Shortly afterward, it was made part of the Roman province of Asia. At the partition of the Roman Empire (395 AD), Aeolis was assigned to the East Roman (Byzantine) empire and remained under Byzantine rule until the early 1400s, when the Ottoman Turks occupied the area.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aeolis

Ed. by J.P.Fitzgerald, Jr.

Thank you, Jochen.
Cleisthenes
42576q00.jpg
[303a] Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 280 B.C.123 viewsSilver drachm, Houghton and Lorber 131(8), Newell ESM 91a-b (same obv die), gVF, Seleukeia mint, weight 4.239g, maximum diameter 17.1mm, die axis 270o, obverse laureate head of Zeus; reverse Athena driving quadriga of horned elephants right, anchor above, BASILEWS on left, SELEUKOU in ex; ex CNG auction 82, lot 713. Ex FORVM.

Seleukos (often spelled Seleucus) I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.

In the year 281 B.C., at the age of 77, Seleukos was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus (the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter). All of the "principal" Diadochi; Antigonas Monophthalmos, Antipater, Kassander, Ptolemy, Lysimichus and Seleukos; had now joined their great king, Alexander, in death.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
5 commentsCleisthenes
CommodusRSC190.jpg
[906a]Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.168 viewsCOMMODUS AR silver denarius. RSC 190. RCV 5644. 16.5mm, 2.3g. F. Obverse: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, bust of Commodus wearing lion skin in imitation of Hercules and Alexander the Great, facing right; Reverse: HER-CVL RO-MAN AV-GV either side of club of Hercules, all in wreath. RARE. Ex Incitatus.

This coin refers to Commodus' belief that he was Hercules reincarnated. According to the historian Herodian, "he issued orders that he was to be called not Commodus, son of Marcus, but Hercules, son of Jupiter. Abandoning the Roman and imperial mode of dress, he donned the lion-skin, and carried the club of Hercules..." (Joseph Sermarini).

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Commodus (A.D. 180-192)

Dennis Quinn

Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus, the son of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius and his wife-cousin Faustina, was born in Lanuvium in 161 AD. Commodus was named Caesar at the age of 5, and co-Augustus at the age of 17, spending most of his early life accompanying his father on his campaigns against the Quadi and the Marcomanni along the Danubian frontier. His father died, possibly of the plague, at a military encampment at Bononia on the Danube on 17 March 180, leaving the Roman Empire to his nineteen-year-old son.[[1]] Upon hearing of his father's death, Commodus made preparations for Marcus' funeral, made concessions to the northern tribes, and made haste to return back to Rome in order to enjoy peace after nearly two decades of war. Commodus, and much of the Roman army behind him, entered the capital on 22 October, 180 in a triumphal procession, receiving a hero's welcome. Indeed, the youthful Commodus must have appeared in the parade as an icon of new, happier days to come; his arrival sparked the highest hopes in the Roman people, who believed he would rule as his father had ruled.[[2]]

The coins issued in his first year all display the triumphant general, a warrior in action who brought the spoils of victory to the citizens of Rome.[[3]] There is a great deal of evidence to support the fact that Commodus was popular among many of the people, at least for a majority of his reign. He seems to have been quite generous.[[4]]. Coin types from around 183 onward often contain the legend, Munificentia Augusta[[5]], indicating that generosity was indeed a part of his imperial program. Coins show nine occasions on which Commodus gave largesses, seven when he was sole emperor.[[6]] According to Dio, the emperor obtained some of this funding by taxing members of the senatorial class.[[7]] This policy of munificence certainly caused tensions between Commodus and the Senate. In 191 it was noted in the official Actus Urbis that the gods had given Commodus to Populus Senatusque Romanus. Normally the phrase Senatus Populusque Romanus was used. [[8]] While the Senate hated Commodus, the army and the lower classes loved him.[[9]] Because of the bad relationship between the Senate and Commodus as well as a senatorial conspiracy,[[10]] Rome "...was virtually governed by the praetorian prefects Perennis (182-185) and Cleander (186-9)."[[11]]

Commodus began to dress like the god Hercules, wearing lion skins and carrying a club.[[12]] Thus he appropriated the Antonines' traditional identification with Hercules, but even more aggressively. Commodus' complete identification with Hercules can be seen as an attempt to solidify his claim as new founder of Rome, which he now called the Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana. This was legitimized by his direct link to Hercules, son of Father Jupiter.[[13]] He probably took the title of Hercules officially some time before mid-September 192.[[14]]

While the literary sources, especially Dio, Herodian, and the Historia Augusta, all ridicule the antics of his later career, they also give important insight into Commodus' relationship to the people.[[15]] His most important maneuver to solidify his claims as Hercules Romanus was to show himself as the god to the Roman people by taking part in spectacles in the amphitheater. Not only would Commodus fight and defeat the most skilled gladiators, he would also test his talents by encountering the most ferocious of the beasts.[[16]]

Commodus won all of his bouts against the gladiators.[[17]] The slayer of wild beasts, Hercules, was the mythical symbol of Commodus' rule, as protector of the Empire.[[18]]

During his final years he declared that his age should be called the "Golden Age."[[19]] He wanted all to revel in peace and happiness in his age of glory, praise the felicitas Commodi, the glorious libertas, his pietas, providential, his victoria and virtus aeterna.[[20]] Commodus wanted there to be no doubt that this "Golden Age" had been achieved through his munificence as Nobilissimus Princeps. He had declared a brand new day in Rome, founding it anew in 190, declaring himself the new Romulus.[[21]] Rome was now to be called Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana, as noted above, and deemed "the Immortal," "the Fortunate," "the Universal Colony of the Earth."[[22]] Coins represent the archaic rituals of city-[re]foundation, identifying Commodus as a new founder and his age as new days.[[23]]

Also in 190 he renamed all the months to correspond exactly with his titles. From January, they run as follows: Lucius, Aelius, Aurelius, Commodus, Augustus, Herculeus, Romanus, Exsuperatorius, Amazonius, Invictus, Felix, Pius.[[24]] According to Dio Cassius, the changing of the names of the months was all part of Commodus' megalomania.[[25]] Commodus was the first and last in the Antonine dynasty to change the names of the months.


The legions were renamed Commodianae, the fleet which imported grain from Africa was called Alexandria Commodiana Togata, the Senate was deemed the Commodian Fortunate Senate, his palace and the Roman people were all given the name Commodianus.[[26]] The day that these new names were announced was also given a new title: Dies Commodianus.[[27]] Indeed, the emperor presented himself with growing vigor as the center of Roman life and the fountainhead of religion. New expressions of old religious thought and new cults previously restricted to private worship invade the highest level of imperial power.[[28]]

If Eusebius of Caesarea [[29]] is to be believed, the reign of Commodus inaugurated a period of numerous conversions to Christianity. Commodus did not pursue his father's prohibitions against the Christians, although he did not actually change their legal position. Rather, he relaxed persecutions, after minor efforts early in his reign.[[30]] Tradition credits Commodus's policy to the influence of his concubine Marcia; she was probably his favorite,[[31]] but it is not clear that she was a Christian.[[32]] More likely, Commodus preferred to neglect the sect, so that persecutions would not detract from his claims to be leading the Empire through a "Golden Age."[[33]]

During his reign several attempts were made on Commodus' life.[[34]] After a few botched efforts, an orchestrated plot was carried out early in December 192, apparently including his mistress Marcia. On 31 December an athlete named Narcissus strangled him in his bath,[[35]] and the emperor's memory was cursed. This brought an end to the Antonine Dynasty.


SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alföldy, G. "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.

Aymard, J. "Commode-Hercule foundateur de Rome," Revue des études latines 14 (1936): 340-64.

Birley, A. R. The African Emperor: Septimius Severus. -- rev. ed.-- London, 1988.
________. Marcus Aurelius: A Biography. London, 1987.

Breckenridge, J. D. "Roman Imperial Portraiture from Augustus to Gallienus," ANRW 2.17. 1 (1981): 477-512.

Chantraine, H. "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quartalschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975): 1-31.

Ferguson, J. The Religions of the Roman Empire. Ithaca, 1970.

Fishwick, D. The Imperial Cult in the Latin West. Leiden, 1987.

Gagé, J. "La mystique imperiale et l'épreuve des jeux. Commode-Hercule et l'anthropologie hercaléenne," ANRW 2.17.2 (1981), 663-83.

Garzetti, A. From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192. London, 1974.

Grosso F. La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo. Turin, 1964.

Hammond, M. The Antonine Monarchy. Rome, 1956.

Helgeland, J. "Roman Army Religion," ANRW II.16.2 (1978): 1470-1505.

Howe, L. L. The Praetorian Prefect from Commodus to Diocletian (A. D. 180-305). Chicago, 1942.

Keresztes, P. "A Favorable Aspect of Commodus' Rule," in Hommages à Marcel Renard 2. Bruxelles, 1969.

Mattingly, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. London, 1930.

Nock, A. D. "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947): 102-116.

Parker, H. M. D. A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337. London, 1935.
________. and B.H. Warmington. "Commodus." OCD2, col. 276.

Raubitschek, A. E. "Commodus and Athens." Studies in Honor of Theodore Leslie Shear. Hesperia, Supp. 8, 1948.

Rostovtzeff, M. I. "Commodus-Hercules in Britain," Journal of Roman Studies 13 (1923): 91-105.

Sordi, M. "Un senatore cristano dell'éta di Commodo." Epigraphica 17 (1959): 104-112.

Speidel, M. P. "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993): 109-114.

Stanton, G. R. "Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus, and Commodus: 1962-1972." ANRW II.2 (1975): 478-549.

Notes
[[1]] For a discussion of the circumstances surrounding the death of Marcus Aurelius, see A. R. Birley, Marcus Aurelius: A Biography -- rev. ed. -- (London, 1987), 210.
Aurelius Victor, De Caes. 16.4, writing around the year 360, claimed Aurelius died at Vindobona, modern Vienna. However, Tertullian, Apol. 25, who wrote some seventeen years after Marcus' death, fixed his place of death at Sirmium, twenty miles south of Bononia. A. R. Birley (Marcus Aurelius, 209-10) cogently argues Tertullian is much more accurate in his general description of where Marcus was campaigning during his last days.
For the dating of Marcus Aurelius' death and the accession of Commodus, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy (Rome, 1956), 179-80.

[[2]] For the army's attitude toward peace, the attitude of the city toward the peace, and the reception of the emperor and his forces into Rome, see Herodian, 1.7.1-4; for Commodus' subsequent political policies concerning the northern tribes, see G. Alföldy, "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.
For a commentary on the early years of Commodus in the public perception as days of optimism, see A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192 (London, 1974), 530. For a more critical, and much more negative portrayal, see the first chapter of F. Grosso, La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo (Turin, 1964).

[[3]]The gods Minerva and Jupiter Victor are invoked on the currency as harbingers of victory; Jupiter Conservator on his coins watches over Commodus and his Empire, and thanks is given to divine Providence (H. Mattingly, The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [London, 1930] 356-7, 366-7). In 181, new coin types appear defining the new reign of Commodus. Victory and peace are stressed. Coins extol Securitas Publica, Felicitas, Libertas, Annona, and Aequitas (ibid., 357).
By 186 Commodus is depicted as the victorious princes, the most noble of all born to the purple. Herodian (1.5.5) describes how Commodus boasted to his soldiers that he was born to be emperor. See also H. Chantraine, "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quatralschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975), 26. He is called Triumphator and Rector Orbis, and associated with the Nobilitas of Trojan descent (Mattingly, RIC III.359; idem, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. Volume IV: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [Oxford, 1940], clxii).

[[4]] Dio tells us that Commodus liked giving gifts and often gave members of the populace 140 denarii apiece (Cass. Dio, 73.16), whereas the Historia Augusta reports that he gave each man 725 denarii (SHA, Comm., 16.3).

[[5]]Mattingly, RIC, III.358.

[[6]] Idem., CBM, IV.clxxiv.

[[7]]Cass. Dio, 73.16.

[[8]]M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 113.

[[9]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.xii. Commodus was also popular amongst the northern divisions of the army because he allowed them to wield axes in battle, a practice banned by all preceding emperors. See, Speidel, JRS 83 (1993), 114.

[[10]]Infra, n. 34.

[[11]] H. Parker and B.H. Warmington, OCD2, s.v. "Commodus," col. 276; after 189, he was influenced by his mistress Marcia, Eclectus his chamberlain, and Laetus (who became praetorian prefect in 191 (Idem.).

[[12]]Herodian, 1.14.8. Hadrian appears on medallions in lion skins; but as far as the sources tell us, he never appeared in public in them. See J. Toynbee, Roman Medallions,(New York, 1986), 208.
He would often appear at public festivals and shows dressed in purple robes embroidered with gold. He would wear a crown made of gold, inlaid with the finest gems of India. He often carried a herald's staff as if imitating the god Mercury. According to Dio Cassius, Commodus' lion's skin and club were carried before him in the procession, and at the theaters these vestiges of Hercules were placed on a gilded chair for all to see (Cass. Dio, 73.17). For the implications of the golden chair carried in procession in relation to the imperial cult, see D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West, (Leiden, 1987-91 ), 555.

[[13]] H. M. D. Parker, A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337, (London, 1935), 34; For medallions that express the relationship between Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius, and Lucius Verus extolling Hercules as a symbol of civic virtue, see Toynbee, Roman Medallions, 208. For a general statement on the symbolism of Hercules in the Antonine age, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy, 238.
For a discussion of Commodus' association with Hercules, see
Rostovtzeff, "Commodus-Hercules," 104-6.
Herodian spells out the emperor's metamorphosis in detail (1.14.8).

[[14]]See Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor," 114. He argues this general date because a papyrus from Egypt's Fayum records Hercules in Commodus' title on 11 October 192.

[[15]]For a preliminary example, Herodian writes (1.13.8), "people in general responded well to him."

[[16]]As Dio reports, Commodus, with his own hands, gave the finishing stroke to five hippopotami at one time. Commodus also killed two elephants, several rhinoceroses, and a giraffe with the greatest of ease. (Cass. Dio, 73.10), and with his left hand (ibid., 73.19). Herodian maintains that from his specially constructed terrace which encircled the arena (enabling Commodus to avoid risking his life by fighting these animals at close quarters), the emperor also killed deer, roebuck, various horned animals, lions, and leopards, always killing them painlessly with a single blow. He purportedly killed one hundred leopards with one hundred javelins, and he cleanly shot the heads off countless ostriches with crescent-headed arrows. The crowd cheered as these headless birds continued to run around the amphitheater (1.15-4-6; for Commodus' popularity at these brutal spectacles, see Birley, The African Emperor, 86) (and Dio tells his readers that in public Commodus was less brutal than he was in private [73.17ff]).

[[17]] According to Herodian (1.15-17), "In his gladiatorial combats, he defeated his opponents with ease, and he did no more than wound them, since they all submitted to him, but only because they knew he was the emperor, not because he was truly a gladiator."

[[18]]Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.360.

[[19]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[20]] Mattingly, RIC, III.361. For Commodus' propaganda of peace, see W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392.

[[21]] W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392-3. In 189 a coin type was issued with the legend Romulus Conditor, perhaps indicating he began the official renaming process during that year. For a discussion on Commodus as Romulus, see A. D. Nock, "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947), 103.

[[22]] HA, Comm. 7.1; Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[23]]Mattingly, RIC, III.361. See also, Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.386.

[[24]]The title Felix is first used by the emperor Commodus, and is used in the titles of almost all successive emperors to the fifth century. See, D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West (Leiden, 1987-91), 473.
HA, Comm., 12.315; Cass. Dio, 73.15; Herodian, I.14.9. These new names for the months seem to have actually been used, at least by the army, as confirmed by Tittianus' Altar. See M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 112.

[[25]] Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[26]]Legions:Idem.; the Grain fleet: SHA, Comm., 12.7. For a further discussion of Commodus' newly named fleet, see, A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines, 547. For coins issued extolling the fleet, see Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxix; RIC, III.359; the Senate: Cass. Dio, 73.15; the Imperial Palace: SHA, Comm., 12.7; the Roman People: Ibid., 15.5.

[[27]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[28]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxxxiv.

[[29]]Eusebius, Hist.Ecc., 5.21.1.

[[30]]For a discussion of the treatment of Christianity during the reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus as well as persecutions during the reign of Commodus, see Keresztes, "A Favorable Aspect," 374, 376-377.

[[31]]Herodian, 1.16.4; Dio, 73.4. A Medallion from early 192 shows Commodus juxtaposed with the goddess Roma, which some scholars have argued incorporates the features of Marcia. See, Roman Medallions, "Introduction." Commodus was married, however, to a woman named Crispina. He commissioned several coins early in his rule to honor her.

[[32]]The Christian apologist Hippolytus tells that she was a Christian (Philos. 9.2.12), Dio tells that she simply favored the Christians (73.4). Herodian does not take a stand on the matter either way (1.16.4).

[[33]]Cass. Dio, 73.15. He pronounces Commodus' edict that his rule should be henceforth called the "Golden Age."

[[34]]H. Parker and B.H. Warmington note that Commodus..."resorted to government by means of favorites...which was exacerbated by an abortive conspiracy promoted by Lucilla and Ummidius Quadratus (182)." (OCD2, col. 276).

[[35]]Herodian, 1.17.2-11; Dio Cass., 73.22; SHA, Comm.,17.1-2.

Copyright (C) 1998, Dennis Quinn. This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and this copyright notice, remain intact. Used by Permission.

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