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DIOCLET-2.jpg
37 viewsDIOCLETIANVS - AE Follis - Mint of Carthago -298/303 AD.
Obv.: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right
Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthago standing left, holding fruits in both hands, A in ex.
Gs. 7,7 mm. 27,9
Cohen 438, RIC 31a
Maxentius
MAXIMIN2-1.jpg
57 viewsMAXIMINVS II - Follis - Mint of Carthago - 305-306 AD.
Obv.:GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left holding fruits in both hands, I in left field, Δ in ex.
Gs. 3,9 mm 29,4
RIC VI 40b, Cohen 150.
2 commentsMaxentius
Punic 1~0.jpg
188 viewsTanit
Punic 7~0.jpg
70 viewsTanit
01141q00.jpg
13 viewsJustinian I, 527-565. 1/2 Siliqua (Silver, 14 mm, 1.31 g, 9 h), Carthage, 534/7-552. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right. Rev. Large monogram; cross above, S below; all within wreath. DOC -. MIB 53. SB 254 ('siliqua'). Darkly toned. Struck on the usual somewhat irregular flan, otherwise, good very fine. Quant.Geek
Album-2677.JPG
12 viewsGeorgia Georgia and Armenia as part of the Iranian state
Husayn, 1105-1135 H./1694-1722 AD Abbasi of oblong shape 1129 H., Tiflîs, mint and date in central cartouche. Album 2677
SpongeBob
Augustus_REX_PTOL.jpg
2 Augustus and Ptolemy, King of Mauretania 28 viewsÆ Semis, Carthago Nova, Spain
C. Laetilius Apalus and Ptolemy, duoviri.

Bare head of Augustus right / Name and titles of the duoviri around diadem, REX PTOL inside

RPC 172; SNG Copenhagen 494

Ptolemy of Mauretania (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος, Latin: Ptolemaeus, 1 BC-40) was the son of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene and the grandson of Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. He was the last Roman client King of Mauretania, and the last of the Ptolemy line.
1 commentsSosius
Scipio_Bronze.jpg
Scipio Africanus30 viewsSCIPIO AFRICANUS
Æ15, Spain, Carthago Nova, (2.4g) c. 209 B.C.

Male Roman style head left, probably Scipio Africanus before he was given title Africanus / Horse head right

SNG Cop. 298, Lindgren Eur. Mints 6. Toynbee p. 18-19. VF, green patina, encrust.

This coin may be the earliest depiction of a living Roman. Carthago Nova also produced rare likely portraits of Hannibal.
RR0029
Sosius
Diocletian_Carthage_RIC_31a-sm2.jpg
1 Diocletian33 viewsDiocletian. A.D. 284-305. Æ follis (29.4 mm, 10.61 g, 6 h). Carthage, A.D. 299-303. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left, holding fruit in both hands; A in exergue. RIC 31a. VF, silvered.
Ex Agora Auctions #1 - Nov 2013
Sosius
rjb_spain2_08_05.jpg
470 viewsObverse
PHILIPPVS monogram
Crowned 1642
Date in cartouche?
Reverse
REX monogram
XII over ?
?
mauseus
rjb_spain1_08_05.jpg
582 viewsObverse
PHILIPPVS monogram
Crowned date (unclear, 1641?)
Cartouche date (unclear)
Reverse
REX monogram
Cartouche 8
VIII over MD
mauseus
rjb_spain6_08_05.jpg
651 viewsObverse
IIII over ?
IIII over bat
Reverse
VI over G
1659 in cartouche
mauseus
rjb_spain7_08_05.jpg
745 viewsObverse
VI over S
Crowned IIII over G
Reverse
Cartouche 1636
mauseus
rjb_spain8_08_05.jpg
864 viewsObverse
VI over G
Cartouche 1654
Reverse
IIII over ?
IIII over ?
Crowned 1636
mauseus
Carthage.jpg
Coinage of Carthage 26 views1 commentsChristian T
Dolphindidrachm.jpg
Punic occupation half shekel78 viewsNude youth on horseback to left, crowning horse with wreath; IΩ to right, ΣΩΓENHΣ below

Taras astride dolphin to left, holding cornucopiae and Nike who crowns him with wreath; TAPAΣ below.

Calabria, Tarentum ; Punic occupation, circa 212-209 BC

AR Reduced didrachm or Half-Shekel.

2.69g chipped otherwise VF+

Vlasto 975-7; HN Italy 1079.

Ex-ANE

Rare!

The climax of the Carthaginian invasion of Italy was reached when Tarentum changed sides in 212 BC. The takeover of the city was a carefully planned coup by Hannibal and members of the city's democratic faction who opened the gates to Hannibal's army. The Carthaginians failed to take the citadel, but subsequent fortifications around this enemy stronghold enabled the city to remain under Punic control. Hannibal installed his own magistrates and struck coinage based on the Punic half shekel standard.
8 commentsJay GT4
Sicily_Gallery_h.jpg
Sicily26 viewsGreek colonies dotted the island of Sicily from about the mid-8th C. BC onward, sometimes conflicting with the native tribes (Sikels to the east, Sikanians in central Sicily, and Elymians to the west) and several Phoenician colonies. The largest issuance of coinage by the city-states often came amidst conflict among themselves and later arrivals, the Carthaginians and Romans. While Greek coin types and denominations predominated, the local litra and its fractions of onkiai survived down to the Roman conquest in 212 BC, when local striking withered. Major mints include Akragas, Gela, Himera, Kamarina, Katane, Leontini, Messene, Naxos, Segesta, Selinos, Syracuse, and the siculo-punic mints of Entella and Lilybaion.
3 commentsAnaximander
Vandals_-__Thrasamund,_496-523_AD,_N_Africa.JPG
106 viewsVANDALS, Thrasamund. 496-523.
Æ Nummus (10mm, 0.40 g)
Contemporary Vandalic imitation. Carthage mint.
Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Victory standing left, holding wreath and palm
MEC 1, 31-2; BMC Vandals 37-41
Ardatirion
00019x00~0.jpg
9 viewsSPAIN
PB Tessera (12mm, 2.57 g)
IQ within beaded square cartouche
Blank
Unpublished
Ardatirion
00026x00~1.jpg
18 viewsSPAIN
PB Tessera (12mm, 2.22 g)
ISI within beaded square cartouche
Blank
Unpublished

Found in Southern Spain

This is a part of a small group of leads of similar module that were found in Southern Spain. They appear to be distinct from the series described by Casariego et al and Stannard.
Ardatirion
sev_alex_sidon_astarte.jpg
(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER22 views222 - 235 AD
AE 23 mm; 7.79 g
O: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind;
R: cart of Astarte, two wheels, four columns supporting roof, Baetyl within, inverted crescent above, two figures at base
Phoenicia, Sidon mint; cf BMC 318 - 319
laney
diocletian_vot_fk_res.jpg
(0284) DIOCLETIAN23 views284 - 305 AD
Struck ca. 303 AD
Post reform radiate AE fraction 20.5 mm, 3.06 g
O: IMP C DIOCLETIANANVS P F AVG; radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R: VOT/XX/FK, all in wreath
Carthage mint
laney
constantius_i_africa.jpg
(0293) CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS50 views293 - 305 AD (As Caesar)
struck 297 - 298 AD
AE 28.5 mm, 6.96 g
O: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right
R: FELIX ADVENT AVGG NN, Africa standing left holding scepter and elephant tusk, lion over bull at feet on left, H in left field
PKT in exe
Carthage
laney
tiberius_nero_drusus_resb.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS20 views14 - 37 AD
AE 28.5 mm; 11.46 g
O: His bare head left
R: Confronted heads of Caesars Nero and Drusus
Spain (Hispania Tarraconensis), Carthago Nova mint
cf RPC 179, SNG Cop 500 Scarce
laney
BYZ_HERACLIUS_20_NUMMI.jpg
(0610) HERACLIUS30 views610 - 641 AD
(struck 611 - 617)
AE 20 NUMMI 17 mm 4.72 g
O: DN ERACLIO PP AV
HELMETED CUIR BUST FACING
R: LARGE XX, CROSS ABOVE
KRTG IN EXE
CARTHAGE
laney
constans_ii_res.jpg
(0641) CONSTANS II41 views641-668 AD
AE Half Follis 18 mm; 4.10 g
O: Beardedbbust facing; wearing consular robes and crown with trefoil ornament, holding mappa and globus cruciger
R: Large cross dividing C-T and X-X; above cross, star between two pellets
CARTHAGE mint
laney
oW4EoRc8bk7N9AxnXr6Mt3yW2DKmC5~0.jpg
(582-602) Maurice Tibere [Sear 565, Carthage]24 viewsD.N. MAVRICI.(Or similar). Crowned, dr. and cuir. bust facing. Lrge I between two crosses; above, n ans m with cross between; in exergue, IND III (Ex Albert Vaughn)1 commentsSégusiaves
072~0.JPG
(610-641) Heraclius [Sear 871]8 viewsAR Half Siliqua, 0.70 gm. Carthage mint. Struck 617-641 AD. Crowned, draped, and cuirassed bust of Heraclius right / no legend, facing busts of Heraclius Constantine on left, wearing crown and chlamys, and Martina on right, wearing crown with long pendilia, and robes; cross between their heads, sometimes with four dots between their shoulders. DOC 233; MIB 149; SB 871.Ségusiaves
57636q00.jpg
*SOLD*16 viewsCarthage, Zeugitania AE15

Attribution: SNG Cop 144 ff., Sardinia
Date: 300-264 BC
Obverse: head of Tanit l. wearing wreath of grain, earring and necklace
Reverse: horse's head r.
Size: 18.8 mm
Weight: 5.57 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
ZeugInHandSideSmaller.jpg
...and another shot of the Carthaginian crusher63 viewsLooks a lot like a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, doesn't it?

YUM!

ZEUGITANA, Carthage. 15 shekel.
AE45, 95.4g
circa 200 BC
Obverse: head of Tanit
Reverse: horse standing right, left foreleg up; above, radiate disc flanked by uraei

I don't have a reference book and the only other picture of one I've found is on the magnagraecia.nl site. Their list indicates four specimens known to them. Don't know if this is one of the four.
TIF
coins30.JPG
004a. Caesonia43 viewsSpain, Carthago Nova. Gaius Caligula, with Caesonia. A.D. 37-41. Æ 26.6 mm (11.5 g). Cn. Atellius Flaccus and Cn. Pompeius Flaccus, duovirs. Laureate head of Caligula right / Draped bust of Caesonia, as Salus, right. RPC 186.

Check
ecoli
0081.jpg
0081 - Denarius Septimius Severus 201-10 AC35 viewsObv/SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimiusr.
Rev/INDULGENTIA AVGG, Dea Caelestis riding r. on a lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre; below, waters gushing from rock.

Ag, 18.3mm, 3.25g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IVa/266 [C] - BMCRE V/335
ex-A.L.Romero Martín
dafnis
RPC_168_Semis_CARTAGONOVA_Augusto_2.jpg
01-61 - Cartago Nova - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)20 viewsAE Semis 23 mm 6.5 gr.
C.Varius Rufus y Sex Iulius Pollio - duoviri.

Anv: "AVGVSTVS - DIVI F" (Leyenda anti-horaria)- Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·VAR·RVF·SEX·IVL·POL·II·VIR·Q" (Leyenda anti-horaria),Implementos sacerdotales, Simpulum (Copa pequeña con mango), aspergillum/aspersorio (Instrumento para espolvorear o rociar), Securis/Segur (Hacha ritual) y Ápex (Gorro utilizado por los Sacerdotes o Flamines).

Acuñada 27 A.C. - 14 D.C.
Ceca: Cartago Nova, Hispania (Hoy Cartagena, España)

Referencias: RPC #168, SNG Cop #510, ACIP #3137, SNG München #130, Sim.NAH #992, Vives #131/132 Pl.CXXXI #12, Burgos (2008) #455, FAB #1451 P.180, Sim. Sear GICTV #12 Pag.2 (Semis en lugar de AS), Beltram #23
mdelvalle
0106.jpg
0106 - Punic - AE unit - 242-209 BC42 viewsObv/ Head of Tanit (rough) l.
Rev/ Horse's head (rough) r.: before, punic letter “aleph”.

AE, 21.5 mm, 10.35 g
Mint: Qart Hadasht (Cartagena, Spain)
CNH/HC45 [R1]
ex-Sanrode Numismática – eBay, art. #260689847460
dafnis
0107.jpg
0107 - As Caligula 37-38 AC28 viewsObv/ C CAESAR AVG GERMANIC IMP PM TR P COS, laureate head of C. r.
Rev/ PM CN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR Q VINC, Salus (Cesonia?) r.; SAL - AVG in field.

AE, 29.0 mm, 14.76 g
Mint: carthago Nova.
APRH/185
ex-Numismática Hinojosa – eBay, art. #290555714886
dafnis
0109.jpg
0109 - Punic - 1/4 AE 242-209 BC33 viewsObv/ Head of Tanit l.
Rev/ Helmet; behind, punic letter “ayin”.

AE, 13.5 mm, 1.52 g
Mint: Qart Hadasht
CNH/HC43 [R4]
ex-Soler y Llach, auction may 2011, lot 2178
dafnis
0110.jpg
0110 - Semis Augustus 13-14 AC40 viewsObv/ AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head of A. l.
Rev/ C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, diadem or wreath: inside, REX TOL.

AE, 20.3 mm, 4.48 g
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/173 [6-8 dies] – RPC I/173
ex-Soler y Llach, auction may 2011, lot 2186
1 commentsdafnis
0120.jpg
0120 - Punic - 1/2 AE 242-209 BC41 viewsObv/ Head of Tanit l.
Rev/ Horse standing r.: behind, palm tree; before, three dots.

AE, 16.5 mm, 3.20 g
Mint: Qart Hadasht
CNH/HC --
ex-Numismática Hinojosa, eBay june 2011 - art. #280699851930
dafnis
0168.jpg
0168 - Semis Augustus 12-11 BC42 viewsObv/ M AGRIP QVIN HIBERO PRAE, bare head of Agrippa (?) r.
Rev/ L BENNIO PRAEF, trophy over shields.

AE, 19.5mm, 4.65g
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/164 – RPC I/164 - AB589
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 132, lot 548 (ex-Hispanic Society of America, colln. Archer M. Huntington, #21102)
1 commentsdafnis
0180.jpg
0180 - Semis Roman Republic 42-36 BC41 viewsObv/Head of Minerva (?) r.
Rev/Statue standing l. on top of pedestal; (CV)-IN on both sides.

AE, 22.2 mm, 5.60 g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/151 - CNH/7 [R2]
ex-Ibercoin, auction 16.1, lot 2018
dafnis
0185.jpg
0185 - As Augustus 2-1 BC35 viewsObv/ AVGVSTVS DIVI F, bare head of A. r.
Rev/ C VAR RVF SEX IVL (P)OL II VIR Q, pontifical instruments (aspergillum, simpullum, ax and apex).

AE, 28.9 mm, 12.88 g
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/167a [36 dies] – RPC I/167
ex-AENP Numismatic Convention, Madrid, march 2014 (Miró)
dafnis
0197.jpg
0197 - Quadrans Tiberius 33-34 AC44 viewsObv/ TI CAESAR DIV AVG F, laureate head of Tiberius l.
Rev/ C CAESAR Q(VINQ) (IN VIN)K bare head of Caligula l.

AE, 17.5 mm, 3.08 g.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
RPC I/184 [3-4 dies]
ex-Naville Numismatics, auction e11, lot 182
dafnis
Craw_459_1_Denario_Q_CAECILIUS_METELLUS_PIUS_SCIPIO.jpg
02-20 - Q. CAECILIUS METELLUS PIUS SCIPIO (47-46 A.C.)26 views Quinto Cecilio Metelo Pio Corneliano Escipión Nasica
AR Denarius 18.2 mm 3.94 gr

Anv: "Q.METEL" sobre la Cabeza laureada de Jupiter viendo a derecha, barba y cabello rizado, "PIVS" debajo.
Rev: "SCIPIO" sobre un elefante avanzando hacia la derecha, "IMP" en exergo.

Escipión fue un comandante pompeyano de las fuerzas anti-Cesáreas. Fruto de esta colaboración fue el matrimonio de Pompeyo con su hija Cornelia (52 a. C.), que se convirtió en su quinta mujer.
Su sede se ubicaba en la capital provincial de Utica, cerca de Cartago, y esta es probablemente la ceca de la acuñación. Derrotado por las fuerzas de César, Escipión se suicidó en el año 46 A.C..

Acuñada durante los años 47 - 46 A.C.
Ceca: Utica - Norte de Africa

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1379 Pag.262 - Craw RRC #459/1 - Syd CRR #1046 - BMCRR (Africa) #1 - Vagi #77 - RSC Vol.1 Caecilia 47 Pag.21 - Babelon I #47 Pag.278
mdelvalle
0200.jpg
0200 - Semis Augustus 2-1 BC49 viewsObv/ AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head of A. r.
Rev/ C VAR RVF SEX IVL POL II VIR Q, simpulum, aspergillum, axe and apex.

AE, 22.5 mm, 6.50 g
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/168 [12-33 dies] – RPC I/168
ex-Herrero, auction december 2014, lot 41.
dafnis
0201.jpg
0201 - As Augustus 7-8 AC36 viewsObv/ AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head of A. r.
Rev/ (M POSTV)M ALBIN L PORC CAPIT II VIR Q, priest standing facing front, holding simpulum and branch.

AE, 28.0 mm, 10.98 g
Mint: Carthago Nova.
APRH/170 [7-20 dies] – RPC I/170
ex-Soler y Llach, auction 84, lot 32
dafnis
0204_RPCI_169.jpg
0204 - Semis Augustus 20 BC-23 AC15 viewsObv/Lotus flower, around IVBA REX IVBAE F II VIR QV.
Rev/Priesthood accessories, around CN ATELIVS PONTI II V Q.

Ag, 22.9mm, 5.02g
Moneyer: anonymous.
Mint: Carthago Nova.
RPC I/169 [7-20c.]
ex-Herrero, auction may 2015, lot 2043.
dafnis
LarryW2407.jpg
030 Zeugitana, Carthage, 310-290 BC85 viewsElectrum shekel-didrachm, 18.5mm, 7.43g, nice VF
Head of Tanit left, wreathed with corn; she wears necklace and triple-drop earring; dot before neck / Horse standing right on exergal line; three pellets under exergual line.
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Apollo Numismatics
Jenkins V, 282-2; Müller p. 84, 52
3 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Septimius-Severus_AR-Den_SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-266_p-_BMCRE-335_C-222_Rome-203-04-AD_Q-001_17-19mm_3,79g-s~0.jpg
049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 266, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, 118 views049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 266, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,
avers:- SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG, Laurate bust right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G, The Dea Caelestis, wearing elaborate headdress, looking right, riding right on lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, below, water gushing from rocks at left.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 3,79g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 203-04 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-266, p-125, C-222, BMCRE-335,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_18-18,5mm_2,91g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,108 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH,
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,91g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231,
Q-001
quadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,93g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),144 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,931g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
Q-001
quadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG_INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G_INCARTH_RIC-IV-I-130a-p231_C-96-97_Rome_201-206-AD_Q-002_6h_18,5-20mm_2,93g-s~0.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),121 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 130a, Rome, AR-Denarius, INDVLGENTIA AVG G, INCARTH, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate draped head right.
revers:- INDVLGEN-TIA-AVG-G/INCARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over flowing water, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exe: -/-//INCARTH, diameter: 18,5-20mm, weight: 2,931g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 201-206 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-130a, p-231, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
Q-001
quadrans
RI 064t img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26642 viewsObv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
References:– RIC 266 (Common), RCV02 6285, RSC222
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064lb_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26620 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right
Rev:- INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
Reference:– RIC 266. RSC 222.
maridvnvm
RI_064lj_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 26626 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate bust right
Rev:- INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203
Reference:– RIC 266. RSC 222.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066a img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 130d66 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate bust right, draped
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG, Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt and scepter, riding lion over waters gushing from rock on left. Exe: IN CARTH
Minted in Rome, A.D. 204-205
References:– VM 29, RIC 130D, RCV02 6806, RSC 97
1 commentsmaridvnvm
LarryW1916.jpg
0689 Focas, 602-61044 viewsÆ pentanummium, 14.5mm, 1.84g, Nice F
Struck at Carthage mint
D N FOCA PERP A, crowned bust facing / large V between two stars, left star has pellets above and below, cross above. Rare
Ex:Forvm Ancient Coins; Colosseum Coin Exchange
Sear 689var (no pellets right star)
Lawrence Woolslayer
06a-Constantine-Car-051c.jpg
06a. Constantine as Caesar: Carthage follis.55 viewsFollis, Nov. - Dec. 306, Carthage mint.
Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART / Carthage standing, dressed in long robe, holding fruit in both hands. H in left field.
Mint mark: Γ
9.49 gm., 27 mm.
RIC #51c; PBCC #575; Sear #15551.
1 commentsCallimachus
Cornelia51QuinVict.jpg
0aa Defeat of Hannibal on Sicily, 222 BC11 viewsCn. Lentulus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Quinarius

Laureled head of Jupiter, right
Victory crowning trophy, CN LENT in ex

Seaby, Cornelia 51

Possibly a reference to this event: [Q. Fabius Maximus, afterwards called Cunctator] broke up his camp at Suessula and decided to begin by an attack on Arpi. . . . Now at last the enemy was roused; there was a lull in the storm and daylight was approaching. Hannibal's garrison in the city amounted to about 5000 men, and the citizens themselves had raised a force of 3000. These the Carthaginians put in front to meet the enemy, that there might be no attempt at treachery in their rear. The fighting began in the dark in the narrow streets, the Romans having occupied not only the streets near the gate but the houses also, that they might not be assailed from the roofs. Gradually as it grew light some of the citizen troops and some of the Romans recognised one another, and entered into conversation. The Roman soldiers asked what it was that the Arpinians wanted, what wrong had Rome done them, what good service had Carthage rendered them that they, Italians-bred and born, should fight against their old friends the Romans on behalf of foreigners and barbarians, and wish to make Italy a tributary province of Africa. The people of Arpi urged in their excuse that they knew nothing of what was going on, they had in fact been sold by their leaders to the Carthaginians, they had been victimised and enslaved by a small oligarchy. When a beginning had been once made the conversations became more and more general; at last the praetor of Arpi was conducted by his friends to the consul, and after they had given each other mutual assurances, surrounded by the troops under their standards, the citizens suddenly turned against the Carthaginians and fought for the Romans. A body of Spaniards also, numbering something less than a thousand, transferred their services to the consul upon the sole condition that the Carthaginian garrison should be allowed to depart uninjured. The gates were opened for them and they were dismissed, according to the stipulation, in perfect safety, and went to Hannibal at Salapia. Thus Arpi was restored to the Romans without the loss of a single life, except in the case of one man who had long ago been a traitor and had recently deserted. The Spaniards were ordered to receive double rations, and the republic availed itself on very many occasions of their courage and fidelity.

Livy, History of Rome, 24.46-47
Blindado
King_John_AR_Penny.JPG
1199 – 1216, John, AR Short cross penny, Struck 1205 - 1216 at Winchester, England22 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of the king holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand, bust extending to edge of flan.
Reverse: +ANDREV•ON•WI around voided short cross within circle, crosslets in each quarter. Moneyer: Andrev, cognate with the modern English name of Andrew.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
Class 5b
SPINK: 1351

The class four type short cross pennies of Henry II continued to be struck during the early years of John's reign, but in 1205 a recoinage was begun and new short cross pennies of better style replaced the older issues. Sixteen mints were initially employed for this recoinage but they were reduced to ten later on. All John's coins continued to bear his father's (Henry II) title of henricvs rex.

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
Contemporary chroniclers were mostly critical of John's performance as king, and his reign has been the subject of much debate by historians from the 16th century onwards. These negative qualities have provided extensive material for fiction writers since the Victorian era, and even today John remains a recurring character within popular culture, primarily as a villain in films and stories regarding the Robin Hood legends.
2 comments*Alex
1205_-_1216_John_AR_Penny_Dublin.JPG
1199-1216, John, AR Penny, Struck 1207 – 1211 at Dublin, Ireland11 viewsObverse: IOHANNES REX around triangle enclosing a crowned and draped facing bust of King John holding, in his right hand, a sceptre tipped with a cross pommée which extends through the side of the triangle into the legend. Quatrefoil to right of bust.
Reverse: ROBERD ON DIVE around triangle containing sun over crescent moon and a star in each angle. Cross pattée at apex of each point of the triangle and above legend on each of the three sides. Moneyer: Roberd, cognate with the modern English name of Robin.
Third issue “REX” coinage, struck to the same weight and fineness as the English standard.
This was the only coinage struck by King John in his own name.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 1.2gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 6228

John was King of England from 1199 until his death in 1216. The baronial revolt at the end of John's reign led to the sealing of the first Magna Carta, a document sometimes considered an early step in the evolution of the constitution of the United Kingdom.
John, the youngest of the five sons of Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine, was not expected to inherit significant lands which resulted in him being given the nickname John Lackland. However, after the failed rebellion of his elder brothers between 1173 and 1174, John became Henry's favourite child. He was appointed Lord of Ireland in 1177 and given lands in England and on the continent. John's elder brothers William, Henry and Geoffrey died young and when Richard I became king in 1189, John was the potential heir to the throne. John unsuccessfully attempted a rebellion against Richard's administration whilst his brother was participating in the Third Crusade but despite this, after Richard died in 1199, John was proclaimed King of England.
King John contracted dysentery at Lynn in 1216 but, just before his death, he managed to dictate a brief will. This will still survives and as part of it John requested: "I will that my body be buried in the church of St. Mary and St. Wulfstan of Worcester".
Some of King John's favourite hunting grounds were in Worcester, at Kinver and Feckenham, and he had a special affection for Saint Wulfstan, one of the two great Anglo-Saxon saints whose shrines and tombs were also at Worcester. Both Saint Wulfstan and Saint Oswald can be seen in miniature beside the head of the effigy of King John on his tomb.
Medieval effigies usually show the subject in the prime of life, however the effigy on King John's tomb is unique in that not only is it a life-like image of him, it is also the oldest royal effigy in England.
King John's tomb has been opened twice, once in 1529 and again in 1797. At the first opening it was said that John's head was covered with a monk's cowl, however it is now thought that this was probably his coronation cap. When the tomb was opened for the second time the antiquarians responsible discovered that a robe of crimson damask had originally covered the king's body but, by 1797, most of the embroidery had deteriorated. They also found the remains of a sword which lay down the left side of the body along with parts of its scabbard.
3 comments*Alex
Heraclius_SB_876.jpg
12. Heraclius7 viewsHERACLIUS
Decanummium, Carthage , 610-641 AD

DN ERACLIO PP AVS, Bust facing, no beard / Large X, dot over N over dot to l., cross above, dot over M over dot to r., star below

SB 876, DOC 236
Sosius
Constantius-I_AE-Follis_CONSTANTIVS_NOB_CAES_FELIX_ADVENT_AVGG_NN__H_left,_PKT_RIC_VI_24a_Carthage__298_A_D__Q-001_0h_25-28,5mm_10,38ga-s~0.jpg
121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Carthage, RIC VI 024a, AE-1 Follis, FELIX ADVENT AVG G N N, Africa standing right, #1152 views121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Carthage, RIC VI 024a, AE-1 Follis, FELIX ADVENT AVG G N N, Africa standing right, #1
avers:- CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
revers:- FELIX AD VENT AVG G N N, Africa standing right, head left, wearing elephant head headress, standard in right and tusk in left, lion and bull at feet left, H left, PKT in ex.
exerg: H|-//PKT, diameter: 25,0-28,5mm, weight: 10,38g, axes: 0h,
mint: Carthage, date: 298 A.D., ref: RIC VI 024a,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Constantius-I_AE-Follis_CONSTANTIVS-NOB-CAES_SALVIS-AVGG-ET-CAESS-FEL-KART_Gamma_RIC_VI_Carthage_32a_298-299-AD_Q-001_11h_28,5-29,5mm_10,17g-s.jpg
121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Carthage, RIC VI 032a, AE-1 Follis, SALVIS AVG G ET CAES S FEL KART, Carthago standing facing, #183 views121 Constantius I. Chlorus (293-305 A.D. Caesar, 305-306 A.D. Augustus), Carthage, RIC VI 032a, AE-1 Follis, SALVIS AVG G ET CAES S FEL KART, Carthago standing facing, #1
avers: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right. Larger portarit-head.
revers: SALVIS AVG G ET CAES S FEL KART, Carthago standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands.
exerg: -/-//Γ, diameter: 28,5-29,5mm, weight: 10,17g, axes:11h,
mint: Carthage, date: 298-299 A.D., ref: RIC VI 032a,
Q-001
quadrans
HENRY_III.JPG
1216 – 1272, Henry III, AR Penny, Struck 1248 - 1250 at London, England (Long cross type)45 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX : III. Crowned bust of Henry III facing within circle of pellets. Mintmark: Six pointed star.
Reverse: NICOLE ON LVND. Voided long cross dividing legend into quarters, trefoil in each quarter of inner circle. Moneyer: Nicole, cognate with the modern English name of Nicholas. The surname Nicole originates in the Netherlands where it was notable for its various branches, and associated status or influence. The modern given name Nicole is a French feminine derivative of the masculine given name Nicolas.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.3gms | Die Axis: 6
SPINK: 1363

The First Barons' War (1215–1217) was a civil war in England in which a group of rebellious barons led by Robert Fitzwalter and supported by a French army under the future Louis VIII of France, waged war against King John of England. The war resulted from King John's refusal to accept and abide by the Magna Carta, which he had been forced to put his seal to on 15th June 1215, as well as from Louis' own ambitions regarding the English throne.
It was in the middle of this war that King John died leaving his son, the nine year old Henry III (who had been moved to safety at Corfe Castle in Dorset along with his mother, Queen Isabella) as his heir.
On his deathbed John appointed a council of thirteen executors to help Henry reclaim the kingdom, requesting that his son be placed into the guardianship of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke. The loyalists decided to crown Henry immediately to reinforce his claim to the throne. William knighted the boy, and Cardinal Guala Bicchieri, the papal legate to England, then oversaw his coronation at Gloucester Cathedral on 28th October 1216. In the absence of the archbishops of either Canterbury or York, Henry was anointed by the bishops of Worcester and Exeter, and crowned by Peter des Roches, bishop of Winchester. During the civil war the royal crown had been lost, so instead, the ceremony used a simple gold corolla belonging to Queen Isabella. In 1217, Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, finally defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich.
Henry's early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh, 1st Earl of Kent and Justiciar of England and Ireland, then by Peter des Roches, and they re-established royal authority after the war. In 1225 Henry promised to abide by the final and definitative version of the Magna Carta, freely authenticated by the great seal of Henry III himself, which protected the rights of the major barons and placed a limit on royal power. It is the clauses of this, the 1225 Magna Carta signed by Henry III, not the King John Magna Carta of 1215, which are on the Statute Books of the United Kingdom today.
4 comments*Alex
RI 148l img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Carthage 39a19 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate bust right
Rev:– SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands
Minted in Carthage (I | _ / B). July A.D. 1st May A.D. 305 to 25th July A.D. 306
Ref:– RIC VI Carthage 39a
maridvnvm
image~3.jpg
15. Constans II44 viewsConstans II. 641-668.
AV Solidus (10mm, 4.43 g, 6h).
Carthage mint. Dated IY 2 (AD 643/4).
Crowned and draped facing bust, holding globus cruciger / Cross potent set on three steps; ΔB (date)//CONOB.
DOC 107.2; MIB 566; SB 1029. Good VF, lightly toned.
From the Sasha Collection.
Ex-CNG
2 commentsSosius
RI_152m_img.jpg
152 - Maxentius as Caesar - RIC VI Carthage 51a37 viewsObv:- M AVR MAXENTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right
Rev:- SALVIS AVGG ET CAES FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, holding up fruits in both hands
Struck in Carthage late 306 A.D. H in left field, Greek_Delta in exe.
References:- RIC VI Carthage 51a.

The coin is on a full flan, well centered, with a decent strike and the reverse still holds on to decent detail enhanced by a nice patina.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
1~0.JPG
1655 - Etats de Vitré 11 viewsMgr de la Molle Houdencour
6,43g
27 mm
argent
POTIVS. MORI. QUAM. FEDARI .
"Plutôt la mort que le déshonneur"
Hermine passant à gauche dans un champ semé d'hermines .
IECTONS. DES. ESTAZ (Z à l'envers, rétrograde). DE. BRETAGNE .
Écu écartelé de France et de Bretagne surmonté de la couronne mi-ducale,
mi-royale, entre deux branches d'olivier
Daniel 14
PYL
1683.JPG
1683 - États de Vitré14 viewsLouis XIV
argent
7,18g
28mm
. LVDOVICVS . . MAGNVS. REX.
Tête nue du roi à droite, non laurée, col nu.
en dessous signé : H.B. (Hercule Le Breton)
. IETONS . DES . ESTAZ . DE . BRETAGNE .
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, dans une couronne formée de deux branches de laurier
à l’exergue : .1683.
Daniel 27
PYL
louis_XIV_daniel_31.JPG
1687 - États de Saint-Brieuc15 viewsLouis XIV
argent
6,78g
28mm
LVDOVICVS . . MAGNVS. REX
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature HB
. IETONS . DES . ESTAZ . DE . BRETAGNE .
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, dans une couronne formée de deux branches de laurier
à l’exergue : .1687.
Millésime avec surcharge grossière d’un 7 sur un 5
Jeton percé puis rebouché.
Daniel 31
PYL
1693.JPG
1693 - États de Vannes7 viewsLouis XIV
7,10g
28 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Sur un piédestal, statue équestre de Louis XIV à droite
cheval au pas
à l’exergue signature T.B.
.IETONS. DES. ESTAZ. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l’exergue : .1693.
Daniel 43
PYL
1695.JPG
1695 - États de Vannes7 viewsLouis XIV
6,77g
28 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Sur un piédestal, statue équestre de Louis XIV à droite
cheval au pas
à l’exergue signature T.B.
.IETONS. DES. ESTAZ. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l’exergue : .1695.
Daniel 44
PYL
accolade_1.JPG
1699 - États de Vannes 12 viewsLouis XIV
7,10g
27 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu mais trce de haut de cuirasse et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature T.B
.IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue une accolade
Daniel 47
PYL
accolade_2.JPG
1699 - États de Vannes 4 viewsLouis XIV
6,55g
27 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
"Louis le Grand Roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature T.B
IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue une accolade
Daniel 48
PYL
accolade_3.JPG
1699 - États de Vannes12 viewsLouis XIV
6,91g
27 mm
argent
LVDOVICVS. MAGNVS. REX.
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu mais trce de haut de cuirasse et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature T.B
.IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue une accolade
Daniel 47
PYL
1701.JPG
1701 - États de Nantes6 viewsLouis XIV
6,16g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS. MAGNUS. REX.
"Louis le Grand Roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature R
.IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1701
Daniel 52
PYL
1707.JPG
1707 - États de Dinan13 viewsLouis XIV
6,56g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS MAGNUS REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature TB en monogramme
.IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
1707 à l'exergue
Daniel 62
PYL
1709_2.JPG
1709 - États de Saint-Brieuc9 viewsLouis XIV
6,71g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS. MAGNUS REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature TB en monogramme
.JETTON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
1709 à l'exergue
Daniel 64
PYL
1709.JPG
1709 - États de Saint-Brieuc8 viewsLouis XIV
6,85g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS. MAGNUS REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature TB en monogramme
.JETTON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
1709 à l'exergue
Daniel 64
PYL
1711.JPG
1711 - États de Dinan15 viewsLouis XIV
6,47g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS. MAGNUS REX.
"Louis le Grand roi"
Tête à droite de Louis XIV, le col nu et les cheveux longs,
au-dessous signature TB en monogramme
IETONS. DES. ESTAS. DE. BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue .1711.
Daniel 66
PYL
1715.JPG
1715 - États de Saint-Brieuc 12 viewsLouis XIV
6,75g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS. MAGNUS REX .
"Louis le Grand Roi"
Buste à droite de Louis XIV signé TB
IETONS DES ESTAS DE BRETAGNE
Écu écartelé de France et de Bretagne couronné sur un manteau fleurdelisé
à l'exergue 1715.
Daniel 71
PYL
1721_-_Nantes.JPG
1721 - mairie de Nantes8 viewsargent
7,34g
28mm
mairie de Gérard Mellier
NOSTRO. FLOREBIT. AMORE.
"Elle fleurira par notre amour"
1721
Ecu aux armes du maire (D' azur à la fasce d' argent, accompagnés de 14 besants d'or, 7 en chef posés 3. 4, et 7 en pointe posés 4. 3.), posé sur la croix de Saint-Lazare et entouré du collier de l'ordre, timbré d'une couronne de marquis. La date est séparée par le bas de la croix de St-Lazare 1721
DE LA MAIRIE DE Mre MELLIER GENal DES FINANCES CHEVer DE L.ORDRE DE St LAZARE
Ecusson sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à à gauche au chef semé de mouchetures d'hermines. Timbré d' une couronne comtale, entouré de la cordelière. La légende commence par une étoile.
PYL
1722.JPG
1722 - États de Nantes6 viewsLouis XV
6,57g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISSIMUS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste couronné à droite, en manteau d’hermine avec le collier de l’ordre du Saint-Esprit
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue .1722.
Daniel 76
PYL
louis_xv.JPG
1726 - États de Saint-Brieuc 11 viewsLouis XV
7,07g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX - CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très Chrétien"
Buste à droite en habit, avec cravate et grand cordon,
au-dessous signature DU VIVIER. F.
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1726.
Daniel 79
PYL
1730_-_Nantes.JPG
1730 - mairie de Nantes9 viewsargent
6,94g
29mm
mairie de René Leray, sieur du Fumet
SIT GEMINO SUB SIDERE TUTA
"Qu'elle soit en sureté sous les deux étoiles"
1730
Dans un cartouche, écu ovale des armes du Maire, ( D'argent au chevron de gueules, accompagné de deux étoiles de sable en chef, et d'une raie de sable dans une mer de même en pointe), timbré de la couronne comtale
DE LA MAIRIE DE MR LERAY DU FUMET LIEUTNT.CIV.ET CRIM. DU. PRESIDIAL. DE. NANTES
Etoile en début de légende.Ecu ovale sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à gauche, au chef chargé d' hermines, surmonté d'une couronne comtale, le tout entouré de la cordelière
PYL
1734.JPG
1734 - États de Rennes 10 viewsLouis XV
6,74g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite du roi, laurée, avec un col drapé,
au-dessous signature DU VIVIER.
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1734.
Daniel 87
PYL
1736.JPG
1736 - États de Rennes10 viewsLouis XV
6,72g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste à droite en habit, avec cravate et grand cordon,
non signé
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1736.
Daniel 89
PYL
1738.JPG
1738 - États de Rennes9 viewsLouis XV
7,01g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
Buste à droite en habit, avec cravate et grand cordon,
signé DU VIVIER sur le bord de la manche
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1738
Daniel 90
PYL
nantes.JPG
1738 - mairie de Nantes15 viewscuivre
8,37g
28mm
mairie de François de la Haye Moricaud
DE LA MAIRIE DE MR DE LA HAYE MORICAUD
Dans un cartouche, écu aux armes du maire (d’argent, à trois têtes de Maures de sable tortillées d’argent.) timbré d'une couronne de marquis
NON REGIT INVITAM
"Il ne dirige pas la ville malgré elle"
1738
Ecu ovale sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à gauche, au chef chargé d' hermines, surmonté d'une couronne comtale, le tout entouré de la cordelière
PYL
1740.JPG
1740 - États de Rennes11 viewsLouis XV
6,40g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, un bandeau dans les cheveux,
au-dessous signature cursive FM
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1740
Daniel 92
PYL
1742.JPG
1742 - États de Rennes 7 viewsLouis XV
6,66g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX - CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, un bandeau dans les cheveux,
au-dessous signature cursive FM
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1742
Daniel 93
PYL
1743_-_Nantes.JPG
1743 - mairie de Nantes12 viewsargent
7,15g
28mm
seconde mairie de René Darquistade, seigneur de la Maillardière
DE LA SECONDE MAIRIE DE Mr. DARQUISTADE
Ecu ovale sur un cartouche, des armes du Maire ( D' argent au chevron de gueules, accompagné de trois trèfles de sinople 2.1.), timbré d'une couronne de marquis
PATRIO CLAVUM SUSCEPIT AMORE
"Il prit le gouvernail par amour de la Patrie"
1743
Les armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à gauche. Au chef chargé d' hermines. Surmonté d'une couronne comtale, le tout entouré de la cordelière
PYL
1744.JPG
1744 - États de Rennes 14 viewsLouis XV
6,83g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, un bandeau dans les cheveux,
au-dessous signature cursive JCR en monogramme
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
à l'exergue 1744.
Daniel 95
PYL
10_-_1748_-_6,65g_-_D99.JPG
1748 - États de Rennes8 viewsLouix XV
6,65g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très Chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite en habit avec le grand cordon, au-dessous signature D.V. et en petits caractères 1746 sur la tranche de l’épaule
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1748.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 99
PYL
1750.JPG
1750 - États de Rennes11 viewsLouis XV
6,89g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite en habit avec le grand cordon,
au-dessous signature D.V.
et en petits caractères 1746 sur la tranche de l’épaule
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1750.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 100
PYL
1752.JPG
1752 - États de Rennes 14 viewsLouis XV
6,10g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite en habit avec le grand cordon,
au-dessous signature D.V.
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1752 .
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 101
PYL
1752_-_Nantes_-_1.JPG
1752 - maire de Nantes11 viewscuivre
7,25g
28mm
mairie de Mathurin Bellabre
PROTEGIT ET PASCIT
"Il protège et nourrit"
1752
Ecu sur un cartouche, des armes du Maire ( D'azur, au palmier de sinople, sur une terrasse de même), timbré d'une couronne comtale. Tenants : deux sauvages armés de massues
A droite sur un ornement de cartouche signature du graveur Duvivier D.V.
* DE LA MAIRIE DE Mr. BELLABRE PRt. ET SENl. DU PRl. DE NANTES
Les armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à à gauche au chef semé de mouchetures d'hermines. Timbré d' une couronne comtale, entourée de la cordelière
PYL
13_-_1754_-_6,47g_-_D102.JPG
1754 - États de Rennes11 viewsLouis XV
6,47g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
"Louis XV ressuscité et triomphant"
Statue du roi sur un piédestal, vêtu à l’antique, derrière, des drapeaux ; à droite la Bretagne assise, devant, les armes de la province, derrière, une ancre sortant de la mer ; à gauche Hygie et un autel allumé .
Sur le piédestal on peut lire l'inscription :
LUDOVICO XV
REGI CHRISTIANISSIMO
REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
HOC AMORIS PIGNUS
ET SALUTATIS PUBLICAE MOMUMENTUM
COMITIA ARMORICA POSUERE
ANNO M DCC LIV
au revers :
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1754.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 102
PYL
1754_2.JPG
1754 - États de Rennes5 viewsLouis XV
6,55g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
"Louis XV ressuscité et triomphant"
Statue du roi sur un piédestal,
vêtu à l’antique, derrière, des drapeaux;
à droite la Bretagne assise,
devant les armes de la province,
derrière une ancre sortant de la mer;
à gauche Hygie et un autel allumé .
Sur le piédestal on peut lire l'inscription :
LUDOVICO XV
REGI CHRISTIANISSIMO
REDIVIVO ET TRIUMPHANTI.
HOC AMORIS PIGNUS
ET SALUTATIS PUBLICAE MOMUMENTUM
COMITIA ARMORICA POSUERE
ANNO M DCC LIV
au revers :
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1754.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 102
PYL
1756.JPG
1756 - États de Rennes7 viewsLouis XV
6,47g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête laurée à droite, le col nu,
au-dessous signature cursive M
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1756.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 103
PYL
1758_2.JPG
1758 - États de Saint-Brieuc7 viewsLouis XV
6,55g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite en habit avec le grand cordon,
au-dessous signature D.V.
et en petits caractères 1746 sur la tranche de l’épaule
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1758.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 107
PYL
1758_3.JPG
1758 - États de Saint-Brieuc7 viewsLouis XV
6,72g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite en habit avec le grand cordon,
au-dessous signature D.V.
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1758.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 108
PYL
1758.JPG
1758 - États de Saint-Brieuc5 viewsLouis XV
6,62g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête laurée à droite, le col nu,
au-dessous signature cursive M
JETON DES ESTATS DE BRETAGNE 1758.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 105
PYL
1760.JPG
1760 - États de Nantes 4 viewsLouis XV
6,64g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS XV. REX CHRISTIANISSIMUS
Buste lauré à droite avec tunique sur l’armure,
au-dessous signature R. FILIUS
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1760.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 110
PYL
1762.JPG
1762 - États de Rennes8 viewsLouis XV
6,72g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Tête laurée à droite,
au-dessous signature R. FIL.
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1762.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 112
PYL
1762_1763_-_Nantes.JPG
1762-1763 - mairie de Nantes10 viewsargent
7,21g
28mm
mairie de Léonard Joubert du Collet
1762 1763
Dans un cartouche, écu presque rond, aux armes du maire ( D'argent au chevron d'azur, chargé de cinq casques de profil d'or, accompagné en chef d'un vol séparé de gueules, et en pointe d'un rocher de sable). Supports deux lions; timbré d'une couronne de marquis
* DE LA MAIRIE DE M. JOUBERT DU COLLET
Ecusson sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à à gauche au chef semé de mouchetures d'hermines. Timbré d' une couronne murale, entouré de la cordelière
PYL
1764.JPG
1764 - États de Rennes 6 viewsLouis XV
6,65g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS XV. REX CHRISTIANISSIMUS
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite avec tunique sur l’armure,
au-dessous signature R. FILIUS
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1764.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 113
PYL
1764_2.JPG
1764 - États de Rennes 10 viewsLouis XV
6,94g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré et cuirassé à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FIL
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1764.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 115
PYL
1766.JPG
1766 - États de Rennes 7 viewsLouis XV
6,89g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX. CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FIL.
ETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1766.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 116
PYL
1766_2.JPG
1766 - États de Rennes5 viewsLouis XV
7,58g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FILIUS
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1766.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 117
PYL
25_-_1768_-_6,54g_-_D119.JPG
1768 - États de Rennes11 viewsLouis XV
6,54g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX. CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FIL.
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1768.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 119
PYL
26_-_1768_-_7,41g_-_D118.JPG
1768 - États de Rennes7 viewsLouis XV
7,41g
28 mm
argent
LUDOVICUS XV. REX CHRISTIANISSIMUS
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste cuirassé et lauré à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FILIUS
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1768.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 118
PYL
27_-_1770_-_6,65g_-_D120.JPG
1770 - États de Rennes12 viewsLouis XV
6,65g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XV. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite, avec col de tunique,
sans signature
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1770
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 120
PYL
1770_1771_-_Nantes.JPG
1770-1771 - mairie de Nantes7 viewsargent
7,24g
28mm
mairie de Philippe-Vincent Roger, seigneur de la Mouchetière
VINCIT AMOR PATRIAE
"L'amour de la Patrie l'emporte"
1770 1771
Ecu sur un cartouche aux armes du maire (D'azur à trois coquilles d'argent, 2.1.). Tenants deux griffons. Timbré d'une couronne de marquis
* DE LA MAIRIE DE MESSIRE PH. V. ROGER ECUYER SGR. DE LA MOUCHETIERE LIEUT. GENERAL DE L’AMIRAUTÉ
Ecusson sur un cartouche, des armes de la ville de Nantes : vaisseau Nantais voguant à à gauche au chef semé de mouchetures d'hermines. Timbré d' une couronne murale à hauts créneaux, le cercle chargé de lions, entouré de la cordelière
PYL
1772.JPG
1772 - États de Morlaix15 viewsLouis XV
6,56g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XV. REX. CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XV roi très chrétien"
Buste lauré à droite, avec tunique,
au-dessous signature R. FIL.
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1772.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et de larmes
Daniel 121
PYL
1774.JPG
1774 - États de Rennes6 viewsLouis XVI
6,57g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XVI. REX. CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, avec un bandeau dans les cheveux,
sans signature
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1774
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 123
PYL
1_-_1774_-_D123_variante_cuivre.JPG
1774 - États de Rennes12 views

Louis XVI
8,90g
29 mm
cuivre
LUD XVI. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, avec un bandeau dans les cheveux,
sans signature
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1774
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
variante du Daniel 123

voir : Gildas Salaün, "De nouveaux jetons des Etats de Bretagne en cuivre", ASBNH, 2004.
PYL
1776_1.JPG
1776 - États de Rennes10 viewsLouis XVI
6,56g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XVI. REX CHRISTIANISS.
Tête à droite, les cheveux noués derrière le cou,
au-dessous signature DU VIV.
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1776
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d'hermines
Daniel 125
PYL
1776_2.JPG
1776 - États de Rennes11 views 1776 - États de Rennes
Louis XVI
6,74g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XVI. REX. CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite, les cheveux noués derrière le cou,
au-dessous signature DU VIV.
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1776
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d'hermines
Daniel 124
PYL
1780.JPG
1780 - États de Rennes8 viewsLouis XVI
6,66g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
sans signature
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1780
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 127
PYL
7_-_1780_-_6,24g_-_D127bis.JPG
1780 - États de Rennes14 viewsLouis XVI
6,66g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite, avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
sans signature
poinçon en forme de faisceau de licteur dans le champ droit
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1780
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne, sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 127 bis
PYL
1780_2.JPG
1780 - États de Rennes12 viewsLouis XVI
6,48g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
sans signature
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1780
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 127 ou peut être Daniel 128
PYL
1782.JPG
1782 - États de Rennes12 viewsLouis XVI
6,72g
28 mm
argent
LUD. XVI. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
signé DU VIV
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1782
Écu écartelé de France et de Bretagne couronné sur un manteau fleurdelisé
Daniel 129
PYL
1784_2.JPG
1784 - États de Rennes10 viewsLouis XVI
7,07g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
signé DU VIV.
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1784.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 131
PYL
1784.JPG
1784 - États de Rennes 12 viewsLouis XVI
7,17g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
sans signature
JETON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1784.
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 130
PYL
1786.JPG
1786 - États de Rennes 12 viewsLouis XVI
6,94g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIAN.
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
au-dessous signature DUVIV
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1786
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 136
PYL
12_-_1786_-_6,30g_-_D135.JPG
1786 - États de Rennes8 viewsLouis XVI
6,30g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIANIS
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
sans signature
JETTON DES ETATS DE BRETAGNE 1786
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 135
PYL
1788.JPG
1788 - États de Rennes16 viewsLouis XVI
6,71g
28 mm
argent
LUDOV. XVI. REX CHRISTIAN
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Buste habillé à droite,
avec le grand cordon retenu par une barrette,
au-dessous signature DUV.
JETTON DES ÉTATS DE BRETAGNE 1788
Écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de France,
aux 2 et 3 de Bretagne,
sur un manteau semé de fleurs de lis et d’hermines
Daniel 139
PYL
1797GeorgeIIICartwheelTwoPence1024.jpg
1797 British Two Pence Cartwheel23 viewsRegal 1797 British Cartwheel Two Pence coin struck by Matthew Boulton
at Soho Mint. This coin grades MS-64 BN. Regal coinage would spell doom
for Conder Tokens which circulated widely in all counties of Britain. In the
far reaches of the countries, Conder Tokens would continue to circulate for
several more years.
Larry M2
George_3_Cartwheel_Penny_1797.JPG
1797 GEORGE III AE "CARTWHEEL" PENNY10 viewsObverse: GEORGIUS III • D : G • REX. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of George III facing right.
Reverse: BRITANNIA 1797. Britannia seated facing left, holding olive branch and trident. Small ship in left background; mint-mark SOHO below shield.
Diameter: 36mm
SPINK: 3777

This portrait of George III was designed by Conrad Heinrich Kuchler (c.1740 - 1810), this is marked by a small "K." in the drapery at the base of the King's bust. Kuchler moved to Birmingham in 1795 and designed many of the coins and medals which were struck at Matthew Boulton's SOHO mint.

This was the year that the first copper penny was struck, it was also the first time that the figure of Britannia was portrayed seated amid the waves and holding a trident instead of a spear. The coin was struck by Matthew Boulton at the Soho Mint, Birmingham but, weighing a full one ounce (28.3g) and with a diameter of 36mm, it was rather heavy for the pocket and was soon discontinued. Many have survived though, battered and worn, having been used as weights for kitchen scales.
*Alex
George_3_Twopence_1797.JPG
1797 GEORGE III AE "CARTWHEEL" TWOPENCE10 viewsObverse: GEORGIUS III • D : G • REX. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of George III facing right.
Reverse: BRITANNIA. 1797. Britannia seated facing left, holding olive branch and trident. Small ship in left background; mint-mark SOHO below shield.
Diameter: 41mm. Weight: 56.7gms.
SPINK: 3776

This portrait of George III was designed by Conrad Heinrich Kuchler (c.1740 - 1810), this is marked by a small "K." in the drapery at the base of the King's bust. Kuchler moved to Birmingham in 1795 and designed many of the coins and medals which were struck at Matthew Boulton's SOHO mint.

The figure of Britannia was portrayed seated amid the waves and holding a trident instead of a spear for the first time on the Cartwheel twopences and pennies of this year. This mighty coin was struck in Birmingham by Matthew Boulton at his Soho Mint, but, since it weighed a full two ounces (56.7gms) and measured 5mm thick with a diameter of 41mm, it was a bit heavy for the pocket and was soon discontinued. Many have survived though, battered and worn, having been used as weights for kitchen scales. Some of these twopence coins, because they were so big, were even turned into patch boxes.
*Alex
rjb_2016_10_02.jpg
1989 viewsCaracalla 198-217 AD
AR tetradrachm
Sidon
Eagle standing head left with wreath in beak; cart of Astarte below
Prieur 1362
mauseus
CaligulaAE27Caesonia.jpg
1ao2 Caesonia (?)19 viewsAE 27 of Carthago Nova, Spain

Laureate head of Caligula, right, C CAESAR AVG GERMANIS
Draped bust of Caesonia (as Salus) right, DN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR Q V I N C, SAL AVG across field

Generally held to portray the fourth wife of Caligula.

Sear 624

Caesonia, Milonia, (d41AD) was the fourth and last wife of Caligula. Her younger half-brother was the Consul Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo. Her niece, Domitia Longina, married Domitian. In 41, Caligula was assassinated and Caesonia and her daughter Julia Drusilla murdered.

Suetonius states: As for Caesonia, who was neither young nor beautiful, had three daughters by another man, and was wildly promiscuous and extravagant, he not only loved her more passionately for it, but also more faithfully, taking her out riding, and showing her to the soldiers, dressed in a cloak with helmet and shield: while he exhibited her to his friends stark naked. He did not honour her with the title of wife until she had given him a child, announcing his paternity and the marriage on the very same day. This child, whom he named Julia Drusilla, he carried round all the temples of the goddesses, before finally entrusting her to Minerva’s lap, calling on that goddess to nurture and educate his daughter. Nothing persuaded him more clearly that she was his own issue than her violent temper, which was so savage the infant would tear at the faces and eyes of her little playmates. . . .

And as [Caligula] kissed the neck of wife or sweetheart, he never failed to say: ‘This lovely thing will be slit whenever I say.’ Now and then he even threatened his dear Caesonia with torture, if that was the only way of discovering why he was so enamoured of her. . . . Some think that Caesonia his wife administered a love potion that had instead the effect of driving him mad.
Blindado
DelmatiusAE3GlorEx.jpg
1eg Delmatius21 viewsCaesar 335-337

AE3, Thessalonica

Laureate, cuirassed bust, right, FL DELMATIVS NOB C two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them, O on banner, GLORIA EXERCITVS. Mintmark: SMTSD.

RIC 202D

Zosimus recorded: After Constantine had oppressed and tormented the people in these various modes, he died of a disease, and was succeeded by his three sons, who were not born of Fausta the daughter of Maximianus Herculius, but of another woman, whom he had put to death for adultery. They devoted themselves more to the pleasures of youth than to the service of the state. They began by dividing the nations between them. Constantine the eldest, and Constans the youngest, having for their share all beyond the Alps, together with Italy and Illyricum, the countries bordering on the Euxine sea and all that belonged to Carthage in Africa; Constantius obtained all Asia, the east, and Egypt. There were likewise others who shared in the government; Dalmatius, whom Constantine made Caesar, Constantius his brother, and Hanniballianus, who had all worn robes of purple embroidered with gold, and were promoted to the order of Nobilissimates by Constantine, from respect to their being of his own family. . . . The empire being thus divided, Constantius who appeared to take pains not to fall short of his father in impiety, began by shedding the blood of his nearest relations. He first caused Constantius, his father's brother, to be murdered by the soldiers ; next to whom he treated Dalmatius in the same manner, as also Optatus whom Constantine had raised to the rank of a Nobilissimate.

A great-nephew of Constantine the Great.
Blindado
rjb_2010_02_24.jpg
218b19 viewsJulia Soaemias
AE 28mm
Sidon in Phoenicia
IVLIA SEMIA AVGV
Diademed, draped bust right
COL AVR PIA METRO SID
Cart of Astarte
BMC-
Curtis Clay notes that there are no coins of Soaemias of Sidon of any type in the BM or Paris (according to Cohen) although a few examples are known. The HJB photo file contains a coin that is an obverse die duplicate of this coin.
mauseus
22125a.jpg
22125 Caracalla/Dea Caelestis29 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate bust right, draped.
INDVLGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH
Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, riding lion over waters.
RIC 130a. 3.00g, 17mm, 6h
Ex Roma Numismatics
AD 204
2 commentsBlayne W
Treb-Gallus-RIC-032.jpg
29. Trebonianus Gallus.60 viewsAntoninianus, ca 252 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES VIB TREB GALLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gallus.
Reverse: APOLL SALVTARI / Apollo standing, holding branch and a lyre set on a rock.
3.82 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #32; Sear #9627.

In his book The Fate of Rome: Climate, Disease, & the End of an Empire, author Kyle Harper suggests the plague described by Cyprian, Bishop of Carthage, was not a localized plague of some sort, but was one and the same with the plague that ravaged the Roman Empire during the reign of Trebonianus Gallus and several of his successors.

The plague was first reported in Alexandria in 249 AD, and by 251 AD it had made its way to Rome where the boy emperor Hostilian died from it. Harper says (p, 138), “The Plague of Cyprian is in the background of imperial history from ca. AD 249 to AD 262, possibly with even later effects around AD 270.”

Harper also presents a case that the plague was either pandemic influenza (similar to that of 1918) or a viral hemorrhagic fever (similar to the Ebola virus of today).

Coins with the reverse legend APOLL SALVTARI (“Apollo the Healer”) exist on coins of Trebonianus Gallus, Volusian, Aemilian, and Valerian I. This reverse type is certainly to be interpreted as an appeal to Apollo for deliverance from the plague that was spreading through the Empire at this time.
3 commentsCallimachus
rjb_fol6_01_09.jpg
305b22 viewsConstantius I as Caesar 293-305 AD
AE Follis
Obv: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Laureate bust right
Rev: FELIX ADVENT AVGG NN
Africa standing left, at feet lion
gamma/-//PKT
Carthage Mint
RIC (VI) Carthage 22a
mauseus
rjb_max_11_07.jpg
30628 viewsMaxentius 306-312 AD
AE Follis
Obv: IMP MAXENTIVS PF AVG
Laureate bust right
Rev: CONSERVATORES KART SVAE
Carthage standing left in hexastyle temple
-/-//PKΓ
Carthage Mint
RIC (VI) Carthage 60
1 commentsmauseus
Denario Septimio Severo RIC 266D.jpg
46-11 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)32 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA AVGG // IN CARTH" en exergo (La Benevolencia del Augusto hacia Cartago) - La Diosa Celestial de Cartago sentada de frente sobre un león que corre hacia la derecha, sostiene un rayo en mano derecha y un cetro en la izquierda. Debajo se vé aguas saliendo de una roca. Esta acuñación recuerda algún favor especial de los Emperadores a Carthage, capital de la provincia nativa de los Severos. Parece estar conectada con el abastecimiento de agua de la ciudad (quizás un acueducto nuevo), pero los detalles no se saben. El diosa principal de Carthage era conocida por los romanos como "Dea Caelestis", la “Diosa celestial”, aunque no es nombrada en las monedas y de allí surge una pequeña duda si Ella realmente es quien monta el león.

Acuñada 17ava. Emisión 204 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #266D Pag.125 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6285 Pag.459 - BMCRE #335/8 Pag.218 - Cohen Vol.III #219 Pag.27 - DVM #47 Pag.183 - RSC Vol.III #222 Pag.28 - Hill CSS #655 - Foss #62
mdelvalle
RIC_266D_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-11 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "INDVLGENTIA AVGG // IN CARTH" en exergo (La Benevolencia del Augusto hacia Cartago) - La Diosa Celestial de Cartago sentada de frente sobre un león que corre hacia la derecha, sostiene un rayo en mano derecha y un cetro en la izquierda. Debajo se vé aguas saliendo de una roca. Esta acuñación recuerda algún favor especial de los Emperadores a Carthage, capital de la provincia nativa de los Severos. Parece estar conectada con el abastecimiento de agua de la ciudad (quizás un acueducto nuevo), pero los detalles no se saben. El diosa principal de Carthage era conocida por los romanos como "Dea Caelestis", la “Diosa celestial”, aunque no es nombrada en las monedas y de allí surge una pequeña duda si Ella realmente es quien monta el león.

Acuñada 17ava. Emisión 204 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #266D Pag.125 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6285 Pag.459 - BMCRE #335/8 Pag.218 (Plate 35 #11y14) - Cohen Vol.III #219 Pag.27 - DVM #47 Pag.183 - RSC Vol.III #222 Pag.28 - Hill CSS #655 - Foss #62 - Salgado II/1 #4126.a.2 Pag.85
mdelvalle
20-Galerius-Car-32b.jpg
49 Galerius as Caesar: Carthage follis.29 viewsFollis, 299 - 303 AD, Carthage mint.
Obverse: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES / Laureate bust of Galerius.
Reverse: SALVS AVGG ET CAES FEL KART / Carthage standing, dressed in long robe, holding fruits in both hands.
Mint mark: Δ
11.02 gm,, 29 mm.
RIC #32b; Sear #14411.
1 commentsCallimachus
49- Maximianus-1.JPG
49-Maximianus #1-S57 viewsAE Follis, 299-303 AD, Carthage mint
Obv, IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left holding fruits and grain.
28mm, 10.5gm
RIC 39b
2 commentsjdholds
63-Constantius I.JPG
63-Constantius I-3-S35 viewsAE Follis, Carthage mint , 305-306 AD.
Obv: IMP CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Carthage standing holding fruits.
H in left field , A in exergue.
27mm, 9.9gm
RIC 39a
jdholds
RIC_67_Antoniniano_Gordiano_III.jpg
69-09 - GORDIANO III (238 - 244 D.C.)14 viewsAR Antoniniano 21 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERALITAS AVG III" - Liberalitas de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un ábaco en mano de brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda.Acuñadas para donativo (regalo monetario a la gente) en el año 240 D.C. para marcar la supresión de la rebelión en Cartago de Sabinianus. Dado en los acontecimientos y circos.

Acuñada 5ta. y 6ta. Emisiones fin 239 a principio 240 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IVc #67 Pag.23, Sear RCTV Vol.III #8621 Pag.119, Cohen Vol.V #142 var Pag.35, RSC Vol. IV #142 Pag.4, DVM #25 var Pag.224, Cayón #47, Hunter #56
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Gordiano III RIC 67.jpg
69-11 - GORDIANO III (238 - 244 D.C.)45 viewsAR Antoniniano 21 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "LIBERALITAS AVG III" - Liberalitas de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando un ábaco en mano de brazo derecho extendido y cornucopia en izquierda.Acuñadas para donativo (regalo monetario a la gente) en el año 240 D.C. para marcar la supresión de la rebelión en Cartago de Sabinianus. Dado en los acontecimientos y circos.

Acuñada 5ta. y 6ta. Emisiones fin 239 a principio 240 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.4ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte III #67 Pag.23 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #8621 - Cohen Vol.V #142 var Pag.35 - RSC Vol. IV #142 Pag.4 - DVM #25 var Pag.224 - Cayón #47
mdelvalle
VespasianPax_RICii10.jpg
710a, Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.135 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II, 10, aVF, 3.5 g, 18mm, Rome mint, 69-71 AD; Obverse: IMP CAESA[R] VESPASIANV[S AV]G - Laureate head right; Reverse: COS ITER [T]R POT - Pax seated left holding branch and caduceus. Ex Imperial Coins.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 69-79)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (b. A.D. 9, d. A.D. 79, emperor A.D. 69-79) restored peace and stability to an empire in disarray following the death of Nero in A.D. 68. In the process he established the Flavian dynasty as the legitimate successor to the Imperial throne. Although we lack many details about the events and chronology of his reign, Vespasian provided practical leadership and a return to stable government - accomplishments which, when combined with his other achievements, make his emperorship particularly notable within the history of the Principate.

Early Life and Career

Vespasian was born at Falacrina near Sabine Reate on 17 November, A.D. 9, the son of T. Flavius Sabinus, a successful tax collector and banker, and Vespasia Polla. Both parents were of equestrian status. Few details of his first fifteen years survive, yet it appears that his father and mother were often away from home on business for long periods. As a result, Vespasian's early education became the responsibility of his paternal grandmother, Tertulla. [[1]] In about A.D. 25 Vespasian assumed the toga virilis and later accepted the wearing of the latus clavus, and with it the senatorial path that his older brother, T. Flavius Sabinus, had already chosen. [[2]] Although many of the particulars are lacking, the posts typically occupied by one intent upon a senatorial career soon followed: a military tribunate in Thrace, perhaps for three or four years; a quaestorship in Crete-Cyrene; and the offices of aedile and praetor, successively, under the emperor Gaius. [[3]]

It was during this period that Vespasian married Flavia Domitilla. Daughter of a treasury clerk and former mistress of an African knight, Flavia lacked the social standing and family connections that the politically ambitious usually sought through marriage. In any case, the couple produced three children, a daughter, also named Flavia Domitilla, and two sons, the future emperors Titus and Domitian . Flavia did not live to witness her husband's emperorship and after her death Vespasian returned to his former mistress Caenis, who had been secretary to Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony and mother of Claudius). Caenis apparently exerted considerable influence over Vespasian, prompting Suetonius to assert that she remained his wife in all but name, even after he became emperor. [[4]]

Following the assassination of Gaius on 24 January, A.D. 41, Vespasian advanced rapidly, thanks in large part to the new princeps Claudius, whose favor the Flavians had wisely secured with that of Antonia, the mother of Germanicus, and of Claudius' freedmen, especially Narcissus. [[5]] The emperor soon dispatched Vespasian to Argentoratum (Strasbourg) as legatus legionis II Augustae, apparently to prepare the legion for the invasion of Britain. Vespasian first appeared at the battle of Medway in A.D. 43, and soon thereafter led his legion across the south of England, where he engaged the enemy thirty times in battle, subdued two tribes, and conquered the Isle of Wight. According to Suetonius, these operations were conducted partly under Claudius and partly under Vespasian's commander, Aulus Plautius. Vespasian's contributions, however, did not go unnoticed; he received the ornamenta triumphalia and two priesthoods from Claudius for his exploits in Britain. [[6]]

By the end of A.D. 51 Vespasian had reached the consulship, the pinnacle of a political career at Rome. For reasons that remain obscure he withdrew from political life at this point, only to return when chosen proconsul of Africa about A.D. 63-64. His subsequent administration of the province was marked by severity and parsimony, earning him a reputation for being scrupulous but unpopular. [[7]] Upon completion of his term, Vespasian returned to Rome where, as a senior senator, he became a man of influence in the emperor Nero's court. [[8]] Important enough to be included on Nero's tour of Greece in A.D. 66-67, Vespasian soon found himself in the vicinity of increasing political turbulence in the East. The situation would prove pivotal in advancing his career.

Judaea and the Accession to Power

In response to rioting in Caesarea and Jerusalem that had led to the slaughter in the latter city of Jewish leaders and Roman soldiers, Nero granted to Vespasian in A.D. 66 a special command in the East with the objective of settling the revolt in Judaea. By spring A.D. 67, with 60,000 legionaries, auxiliaries, and allies under his control, Vespasian set out to subdue Galilee and then to cut off Jerusalem. Success was quick and decisive. By October all of Galilee had been pacified and plans for the strategic encirclement of Jerusalem were soon formed. [[9]] Meanwhile, at the other end of the empire, the revolts of Gaius Iulius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and Servius Sulpicius Galba , governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, had brought Nero's reign to the brink of collapse. The emperor committed suicide in June, A.D. 68, thereby ensuring chaos for the next eighteen months, as first Galba and then Marcus Salvius Otho and Aulus Vitellius acceded to power. Each lacked broad-based military and senatorial support; each would be violently deposed in turn. [[10]]

Still occupied with plans against Jerusalem, Vespasian swore allegiance to each emperor. Shortly after Vitellius assumed power in spring, A.D. 69, however, Vespasian met on the border of Judaea and Syria with Gaius Licinius Mucianus, governor of Syria, and after a series of private and public consultations, the two decided to revolt. [[11]] On July 1, at the urging of Tiberius Alexander, prefect of Egypt, the legions of Alexandria declared for Vespasian, as did the legions of Judaea two days later. By August all of Syria and the Danube legions had done likewise. Vespasian next dispatched Mucianus to Italy with 20,000 troops, while he set out from Syria to Alexandria in order to control grain shipments for the purpose of starving Italy into submission. [[12]] The siege of Jerusalem he placed in the hands of his son Titus.

Meanwhile, the Danubian legions, unwilling to wait for Mucianus' arrival, began their march against Vitellius ' forces. The latter army, suffering from a lack of discipline and training, and unaccustomed to the heat of Rome, was defeated at Cremona in late October. [[13]] By mid-December the Flavian forces had reached Carsulae, 95 kilometers north of Rome on the Flaminian Road, where the Vitellians, with no further hope of reinforcements, soon surrendered. At Rome, unable to persuade his followers to accept terms for his abdication, Vitellius was in peril. On the morning of December 20 the Flavian army entered Rome. By that afternoon, the emperor was dead. [[14]]

Tacitus records that by December 22, A.D. 69, Vespasian had been given all the honors and privileges usually granted to emperors. Even so, the issue remains unclear, owing largely to a surviving fragment of an enabling law, the lex de imperio Vespasiani, which conferred powers, privileges, and exemptions, most with Julio-Claudian precedents, on the new emperor. Whether the fragment represents a typical granting of imperial powers that has uniquely survived in Vespasian's case, or is an attempt to limit or expand such powers, remains difficult to know. In any case, the lex sanctioned all that Vespasian had done up to its passing and gave him authority to act as he saw fit on behalf of the Roman people. [[15]]

What does seem clear is that Vespasian felt the need to legitimize his new reign with vigor. He zealously publicized the number of divine omens that predicted his accession and at every opportunity he accumulated multiple consulships and imperial salutations. He also actively promoted the principle of dynastic succession, insisting that the emperorship would fall to his son. The initiative was fulfilled when Titus succeeded his father in A.D. 79.[[16]]

Emperorship

Upon his arrival in Rome in late summer, A.D. 70, Vespasian faced the daunting task of restoring a city and a government ravaged by the recent civil wars. Although many particulars are missing, a portrait nevertheles emerges of a ruler conscientiously committed to the methodical renewal of both city and empire. Concerning Rome itself, the emperor encouraged rebuilding on vacated lots, restored the Capitol (burned in A.D. 69), and also began work on several new buildings: a temple to the deified Claudius on the Caelian Hill, a project designed to identify Vespasian as a legitimate heir to the Julio-Claudians, while distancing himself from Nero ; a temple of Peace near the Forum; and the magnificent Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheatre), located on the site of the lake of Nero 's Golden House. [[17]]

Claiming that he needed forty thousand million sesterces for these projects and for others aimed at putting the state on more secure footing, Vespasian is said to have revoked various imperial immunities, manipulated the supply of certain commodities to inflate their price, and increased provincial taxation. [[18]] The measures are consistent with his characterization in the sources as both obdurate and avaricious. There were occasional political problems as well: Helvidius Priscus, an advocate of senatorial independence and a critic of the Flavian regime from the start, was exiled after A.D. 75 and later executed; Marcellus Eprius and A. Alienus Caecina were condemned by Titus for conspiracy, the former committing suicide, the latter executed in A.D. 79.
As Suetonius claims, however, in financial matters Vespasian always put revenues to the best possible advantage, regardless of their source. Tacitus, too, offers a generally favorable assessment, citing Vespasian as the first man to improve after becoming emperor. [[19]] Thus do we find the princeps offering subventions to senators not possessing the property qualifications of their rank, restoring many cities throughout the empire, and granting state salaries for the first time to teachers of Latin and Greek rhetoric. To enhance Roman economic and social life even further, he encouraged theatrical productions by building a new stage for the Theatre of Marcellus, and he also put on lavish state dinners to assist the food trades. [[20]]

In other matters the emperor displayed similar concern. He restored the depleted ranks of the senatorial and equestrian orders with eligible Italian and provincial candidates and reduced the backlog of pending court cases at Rome. Vespasian also re-established discipline in the army, while punishing or dismissing large numbers of Vitellius ' men. [[21]]
Beyond Rome, the emperor increased the number of legions in the East and continued the process of imperial expansion by the annexation of northern England, the pacification of Wales, and by advances into Scotland and southwest Germany between the Rhine and the Danube. Vespasian also conferred rights on communities abroad, especially in Spain, where the granting of Latin rights to all native communities contributed to the rapid Romanization of that province during the Imperial period. [[22]]

Death and Assessment

In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!" [[23]] In fact, public deification did follow his death, as did his internment in the Mausoleum of Augustus alongside the Julio-Claudians.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century.

Bibliography

Since the scholarship on Vespasian is more comprehensive than can be treated here, the works listed below are main accounts or bear directly upon issues discussed in the entry above. A comprehensive modern anglophone study of this emperor is yet to be produced.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Flaviani, 2 vols. Rieti, 1983.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Vespasianei, 2 vols. Rieti, 1981.

Bosworth, A.B. "Vespasian and the Provinces: Some Problems of the Early 70s A.D." Athenaeum 51 (1973): 49-78.

Brunt, P. A. "Lex de imperio Vespasiani." JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

D'Espèrey, S. Franchet. "Vespasien, Titus et la littérature." ANRW II.32.5: 3048-3086.

Dudley, D. and Webster, G. The Roman Conquest of Britain. London, 1965.

Gonzalez, J. "The Lex Irnitana: A New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

Grant, M. The Roman Emperors: A Biographical Guide to the Rulers of Rome, 31 B.C. - A.D. 476. New York, 1985.

Homo, L. Vespasien, l'Empereur du bons sens (69-79 ap. J.-C.). Paris, 1949.

Levi, M.A. "I Flavi." ANRW II.2: 177-207.

McCrum, M. and Woodhead, A. G. Select Documents of the Principates of the Flavian Emperors Including the Year of the Revolution. Cambridge, 1966.

Nicols, John. Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae. Wiesbaden, 1978.

Scarre, C. Chronicle of the Roman Emperors. The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Rome. London, 1995.

Suddington, D. B. The Development of the Roman Auxiliary Forces from Caesar to Vespasian, 49 B.C. - A.D. 79. Harare: U. of Zimbabwe, 1982.

Syme, R. Tacitus. Oxford, 1958.

Wardel, David. "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol." Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

Wellesley, K. The Long Year: A.D. 69. Bristol, 1989, 2nd ed.


Notes

[[1]] Suet. Vesp. 2.1. Suetonius remains the major source but see also Tac. Hist. 2-5; Cass. Dio 65; Joseph. BJ 3-4.

[[2]] Suetonius (Vesp. 2.1) claims that Vespasian did not accept the latus clavus, the broad striped toga worn by one aspiring to a senatorial career, immediately. The delay, however, was perhaps no more than three years. See J. Nicols, Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae (Wiesbaden, 1978), 2.

[[3]] Military tribunate and quaestorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3; aedileship: ibid., 5.3, in which Gaius, furious that Vespasian had not kept the streets clean, as was his duty, ordered some soldiers to load him with filth;,they complied by stuffing his toga with as much as it could hold. See also Dio 59.12.2-3; praetorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3, in which Vespasian is depicted as one of Gaius' leading adulators, an account consistent with Tacitus' portrayal (Hist 1.50.4; 2.5.1) of his early career. For a more complete discussion of these posts and attendant problems of dating, see Nicols, Vespasian, 2-7.

[[4]] Marriage and Caenis: Suet. Vesp. 3; Cass. Dio 65.14.

[[5]] Nicols, Vespasian, 12-39.

[[6]] Suet. Vesp. 4.1 For additional details on Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see D. Dudley and G. Webster, The Roman Conquest of Britain (London, 1965), 55 ff., 98.

[[7]] Concerning Vespasian's years between his consulship and proconsulship, see Suet. Vesp. 4.2 and Nicols, Vespasian, 9. On his unpopularity in Africa, see Suet. Vesp. 4.3, an account of a riot at Hadrumentum, where he was once pelted with turnips. In recording that Africa supported Vitellius in A.D. 69, Tacitus too suggests popular dissatisfaction with Vespasian's proconsulship. See Hist. 2.97.2.

[[8]] This despite the fact that the sources record two rebukes of Vespasian, one for extorting money from a young man seeking career advancement (Suet. Vesp. 4.3), the other for either leaving the room or dozing off during one of the emperor's recitals (Suet. Vesp. 4.4 and 14, which places the transgression in Greece; Tac. (Ann. 16.5.3), who makes Rome and the Quinquennial Games of A.D. 65 the setting; A. Braithwaite, C. Suetoni Tranquilli Divus Vespasianus, Oxford, 1927, 30, who argues for both Greece and Rome).

[[9]] Subjugation of Galilee: Joseph. BJ 3.65-4.106; siege of Jerusalem: ibid., 4.366-376, 414.

[[10]] Revolt of Vindex: Suet. Nero 40; Tac. Ann. 14.4; revolt of Galba: Suet. Galba 10; Plut. Galba, 4-5; suicide of Nero: Suet. Nero 49; Cass. Dio 63.29.2. For the most complete account of the period between Nero's death and the accession of Vespasian, see K. Wellesley, The Long Year: A.D. 69, 2nd. ed. (Bristol, 1989).

[[11]] Tac. Hist. 2.76.

[[12]] Troops in support of Vespasian: Suet. Vit. 15; Mucianus and his forces: Tac. Hist. 2.83; Vespasian and grain shipments: Joseph. BJ 4.605 ff.; see also Tac. Hist. 3.48, on Vespasian's possible plan to shut off grain shipments to Italy from Carthage as well.

[[13]] On Vitellius' army and its lack of discipline, see Tac. Hist. 2.93-94; illness of army: ibid., 2.99.1; Cremona: ibid., 3.32-33.

[[14]] On Vitellius' last days, see Tac. Hist. 3.68-81. On the complicated issue of Vitellius' death date, see L. Holzapfel, "Römische Kaiserdaten," Klio 13 (1913): 301.

[[15]] Honors, etc. Tac. Hist. 4.3. For more on the lex de imperio Vespasiani, see P. A. Brunt, "Lex de imperio Vespasiani," JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

[[16]] Omens: Suet. Vesp. 5; consulships and honors: ibid., 8; succession of sons: ibid., 25.

[[17]] On Vespasian's restoration of Rome, see Suet. Vesp. 9; Cass. Dio 65.10; D. Wardel, "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol," Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

[[18]] Suet. Vesp. 16.

[[19]] Ibid.; Tac. Hist. 1.50.

[[20]] Suet. Vesp. 17-19.

[[21]] Ibid., 8-10.

[[22]] On Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see esp. Tac., Agricola, eds. R. M. Ogilvie and I. A. Richmond (1967), and W. S. Hanson, Agricola and the Conquest of the North (1987); on the granting of Latin rights in Spain, see, e.g., J. Gonzalez, "The Lex Irnitana: a New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

[[23]] For this witticism and other anecdotes concerning Vespasian's sense of humor, see Suet. Vesp. 23.

Copyright (C) 1998, John Donahue. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, an Online Encyplopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/vespasia.htm
Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





Cleisthenes
79-George-III.jpg
79. George III.25 viewsPenny "cartwheel," 1797.
Obverse: GEORGIUS III D G REX / Laureate bust, right.
Reverse: BRITANNIA 1797 / Britannia seated, left.
27.94 gm., 36 mm.
Seaby #3777.
Callimachus
Album-2522.jpg
Ağ Qoyunlu: Ya'qub (1478-1490 CE) AR Tanka, NM, ND (Album-2522)12 viewsObv: Within cartouche, السلطان العادل يعقوب خان (the Just Sultan, Ya’qub Khan); below, خلد الله ملکه (May Allah preserve his kingdom) where mint name is usually found; margin unread
Rev: Within square, فمن يعمل مثقال ذرة خيرا يره (He who does the weight of one grain of good shall see it); in margin, ابو بكر عمر عثمان علي (the Rashidun - Abu Bakr, Umar, Uthman, Ali)
SpongeBob
zeugitania.jpg
AE 1717 viewsCarthage, Zeugitania, North Africa, c. 310 - 290 B.C. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 109 ff., F, Sicilian (?) mint, 2.372g, 15.0mm, 225o, c. 310 - 290 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain and pendant necklace; reverse, horse standing right, date palm tree behind. Tanit was a Phoenician lunar goddess, worshiped as the patron goddess at Carthage. Ex FORVMPodiceps
sb1059_18mm480g.jpg
AE follis Constans II8 viewsObv:CONSTANTN, crowned and mantled bust facing with short beard, (cross or trefoil on crown), holding mappa and cross on globe
Rev: C-T-X-X clockwise from top left around cross, star above, with pellets to right and left.
Mint: Carthage
Date: 641-668 CE
18mm, 4.80g
SB 1059
wileyc
sb264,25mm573g.jpg
AE half Follis Justinian I sb 26416 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG helmeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr. and shield; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large K; to l., ANNO; to r., numerals representing the regnal yr; cross above, SO beneath, KAR in exergue.
Date: 527-538 CE
Mint: Carthage
Sear 264, DO 294
wileyc
AE19_SEMIS_CARTAGONOVA-CARTAGENA_SPAIN-_TEMPLE.JPG
AE19 SEMIS CARTAGONOVA (Cartagena, Spain).TEMPLE30 views14 - 36 D. C. Antonivs Protti
Punic_AR.JPG
Akragas, Sicily123 views213-211 BC (Punic Occupation)
AR 1/4 Shekel (14mm, 2.11g)
O: Head of Triptolemus right, wreathed in corn.
R: Horse galloping right; Punic letters 'ht' below.
SNG Cop 379; HGC 2, 174; Burnett, Enna 151; de Luynes 3965; Weber 8540; Walker Group II, 1st Series
ex Tom Cederlind

One of the leading centers of Greek influence in the west during the 6th and 5th centuries BC, Akragas was sacked by Carthage in 406. Conquered by Rome in 262 and retaken by Carthgage 8 years later, the city never again regained its' former status. Akragas suffered greatly during the Second Punic War (218-201), with this coin being struck just before the city fell to Rome once again in 210.
Although renamed Agrigentum, its' culture remained essentially Greek for another few hundred years until Rome granted the inhabitants citizenship after Julius Caesar's death in 44 BC.

This coin was struck on the Carthaginian standard and of debased silver.
3 commentsEnodia
mamlukOR.jpg
al-Ashraf Sha'ban II, Balog 45846 viewsIslamic, Mamluks, al-Ashraf Sha'ban II, 1363-1377, AE fals, Dimashq, no date, 18mm 2.24g, Balog 458
O: Eye-shaped cartouche with Arabic al-sultan al-malik al-Ashraf Sha'ban clockwise around perimeter; at center, bin Hasan
R: Floreated octolabe with zarb Dimashq at center
casata137ec
079M.jpg
Alexander (Tyrannus) of Carthage34 viewsAlexander of Carthage. Usurper, AD 308-310.
Æ Follis (21.5mm, 5.26 g, 6h). Carthago (Carthage) mint.
IMP ALEXANDER P F AVG, laureate head right
[S P Q R OPT]IMO PRINCIPI, aquila between two signa, one on left surmounted by hand, one on right surmounted by wreath; PK.
RIC VI 72 (R3); Salama type X, portrait style G. VF, green patina, earthen encrustation. Very rare reverse type.

CNG Coins Triton XXII Auction, Lot 1170.
3 commentsMark Z
26.JPG
Anonyme attribué à Jean II (1239-1305) - Arthur II (1261-1312) - Jean III (1286-1341)16 viewsDenier de Guingamp
1,01g
18mm
+ DVX . BRITANNIE
"Duc de Bretagne"
Champ écartelé de Dreux au franc quartier de bretagne à quatre mouchetures d'hermine posées 2 et 1
+ CASTRI GIGANPI
"Château de Guingamp"
Croix cantonnée au 2 d’un castel en forme de trident
de Mey 76 (Pierre Mauclerc)
Bigot 244
Jézéquel 61b
Monnaie issue de la collection personnelle d'Alexis Bigot
Provenant de Bazouges-la-Pérouze du département d'Ille-et-Vilaine
PYL
316_Greek.jpg
Anonymous. Circa 215-212 BC. Æ Uncia11 viewsAnonymous (post-semilibral), Uncia,Roma, 215-212 BC, AE,

Reference.
Crawford 41/10; Sydenham 108.

Post Semi-Libral standard. Rome mint.

Obv. no legend

Helmeted head of Roma right ; behind, • (mark of value)

Rev. ROMA
Prow of galley right; • (mark of value) below.

5.71 gr
20 mm

Note. Andrew McCabe
They are always overstruck on captured Sicilian or Carthaginian coin, which explains the mashed up areas eg behind the head.
okidoki
SeleukL_copy.jpg
Antiochos VII, Sidetes31 viewsAE 18, Syria, Antiochos VII, ca. 138-129 B.C. Obv: Winged bust of Eros facing right. Rev: Headress of Isis, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΞΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ, cartwheel (?) below. Near black patina with light earthen highlights, VF. SGII 7098 var.Molinari
Scarab.jpg
Antiquity New Kingdom Scarab of Tuthmosis III53 viewsNew Kingdom. 18th Dynasty. Tuthmosis III (circa 1504-1450 BC). Steatite scarab (14x10mm). Base engraved with the cartouche of Tuthmosis III; on the left, a Maat father and the crown of Lower Egypt. Intact, once glazed, pierced for mounting. Ex David Hendin collection. CNG Auction 93.

Scarabs were used as lucky and magical charms in ancient Egypt. Scarabs, such as this one, with the names of pharos, were particularly powerful, and were produced as protective amulets for the public. Hendin’s collection of scarabs were collected by him in Israel in the 1970s and 1980s.
2 commentsLucas H
denier_de_Caracalla,_RARE.jpg
AR denier de Caracalla 35 viewsCaracalla Denarius. 201-206 AD. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate draped bust right / INDVLGENTIA AVGG, Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt & sceptre, riding lion over waters gushing from rock on left, IN CARTH in ex. RIC 130

20mm., 3,23g
_6661
1 commentsAntonivs Protti
2010-09-25.jpg
AR half Siliqua Heraclius, SB 87128 viewsObverse: DN :Greek_epsilon:RAC :Greek_Lambda:IO PP AV or similar, Crowned, dr, and cuir bust facing beardless
Reverse: No legend, facing busts of Heraclius Constantine on L., and Martina on r., the former wearing crown and Chlamys, the other latter , crown with long pendilla and robes, between thier heads, cross and with four dots between down lower.
Mint: Carthage
Date: 610-641 CE
Sear 871
.66gm 9mm
wileyc
Arpi.JPG
Arpi, Apulia30 views325-275 BC
AE20 (20mm, 7.07g)
O: Laureate head of Zeus left; [thunderbolt] behind.
R: Kalydonian boar running right; spearhead above, [Α]ΡΠΑΝ[ΟΥ] below.
SNG ANS 639; SNG Cop 605; HN Italy 642; Sear 569; BMC 1, 4
ex Andre C

Situated about 20 miles inland from the Adriatic Sea, Arpi was an ancient city which legend tells us was founded by the hero Diomedes. Arpi allied with Rome at the end of the 4th century BC, and supplied them with infantry and cavalry in the war against Pyrrhus.
After the annihilation of the Roman army at Cannae in 216 Arpi defected to the Carthaginian cause, and Hannibal made the city his winter headquarters in 215. However upon his departure to move his army south the Roman consul Quintus Fabius Maximus retook the city in 213, and Arpi never again regained its’ former importance.
Enodia
Athen_owl_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Athena and her owl 182 viewsIn Greek mythology, a Little Owl baby (Athene noctua) traditionally represents or accompanies Athena, the virgin goddess of wisdom, or Minerva, her syncretic incarnation in Roman mythology. Because of such association, the bird often referred to as the "owl of Athena" or the "owl of Minerva" has been used as a symbol of knowledge, wisdom, perspicacity and erudition throughout the Western world.
The reasons behind the association of Athena and the owl are lost in time. Some mythographers, such as David Kinsley and Martin P. Nilsson suggest that she may descend from a Minoan palace goddess associated with birds and Marija Gimbutas claim to trace Athena's origins as an Old European bird and snake goddess.
On the other hand, Cynthia Berger theorizes about the appeal of some characteristics of owls such as their ability to see in the dark to be used as symbol of wisdom while others, such as William Geoffrey Arnott, propose a simple association between founding myths of Athens and the significant number of Little Owls in the region (a fact noted since antiquity by Aristophanes in The Birds and Lysistrata).
In any case, the city of Athens seems to have adopted the owl as proof of allegiance to its patron virgin goddess, which according to a popular etiological myth reproduced on the West pediment of the Parthenon, secured the favor of its citizens by providing them with a more enticing gift than Poséidon.
Owls were commonly reproduced by Athenians in vases, weights and prize amphoras for the Panathenaic Games. The owl of Athena even became the common obverse of the Athenian tetradrachms after 510 BC and according to Philochorus, the Athenian tetradrachm was known as glaux throughout the ancient world and "owl" in present day numismatics. They were not, however, used exclusively by them to represent Athena and were even used for motivation during battles by other Greek cities, such as in the victory of Agathocles of Syracuse over the Carthaginians in 310 B.C. in which owls flying through the ranks were interpreted as Athena’s blessing or in the Battle of Salamis, chronicled in Plutarch's biography of Themistocles.
(Source: Wikipédia)
moneta romana
PtolemyREX.jpg
AUGUSTUS & PTOLEMY OF NUMIDIA AE semis176 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head of Augustus right

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, REX PTOL (Ptolemy, King) within diadem

Carthago Nova, Spain, under sole 'duovir quinqunennales' C Laetilius Apalus.

18.5mm, 5.3g.
RPC 172.

Ex-Incitatus

Ptolemy of Numidia was the son of King Juba II of Numidia and Cleopatra Selene II. He was also the grandson of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII on his mohter's side. He was named in honor of the memory of Cleopatra VII, the birthplace of his mother and the birthplace of her relatives. In choosing her son's name, Cleopatra Selene II created a distinct Greek-Egyptian tone and emphasized her role as the monarch who would continue the Ptolemaic dynasty. She by-passed the ancestral names of her husband. By naming her son Ptolemy instead of a Berber ancestral name, she offers an example rare in ancient history, especially in the case of a son who is the primary male heir, of reaching into the mother's family instead of the father's for a name. This emphasized the idea that his mother was the heiress of the Ptolemies and the leader of a Ptolemaic government in exile.

Through his parents he received Roman citizenship and was actually educated in Rome. Amazingly he grew up in the house of his maternal aunt, and Antony's daughter Antonia Minor, the youngest daughter of Mark Antony and the youngest niece of Augustus. Antonia was also a half-sister of Ptolemy's late mother, also a daughter of Mark Antony. Antonia Minor's mother was Octavia Minor, Mark Antony's fourth wife and the second sister of Octavian (later Augustus). Ptolemy lived in Rome until the age of 21, when he returned to the court of his aging father in Mauretania.

Ptolemy was a co-ruler with his father Juba II until Juba's death and was the last semi-autonomous ruler of Africa. On a visit to Rome in 40 AD he was seen by the Emperor Caligula in an amphitheather wearing a spectacular purpal cloak. A jealous Caligula had him murdered for his fashionable purple cloak.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
spaincart2.jpg
Augustus ( Octavian) Colonial Patricia, Spain 27 BCE-14 CE19 viewsObverse: PER ACE AVG, head of Octavian to the left.
Reverse: COLO PATR, Aspergilo (holy water sprinkler),
prefericulo (peripheral ring), lituo (curved stick used for worship)
and patera (shallow bowl).
14 mm., 2.0 g., AB 1566
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
9eEGYk7pfdF6Q8yFj45BKo32mZ4wbA.jpg
AUGUSTUS AE as. Carthago Nova, Hispania. Duovirs M Postumius Albinus & L Porcius Capito. Priest standing holding branch.19 viewsAUGUSTUS AE as. Struck at Carthago Nova, Hispania, under Duovirs Marcus Postumius Albinus & Lucius Porcius Capito. AVGVSTVS DIVI F, laureate head of Augustus right. Reverse - M POSTVM ALBIN LPORC CAPIT II VIR Q, Priest standing, holding vase & branch. RPC 170. 28mm, 13.2g. Antonivs Protti
Augustus_Carteia_Dolphin_and_Rudder.jpg
Augustus Carteia Dolphin and Rudder31 viewsAugustus, Spain, Carteia, AE Quadrans, 27 BC - 14 AD, 4.8g, 17.29mm, Burg. 527, RPC.119, SNG Cop 441
OBV: IIII VIR above, DD below, rudder
REV: CARTEIA below dolphin swimming left with trident.
Semi autonomous issue from Spain

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Augustus_Carteia_Tyche_and_Neptune.JPG
Augustus Carteia Tyche and Neptune71 viewsAugustus, Carteia Spain, AE Semis, 27 BC - 14 AD, 21.36mm, 7.2g, RPC I 122, Villaronga 71, Burgos 662,
OBV: CARTEIA, Turreted bust of Tyche right
REV: D D, Neptune standing left, foot on rock, holding dolphin and trident

The Latin colony of Carteia was founded in 171 B.C. In 27 B.C., when Augustus had become emperor, Hispania Ulterior was divided into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Cantabria and Basque country were also added to Hispania Citerior.
3 commentsRomanorvm
aunep.jpg
Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune11 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.E. - 14 C.E.
AE Semis, RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, Turrited bust of Tyche right
Reverse - DD, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
21.2 mm., 4.6 g.
NORMAN K
nept516.jpg
Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune, 31 BCE-14 CE21 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.E.- 14 C.E.
AE Semis, 21.3 mm., 4.5 g. RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, Turrited bust of Tyche right
Reverse - DD, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
NORMAN K
augustus-ebora.jpg
Augustus- RPC 16813 viewsOctavian as Augustus, 27 BC – 14 AD
Bronze, Carthago Nova after 27 BC.
Laureate head r. DIVIF AVGVSTVS
Simpulum aspergiullum, securis and apex.
Duumviri C. Varius Rufus und Sextus Iulius Pollio
xokleng
AUSTRIA_HALF_KREUZER_ND.jpg
AUSTRIA -- Francis I38 viewsAUSTRIA -- Francis I (1745-1765 ) Copper 1/2 Kreuzer, No Date. Kremnitz Mint. Obv.: BUst right, FRANC D. G. R . I. S . A . GE . I . REX . Rev.: 1/2 / K in cartouche. Reference: KM #2006dpaul7
147.jpg
AVP (engraved monogram in cartouche)155 viewsTHRACE. Topirus. Caracalla. Æ 22. A.D. 198-217. Obv: AVTKMAVP-(ANTΩN)INOC. Laureate bust right; "Cartouche" on shoulder. Rev: (OVΛΠ)ACTOΠIPOV. Naked figure of Herakles seated left on rock covered with lion's skin, holding club in extended right hand, resting left hand on rock. Ref: BMC 6. Axis: 210°. Weight: 6.81 g. “CM”: Monogram of AVP in circular "cartouche". Howgego -. Note: This is not actually a countermark, since it was engraved on the original die. Collection Automan.Automan
BCC_B20_Justinian_I_Nummus.jpg
BCC B207 viewsByzantine Period
Justinian I 527-565CE
Obv: Diademed (draped, and
cuirassed) bust right,
traces of inscription.
Rev: Large A (one nummus)
AE 8mm 0.68gm. Axis:210
Struck 534-539CE
SB 281 DOC 309 Carthage
Surface find, Caesarea M. 1977.
v-drome
BCC_B23_Justinian_I_Stuarogram.jpg
BCC B234 viewsByzantine Period
Justinian I 527-565CE
Obv: [Helmeted, draped bust
facing, stars flanking].
Rev: Staurogram, below, left
and right: A and w
AE 8mm 0.57gm. axis:345?
SB 342, DOC 308, MIB 208a
Nummus. Carthage Mint
Surface find, Caesarea M. 1977.
v-drome
BCC_B25_Gelimer_Monogram.jpg
BCC B254 viewsByzantine Period
Gelimer 530-534CE
Obv: [GEIL] Bust right,
traces of inscription.
Rev: Monogram of Gelimer
within wreath.
AE 9.75mm 0.88gm. Axis:0
BMC Vandals 4-6
Nummus. Carthage Mint
Surface find, Caesarea M. 1974.
Vandalic coinage has frequently
been found alongside late Roman
and early Byzantine coins in
excavations at Caesarea Maritima.
v-drome
valerian_tyre.jpg
BCC rgp3x77 viewsRoman Provincial - Tyre
Valerian I 253-260C.E.
Obv:IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG
Luareated bust rt.
Rev:COL TV/RO MET
Dido of Carthage, wearing tall kalathos,
standing rt .before lighted altar, raising
both arms towards two-columned temple,
seen in perspective, containing the club
of Melqart-Herakles. Murex shell in field.
AE26.5x29mm. 11.07gm. Axis:180
Possible reference Rouvier 2501v. (Gallienus)
1 commentsv-drome
BCC_RI24_Caracalla_Indvlg.jpg
BCC RI24 - Hybrid18 viewsRoman Imperial
Caracalla 198-217C.E.
AR Denarius (debased silver?)
Obv:ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate, bearded bust right.
Rev:INDVGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH
Dea Caelestis riding lion right,
over waters.
18mm. 3.50gm. Axis:180
Possible reference for reverse: RIC 130
This is a very unusual coin, perhaps
a contemporary imitation mis-matching
the Dea Caelestis reverse with a later,
mature portrait of Caracalla.
v-drome
CarthageBillion.jpg
Billion Tridrachm from Carthage83 viewsA Billion tridrachm from Carthage, minted during the second Punic war. 9.589g, 26.2mm, Carthage mint, c. 215 - 205 B.C.

Obverse: Head of Tanit left, wearing barley wreath, pellet on leaf, triple-pendant earing, and necklace with many pendants

Reverse: Unbridled horse standing right, palm tree in background, pellet below horse's belly forward of the palm trunk; scarce;

Attribution: Alexandropoulos 44a; Müller Afrique 104; SNG Cop 190 var (no pellet); SRCV II 6494 var (same)
3 commentschuy1530
1058.jpg
bmc4097 viewsElagabalus
Tyre, Phoenicia

Obv: Laureate cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Dido building Carthage, she stands front looking left, holding a ruler in right hand and scepter in left, before the arched gate of the city; above the gate a mason at work on one of the towers, below a man digging with a pick, murex shell and palms tree in upper fields.
27 mm, 12.07 gms

BMC 409
Charles M
Brandenburg-Ansbach - 2½ Kreuzer.jpg
BRANDENBURG-ANSBACH140 viewsBRANDENBURG-ANSBACH -- Billon 2½ Kreuzer 1778. Obv.: Crowned coat of arms, OVER LETTER "s" IN CARTOUCHE; "NACH DEM CONVENTIONS FUS" Reverse: On 4 lines: 'BR./ONOIZB/LAND:M/1778. Reference: KM# 277.dpaul7
George III Cartwheel IMG.jpg
British, George III, Cartwheel 2d, BOX50 viewsCartwheel 2d
Obv:- GEORGIUS III . D : G . REX., Laureate, draped bust right
Rev:- BRITANNIA 1797, Britannia seated left holding branch and trident

Actually a box created from two 2d coins.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
174.JPG
Bronze CALEDU, -75/-5043 viewsBronze, 2,39 g, 17 mm.
A/ Tête à droite, losange pointé derrière, CALIIDV devant dans un cartouche.
R/ Cheval galopant à gauche, roue à quatre rayons cantonnés de cercles dessus, fleuron dessous.
Réfs : Dicomon ARV-3931 ; LT 3931 ; BnF 3931-3935 ; Depeyrot 2004, type 204 ; DT 3569 ; RIG, type 89.
Gabalor
176.JPG
Bronze CALEDU, -75/-5033 viewsBronze, 1,89 g, 17 mm.
A/ Tête à droite, losange pointé derrière, CALIIDV devant dans un cartouche.
R/ Cheval galopant à gauche, roue à quatre rayons cantonnés de cercles dessus, fleuron dessous.
Réfs : Dicomon ARV-3931 ; LT 3931 ; BnF 3931-3935 ; Depeyrot 2004, type 204 ; DT 3569 ; RIG, type 89.
Gabalor
3.JPG
Bronze CALEDU, -75/-5050 viewsBronze, 2,94 g, 19 mm.
A/ Tête à droite, losange pointé derrière, CALIIDV devant dans un cartouche.
R/ Cheval galopant à gauche, roue à quatre rayons cantonnés de cercles dessus, fleuron dessous.
Réfs : Dicomon ARV-3931 ; LT 3931 ; BnF 3931-3935 ; Depeyrot 2004, type 204 ; DT 3569 ; RIG, type 89.
1 commentsGabalor
017~3.JPG
Bronze CALEDU, -75/-5023 viewsBronze, 2,22 g, 17 mm.
A/ Tête à droite, losange pointé derrière, CALIIDV devant dans un cartouche.
R/ Cheval galopant à gauche, roue à quatre rayons cantonnés de cercles dessus, fleuron dessous.
Réfs : Dicomon ARV-3931 ; LT 3931 ; BnF 3931-3935 ; Depeyrot 2004, type 204 ; DT 3569 ; RIG, type 89.
Gabalor
carthage.jpg
Bronze Punic Carthage Coin21 viewsA bronze coin from Punic Carthage, minted between 264-241 BC. 20 mm, 4.9 g.chuy1530
HN_Italy_2497.jpg
Bruttium, Rhegion, 415-387 B.C., Drachm 26 views14mm, 3.89 grams
Reference: Sear 502; B.M.C.1.38
Lion's scalp facing.
PHΓINON, Laureate head of Apollo right, olive-sprig behind.

"Dionysios I, after concluding a peace with the Carthaginians, went about securing his power in the island of Sicily. His troops, however, rebelled against him and sought help from, among others, the city of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 14.8.2). In the ensuing campaigns, Dionyios I proceeded to enslave the citizens of Naxos and Katane, with whom the Rhegians shared a common history and identity (Diod. Sic. 14.40.1). This association was a source of anger and fear for the inhabitants of Rhegion. The Syracusan exiles living there also encouraged the Rhegians to go to war with Syracuse (Diod. Sic. 14.40.3). The overarching strategy of Dionysios I included extending his power into Italy by using Rhegion as a stepping stone to the rest of the peninsula. In 387 BC, after a siege that lasted eleven months, the Rhegians, on the brink of starvation, surrendered to Dionysus. Indeed, we are told that by the end of the siege, a medimnos of wheat cost about five minai (Diod. Sic. 14.111.2). Strabo remarks that, following Dionysios' capture of the city, the Syracusan “destroyed the illustrious city” (Strabo 6.1.6).

The next decade or so of the history of Rhegion is unclear, but sometime during his reign, Dionysios II, who succeeded his father in 367 BC, rebuilt the city, giving it the new name of Phoibia (Strabo 6.1.6). Herzfelder argues that this issue was struck by Dionysios II of Syracuse after he rebuilt the city, and dates it to the period that Dionysios II is thought to have lived in the city. Due to civil strife at Syracuse, Dionysios II was forced to garrison Region, but was ejected from the city by two of his rivals circa 351 BC (Diod. Sic. 16.45.9).

The coin types of Rhegion, founded as a colony of Chalcis, are related to its founding mythology. Some of the earliest tetradrachms of the city, from the mid-5th century BC, depict a lion’s head on the obverse, and a seated figure on the reverse. J.P. Six (in NC 1898, pp. 281-5) identified the figure as Iokastos, the oikistes (founder) of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 5.8.1; Callimachus fr. 202). Head (in HN), suggested Aristaios, son of Apollo. Iokastos was one of six sons of Aiolos, ruler of the Aeolian Islands. All of the sons of Aiolos secured their own realms in Italy and Sicily, with Iokastos taking the region around Rhegion. Aristaios, born in Libya, discovered the silphium plant, and was the patron of beekeepers (mentioned by Virgil), shepherds, vintners, and olive growers. He also protected Dionysos as a child, and was the lover of Eurydike. The replacement of the seated figure type with the head of Apollo circa 420 BC also suggests the figure could be Aristaios. An anecdote from the first-century BC geographer Strabo (6.1.6 and 6.1.9), which connects Rhegion’s founding to the orders of the Delphic Oracle and Apollo, as the reason for the advent of the new type could be simply serendipitous.

Different theories exist for the lion’s head on the coins of Rhegion. The lion’s head (or mask as it is sometimes described) first appeared on the coinage of Rhegion at the start of the reign of Anaxilas, in about 494 BC. E.S.G. Robinson, in his article “Rhegion, Zankle-Messana and the Samians” (JHS vol. 66, 1946) argues that the lion was a symbol of Apollo. He makes a comparison to the coinage of the nearby city of Kaulonia, “At Kaulonia Apollo’s animal was the deer; if at Rhegion it was the lion, the early appearance and persistence of that type is explained. The lion is a certain, though infrequent, associate of Apollo at all periods.” The link, he suggests, is that the lion was associated with the sun, as was Apollo himself.

The lion’s head could also relate to the exploits of Herakles, who had some significance for the city. The extant sources tell us that Herakles stopped at southern Italy near Rhegion on his return with the cattle of Geryon (Diod. Sic. 4.22.5). It was here that supposedly a bull broke away from the rest of the herd and swam to Sicily (Apollod. 2.5.10). Though but a passing reference in Apollodorus, it is very possible that the Rhegians venerated Herakles. Indeed, Herakles was a very important figure throughout the entire area. Dionysios of Halicarnassus says that “in many other places also in Italy [besides Rome] precincts are dedicated to this god [Herakles] and altars erected to him, both in cities and along highways; and one could scarcely find any place in Italy in which the god is not honoured” (I.40.6). As the skin of the Nemean Lion was one of the main attributes of Herakles, the lion’s head may refer to him through metonymic association."
1 commentsLeo
00017Q00.JPG
Bruttium, The Brettii (Circa 211-208 BC)28 viewsÆ Double Unit (Didrachm)

26 mm, 16.19 g

Obverse: Head of Ares left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet decorated with griffin

Reverse: BRET-TIWN, Hera Hoplosima (or Athena) advancing right, holding spear and shield; racing torch right.

Scheu 72; SNG ANS 82; HN Italy 1987

The Brettii were an indigenous Italian people who emerged in southern Italy in the mid-fourth century BC. Ancient authors describe them as a group of revolted slaves and miscellaneous fugitives who came together after seeking refuge in the rugged mountains of the area. Nonetheless, it is more likely that most of these people were native Oenotrians or Pelasgians who had escaped from domination by the Greek cities and other native groups to the north. By the mid-third century BC, this disparate congregation of people, now known as the Brettii, had become the predominant power over most of Italy south of the river Laos, including the important mints of Consentia, Medma, Hipponium, Terina, and Thurium (Diod. XVI.15; Strabo VI). Their rising power, however, was eventually checked by the expansion of Roman authority in their region. In the 280s BC, they united with their neighbors, the Lucanians, against Rome, an adventure that proved inconclusive. Soon thereafter, they aided Pyrrhos in his war against Rome, an unsuccessful endeavor that resulted in the Romans carrying on the conflict against the Brettians after defeating the Epiran leader. The Brettians submitted to the Romans, but in the face of Hannibal's successes against Rome, they again allied themselves with Rome's enemy during the Second Punic War (Livy XXII. 61). In this conflict, the Brettians were completely invested in the alliance with Carthage, such that the entire region of Bruttium became a veritable Punic fortress, and it was during this war that the entire series of Brettian coinage was struck. Once again, though, the Brettii had supported the losing side, and this time the Romans were determined to squash any further ability of the Brettians to threaten them. In the aftermath of Hannibal's defeat, the Romans subjugated Bruttium through annual military deployments and the establishment of three colonies, at Tempsa, Kroton, and Vibo Valentia (Livy XXXIV. 45 and XXXV. 40). Unlike other Italian populations that had been conquered by the Romans, the Brettii were also not admitted as Roman allies and could not serve in the Roman military (Appian, Annib. 61). Little is known of the Brettii thereafter.
1 commentsNathan P
Brittium__The_Bretti_River_God_221-179_BC.jpg
BRUTTIUM. The Brettii.21 viewsAR Drachm
215-2015 BC
18.5mm, 4.23 grams
Diademed bust of Nike r.; behind, harpa
BPETTIΩN, river-god standing, crowning himself, holding cloak and sceptre at r., snake and Σ.
Scheu 61. SNG Copenhagen 1624. Historia Numorum Italy 1963.
The Bretti (or Brutti) emerged from the rugged hills of southern Italy in the mid-4th century BC as an insurgent force of escaped slaves and other fugitives rebelling against the Lucanians, who had subjugated the area a generation earlier. Having thrown off the yoke of oppression, the Bretti retained their independence until 280 BC, when they helped the Greek king Pyrrhus of Epirus in his war against the Romans. After defeating Pyrrhus, the Romans invaded Bruttium and occupied most of the country. The Brettii remained pacified throughout the First Punic War (264-241 BC) but were among the first to declare in favor of the Carthaginian general Hannibal against Rome in the Second Punic War (218-201 BC), resulting in their final crushing as a separate people and absorption by Rome.
1 commentsJBGood
Justinian_I__AR_Half_Siliqua.jpg
Byzantine , Justinian I. 527-565.36 viewsAR Half Siliqua. Carthage mint , aVF , rare.Sam
Gavilá-44.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Anonymous (555-624) 4 Nummi, Cartago Spartaria (Gavilá 44)14 viewsQuant.Geek
Sear-1039.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668 CE) AV Solidus, Carthage (Sear 1039; DOC 119; MIB 66)8 viewsQuant.Geek
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Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668 CE) AV Solidus, Carthage, IY 3 (Sear 1030; DOC 108; MIB 57.1)12 viewsObv: D N CON-TΛNTIN VPP Crowned and draped bust of Constans facing, holding globus cruciger
Rev: VICTORI AAVς Γ; Cross potent set on three steps; P to right; in exergue, CONOB
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Sear-1043.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668) AV Solidus, Carthage (Sear 1043; DOC 125; MIB 72b)14 viewsObv: Crowned and draped facing busts of Constans, holding globus cruciger, and Constantine
Rev: Cross potent set on globe; at sides, crowned and draped facing busts of Heraclius and Tiberius; P below
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Sear-1037.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668) AV Solidus, Carthage, IY 12 (Sear 1037; DOC 116; MIB 64)12 viewsObv: D N CO-NSTANT; Crowned bust facing, holding globus cruciger
Rev: VICTORIA AVGG; cross potent set on three steps; IA/CONOB in exergue



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Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668) Æ Half Follis, Carthage (Sear 1057; DOC II 138; MIB 196a-b)13 viewsObv: CONSTAN TINVSPP AVG; Bust facing, beardless, wearing chlamys and crown with cross on circlet; in right hand, globus cruciger
Rev: Large cross; X on either side; in exergue, CRTς
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Sear-1060var.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Constans II (641-668) Æ Half Follis, Carthage (Sear-1060/1059 Mule)13 viewsObv: Crowned and draped bust facing, holding mappa and globus cruciger, crown ornamented with cross
Rev: Large cross; C-T above X-X across field; above, star between two pellets

From the Prue Morgan Fitts Collection.

This coin has the reverse type of SB 1059, with pellets to either side of the star on the reverse, but has the obverse type of SB 1060, with Constans' crown ornamented with a cross instead of a trefoil
SpongeBob
Sear-866.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Heraclius (610-641 CE) AV Solidus, Carthage, IY 14 (Sear 866; DOC 202; MIB 83) 9 viewsObv: D-N ЄR-ACLIO P P IΔ; crowned, cuirassed bust of Heraclius facing, wearing pendilia, globus cruciger in right hand
Rev: VICTORIA • AVGG A; cross potent set on three steps; in exergue, CONOB
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Sear-859.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Heraclius (610-641) Decanummium, Carthage Mint (Sear-859)20 viewsObv: D N ERACLIO P P AVG.
Draped and cuirassed bust facing, wearing crown cruciger.
Rev: Large X between M and N; above, cross; below, star; pellet below M and N .
SpongeBob
Sear-867.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine (610-641 CE) AV Solidus, Carthage, IY 6 (Sear 867; DOC 208; MIB 84a)11 viewsObv: D N ЄRACLIO ЄT ЄRA CONST P P S; To left, bust of Heraclius with short beard; to right, smaller bust of Heraclius Constantine, beardless; each wears cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with cross; Between heads, cross
Rev: VICTOR-IA AVCC S; Cross potent on base and two steps; in exergue, CONOB
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Sear-867(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Heraclius with Heraclius Constantine (610-641 CE) AV Solidus, Carthage, IY 7 (Sear 867; DOC 209; MIB 84a)8 viewsObv: D N ЄRACLIO ЄT ЄRA CONST P P Z; To left, bust of Heraclius with short beard; to right, smaller bust of Heraclius Constantine, beardless; each wears cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with cross; Between heads, cross
Rev: VICTOR-IA AVCC Z; Cross potent on base and two steps; in exergue, CONOB
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Sear-401.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Carthage (Sear-401; DOC 194; MIBE 81)15 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justin II right
Rev: Large V; above, cross; to left, P/R; to right, A/N/N/O; CAR in exergue

Quant.Geek
Sear-400.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II with Sophia (565-578) Æ Decanummium , Carthage (Sear-400; DOC I-200; MIBE-80a)12 viewsObv: Draped busts facing of Justin, helmeted, and Sophia, crowned; VITA below
Rev: Large I; N - M across field

From the Prue Morgan Fitts Collection
SpongeBob
Sear-394.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II with Sophia (565-578) Æ Follis, Carthage (Sear-394; DOC 202; MIBE 74)14 viewsObv: Justin and Sophia seated facing on double throne; cross between; VITA in exergue
Rev: Large M; large X (date) above, with star above and below in upper central field; A/N/N/O - K/A/R across field
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Sear-396.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II with Sophia (565-578) Æ Half Follis, Carthage (Sear-396; DOC I-203; MIBE-77)16 viewsObv: Justin and Sophia seated facing; cross between, [VITA] in exergue
Rev: Two Victories standing facing one another, holding round shield between; cross above, K/NM below
SpongeBob
Sear-395.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II, with Sophia (565-578) Æ Half Follis, Carthage, RY 8 (Sear-395; DOC 199; MIBE 76)11 viewsObv: Facing busts of Justin, helmeted and cuirassed, and Sophia, crowned and draped; cross above, VITA in exergue
Rev: Large K; A/N/N/O to left, cross above, V/III to right, retrograde ς below; KAR in exergue
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Sear-277(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 2 Nummi, Carthage (Sear 277; DOC 102; MIBE 190)6 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right between two crosses
Rev: Large B
Dim: 10 mm, 0.80 g, 7 h
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Sear-277.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ 2 Nummi, Carthage (Sear 277; DOC 102; MIBE 190)12 viewsObv: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right between two crosses
Rev: Large B
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Sear-276.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Carthage (Sear 276; DOC 306; MIB 204)8 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIAVS PP AVC; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian to right
Rev: VICTORIA AG; Large Є, CAR in exergue
Dim: 15 mm, 2.57 g, 7 h
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Sear-269.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, RY 13, Carthage (Sear-269; DOC I-297; MIBE-199)8 viewsObv: DNIVSTINI ANVSPP AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large I; cross above, A/N/N/O X/III across field; CAR in exergue
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Sear-281.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Nummus, Carthage (Sear 281; DOC 309; MIBE 193)15 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Justinian I to right
Rev: Large A
Dim: 10 mm, 0.53 g, 4 h

This issue was struck shortly after Belisarius defeated Gelimer, the last king of the Vandals, which reunited the African provinces with the Empire.
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Sear-551.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Maurice Tiberius (582-602 CE) AR 1/2 Siliqua, Carthage (Sear-551; DOC 239; MIBE 57)12 viewsObv: D N TIB [MA]-VRIC [PP A]; crowned, draped, and cuirassed bust of Maurice Tiberius facing
Rev: * SALVS MVNDI, cross within circular border of pellets
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Sear-553.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Maurice Tiberius (582-602) AR 1/2 Siliqua, Carthage (Sear-553; DOC 241; MIBE 61)12 viewsObv: D N MAVR Tb PP; helmeted and draped bust of Maurice Tiberius facing, wearing consular robes, holding mappa and globus cruciger
Rev: Cross potent on three steps, flanked by A-ω; all within circular pelleted border surrounded by laurel wreath
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Sear-681.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Phocas (602-610) AV Solidus, Carthage (Sear 681; DOC 108; MIB 32)9 viewsQuant.Geek
Sear-686.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Phocas (602-610) Æ Half Follis, Carthage, RY5 (Sear-686; DOC 116; MIBE-98a)13 viewsObv: Crowned bust facing, wearing consular robes and holding mappa and cruciform scepter
Rev: Large X•X; cross above, star to left, Є to right; KRTς

From the Prue Morgan Fitts Collection
SpongeBob
heraclius~1.jpg
Byzantine Heraclius quarter siliqua - UNIQUE8 viewsHaraclius, AR quarter siliqua, mint of Carthage.
10 mm ; 0.25 gr.
Obv. D.N.ERACAIO PP AV (or similar). Crowned, dr. and cuir. bust facing, beardless.
Rev. Cross potent, with star in each angle.

D.O. ..., BMC ..., T ...., R ...., BN ...(but now in BN), MIB 150 ; Sear 871a

Unique
Tanit
Justinian.jpg
Byzantine Justinian I Decanummium88 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint, year 13 (539-40). D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, surmounted by cross; to left, A/N/N/O; to right, numerals representing the regnal year X/III ; in ex. CAR

Sear 269, DO.297-8, BMC 388-93.
4 commentsTanit
justinian1.jpg
Byzantine Justinian I Half siliqua11 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. AR Half Siliqua (0.54 g). Carthage mint. Struck 533-534.

Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / O-V/T-M in the angles of a cross; all within wreath; CONOS.

Cf. DOC 282; cf. MIBE 52; SB 256.

Extremely rare.
Tanit
theodosius~0.jpg
Byzantine Theodosius 1/3 Siliqua15 viewsTheodosius, son of Maurice Tiberius (590-602).
1/3 Siliqua (200 Nummi). Carthage, 592-597.
AR 0.3 gr.
DNTHEODO SIVSPPA. Bust facing, wearing cuirass and crown with trefoil ornament above circle.
Rv. Large N • M; above, +; beneath, CC, all within circle of dots surrounded by wreath.

BNC Maurice Tiberius 6; MIB Maurice Tiberius 62; Sear 615A.


Extremely rare.
1 commentsTanit
Teodosius.jpg
Byzantine Theodosius Half Siliqua52 viewsHalf Siliqua (Silver, Carthage, 592-602. )
D N TEODOSIVS PP A Helmeted and cuirassed bust of Theodosius facing. Rev. Facing busts of Maurice and Constantina with long cross between; in exergue,

ACTI. DOC 307. MIB 59. S. 615.

Rare
Tanit
heraclius~2.jpg
Byzantine, Heraclius, quarter siliqua - UNIQUE19 viewsHaraclius, AR quarter siliqua, mint of Carthage.
10 mm ; 0.25 gr.
Obv. D.N.ERACAIO PP AV (or similar). Crowned, dr. and cuir. bust facing, beardless.
Rev. Cross potent, with star in each angle.

D.O. ..., BMC ..., T ...., R ...., BN ...(but now in BN), MIB 150 ; Sear 871a

Unique
Tanit
JustinianS279.JPG
BYZANTINE, Justinian I 527-565 Carthage65 viewsObv: ...INA... (blundered legend)
Rev: VOT XIIII
Sear 279
8-9 mm and very hard to photograph!
Laetvs
Justinian~2.jpg
Byzantine, Justinian I, Æ Decanummium.23 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint, year 13 (539-40). D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, surmounted by cross; to left, A/N/N/O; to right, numerals representing the regnal year X/III ; in ex. CAR

Sear 269, DO.297-8, BMC 388-93.
Tanit
803_Annius_Luscus_and_Fabius_Hispaniensis.jpg
C. Annius T.f. T.n. Luscus and L. Fabius L.f. Hispaniensis - AR denarius8 views²Transalpine Gaul
¹north Italy
¹²82-81 BC
diademed draped bust of Anna Parenna right; caduceus left, scales right, dagger below
C·ANNI·T·F·T·N_·_PRO·COS·EX·S·C·
Victory in quadriga right, holding palm branch and reins
Q .
L·FABI·L·F·HISP
¹Crawford 366/1a, SRCV I 289, Sydenham 748, RSC I Annia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Moneyer apparently used Anna Parenna as a pun to his name Annius. It is the only known depiction of Anna Parenna whose identity is very complicated.

"An older myth tells that Anna Perenna was an old woman from the city of Bollivae in Latium. The myth tells that Anna Perenna brought bread and cakes to the Plebeians who wanted to separate from Rome because of their unequal status as Plebeians in 494 BC and so she saved them from starving. This is why she was popular on the common people and considered as goddes after her death.

A later tradition from the time of the myth of Aeneas made Anna the sister of Dido. After Dido has committed suicide and Carthage was conquered she had to fly. A heavy storm throw her to the coast of Latium at Laurentum where Aeneas was the ruler. Aeneas and his companion went to the beach and he recognized her and took her to his palace. In a dream Anna was warned to be alarmed at the traps that Lavinia, Aeneas' wife, would set for her so she fled from the palace. While she was wandering she met Numicius, the god of a nearby stream who carried her off to his bed. The servants of Aeneas searched for Anna and followed her tracks to the river bank a shape rose from the water and revealed to them that Anna had become a water nymph, whose new name, Perenna, signified eternity. Aeneas' servants in their joy scattered among the fields and passed the day in feasting and festivities, which became established as an annual celebration of the festival of Anna Perenna. There is another opinion too that she committed suicide by drowning in the river Numicius because of her desperation.

In another myth she was an old woman again. Mars was fallen in love to Minerva, sworn virgin. Mars asked Anna Perenna for interceding on his behalf. But instead of this - knowing about the impossibility of his wishes - she dressed herself like Minerva and came to Mars veiled. When he tried to kiss her she lifted her veil, break out in laughter and mocked Mars. Minerva's main festival, the Quinquatrus, was celebrated 4 days after the festival of Anna Perenna so this could be reason of this story." from Jochen's coins of mythological interest.
Johny SYSEL
C__Caecilius_Metellus_Jupitor_in_Biga_of_Elephants.jpg
C. Caecilius Metellus Jupitor in Biga of Elephants40 viewsC. Caecilius Metellus, Denarius, Rome, 125 BC,3.833g, 17.5mm, die axis 90o, SRCV I 145, Crawford 269/1, Sydenham 485, RSC I Caecilia 14,
OBV: Head of Roma right in winged Phrygian helmet, ROMA behind, X (XVI monogram) below chin
REV: Jupiter in biga of elephants left, holding thunderbolt, crowned by Victory flying right above, C METELLVS (ME in monogram) in ex;

EX: Forum Ancient Coins

The reverse refers to the victory of L. Caecilius Metellus over the Carthaginian Hasdrubal
at Panormus in 250 B.C. and the capture of Hasdrubal's elephants.
The elephants were paraded at his triumph in Rome.
1 commentsRomanorvm
CALIGULA-1.jpg
Caesonia (?), wife of Caligula, died 41 CE677 viewsÆ (28 mm, 11.17 g) of Carthago Nova, Spain.
Obv: C CAESAR AVG. GERMANIC. IMP. PM. TRP. COS. Laurate head of Caligula, right.
Rev: CN. ATEL. FLAC. CN. POM. FLAC. II VIR. Q.V.I.N.C. Head of Caesonia (as Salus) right, SAL AVG across field.
SGI 419; Heiss 272,35; Cohen 247,1.

Though this coin is reputed to portray Caesonia, this is not likely for its obverse is dated TR P COS = 37 AD, yet Caligula did not marry Caesonia until late 39! RPC 185 calls the lady Salus, but also mentions possible IDs with Antonia or Livia (p. 92).
EmpressCollector
103002.jpg
CALABRIA, Tarentum184 viewsTaranto was founded in 706 BC by Dorian immigrants as the only Spartan colony, and its origin is peculiar: the founders were Partheniae, sons of unmarried Spartan women and perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta); these unions were decreed by the Spartans to increase the number of soldiers (only the citizens of Sparta could become soldiers) during the bloody Messenian Wars, but later they were nullified, and the sons were forced to leave. According to the legend Phalanthus, the Parthenian leader, went to Delphi to consult the oracle and received the puzzling answer that he should found a city where rain fell from a clear sky. After all attempts to capture a suitable place to found a colony failed, he became despondent, convinced that the oracle had told him something that was impossible, and was consoled by his wife. She laid his head in her lap and herself became disconsolate. When Phalanthus felt her tears splash onto his forehead he at last grasped the meaning of the oracle, for his wife's name meant clear sky. The harbour of Taranto in Apulia was nearby and he decided this must be the new home for the exiles. The Partheniae arrived and founded the city, naming it Taras after the son of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, and the local nymph Satyrion. A variation says Taras was founded in 707 BC by some Spartans, who, the sons of free women and enslaved fathers, were born during the Messenian War. According to other sources, Heracles founded the city. Another tradition indicates Taras himself as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin. Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, ruling over the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

In its beginning, Taranto was a monarchy, probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta; according to Herodotus (iii 136), around 492 BC king Aristophilides ruled over the city. The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia. In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peuceti, and Lucanians (see Iapygian-Tarentine Wars), but the joint armies of the Tarentines and Rhegines were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie), in what Herodotus claims to be the greatest slaughter of Greeks in his knowledge, with 3,000 Reggians and uncountable Tarentines killed. In 466 BC, Taranto was again defeated by the Iapyges; according to Aristotle, who praises its government, there were so many aristocrats killed that the democratic party was able to get the power, to remove the monarchy, inaugurate a democracy, and expel the Pythagoreans. Like Sparta, Tarentum was an aristocratic republic, but became democratic when the ancient nobility dwindled.

However, the rise of the democratic party did not weaken the bonds of Taranto and her mother-city Sparta. In fact, Taranto supported the Peloponnesian side against Athens in the Peloponnesian War, refused anchorage and water to Athens in 415 BC, and even sent ships to help the Peloponnesians, after the Athenian disaster in Sicily. On the other side, Athens supported the Messapians, in order to counter Taranto's power.

In 432 BC, after several years of war, Taranto signed a peace treaty with the Greek colony of Thurii; both cities contributed to the foundation of the colony of Heraclea, which rapidly fell under Taranto's control. In 367 BC Carthage and the Etruscans signed a pact to counter Taranto's power in southern Italy.

Under the rule of its greatest statesman, strategist and army commander-in-chief, the philosopher and mathematician Archytas, Taranto reached its peak power and wealth; it was the most important city of the Magna Graecia, the main commercial port of southern Italy, it produced and exported goods to and from motherland Greece and it had the biggest army and the largest fleet in southern Italy. However, with the death of Archytas in 347 BC, the city started a slow, but ineluctable decline; the first sign of the city's decreased power was its inability to field an army, since the Tarentines preferred to use their large wealth to hire mercenaries, rather than leave their lucrative trades.

In 343 BC Taranto appealed for aid against the barbarians to its mother city Sparta, in the face of aggression by the Brutian League. In 342 BC, Archidamus III, king of Sparta, arrived in Italy with an army and a fleet to fight the Lucanians and their allies. In 338 BC, during the Battle of Manduria, the Spartan and Tarentine armies were defeated in front of the walls of Manduria (nowadays in province of Taranto), and Archidamus was killed.

In 333 BC, still troubled by their Italic neighbours, the Tarentines called the Epirotic king Alexander Molossus to fight the Bruttii, Samnites, and Lucanians, but he was later (331 BC) defeated and killed in the battle of Pandosia (near Cosenza). In 320 BC, a peace treaty was signed between Taranto and the Samnites. In 304 BC, Taranto was attacked by the Lucanians and asked for the help of Agathocles tyrant of Syracuse, king of Sicily. Agathocles arrived in southern Italy and took control of Bruttium (present-day Calabria), but was later called back to Syracuse. In 303 BC-302 BC Cleonymus of Sparta established an alliance with Taranto against the Lucanians, and fought against them.

Arnold J. Toynbee, a classical scholar who taught at Oxford and other prestigious English universities and who did original and definitive work on Sparta (e.g. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. xxxiii 1913 p. 246-275) seemed to have some doubts about Tarentum (Taranto) being of Spartan origin.

In his book The Study of History vol. iii p. 52 he wrote: "...Tarentum, which claimed a Spartan origin; but, even if this claim was in accordance with historical fact..." The tentative phrasing seems to imply that the evidence is neither conclusive or even establishes a high degree of probability of the truth that Tarentum (Taranto) was a Spartan colony.

CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 302-281 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.91 gm). Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right head facing, on olive branch; Vlasto 1058; SNG ANS 1312; HN Italy 1015. VF.

Ex-Cng eAuction 103 Lot 2 190/150
2 commentsecoli
B-caligula_caesonia_0001.jpg
Caligula AE Medallion68 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG GERMANIC IMP P M TR P COS - Laureate bust right.
Rev: CN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR QVINC / SAL - AVG - Bust of Salus r.
Mint: Carthago Nova
Weight: 18.75g
Ref: Cohen 2
1 commentsoa
CaligulaCaesonia_CarthagoNova.jpg
Caligula, Caesonia, Carthago Nova46 viewsAE22, 6.5g
cf.
http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer.php?LotID=51775&AucID=54&Lot=266
areich
1VIII_campgate.jpg
Campgate: Valentiniano III, zecca di Roma (o imitazione vandala di Genserico)39 viewsVALENTINIANO III (425-455 d.C.), zecca di Roma (o imitazione vandala Genserico)
AE, 1,0 gr, 10 mm
D/ [D N VALЄN AVG], busto perlato, diademato, drappeggiato e corazzato a dx
R/ [CAS-VIC], camp-gate con due torrette, stella in alto
RIC X 2160-2163
Nota dalla discussione sul FAC (dicembre 2012): "Se ufficiale e della zecca di Roma, oppure imitativa e battuta a Cartagine, i pareri si contrappongono e, ovviamente, ognuno ha argomenti a favore del proprio parere. Il Ric la colloca tra le monete ufficiali di Valentiniano III, ma dice anche che "attribution to the mint of Rome may be questioned. [...] The possibility that some at least are African should be retained...".
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (7 dicembre 2012, numero catalogo 170), ex Ricardo Veltri collection, Longchamps, Buenos Aires Argentina (prima del 2012)
paolo
cartet.jpg
Caracalla (198 - 217 A.D.)56 viewsAR Tetradrachm
Mesopotamia, Carrhae
O: AVT·K·M·A ANTONЄINOC ·C-EB · ·, laureate head of Caracalla right; two pellets beneath rear truncation.
R: ΔΗΜΑΡΧ ΕΞ ΥΠΑΤΟ Δ, eagle standing facing on bucranium, dot to each side, wings spread, head right, wreath in beak.
28mm
17.10g
Prieur 820, Bellinger 160, SGI 2701

Ex. Agora Auctions, lot 184, Sale 81
5 commentsMat
00768.jpg
Caracalla (RIC 130a, Coin #768)14 viewsRIC 130a, AR Denarius, Rome, 201 - 206 AD
OBV: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate and draped bust right, from behind.
REV: INDVLGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis riding lion right over water gushing from rock, thunderbolt in right hand, scepter in left hand.
SIZE: 18.4mm, 2.20g
MaynardGee
Caracalla.jpg
Caracalla - Dea Caelestis98 viewsCaracalla (198-217) Silver Denarius - 3.02 grams, 18.9mm.
Minted at Rome, circa: 201-206 Reference: RIC-IV-I-130a-C
Obv: Laureate and draped youthful bust of Caracalla facing right - ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Rev: The Dea Caelestis, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, riding on lion running right over waters gushing from a rock - INDVLGENTIA AVGG IN CARTH
Well centered and struck with light toning and even wear on both surfaces. A historically interesting coin that celebrates the completion of Carthage aquaduct
1 commentsBolayi
Caracalla Carth denier.jpg
Caracalla - denarius26 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG. , Bust of young Caracalla laureate, draped and cuirassed
INDVLGENTIA AVGG. / IN CARTH. , Caelestis golding thunderbolt and riding jumping lion right, above stream of water.
Ginolerhino
RI105.jpg
Caracalla Denarius57 views201 - 206 AD

Carthage

ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureate and draped bust right

INDVLGENTIA AVGG, INCARTH
Dea Caelestis riding lion springing right, holding thunderbolt & scepter

3.09g, 19mm

RSC 97
2 commentsZaph0dd
diad111.jpg
Caracalla Denarius. 196-19841 viewsOb. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right
Rev. INDVLGENTIA AVGG, IN CARTH below, Dea Caelestis (Cybele) riding lion springing right, holding thunderbolt & scepter

Ref. RIC 130a, RSC 97, BMC 280

Cybele, the mother of the Gods was the favourite deity of the Carthagenians; here the lion, which Virgil tells us (Æneid lib. 3) was tamed by Cybele, may be taken as an emblem of Africa (Septimus Severus, Caracallas father, originated there).

-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
Caracalla_RIC_130a~0.JPG
Caracalla, 198 - 217 AD20 viewsObv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate, draped bust of Caracalla facing right.

Rev: INDVLGENTIA AVGG around, IN CARTH in exergue, Dea Caelestis, holding a thunder-bolt and a scepter, riding on the back of a lion running right over water gushing from a rock.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 204 AD

3.5 grams, 20.09 mm, 0°

RIC IVi 130a, RSC 97, S6806, VM 29
SPQR Coins
caraCAST~0.JPG
Caracalla, AE As Imitation, 203 AD46 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG PONT TR P VI
Laureate, cuirassed, draped, right
INDVLGENTIA AVG/IN CARTH/SC
Dea Caelestis on lion, right, facing, holding drum and scepter
"Cast in Gaul" imitation of RIC ROME 415c
This new specimen is an ancient cast of a mint coin, not a mint coin itself. Such lightweight casts (22 mm, 3,49 g) in brass, usually on thin round flans, are what Cohen calls "Cast in Gaul". Specimens in the BM coll. are BMC V pl. 49.3, 50.5-6, and 52.8. They are considerably commoner than the struck originals. "The obverse die of your cast is somewhat unusual, for I only know ONE original from that same die, as against a dozen or so of the casts. The original has the same rev. die too, but that rev. was also used with other obverses so is known to me in numerous specimens, e.g. BM pl. 50.3." (Courtesy of C. Clay)
whitetd49
CaraDeaCael.JPG
Caracalla, AE As, 204 AD25 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG PONT TR P COS VII
Laureate, cuirassed, draped, right
INDVLGENTIA AVGG/IN CARTH/S C
Dea Caelestis on lion, right, facing right, holding thunderbolt
3 specimens known, Vienna, Glasgow 83, Klosterneuburg (Austrian monastery), all same die pair (courtesy of C. Clay)
Rome, 25 mm, Not pretty but not bad for an uncleaned coin (Forum Ancient Coins)
whitetd49
IMG_6248.JPG
Carta12 viewsJuancho
2.jpg
CARTAGINE o Zeugitania (375-325 a.C.)62 viewsCartagine o Zeugitania (possedimenti cartaginesi), 375-325 a.C.
AE, 1,8 gr.,15 mm., 90°, BB-
D/ Testa di Tanit a sinistra.
R/ Cavallo a destra e palma sullo sfondo.
SNGSas 186-256
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (7 ottobre 2007, numero catalogo 72); ex Artemide aste (San Marino, fino al 2007).
paolo
SGCV_6444_Medio_Calco_CARTAGO.jpg
CARTAGO - Nor-África 12 viewsAE 1/2 Calco 15 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: Cabeza coronada de Tanit a izquierda, vistiendo triple pendiente.
Rev: Caballo estante a derecha, palmera en segundo plano, 3 puntos en formación triangular, en campo derecho.

Tanit fue la diosa más importante de la mitología cartaginesa, la consorte de Baal y patrona de Cartago. Era equivalente a la diosa fenicia Astarté; también fue una deidad bereber. Fue la diosa de Ibiza (Islas Baleares, España). Wikipedia

Acuñada: 325-300 A.C.
Ceca: Cartago - Nor-África

Referencias: Visona #16 - MAA #18f - Sear GCV II #6444 Pag.596 - Jenkins & Lewis #12 Plate.26 - Müller II #163 Pag.95 - SNG Cop #109 - Calciati III #20 - Henzen #384-9
mdelvalle
ABH_315_Calco_CARTAGO_NOVA.jpg
CARTAGO NOVA - Hispania 22 viewsHispano-Cartaginés, acuñada durante la II Guerra Púnica en Cartago Nova (Hoy Cartagena).

AE Calco 18 mm 9.7 gr.

Anv: Cabeza de Tanit a izquierda.
Rev: Cabeza de caballo a derecha, delante letra fenicia aleph.

Tanit fue la diosa más importante de la mitología cartaginesa, la consorte de Baal y patrona de Cartago. Era equivalente a la diosa fenicia Astarté; también fue una deidad bereber. Fue la diosa de Ibiza (Islas Baleares, España). Wikipedia

Acuñada: 220 - 215 A.C.
Ceca: Hispano-Cartaginesa, muy probablemente Cartago Nova (Hoy Cartagena - España)

Referencias: ABH #515 - Villaronga CNH #45 Pag.69
1 commentsmdelvalle
ABH_1407_Semis_CARTEIA.jpg
CARTEIA - Hispania16 viewsHoy Guarranqué - San Roque - España

AE Semis 18/19 mm 4.8 gr.

Anv: "CARTEIA" (leyenda horaria), Tyche vistiendo corona mural, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "D D" en campo izquierdo. Neptuno estante a izquierda, apoyando su pié derecho en una roca?, portando delfín en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y tridente en izquierdo.

Acuñada: En tiempos de Augusto 27 A.C. - 12 D.C.

Referencias: SNG Cop #443, Vv Pl. CXXIX #2, ABH #663, Villaronga CNH #71 P.420, MBR #48, RPC I #122, Guadan #957, ACIP #2615, ABH(Ant) #1407 P.176, Ripolles #2320/2412 P.289/97, Chaves IV (1979) #29, NAH #949
mdelvalle
ABH_688_Semis_CARTEIA.jpg
CARTEIA - Hispania7 viewsHoy Guarranqué - San Roque - España

AE Semis 19 mm 4.8 gr.

Anv: "S" detrás de cabeza c/yelmo viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M·ARGA" sobre proa de galera, en campo izquierdo. "CARTE" en exergo.

Acuñada: 70 A.C.

Referencias: ABH #688 a 690, Villaronga CNH #47 P.417 (R5), Ripolles #2263/4 P.284, Chaves II (1979) #17b
mdelvalle
Spain_carteia_dolphin.jpg
Carteia, Hispania18 views Obv. [CARTEIA] turreted head of city goddess right
Rev. Winged Genius riding dolphin right. EX D dot D in exergue
Sear 68
Skyler
DSC01630.JPG
Carteia, Spain 27 B.C.14 viewsTime of Augustus

Obverse: Dolphin holding trident swimming, C MINI Q F below
Reverse: Rudder, III VIR above, DD below
Dk0311USMC
carteia.jpg
Carteia, Spain, 1st Century B.C. Bronze semis, SNG Cop 43350 viewsCarteia, Spain, 1st Century B.C. Bronze semis, SNG Cop 433, F, Carteia mint, 5.733g, 22.3mm, 270o, obverse head of Jupiter right; reverse Q PEDECAI CARTEIA, dolphin right. Ex FORVMPodiceps
RT_001_carteia.jpg
Carteia, Spain, 9 B.C.32 viewsUnder Germanicus and Drusus. Head of city goddess / "CART CAESARSUS" around rudder. RPC 123jimmynmu
spanish_dolphin.jpg
Carteia; Time of Augustus, semis, Tyche CARTEIA/ Eros on dolphin, DD7 viewsCarteia, Spain. Time of Augustus. Semis, 4.230g, 16.7mm, 180o, obverse CARTEIA, turreted head of Tyche right; reverse D D (=Decreto Decurionum), Eros on dolphin right. Lindgren II 76, Burgos (1982) 1414, Burgos (1987) 517, SNG Cop 434. Ex FORVM Podiceps
103093.jpg
CARTHAGE143 viewsCARTHAGE. Circa 400-350 BC. Æ 16mm (2.59 gm). Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing pendant necklace / Horse standing right, palm behind; pellet above, trefoil of pellets before. Alexandropoulos 18f; SNG Copenhagen 119; Müller 167. Nice VF, green patina. Ex-CNG(77) B54V64ecoli
106085.jpg
CARTHAGE79 viewsCARTHAGE. Circa 370-340 BC. Æ 13mm (1.37 gm). Sicilian mint. Wreathed male head left / Horse prancing right. Calciati III pg. 377, 4; SNG Copenhagen 98. VF, dark brown, green and red patina, some roughness. Scarce. EX-CNG B33V4B
ecoli
carthage_bronze.jpg
Carthage23 viewsCarthage, Zeugitana; AE 16, uncertain Sicilian mint, circa 300 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horse standing right, palm-tree behind.
SNGCop 113, Müller 163; 2.66 gm.
b70
carthage_bronze2.jpg
Carthage17 viewsCarthage, Zeugitana; AE 16, uncertain Sicilian mint, circa 300 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horse standing right, palm-tree behind.
SNGCop 113, Müller 163; 16mm, 2.44 gm.
b70
coins64.JPG
Carthage32 viewsCarthage (3rd century BC). AE (18 mm / 4.90 g). Head of Tanit left / Horse head right, punic letter before. cf S 6525. Possibly overstruck on another coin, traces barely visible on obverse and reverse. Ex-Barry and Darling G15

Check

ecoli
Capture_00084.JPG
Carthage50 viewsSiculo-Punic Series
400-340 B.C.
Bronze Unit
4.72 gm, 15.5 mm
Obv.: Wreathed head of Tanit left
Rev.: Horse rearing right
Sicilian mint, c. 400-340 B.C.
SNG Cop 96,
SNG Cop 1021
2 commentsJaimelai
carthage.jpg
Carthage 99 viewsCarthage,. AE 19. Sardinia c. 300-264 B.C. (very few other coins were ever struck there). (5.48 grams. 6:30h). Obv: head of Tanit left, wreathed with grain. Rev: horse head and neck right.
Sear Greek 6523. Morcom 913. Ex Warren Esty.

Carthage, Rome’s first enemy off the Italian peninsula, minted coins in Sardinia, which it controlled during the First Punic War, possibly due to the close proximity of the troops.
1 commentsLucas H
O_001_carthage.jpg
Carthage39 viewsjimmynmu
carthage_k.jpg
CARTHAGE16 viewsÆ Unit, 16mm, 2.8g, 5h; Carthage mint, c. 400-350 BC.
Obv.: Wreathed head of Tanit left.
Rev.: Horse standing right; palm tree in background.
Reference: SNG Copenhagen (Africa) 109 / 17-120-128
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Carthage_SNG-Cop390.jpg
Carthage38 viewsCarthage. c. 203-201 BC, Second Punic War. BI Tridrachm, or 1½ Sheckel (9.28 gm) of Zeugitania. Wreathed head of Tanit l. wearing single-pendant earrings. / Collared stallion stdg r., head l., r. foreleg raised. gVF. SNG Copenhagen 8 #390; CNP 103; MAA 81; Müller Afrique 230.1 commentsChristian T
Carthage_SNG-Cop132.jpg
Carthage35 viewsCarthage. 4th c. BC. EL ⅒ stater or AR Litre (0.66 gm) of Zeugitania Palm tree. / Head and neck of horse r. gVF. SNG Cop. 8 (Carthage) #132., 1 (Sicily) #961; Falbe 1829-1832; L Müller Afrique 79. cf. Sear Greek 6461 var.
1 commentsChristian T
Sicily,_Punic_2.jpg
Carthage20 viewsCARTHAGE/SICILY-PUNIC Æ15 SNG Cop 1024
OBVERSE: Head of Tanit left
REVERSE: Galloping horse right
4.59g, 15.6mm
Struck at Carthage, 3d-4th Century BC
Adam P2
SICILY_PUNIC_1.jpg
Carthage28 viewsCARTHAGE/SICILY-PUNIC AE20
OBVERSE: Date palm tree with fruit
Rev: Horse head
Struck at Zeugitana, Carthage or Siculo-Punic, 3d-4th Century BC
8.2g, 20mm
SNG Cop-10
Adam P2
1281_Carthage.jpg
Carthage - AE8 viewsc. 400-350 BC
head of Tanit left wearing wreath
horse galloping right
MAA 15; SNG Copenhagen (Africa) 96
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
Cartago_Sicily.jpg
Carthage - AE 148 viewsSicilian mint
310-290 BC
head of Tanit decorated by grain ears left
horse right, palm behind
Alexandropoulos 18, SNG Cop 109 ff., Müller Afrique 163, SGCV II 6444
2,37g
Johny SYSEL
345_Carthage_horse_head.jpg
Carthage - AE 1410 viewsSardinian mint
300-264 BC
head of Tanit left
head of horse right
SNG Cop 149, Alexandropoulos 57, Müller Afrique 268
2,33g
Johny SYSEL
c~0.jpg
Carthage AR Quarter Shekel 38 viewsCARTHAGE, Second Punic War. Circa 220-205 BC. AR Quarter Shekel (14mm, 1.80 g). Wreathed head of Tanit left / Horse standing right. MAA 78; SNG Copenhagen 335. Good VF, find patina.1 commentsTLP
carthage_01_t.jpg
Carthage Electrum Stater 161 viewsObv: Head of Tanit to l. with grain ears in hair, triple-pendant earring and necklace. Dot in front.
Rev: Horse standing to r., dot underneath l. hind leg.
Year: 310-290 BC
Weight: 7.45g
Cat #: Jenkins 298
2 commentsoa
Carthage_Tanit~0.JPG
Carthage Tanit43 viewsCarthage Tanit, Greek AE, 19mm, 5g, 3rd century B.C.
OBV: Phoenician lunar goddess and consort of Baal Hammon Tanit
REV: neck up profile of horse right
Similar 6527
Zeugitana, Carthage????
1 commentsRomanorvm
Carthage,_3rd_century_BC.JPG
Carthage, 3rd century BC26 viewsZeugitania, Carthage
AE19
3rd century BC
head and neck of horse r.
date palm
Sear 6531
Ardatirion
Carthage, c300-200 BC.JPG
Carthage, c300-200 BC38 viewsCarthage
AE3 – c. 300-200 BC
Head of Tanit l., wreathed with corn
Horse facing left, palm tree behind
S 6444
Ardatirion
CarthagoNova_Hannibal_SNG-Cop296(Zeugitania).jpg
Carthage, Hispano-Carthaginian 18 viewsCarthage, Hispano-Carthaginian. 218-209 BC. AR 1/2 Sheckel (3.63 gm) of Carthagoa Nova, Iberia. Beardless head of Hannibal (or Eshman-Apollo) l. / Horse stdg r. aVF. SNG Cop. 8 #296 (Zeugitania); ACIP 604; CNH 17; De Navasques 75; Robinson Essays Mattingly 7(j); MHC 166-78; SNG BM Spain 104; Villaronga Benages 615. cf CNG 366 #2.Christian T
punicOR~0.jpg
Carthage, Punic Spain, SNG BM Spain 6738 viewsMobile military mint, Punic Spain, C. 237-209 B.C. AE, 13mm 1.46g, MHC 114; CNH 42; SNG BM Spain 67
O: Wreathed head of Tanit l.
R: Helmet l.


After putting down the mercenary revolt, Hamilcar Barca and other Carthaginians went to Spain to “start over” in the only remaining significant Carthaginian possession outside of North Africa. They extended Carthaginian influence beyond the Punic cities of southeastern Spain and utilized the local mineral resources to help re-establish the Carthaginian empire. Hamilcar drowned in 231 BC and was succeeded by his son-in-law, Hasdrubal, who founded Carthago Nova in 229 BC. Hasbrudal was assassinated in 221 BC. Hannibal Barca succeeded his brother-in-law. In 219 BC, Hannibal took Saguntum. Rome responded by declaring war and Hannibal made preparations to invade Italy. After Hannibal was in southern Italy during the Second Punic War, Spain continued to support his efforts until P. Cornelius Scipio (later Africanus) captured Carthago Nova in 209 BC. Carthaginian forces were driven out of Spain by 206 BC and Rome maintained control after the Second Punic War.
casata137ec
pSNGBMSpain67OR.jpg
Carthage, Punic Spain, SNG BM Spain 6734 viewsMobile military mint, Punic Spain. C. 237-209 B.C. AE, 13mm 1.52g, MHC 114; CNH 42; SNG BM Spain 67
O: Wreathed head of Tanit l.
R: Helmet l.
casata137ec
carthsardiniaOR.jpg
Carthage, Sardinian mint, SNG Cop 20439 viewsSardinian mint, Zeugitania, Carthage, 264-241 B.C., 20mm 6.08g, SNG Cop 204
O: Head of Tanit, l
R: horse stg r, Punic letters between legs
Ex HJB
casata137ec
carthageOR.jpg
Carthage, Sardinian mint, SNG Cop 31127 viewsCarthage, Sardinian mint, 221-210 BC AE, 23mm 7.52g, SNG Cop 311
Obverse: Head of Tanit left
Reverse: Horse standing right, head reverted, Punic letter below
casata137ec
Carthage.jpg
Carthage, Second Punic War (220-215 BC)28 viewsAE Trishekel

29 mm, 18.21 g

Obverse: Head of Tanit left, wearing wreath of grain ears and single-pendant earring

Reverse: Horse standing right; palm tree in background to left.

MAA 84; Müller, Afrique 147; SNG Copenhagen 344.

The Second Punic War formally began when the Carthaginian general Hannibal and his army crossed the Alps in November of 218 BC and descended into Northern Italy. Battles raged on Italian soil for nearly 15 years until Hannibal and what remained of his army sailed for North Africa in the summer or fall of 203 BC. Shown above is a typical example of what would have been a lower-value coin issued by the Carthaginians in the early stages of the war.

Carthage was a Phoenician colony, and as such the Carthaginians were related to the Hebrews and the Canaanites (among others). Culturally they had much in common, including the use of the shekel as the primary unit of money. Likewise, the Carthaginians worshipped a variety of deities from the ancient Middle East. One in particular was the goddess Tanit. A Phoenician (Punic) goddess of war, Tanit was also a virgin mother goddess and a fertility symbol.
2 commentsNathan P
64035p00_copy.jpg
Carthage, Second Punic War, c. 216 - 205 B.C.21 views
64035. Silver quarter shekel, Robinson NC 1964, p. 44, group I, 3; SNG Cop 348 -349; Alexandropoulos 78; HN Italy 2015, VF, scratches, 1.733g, 13.6mm, 45o, Carthage mint, c. 216 - 205 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed with grain, wearing necklace and earring, dot border; reverse horse standing right, dot border; ex Ancient Eagles;
MagisterRiggs
carthage.jpg
Carthage, Second Punic War. Circa 220-205 BC.107 viewsAR 1/4 Shekel (14mm, 1.71 g, 12h)
Obverse- Head of Tanit left, wearing grain-ear wreath, single-pendant earring, and necklace with pendants.
Reverse- Horse standing right; pellet below.
MAA 78; SNG Copenhagen 337.
3 commentsb70
punicOR.jpg
Carthage, Sicilian (?) mint, SNGCop 10951 viewsSicilian (?) mint, Carthage (Punic), 4th-3rd century B.C. AE, 17mm 2.90g, SNGCop 109, Calciati 20. Sear Greek Coins and their Values (SG) #sg6444
O: Head of Tanit left, wreathed with corn
R: Horse right, palm behind

1 commentscasata137ec
siculo_punic.jpg
CARTHAGE, Siculo-Punic Mint AE16 - Tanit/Horse + Palm71 viewsCarthaginian Mint in Sicily 16mm 3.10g late 4th - early 3rd century BC.

O: Head Tanit l. wearing grain ears.

R: Horse standing r. before Palm.

Refs: Sear - , Mueller 163, SNG Cop 109-113.
3 commentsAdrian S
punicsicilyOR.jpg
Carthage, SNG Copenhagen 10820 viewsCarthage, Sicilian mint, Circa 330-300 B.C. AE, 16mm, 2.86g, MAA 23; SNG Copenhagen 108
O: Date palm
R: Pegasos flying left; Punic "B" below
casata137ec
Zeugitania_001.jpg
Carthage, Tanit, Horse43 viewsCarthage
1/2 Shekel, 3rd-2nd century BC
Obv: Head of Tanit left, crowned with ears of corn.
Rev.: Horse standing right, head turned left, foreleg raised, linear circle.
Billon, 5.37g, 23.3mm
Ref.: Sear 6497, SNG Cop. 396
Ex Pecunem 10, Lot 263
1 commentsshanxi
G_287_Carthage_fac.jpg
Carthage, Tanit, Horse12 viewsCarthage
Trishekel, circa 201-195 BC
Obv: Head of Tanit left, wearing grain wreath.
Rev.: Horse prancing right; pellet between forelegs.
AE, 19.4g, 29mm
Ref.: MAA A.105c; SNG Copenhagen 409-10 var. (pellet).
Ex Gorny&Mosch, 2017, A251, 4583
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 66, lot 237
shanxi
G_348_Carthage.jpg
Carthage, Tanit, Horse, O to right20 viewsCarthage
Circa 300-264 BC. Æ 18
Obv: Wreathed head of Tanit left
Rev.: Horse’s head right; O to right.
Æ, 5.25g, 18mm
Ref.: SNG Copenhagen 151
3 commentsshanxi
Carthage_2.JPG
Carthage, Zeugitana 49 viewscirca 4th-3rd century BC
AE16 (2.99g)
O: Head of Tanit left, wreathed in corn, wearing earring and necklace; pellet behind.
R: Horse standing right, palm tree in background; pellet at right.
Sear 6444v
1 commentsEnodia
128.JPG
Carthage, Zeugitana24 views310-290 B.C.
Bronze AE17
1.96 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain ears, triple drop earrings and necklace
Rev.: Horse right, in front of palm tree
Siculo-Punic, Sicilian Mint?
Sear 6444;
[SNG Cop 109, 117]
Jaimelai
Carthage_AE.JPG
Carthage, Zeugitana45 viewscirca 3rd century BC
AE19 (19mm, 5.84g)
O: Head of Tanit left, wreathed in corn, wearing plain necklace and earring.
R: Head and neck of horse right.
Sear 6523v (pendant necklace)

Enodia
65642p00.jpg
Carthage, Zeugitania Tanit Bronze c. 310-290 B.C.12 viewsBronze AE 17, 2.875g, 16.1mm, 315o, Sicilian mint, c. 310 - 290 B.C.
Obv: Head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain, earring, and necklace.
Rev: Horse standing right, date palm tree in background behind horse.
Ref: SNG Cop 109 ff., SGCV II 6444.
Choice VF.
mjabrial
52097p00.jpg
Carthage, Zeugitania, North Africa, 201 - 175 B.C.15 viewsBronze trishekel, SNG Cop 409 ff. (various symbols), Fair, 11.078g, 26.8mm, 0o, Carthage mint, 201 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain; reverse horse striding right, Punic letter below; scarceMagisterRiggs
thumb_57636p00.jpg
Carthage, Zeugitania, North Africa, 300 - 264 B.C.24 viewsFrom Forum: Bronze AE 15, cf. SNG Cop 144 ff., aF, 5.571g, 18.8mm, 270o, Sardinian mint, obverse head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain, earring and necklace; reverse horse's head right;

Wish Tanit had kept her head on this coin....but LOVE the horse!
1 commentsMagisterRiggs
thumb_58489p00~0.jpg
Carthage, Zeugitania, North Africa, c. 400 - 350 B.C.12 viewsBronze AE 17, cf. Alexandropoulos 18, SNG Cop 109 ff., Müller Afrique 163, SGCV II 6444, F, 1.606g, 13.9mm, 270o, c. 400 - 350 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain and pendant necklace; reverse horse standing right, date palm tree behind;MagisterRiggs
20180528_103242.png
Carthage. Carthage circa 400-350 BC. 11 viewsObv. Head of Tanit to left, wearing wreath of grain ears.
Rev. Horse standing right, palm tree in background, three pellets above pellet in right field.
References: MAA 18l; Jenkins & Lewis 13; SNG Copenhagen 118. SEAR 6508-11.
16.1mm and 2.23grams.
As found condition.
Canaan
10313981_10102484189296593_8051174908714375070_n.jpg
Carthaginian Coin15 viewsA bronze Carthaginian coin minted in Carthage between 264-241 BC. 22 mm, 8.57 g

Obverse: Head of Tanit left wearing earrings and wreathed in ears of grain

Reverse: Horse's head right

Attribution: Sear 6526, Mueller 2.102.286, SNG Copenhagen 151
chuy1530
10250110_10102484189401383_1805500442807347379_n.jpg
Carthaginian Coin19 viewsA bronze coin minted in Carthage or possibly Punic Sicily between 264-241 BC. 16 mm, 2.06 g

Obverse: Head of Tanit left wearing earrings and wreathed in ears of grain

Reverse: Horse standing right, date palm tree behind

Attribution: SNG Copenhagen 109
chuy1530
10177397_10102484189456273_1023944263046223324_n.jpg
Carthaginian Coin11 viewsA Carthaginian coin minted in Carthage or possibly Punic Sicily around 306 BC. 11 mm, 5.09 g

Obverse: Head of Tanit left wearing earrings and wreathed in ears of grain

Reverse: Horse prancing right

Attribution: SNG Copenhagen 95
chuy1530
roman 2+.jpg
Carthago - Augustus - AE As RPC 74526 viewsAE As, Augustus, Carthage, AD 10
24-25 mm, 7.25 g
Obv: IMP C D F A P M P P ; hd. l.
Rev: C I C P I SP D V SP IIVIR around P P/D D

RPC 745
Tanit
Augustus_2.jpg
Carthago - Augustus - AE As RPC 74514 viewsAE As - Augustus - Carthago, 8-5 AD
24-25 mm; 7,3 g
Obv: IMP C D F A P M P P; bare hd. of Augustus r.
Rev: C I C P I SP D V SP IIVIR; IN FIELD: P P D D

SNG 745
Tanit
C+.jpg
Carthago - Augustus - AE As RPC 746 23 viewsAE As, Augustus, Carthage, AD 10
24-25 mm, 7.25 g
Obv: IMP C D F A P M P P; hd. r.
Rev: C I C P I SP D V SP IIVIR around P P/D D

RPC 746
Tanit
Constantinus I 3 D~0.jpg
Carthago - Constantinus I - Follis39 viewsAE Follis. Carthago.
Obv.: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES
Rev.: CONSERVATO - R - AFRICAE SVAE, SE in l. field, F in r. field, Delta in ex.
Africa stg. facing, head l., in long drapery with elephant-skin head-dress, r. holding standard, l. tusk; at feet to l., lion with captured bull.

RIC VI, Carthago 58; struck c. early 307; scarce
Tanit
Constantinus_3.jpg
Carthago - Constantinus I - Follis26 viewsAE Follis. Early 307 AD.
Obv: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES
Rev: CONSERVATOR AFRICAESVAE / SE F in field / delta in exergue ;Africa standing facing, head left, in long drapery with elephant-skin head-dress, right holding standard, left tusk; at feet to left, lion with captured bull.

RIC VI Carthage 58
Scarce
Tanit
greekhorse1.jpg
Carthago Horse/Kore179 viewsCarthago - Siclian Mint
Bronze Punic
Ae; 2.86g; 17mm

Head of Kore Left;
Horse standing right, Palm tree behind

SNG Copenhagen 109/113; Acquaro 193/324; Muller II 163
7 commentsarizonarobin
Carthago%2BNova.jpg
Carthago Nova13 viewsA lovely coin from Carthago Nova, Iberia. 237 - 209 B. C. 1.891 grams, 13 mm. From the days of Hannibal Barka.Handini
carthago nova.jpg
Carthago Nova. Augustus82 viewsObverse: AVGVSTVS DIVI F, Augustus Bare head right
Reverse: C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q
Exe: REX/PTOL in two lines across field within diadem
Mint : Carthago Nova
Date : 27 BC-AD 14
Reference : RPC I 172; SNG Copenhagen 494
Grade : Good VF
Weight : 5.26 g
Denom : Semis
Metal : AE
Dealer : CNG.

Comments : 20mm, 12h . Red and black-olive patina. The bronze coin honors the young Mauretanian prince Ptolemaios (Juba II and Cleopatra Selene's son) with the highest official title of the city.
Bolayi
Carthago.jpg
Carthago Tiberius AE As RPC 75520 viewsAE As - Carthago - During the reign of Tiberius - 14-18 AD
Obv: TI CAESAR IMP PP ; Bare head of Tiberius to right
Rev : LA FAVSTVS DC BASSVS IIVIR ; Livia seated to left, holding a patera and a sceptre; in the field PP DD

RPC 755 - SBG 422 - M 328
Tanit
Carthago_RIC-B.jpg
Carthago_RIC-21 viewsThis coin is close to RIC519, but "VICTO_RIA" is divided as in RIC520, but the legend direction is the opposite. Probably just another die. This belongs to the group of coins I could not afford to keep. A wonderful substitute for a Clodius Macer...jmuona
RIC520_CarthageB.jpg
Carthago_RIC52020 views3.33 gr., max 18 mm, die-axis 7.jmuona
castulo_pan1.jpg
Castulo, Baetica, Spain, c. 150 - 100 B.C.?67 viewsBronze AE 30; Lindgren II 43, Sear GIC 15, (SNG BM Spain 1298); Weight 18.5 g, max. diameter 30.4 mm; Castulo mint, Obv. diademed young male head right, Rev. helmeted sphinx walking right, left leg raised [star before], KASTILO in Iberic script in ex; Dark olive patina, rev. edge bevelled.

Background Info., courtesy of Forvm Ancient Coins;

Of tradition, a local princess named Himilce married Hannibal and gained the alliliance of the city with the Carthaginian Empire. In 213 BCE, Castulo was the site of Hasdrubal Barca's crushing victory over the Roman army with a force of roughly 40,000 Carthaginian troops plus local Iberian mercenaries. Soon after the Romans made a pact with the residents of city and the city became an foederati (ally) of Rome.
1 commentsSteve E
catalonia_ferd_vii.jpg
CATALONIA - Ferdinand VII127 viewsCATALONIA - Ferdinand VII (1808-1833) Cu 6 Quartos, 1810. Obv.: FERDIN.VII.HISP.REX. around crowned arms of Spain. Date 1810 below. Rev.: Arms of Catalonia, vallue VI QUARTOS in cartouche below. CATHAL.PRINCIP. surrounds. Reference: KM-116. Flan crack, but nice!dpaul7
carteia_dolphin_b.jpg
CELTIC, IBERIAN (CARTEIA)16 views2nd - 1st Century BC
AE 18.5 mm, 5.9 g
O: Turreted head of Tyche right
R: Dolphin swimming right, DD below
laney
CHARTRES_DENIER.jpg
CHARTRES50 viewsCHARTRES - Anonymous, AR Grand Denier. C. 1000-1050 AD. Simple type; Obv. with 3 besants in a row; center one is the eye to a simply-drawn crowned face; 3 wedges makek the mouth. Rev.: Cross in beaded circle; + CARTIS CIVITAS around. 21 mm. Poey D'Avant #1731. R SUP. Bd.204 (3f). 2 commentsdpaul7
CivilWarRIC12.jpg
Civil Wars RIC 12174 viewsCivil Wars 68-69 CE. AR Denarius (17.50 mm, 3.39 g). Spanish mint, April-June 68 CE.
O: BONI EVENTVS, Female bust right, wearing fillet; hair rolled and looped above neck
R: VICTORIA P R, Victory standing left on globe, holding wreath in right hand and palm in left
- BMCRE I 292 Note + Taf 50.2; P.-H. Martin, the anonymous coins of the year 68 AD (1974) 82 # 99 PL 9; E. P. Nicolas, De Néron à Vespasien (1979) 1308 No. 31; 1435 f 1456 # 107 Taf 14.107 B; RIC I² Nr. 12 (Spain, 68 n. Chr.) R5 (Group I). Evidently the second known. The above references are all to one example found in Münzkabinett Berlin.

Likely struck by Galba in Spain between April 6 and early June, 68 AD, that is, between the dates of his acceptance of the offer from Vindex and of his receiving news of his recognition by the Senate.

The civil wars at the end of Nero’s reign began with the revolt of the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gaius Julius Vindex, probably around the beginning of March of AD 68. Vindex had claimed that he had a force of 100,000 men, and a substantial coinage was certainly needed to pay them.

Vindex offered the leadership of the revolt to Servius Sulpicius Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, who was hailed imperator by the Spanish legions at Carthago Nova in April of the same year. The title was cautiously refused, but Galba did declare himself the legatus of the senate and people of Rome. Just a month later, Galba’s confidence would be shaken by the crushing defeat of Vindex near Besançon by the general Lucius Verginius Rufus, governor of Germania Superior. By 9 June Nero was dead, having taken his own life. Galba began his march to Rome, and his brief reign was underway.

Without an emperor to strike in the name of (save for that in honor of the “model emperor” of Roman history, Augustus) the coinage was struck with messages suiting the political climate. The coinage under Vindex possesses a more aggressive air that underscores the militant nature of his revolt, while Galba’s tends to be more constitutional and optimistic in tone. Originally struck in large numbers, as indicated by the number of types employed, the coins of the civil wars are all rare today, having been recalled after the final victory of Vespasian in 69 AD.
5 commentsNemonater
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO52 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 AD

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO, god

CLAVDIO, Cladius

Dot in right field

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

Showing: eagle standing left, head right

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 17 mm

Mint: ???

The Helvetica tables list this as RIC V (1) 266 this also according to The helvetica is the same reference number for all mints..
It lists 2 dots below on the obverse , but my coin shows the dots to the right if I see them correctly
I'm still not sure on the mint it's either Lyons, Rome or Aquileia .

Comment: Consecratio. In the first and second centuries when a popular emperor or their family member dies, they were consecrated as gods. Their successors built a personality cult around the dead emperor, serving as chief priest, and often dedicating temples to the dead. In the third century this custom faded out as the Cristian era evolved. Some common types of these depict a cult item or temple of the deified emperor. Some include: a cart drawing the cult image of the deified emperor, an emperor throne, a funeral pyre, an eagle, altar or peacock
John S
COLOGNE QUARTER STUBER 1765.jpg
COLOGNE - MAXIMILIAN FRIEDRICH138 viewsCOLOGNE - MAXIMILIAN FRIEDRICH (1761-1784) Cu. 1/4-Stuber. Obverse with crowned monogram; reverse with value and date 1765 in floreate cartouche. Reference: KM#161.dpaul7
BIZ 25 D.jpg
Constans II38 viewsHalf follis, Carthage, Sear 1057

Obv: Bust facing, DN CONSTANTNV PP
Rev: Cross, X - X at sides, CRTG in exergue
Tanit
BIZ 33 D.jpg
Constans II24 viewsConstans II (r. 641-668 AD)
Half Follis, Carthage mint
Struck: 643-647 AD

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS (sometimes preceded by D or DN) PP A (or similar)
Bust facing, beardless, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger.

Reverse: XX with large cross between; in exergue, CRT [G] ; sometimes with pellets to left and right of cross, sometimes two pellets above the cross, and sometimes three pellets at the center of the exergual line.

SB 1057.
Tanit
BIZ 32 D.jpg
Constans II21 viewsHalf follis of Carthage,
Sear 1057
Tanit
BIZ 29 D.jpg
Constans II27 viewsConstans II (r. 641-668 AD)
Half Follis, Carthage mint
Struck: 647-659 AD

Obverse: DNCONSTANTN (or similar)
Bust facing, with short beard, as consul, wearing loros and crown with trefoil ornament on circlet. In right hand, mappa; in left, globus cruciger.

Reverse: Cross. To left and right, C / X and T / X. Above, [star2] with pellets to left and right.

DOC 144 (Class 4 of Carthaginian copper); SB 1059.
Tanit
BIZ 27 D.jpg
Constans II26 viewsConstans II, mint Carthage. Sear 1055.
No legend. Constans (on left), with long beard, and Constantine IV (on right), beardless, standing facing; the former wears crown and cuirass, and holds long cross; the latter wears crown and chlamys; between their head cross (which I didn't notice).
Reverse: Heraclius on left and Tiberius on right, standing facing, each wearing crown and chlamys; between them, large M, with monogram 35 above, and KT(C like symbol with a tail) beneath.

Tanit
BIZ 24 D.jpg
Constans II21 viewsConstans II, half follis of Carthage, Sear 1057, which has been overstruck on another issue, possibly as Sear says S.1056.

Obv. Beardless crowned bust facing, CONSTANTINVS round
Rev. XX with large cross between, CRTG in ex.
Tanit
BIZ 23 D.jpg
Constans II30 views20 nummia .
CE 641-668 mint of Carthage.
Similar to Sear 1059.
Tanit
100-5+.jpg
Constans II25 viewshalf follis
minted at Carthage
Sear 1057
Tanit
Byz.jpg
Constans II Half follis28 viewsHalf follis of Constans II, Carthage mint, Sear 1057
Tanit
byzant_gold_1.jpg
Constans II Solidus31 viewsConstans II AV Solidus. Carthage mint. (645/6 AD).

Obv: DN CONS TATIN P, beardless facing bust, in crown & chlamys, holding globus cruciger / VICTO RIAVGGG, cross potent on three steps; P in right field; /CONOB.

Sear 1030
Tanit
Constans2,S1062.jpg
Constans II, SBCV 106213 viewsFragmentary blundered legend
Facing busts of Constans II with long bead and Constantine IV beardless, both wearing crowns and chlamys, each holding globus cruciger
No legend
Facing busts of Heraclius and Tiberius above line, XX below
AE half follis
Carthage mint
21 mm, 4.52g
novacystis
Constans_II.jpg
Constans II, September 641 – 15 July 668 AD42 viewsObverse: DN CONSTANTINVS PP AV (AV ligatured), beardless bust of Constans II facing, wearing crown and chlamys, and holding globus cruciger in right hand
Reverse: Mark of value X X with large cross between
Exe: CRTG
Mint : Carthage
Date : 643-647AD
Reference : MIB 196a, Wroth (BMC) 312, Tolstoi 205, Ratto 1568, CBN 16, S 1057
Grade : VF
Weight : 6.19g
Denom : Half Follis
Metal : Bronze
Comments : Ex. Woolslayer collection and Forum, 21.1mm, DO 138.5, Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.
Bolayi
098.jpg
Constans II. half follis 43 viewsByzantine coinage
Carthage mint
2 commentstibsi67
Biz1_.jpg
Constantin IV Solidus30 viewsCONSTANTINE IV. 668-685 AD. AV Solidus. Carthage mint. Struck 668 AD. Helmeted facing bust, holding spear and shield / Cross potent on three steps; flanked by Heraclius and Tiberius standing facing; pellet to left of cross.

Ref.: Sear, 1188; R., 1651; B.N. 4; D.O. 43; M.I.B.III 20.

Rare
Tanit
Constantine I D 5.jpg
Constantine I SALVIS46 viewsConstantine the Great AE27 Follis. 306 AD. FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right / SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, holding fruits in both hands.

RIC VI 44b , Cohen 479.
1 commentsTanit
Constantine I.jpg
Constantine I SALVIS48 viewsAE Follis. Obv.: FL VAL CONSTANTINVS NOB CAES ; Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART ; Carthage stg. l. holding fruitsTanit
costantino_iv_eraclio_tiberio_674-681_a~0.jpg
Constantine IV and sons Heraclius and Tiberius143 views674-681 - Cartago
Ratto 1652
antvwala
Constantine_4_S1195.jpg
Constantine IV, SBCV 119513 viewsNo legend
facing bust wearing chlamys
Large M, figures of Heraclius and Tiberius to sides, monogram 35 above
AE follis, 18mm, 6.20g
Carthage mint
novacystis
coin12_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C (the 2nd) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3 follis (317-337 A.D.) 23 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers facing each other, holding spears and shields, with one standard between them, devices on banners not very clear, but probably dots or "o". Mintmark: Epsilon SIS in exergue.

AE3, 18-19mm, 1.65g, die axis 2 (turned medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

IVN = IVNIOR = Junior, NOB C = Nobilitas Caesar, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", officina Epsilon (workshop #5), SIScia mint (now Sisak, Croatia).

Siscia mint combined with two standards and IVN NOB C variety points to only two types, RIC VII Siscia 220 and RIC VII Siscia 236, both of Constantine II, with possible officinas A, delta, gamma and epsilon. So even though the name is not very clear and theoretically the officina letter may be B rather than E, we can be sure that it is Constantine and that officina is E. Type 236 should have dots before and after the
mintmark, and it doesn't seem the case here, so this must be RIC VII Siscia 220, officina epsilon. Minting dates according to some sources: 330-335 AD.

Flavius Claudius Constantinus Augustus, born January/February 316, was the elder son if Constantine the Great and his second wife Fausta. Constantine II was born in Arles (south of modern France) and raised a Christian. On 1 March 317, he was made Caesar. A child general: in 323, at the age of seven, he took part in his father's campaign against the Sarmatians. At age ten, he became commander of Gaul, following the death of Crispus. An inscription dating to 330 records the title of Alamannicus, so it is probable that his generals won a victory over the Alamanni. His military career continued when Constantine I made him field commander during the 332 campaign against the Goths.

Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II initially became augustus jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans, with the Empire divided between them and their cousins, the Caesars Dalmatius and Hannibalianus. This arrangement barely survived Constantine I’s death, as his sons arranged the slaughter of most of the rest of the family by the army. As a result, the three brothers gathered together in Pannonia and there, on 9 September 337, divided the Roman world between themselves. Constantine, proclaimed Augustus by the troops received Gaul, Britannia and Hispania. He was soon involved in the struggle between factions rupturing the unity of the Christian Church. The Western portion of the Empire, under the influence of the Popes in Rome, favored Catholicism (Nicean Orthodoxy) over Arianism, and through their intercession they convinced Constantine to free Athanasius, allowing him to return to Alexandria. This action aggravated Constantius II, who was a committed supporter of Arianism.

Constantine was initially the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion of the empire was Italia, Africa and Illyricum. Constantine soon complained that he had not received the amount of territory that was his due as the eldest son. Annoyed that Constans had received Thrace and Macedonia after the death of Dalmatius, Constantine demanded that Constans hand over the African provinces, to which he agreed in order to maintain a fragile peace. Soon, however, they began quarreling over which parts of the African provinces belonged to Carthage, and thus to Constantine, and which belonged to Italy, and therefore to Constans. Further complications arose when Constans came of age and Constantine, who had grown accustomed to dominating his younger brother, would not relinquish the guardianship. In 340 Constantine marched into Italy at the head of his troops. Constans, at that time in Dacia, detached and sent a select and disciplined body of his Illyrian troops, stating that he would follow them in person with the remainder of his forces. Constantine was engaged in military operations and was killed in an ambush outside Aquileia. Constans then took control of his deceased brother's realm.
Yurii P
constantius_clhrus-ric_28a_.png
Constantius Chlorus- RIC VI 28a21 viewsCarthago 298-299 AD.
25 mm, 7.7g
CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
SALVS AVG ET CAESS AVCTA KART
G in ex.
xokleng
Constâncio_Cloro_-_RIC_VI_35a.jpg
Constantius I RIC VI 35a20 viewsCarthago 303 AD.
20 mm, 2.5 g.
FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
VOT/X/FK
xokleng
constancarth.jpg
Constantius I (293 - 305 A.D.)38 viewsÆ Follis
O.: CONSTANTIVS NOB CES; Laureate head right.
R.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART; Carthago standing facing, head left, holding fruits in both hands // Γ
Carthage mint, 298-299 A.D.
8.4g
31mm
RIC VI 30a, p. 427
3 commentsMat
votxfkORweb.jpg
Constantius I AE fraction, RIC VI 35a46 viewsCarthago mint, Constantius I AE fraction, AD 293-305, 21mm 3.125g, RIC VI 35a
O: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r
R: VOT X FK, in wreath
casata137ec
Constantius_Chlorus_Karthago__RIC_30a.jpg
Constantius I Carthage26 viewsAE (29mm- 10.2g)
obv. CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
laureate head right
rev. SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART
Carthage standing facing, head left, holding fruits in both hands;
in ex. Γ
mint Carthage
RIC 30a
HG
Constantius_Carthage.png
Constantius I Carthage12 viewsConstantius I as Caesar
Reigned as Caesar 293-305

O: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right

R: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL. KART, Carthago standing looking left with fruits in both hands
Gao
Constantius I -1.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus42 viewsConstantius I as Caesar, AD 293-305, AE fraction, Carthage, 303.
Obv: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev: VOT X FK in wreath.

RIC 35a.
Scarce
Tanit
constantius.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus43 viewsConstantius I as Caesar, AD 293-305, AE fraction, Carthage, 303.
Obv: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev: VOT X FK in wreath.

RIC 35a.
Scarce
Tanit
Const_16.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus37 viewsConstantius I as Caesar, AD 293-305, AE fraction, Carthage, 303.
Obv: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r. Rev: VOT X FK in wreath.

RIC 35a.
Scarce
Tanit
ConstantiusI RIC 35a.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus as Caesar - radiate RIC 35a26 viewsRadiate, RIC 35a, 3.01g; minted in Carthage, 293-305 A.D.; obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, radiated & draped bust right; reverse: VOT X FK in wreath. Priscian
Constantius_I_2_opt.jpg
CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS, AE Follis RIC VI 32a, Carthago33 viewsOBV: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right (large head type)
REV: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthago standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands. Mintmark Gamma
7.41g, 28mm

Minted at Carthage, 298-99 AD
1 commentsLegatus
Constantius_I_1_opt.jpg
CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS, AE Fraction RIC VI 35a, Vota30 viewsOBV: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
REV: VOT X FK within wreath
2.3g, 20mm

Minted at Carthage, 303 AD
1 commentsLegatus
constantiusI_carthago_32.jpg
Constantius I Chlorus, RIC VI, Carthago 32(a)17 viewsConstantius I Chlorus, AD 293-305, father of Constantin I the Great
AE - Follis, 27mm, 8.48g
Carthago, AD 298/9
obv. CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Head, laureate, r.
rev. SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART
Personification of Carthago, wearing long robe, stg. facing, head l., holding fruits
in each hand.
in ex. Gamma
RIC VI, Carthago 32(a), C. 271
VF, rev. with thick green patina

The rev. legend is the famous ablativus absolutus meaning 'The emperors are well, Carthago is happy'.
Jochen
Constantius_I_RIC_35.JPG
Constantius I, RIC 358 viewsFL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
VOT X
AE3, 22mm, 2.35g
Radiate head right
Wreath with FK
Carthage Mint
novacystis
csriciv39aOR.jpg
Constantius I, RIC VI 39a18 viewsCarthage mint, Constantius I, 305-306 A.D. AE, 29mm 9.54g, RIC VI 39a
O: IMP CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
R: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, in long robe holding fruit in both hands, H in left field
Ex: A
casata137ec
tn_sidon.jpg
Countermark on Elagabalus --AE24, Sidon.267 viewsElagabalus --AE24, Sidon. R: Kadmos subduing lion (?) or Artemis w/Lion, Cart of astarte above. BM262. Unknown c/m (featherz)featherz
917rma581.jpg
Cr 197-198B/1b Æ As Anonymous1 viewsc. 157-156 b.c.e.
Laureate head of Janus, I [value] above
Prow right; I [value] before, ROMA below
16.03 gm 30mm
McCabe Group K3 (note cartoonish prowstem and peaked deck structure)
The Crawford numbering of these issues are a bit difficult to follow, and McCabe makes associations that are clearer once one can see a number of specimens of each Group.
PMah
660aa177combo.jpg
Cr 231/1 AR Denarius C. Renius8 views138 BCE Rome mint
o: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
r: Juno (Caprotina?) in biga of goats right, C. RENI below goats, ROMA in exergue.
Renia 1. 3.73 gm 18.00 mm
What can one say about a type that prominently features goats pulling a cart? Apparently a great deal if you are one of the great Republican numismatists and historians, who have a wide variety of explanations for why one of the more serious goddesses is being pulled around in a goat chariot on a fairly common coin. Crawford spends half a page saying why his predecessors are wrong to say the reverse depicts "Juno Caprotina" or other variations on the type. However, all he concludes is that it has something to do with Juno and and something to do with a goat, but not apparently "Juno of the Goat". This is one of those explanations in Crawford that leave something to be desired, such as clarity.

However, clarity is not a problem with this coin, which is nearly perfect except for the awkward chip in the flan from separation from the strip. I feel that the worker who separated the coins really tried to get the best out of this one.
PMah
10116v.jpg
Crawford 374/1, Roman Republic, Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius, Denarius58 viewsRoman Republic (mobile mint of Sulla in North Italy, 81 BC.), Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius. AR Denarius (3.80 g, 17-19 mm). Obv.: Diademed head of Pietas right, wearing earring; stork before. Rev.: Q. C. M. P. I , Elephant l.. Crawford 374/1. Syd. 750. BMCRR Spain 43 ; Bab. Caecilia 43.

The issue was produced by Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius, serving as a Sullan commander in the fight against Carrinas, Norbanus and Carbo. The type of Pietas commemorates the title of "Pius" received by Metellus when he tried to get his father returned from banishment. The elephant recalls the victory of his ancestor, L.Caecilius Metellus at Panormus (Sicily) in 251 BC over the Hasdrubal and his Carthaginians in the First Punic War, after which he displayed the elephants captured from the Carthaginians in his triumph in Rome.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
11062v.jpg
Crawford 417/1a, Roman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC., AR Denarius.72 viewsRoman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC.,
AR Denarius (18-20 mm / 3,72 g),
Obv.: [P]AVLLVS. LEPIDVS - CONCORD head of Concordia r., wearing veil and diadem.
Rev.: PVTEAL SCRIBON / LIBO , Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian well, the "Puteal Scribonianum" well in the Forum Romanum near the Arch of Fabius), decorated with garland and two lyres, hammer at base.
Crawf. 417/1a ; Syd. 927 ; Bab. / Seaby Aemilia 11 ; Kestner 3422 ; BMC Rome 3383 ; CNR Aemilia 62 .
Rare

A puteal was a classical wellhead, round or sometimes square, set round a well opening to keep people from falling in. Such well heads (putealia) might be of marble, enriched with bas-reliefs. - The puteal is on the reverse of the coin adorned with garlands and two lyres. It is generally stated that there were two putealia in the Roman forum; but C. F. Hermann, who has carefully examined all the passages in the ancient writers relating to this matter (Ind. Lect. Marburg. 1840), comes to the conclusion that there was only one such puteal at Rome. It was in the forum, near the Arcus Fabianus, and was dedicated in very ancient times either on account of the whetstone of the Augur Navius (cf. Liv. I.36), or because the spot had been struck by lightning. It was subsequently repaired and re-dedicated by Scribonius Libo, who had been commanded to examine the state of the sacred places. Libo erected in its neighbourhood a tribunal for the praetor, in consequence of which the place was, of course, frequented by persons who had law-suits, such as money-lenders and the like.

The Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian Puteal) or Puteal Libonis (Puteal of Libo), building in the Forum at Rome, dedicated or restored by a member of the Libo family, perhaps the praetor of 204 BC, or the tribune of the people in 149 BC. In its vicinity the praetor's tribunal, removed from the comitium in the 2nd century BC, held its sittings, which led to the place becoming the haunt of litigants, money-lenders and business people. According to ancient authorities, the Puteal Libonis was the name given to an erection (or enclosure) on a spot which had been struck by lightning; it was so called from its resemblance to the stone curb or low enclosure round a well (puteus) that was between the temples of Castor and Vesta, near the Porticus Julia and the Arcus Fabiorum (arch of the Fabii), but no remains have been discovered. The idea that an irregular circle of travertine blocks, found near the temple of Castor, formed part of the puteal is now abandoned. See Horace, Sat. ii.6.35, Epp. i.19.8; Cicero, Pro Sestio, 8; for the well-known coin of Lucius Scribonius Libo, representing the puteal of Libo, which rather resembles a cippus (sepulchral monument) or an altar, with laurel wreaths, two lyres and a pair of pincers or tongs below the wreaths (perhaps symbolical of Vulcan as forger of lightning), see C. Hulsen, The Roman Forum (Eng. trans. by J. B. Carter, 1906), p. 150.

L. Scribonius Libo, was the father-in-law of Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey the Great. On the breaking out of the civil war in 49, he sided with Pompey, and was given command of Etruria. Shortly afterwards he accompanied Pompey to Greece, and was actively engaged in the war that ensued. On the death of Bibulus (48) he had the given command of the Pompeian fleet. In the civil wars following Caesar's death, he followed the fortunes of his son-in-law Sextus Pompey. In 40, Octavian married his sister Scribonia, and this marriage was followed by a peace between the triumvirs and Pompey (39). When the war was renewed in 36, Libo for a time supported Pompey, but, seeing his cause hopeless, he deserted him in the following year. In 34, he was consul with Mark Antony.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
SEVERUS KYBELE.jpg
Cybele, the mother goddess302 viewsSEPTIMIUS SEVERUS -- AD 193-211.
Thrace, Anchialus. Æ (27mm, 10.7 gm).
Obv: AV.K.L.CEP. CEVHROC., Laureate and cuir. bust, r.
Rev: OVLPIANWN AGXIALEWN. Cybele seated l., l. arm resting on drum, r. hand holding patera, two lions at her feet.
Moushmov 2817.

On coins, Cybele wears a turreted crown, holds a patera and tympanum (small drum) and is usually shown seated in a cart pulled by lions or (as here) on a throne with lion supporters.
EmpressCollector
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm
diocletian.jpg
Diocletian Abdication Follis. AE28. Carthage81 viewsDiocletianus as Senior Augustus, minted under Severus II.
AE28. Mint of Karthago. 305 - 306 AD.
Obv. D N DIOCLETIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laurate bust right, in imperial mantle, right holding olive-branch, left mappa.
Rev. PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, right holding branch, left leaning on sceptre.
S - F in field right and left. PKB in ex.
Cf. RIC VI Carthago 42a
2 commentsancientone
Diocletian.jpg
Diocletian Follis12 viewsAE Follis
Obv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART ; Carthage sg. l., holding fruits
Tanit
dio1.jpg
Diocletian Follis8 viewsBillon Follis
Obv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART ; Carthage sg. l., holding fruits
Tanit
roman17.jpg
Diocletian Silvered Follis32 views299-303 AD . Carthage mint.
Obv.: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG - Laureate bust right.
Rev.: SALVS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART - Carthage standing facing, head left, A in ex.
RIC 31a
Minos
DIOCLET-1-ROMAN.jpg
Diocletian, Carthage RIC VI-031a(A)22 viewsAE Follis
Carthage mint, 299-303 A.D.
7.81g, 31mm
RIC VI-31a

Obverse:
IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG
Laureate head right.

Reverse:
SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART
A
Carhtigo standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands.
rubadub
6768_6769.jpg
Diocletian, Follis, NO LEGEND, Wreath, VOT/XX/FK10 viewsAE Follis
Diocletian
Augustus: 284 - 305AD
Issued: 303AD
21.5 x 20.0mm 2.80gr 11h
O: IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Wreath, badge at top; VOT/XX/FK within.
Carthage Mint
Rarity: C
RIC VI Carthage 37a
Aorta: 1471: B50, O35, R188, T191, M4.
champoldfart 222990840986
5/30/18 8/8/18
Nicholas Z
4777860l.jpg
Diocletian. Æ Large Follis. Struck circa AD 299-303.68 views Carthage mint. (28mm, 9.6 g). Laureate head right / Carthage standing facing, head left, holding fruits in both hands; A. RIC VI 31a.Ruslan K
1_-_Diocleciano_-_RIC_VI_38_(S).jpg
Diocletianus - RIC VI 38.17 viewsCarthago 303 AD.
21 mm, 2,5 g.
IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
VOT/XX/FK
xokleng
Diocletianus- SALVIS new.jpg
Diocletianus- Salvis55 viewsDiocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.

Obverse:Laureate head right
IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG

IMP: Imperator

DIOCLETIANVS, Diocletianus

PF, PIUS FELIX,

AVG: Augustus,

Reverse:
SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART

Salvis Augustis et Caesaribus Karthago felix

Showing: Carthago standing left holding up fruits in both hands

Domination: Follis, Bronze, size 26 mm

Mint: A, Carthage
John Schou
an3~0.jpg
Dolphin - Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune108 viewsAugustus 27 BCE - 14 CE
AE Semis, 20 mm diam. 4.6 g. RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, turreted bust of Tyche right
Reverse - D D, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
NORMAN K
Dominican.jpg
Dominican Republic86 viewsKm7 - 2.5 Centavos - 1888
km69 - 5 Centavos - 1989
km60 - 10 Centavos - 1987
km61 - 25 Centavos - 1983 (medal rotation)
km71.1 - 25 Centavos - 1991 - Ox Cart (no beaded circle)
km71.2 - 25 Centavos - 1990 - Ox Cart (beaded circle)
Daniel F
EB0081b_scaled.JPG
EB0081 Horse / Palm6 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AR litra, 320-310 BC.
Obverse: Horse head
Reverse: Palm tree
References: SNGCop 74.
Diameter: 9mm, Weight: 0.732g.
EB
EB0234b_scaled.JPG
EB0234 Tanit / Horse5 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AE 16, 200-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horse standing right, palm tree in background.
References:-.
Diameter: 16mm, Weight: 1.81g.
EB
EB0235b_scaled.JPG
EB0235 Tanit / Horse7 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AE 20, 241-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horse standing right, looking left.
References: SG 6511, Weber 8503.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 5.921g.
EB
EB0236b_scaled.JPG
EB0236 Tanit / Horse5 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AE 20, 241-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horse standing right, looking left.
References: SG 6511, Weber 8503.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 4.912g
EB
EB0237b_scaled.JPG
EB0237 Tanit / Horse6 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AE 19, 241-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: horses head right, palm tree symbol .
References: SG 6528.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 5.922g.
EB
EB0238b_scaled.JPG
EB0238 Tanit / Horse14 viewsCarthage, ZEUGITANA, AE 30, 241-146 BC.
Obverse: Head of Tanit left.
Reverse: Horsehead right; caduceus before.
References: SG 6520; SNG Cop 197; Müller 296.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 15.586g.
1 commentsEB
EB0264b_scaled.JPG
EB0264 Horse / Palm3 viewsSicilo-Punic or Carthage in Zeugitana, AE 19, 300-264 BC.
Obverse: Horse's head right.
Reverse: Palm tree with two dates.
References: Acquaro 148; Lindgren 626; or ... Sear 6531; Muller II, 104,317; SNG Copenhagen 102.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 5.703g.
EB
EB0312b_scaled.JPG
EB0312 Palm / Horse9 viewsCarthage in Zeugitana, AE 17.
Obverse: Palm tree with two bunches of dates.
Reverse: Horse standing right, head reverted.
References: -.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 3.266g.
EB
EB0686_scaled.JPG
EB0686 Tiberius / Nero and Drusus7 viewsTiberius, 14-37, Spain, Carthago Nova, AE 27.
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI F AVGVSTVS P M, bare head of Tiberius left.
Reverse: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES QVINQ C V I N C, confronting heads of Nero & Drusus.
References: RPC 179, Sear'88 #586, SGI 335, RPC 179, SNGCop 500.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 19.47g.
EB
EB0746_scaled.JPG
EB0746 Constantius I / Carthago18 viewsConstantius I 293-305, AE Follis, Carthage 298-299 AD.
Obverse: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right (large head type).
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthago standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruits in both hands. Mintmark Γ.
References: RIC VI Carthage 32a.
Diameter: 29.5mm, Weight: 9.859g.
EB
EB0748_scaled.JPG
EB0748 Galerius / Carthago11 viewsGalerius as Caesar 293-305, AE Follis, Carthage 298-299.
Obverse: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right (large head type).
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left with fruits in both hands. Mintmark (officina) Δ.
References: RIC VI Carthage 32b; Cohen 191; Sear 14411.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 7.697g.
EB
EB0753_scaled.JPG
EB0753 Severus II / Carthage15 viewsSeverus II as Caesar 305-306, AE Follis, Carthage 305-306 AD.
Obverse: FL VAL SEVERVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, holding fruits in both hands, H in left field. Mintmark Γ.
References: RIC VI 40a.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 10.224g.
EB
EB0874_scaled.JPG
EB0874 Galerius / Africa10 viewsGalerius 305-311, AE Follis, Carthage circa 298 AD.
Obverse: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: FELIX ADVENT AVGG N N, Africa standing facing, head left, in long drapery with elephant-skin headdress, holding standard and tusk, at feet to left, lion with captured bull, I to left. Mintmark PKΔ.
References: RIC VI Carthage 26b; Sear 14336.
Diameter: 27.5mm, Weight: 9.462g.
EB
EB0875_scaled.JPG
EB0875 Maximinus II / Carthage6 viewsMaximinus II, AE Follis, Carthage 305-306 AD.
Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left, holding fruits and corn-ears. I in left field. Mintmark Δ.
References: RIC VI Carthage 40b; Sear 14763.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 9.114g.
EB
EB0984_scaled.JPG
EB0984 Constans II & Constantine IV / Heraclius & Tiberius5 viewsConstans II. 641-668 AD. AE Follis, Carthage.
Obverse: No legend, Constans, crowned and cuirassed with long beard, holding long cross, on left and Constantine IV, crowned and wearing chlamys, no beard, empty-handed, on right, both standing, cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large M, Heraclius standing to left, TKw-like monogram above, Tiberius standing to right, both sons crowned and wearing chlamys; [mintmark KTS].
References: SB 1055, DOC 147.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 5.622g.
EB
EB0988_scaled.JPG
EB0988 Constans II & Constantine IV / Heraclius & Tiberius6 viewsConstans II, with Constantine IV, Heraclius, and Tiberius. 641-668. Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint.
Obverse: Facing busts of Constans and Constantine IV; cross above.
Reverse: Facing busts of Heraclius and Tiberius; cross above, X between.
References: SB 1066; DOC 149; MIB 203.
Diameter: 12mm, Weight: 1.749g.
EB
equadaelcapORweb.jpg
Elagabalus, BMC Palestine 89, Hendin 81625 viewsAelia Capitolina mint, Elagabalus, 218-222 A.D. AE, 24mm 8.82g, BMC Palestine 89, Hendin 816
O: IMP C MA ANTON-IN AVG, Laur., dr., and cuir., bust r., wearing paludamentum
R: COL A C C P F, Quadriga draws cart carrying Stone of Elagabal, eagle in relief on stone, wavy (ivy) branch in ex.
casata137ec
Elagabalus-RIC-195~0.jpg
Elagabalus.130 viewsDenarius, 218-219 AD, Antioch mint.
Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Elagabalus.
Rev: SANCT DEO SOLI ELAGABAL / Slow quadriga bearing the conical stone of Emesa, on which is an eagle, surrounded by four parasols.
2.41 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #195.

Elagabalus was a high priest of the local ba'al of Emesa, Syria, at the time he was proclaimed emperor. This deity was named El-Gabal, and was worshiped in the form of a large, black, conical-shaped stone, which was probably a meteorite. When Elagabalus moved to Rome, he took this god with him. After a long overland journey from Emesa, Elagabalus and his entourage entered Rome in 219. The black stone was carried on a cart pulled by white horses. It was decorated with an eagle, and shaded by four parasols. Elagabalus, dressed in his priestly robes, walked backwards in front of this cart to show his reverence for his deity.

The entry of their new emperor into the city shocked the people of Rome. They soon realized that he fully intended to continue in his duties as High Priest to El-Gabal, and that his worship was to be imposed on the whole Empire. The the temple of Jupiter (Jove) in Rome was turned into the temple of El-Gabal. The religious excesses of the reign finally ended with the murder of Elagabalus. Under the new emperor, Severus Alexander, the temple was cleansed, rededicated to Jupiter, and El-Gabal sent back home to Emesa.

This coin commemorates the journey of El-Gabal to Rome and his entrance into the city. The legend on the reverse translates "Holy Sun-God Elagabal." Silver denarii with this reverse type all seem to be in the "Eastern" style so numismatists generally assign them to the mint at Antioch. It is possible, though, that they could have been minted by a mint that traveled with Elagabalus on his journey from Emesa to Rome, spending the winter of 218-219 in Nicomedia.
1 commentsCallimachus
CARTWHEEL.jpg
ENGLAND - GEORGE III100 viewsGREAT BRITAIN 1797 PENNY, COMMONLY REFERRED TO AS THE "CART WHEEL" PENNY, A PHRASE ALLUDING TO IT'S HEFTY SIZE AND WEIGHT AND DESIGN. AN EXCEPTIONAL EXAMPLE WITH ONLY A COUPLE OF MINUTE RIM NICKS INSTEAD OF NUMEROUS ONES AS USUALLY FOUND. KM.618. GRADED: FINE +.dpaul7
FH-G-037_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03711 viewsSyria, Antioch ad Orntem; Silanus Antioch; AD 12-13; bronze AE20

- Laureate head of Zeus right, round dot border.

- ANTIOXEΩN EΠI ΣIΛANOY
- ANTIOCEWN EPI SILANOU (“reign of Silanus Antioch”)
-Ram leaping right, looking back at star above; ΓM below

6.38gm / 20.67mm / Axis: 0

References:
Butcher 57
BMC Galatia 63
MacDonald, NC 1904, pp 113-117

Notes: Dec 11, 15 - Coin is pitted all over though full legend is legible. This is one of the well researched and reported Star of Bethlehem Commemorative coins. - Star of Bethlehem Coins – A Set of Serial Commemoratives By: T. B. Cartwright may be found here: http://www.beastcoins.com/Collections/Star-Of-Bethlehem/Star-Of-Bethlehem.htm
Jonathan P
FH-G-038_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03810 viewsSyria, Antioch ad Orntem; Silanus Antioch; AD 13-14; bronze AE20

- Laureate head of Zeus right, round dot border.

- ANTIOXEΩN EΠI ΣIΛANOY
- ANTIOCEWN EPI SILANOU (“reign of Silanus Antioch”)
-Ram leaping right, looking back at star above; ΓM below

6.35gm / 20.12mm / Axis: 0

References:
Butcher 58
BMC Galatia 65
MacDonald, NC 1904, pp 113-117

Notes: Dec 11, 15 - Coin will improve much with proper cleaning. This is one of the well researched and reported Star of Bethlehem Commemorative coins. - Star of Bethlehem Coins – A Set of Serial Commemoratives By: T. B. Cartwright may be found here: http://www.beastcoins.com/Collections/Star-Of-Bethlehem/Star-Of-Bethlehem.htm
Jonathan P
Tanit -1.jpg
First Punic War72 viewsShekel - Punic - Carthage - ~ 241 BC
D. 22 mm - Wt. 4.9 gms
Obv: Head of Tanit left
Rev: Plough
Rare
1 commentsTanit
003~11.JPG
François Ier Roi de France (1515-1547) - Ecu d'or 6 viewsEcu d'or au soleil du Dauphiné, 3,33 g
Point sous la première lettre pour Crémieu
A/ + FRANCISCVS DEI GRATIA FRANCORV REX, Champ écartelé surmonté d'un soleil, aux 1 et 4 de France, aux 2 et 3 de Dauphiné .
R/ + XPS VINCIT XPS RENAT XPS IMPERAT , croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Duplessy 782
Gabalor
0019-Francois_I_Testons.jpg
Francois I° (1515-1547) - Teston du Dauphiné deuxieme type46 viewsAtelier de Romans (point secret sous la deuxième lettre, R couronnée au revers)
+ (triangle) FRANCISCVS.DEI.GRA.FRANCOR.REX (triangle) buste cuirassé et couronné a droite
+ (triangle) SIT.NOMEN.DNI.BENEDICTVM.R.(Mm) (triangle). Ecu ecartelé de France et Dauphiné. Grande F sur l'ecartelé (après le 8 octobre 1528, date à laquelle une lettre F brochant sur l'écartelé fut ajoutée sur les testons (source CGB VSO 09/1067))
9,25 gr - 26/29 mm
Ref : Ciani # 1141v
16-390
2 commentsPotator II
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar208 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
853_Galerius_Carthage.jpg
Galerius - AE post-reform radiate6 viewsCarthage
303 AD
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C
VOT / X / F K
within wreath
RIC VI Carthage 36
ex Lucernae

scarce
Johny SYSEL
galerius-cartago.jpg
Galerius -RIC VI 36.13 viewsCarthago - 303 AD.
23 mm, 3.4 g.
GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C
VOT/X/FK
xokleng
roman34.jpg
Galerius AE Follis35 views298-299 AD. Carthage mint.
Obv.: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES - Laureate head of Galerius.
Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART - Carthage holding fruits in each hands. Delta in ex..
RIC 32b.
Minos
29919_0.jpg
Galerius as Caesar, 293-305. circa 299-303.5 viewsFollis Carthage. Æ 28mm., 9.56g. Laureate head r. Rev. Carthago standing facing, head l., holding fruits in both hands; in exergue, Δ. RIC 32b.
Ruslan K
Maximianus D 1.jpg
Galerius Follis38 viewsGalerius Æ Follis. 299-303 AD. MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, laureate head right / SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left with fruits in both hands, DELTA in ex.

RIC VI 32b of Carthage, Cohen 191.

Tanit
galerio.jpg
Galerius Maximianus caesar, frazioni radiate post riforma (Gaviller & Boyd collection)110 viewsGalerio Massimiano, cesare (293-305 d.C.), due frazioni radiate post riforma
La prima (297-298 d.C.) zecca di Roma, II officina
AE, 3.26 gr., mm. 19,0; MB (F)
D/GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, busto radiato e drappeggiato di Galerio a dx
R/ VOT XX B in una corona
RIC 6 Roma 87b (var: officina non menzionata), Cohen 247 (var: idem)
o RIC 6 Roma 82 (Massimiano Erculeo, co-augusto con Diocleziano)
La seconda: zecca di Cartagine
AE, 2.31 gr., 20,0 mm; MB (F)
D/ GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, busto radiato e drappeggiato di Galerio a dx
R/ VOT XX FK in una corona
RIC 36b
Provenienza: entrambe collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (30 aprile 2008, numero catalogo 29 e 29bis), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005), ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, entrambe nel lotto 684), ex W.C.Boyd collection (London, prima del 1906). I primo esemplare ex George Henry Gaviller collection (London, fino al 1886), ceduta per legato testamentario al nipote W. C. Boyd alla morte avvenuta a Londra il 28 febbraio 1886.
paolo
galerius_carthago_26(b).jpg
Galerius RIC VI, Carthago 26(b)83 viewsGalerius AD 305 - 311
AE - Follis, 11.36g, 28.5mm
Carthago 4th officina, c. AD 298
obv. MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES
laureate head r.
rev. FELIX A - D - VENT AVGG NN
Africa stdg. facing, head l., in long drapery with elephant-skin head-dress, r.
holding standard, l. tusk; at feet to l., lion with captured bull.
in l. field: I
exergue: PK Delta
RIC VI, Carthago 26(b)
VF
added to www.wildwinds.com
2 commentsJochen
Galerius_VOT_X_FK_Carthage.JPG
Galerius VOT X FK Carthage31 viewsGalerius, Carthage, 306 AD, 21.5mm, 2.87g, RIC VI 35b,
OBV: GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust at right
REV: VOT X FK in three lines within wreath
1 commentsRomanorvm
Sicily_Gela_SNG-ANS4_7_gf.jpg
Gela16 viewsGela. (CEΛAΣ) c. 490/485-480/475 BC. AR Didrachm (8.57 gm). Horseman galloping right, brandishing spear overhead. / Forepart of river god Gelas as man-headed bull r. (Ε-ΛΑ before.  nEF.  Triton V #1167. Ex William N. Rudman Coll. SNG ANS 4 mule: #7 (same ob. die) / #5 (same rev. die); Jenkins Gela Gp Ib 42 (O13'/R17); SNG Cop 1 #256; SNG Klagenfurt 430; HGC 2 #363.
480-470 BC.  Rule of tyrant Gelon, born in Gela, who won a crushing victory over the Carthaginians and ruled Syracuse for a time.
3 commentsAnaximander
gelimer.jpg
gelimer181 viewsGelimer, (530-534 AD)

Obverse: KART HAGO - Soldier facing, holding spear in left hand r.
Reverse: Horse's head, with bridle, facing left, XXI in exergue
Mint : Carthage
Date : 530-534 AD
Reference : MIB I-23, MEC-45
Grade : VF
Weight : 6.74g
Denom: Nummi
Metal : Bronze

Comments: The last king of the Vandals in Africa, who lost his kingdom to General Belisarius who was sent to Africa in 533 by Justinian the Great to return Africa to the Roman empire and avenge the imprisonment and execution of Huneric, a Romanized Vandal king who had been overthrown by Gelimer. 22.9 mm. From the Garth R. Drewry Collection. Ex Stack's 3-5 May 1984, lot 183 Ex:Stack's 05/84, Lot 1832 ex CNG 67, Lot: 1830.
3 commentsBolayi
gelimer1.jpg
Gelimer123 viewsObverse: Gelimer, bare-headed and mantled bust right
Reverse: Gelimer monogram within wreath
Mint : Carthage
Date : AD 530-534
Reference : MIB 1, 25; cf. MEC 1, 28-30
Grade : VF
Weight : ?
Denom : Nummus
Metal : AE
3 commentsBolayi
Gelimer.jpg
Gelimer Vandalic 21 Nummi15 viewsGELIMER (530 - 534). 21 Nummi, Carthago KART-HAGO.
Obv: Soldier in armor and Paludament standing en face, spear in his left hand. ;
Rev: Horsehead with bridles and reins to the left. In ex. XXI.

BMC 13 Taf. 1, 9; MIB I Taf. 42, 23; Arslan 31; MEC I 46
Tanit
2pence.jpg
George III (1760 - 1820 A.D.)54 viewsÆ "Cartwheel" 2 Pence
O: GEORGIUS III D G REX, Laureate, draped, and armored bust right.
R: BRITANNIA, Britannia seated left on rocks, holding branch and trident; shield to right; in background, ship under sail right upon waves. 
Soho (Birmingham) mint, 1797. 
41mm
54.73g
6h
Peck 1077; SCBC 3776; KM 619.
1 commentsMat
cart4.jpg
George III (1760 - 1820 A.D.)22 viewsÆ "Cartwheel" 1 Pence
O: GEORGIUS III D G REX, Laureate, draped, and armored bust right.
R: BRITANNIA, Britannia seated left on rocks, holding branch and trident; shield to right; in background, ship under sail right upon waves.
Soho (Birmingham) mint, 1797.
36mm
27.83g
6h
KM 618
Mat
DSC05386.JPG
George III 1797 Cartwheel Penny83 viewsGreat Britain. George III 1797 Cartwheel Penny. S 3777. Proclamation coin1 commentsCGPCGP
German_States,_City_of_Emden,_Ferdinand_III,_Gulden_ND(1624-37AD),__FLOR__ARGEN_28_CIVITAT_EMB,_28_IMP_CAMPEN,__FERDINAN_III_ROM_IMP_SEM_AVG__Q-001,_5h,_40,5mm,_19,93g-s.jpg
German, German States, City of Emden, Ferdinand III. No Date, (1637-1657 A.D.), KM 10.1, AR-2/3Thaler/Gulden/28 Stuiver, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, #166 viewsGerman, German States, City of Emden, Ferdinand III. No Date, (1637-1657 A.D.), KM 10.1, AR-2/3Thaler/Gulden/28 Stuiver, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, #1
avers: •FLOR•ARGEN 28 CIVITAT•FMB:, Crowned and garnished arms flanked by angel wings.
reverse: •FERDINAN•III•ROM•IMP•SEM•AVG•, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, surmounted by a crown cutting the legend at 12 o'clock.
exergue: -/-//28, diameter: 40,5mm, weight: 19,93g, axis: 5h,
mint: City of Emden, date: No Date, (1637-1657 A.D.), but the time of Ferdinand III., ref: KM 10.1, AR-2/3Thaler/Gulden/28 Stuiver,
Q-001
"Emden, a seaport on the Ems River adjoining the North Sea was founded in the 9th century."
quadrans
LarryW2348~0.jpg
GG, Carthage, c. 310-290 BC169 viewsElectrum shekel, 18.8mm, 7.76g, choice VF
Head of Tanit left, wreathed with corn; she wears necklace and triple earring; pellet in lower left field / Horse standing right on double exergal line; pellet in lower right field. COA
Ex: Glenn Woods
Sear 6462; Jenkins V, 249
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
GIRAY_-_MEHMED_1_1516_-_922_AH.jpg
GIRAY KHANS -- Mehmed Giray I 24 viewsGIRAY KHANS -- Mehmed Giray I (1515-1523) AR Akche, dated AH 922 (1516). Obv.: Tamgha in ornate cartouche. Name and titles. Reference: Restovskovo #5-1.dpaul7
GordII.jpg
Gordian II Africanus / Victory62 viewsGordian II Africanus. Silver Denarius, AD 238. Rome.
O: IMP M ANT GORDIANVS AFR AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian II right.
R: VICTO-RIA AVGG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
- RIC 2; BMC 28; RSC 12.

Gordian II (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus), was Roman Emperor for one month with his father Gordian I in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. The double "GG" in "AVGG" (Augustus) on the reverse was to show that power was shared between the two men although Gordian II did not receive the additional title of high priest or Pontifex Maximus. He died in battle outside of Carthage.

Confronted by a local elite that had just killed Maximinus's procurator, Gordian's father (Gordian I) was forced to participate in a full-scale revolt against Maximinus in 238 and became Augustus on March 22.

Due to his advanced age, Gordian I insisted that his son, Marcus Antonius Gordianus (Gordian II), be associated with him. A few days later, Gordian entered the city of Carthage with the overwhelming support of the population and local political leaders. Meanwhile in Rome, Maximinus' praetorian prefect was assassinated and the rebellion seemed to be successful. Gordian in the meantime had sent an embassy to Rome, under the leadership of Publius Licinius Valerianus, to obtain the Senate’s support for his rebellion. The senate confirmed the new emperor on 2 April and many of the provinces gladly sided with Gordian.

Opposition would come from the neighboring province of Numidia. Capelianus, governor of Numidia, loyal supporter of Maximinus Thrax, and who held a grudge against Gordian, renewed his alliance to the former emperor and invaded Africa province with the only legion stationed in the region, III Augusta, and other veteran units. Gordian II, at the head of a militia army of untrained soldiers, lost the Battle of Carthage and was killed, and Gordian I took his own life by hanging himself with his belt. The Gordians had reigned only twenty-two days.
3 commentsNemonater
UK_Penn7_1793_secret_box.jpg
Great Britain, George III, 1760 - 1820, Modified Into a "Secret" Box21 viewsBronze penny, SCBC 3777, VF, altered into a screw top box, screws worn, Soho mint, weight 20.008g, maximum diameter 35.4mm, die axis 0o, 1797; obverse GEORGIUS III D G REX, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse BRITANNIA 1797, Britannia seated left on rocks, olive-branch in right hand, trident in left, Union shield at side, tiny SOHO on rock below, sailing ship on water at a distance on left, diving whale right, waves in exergue.

In 1797, at the Soho Mint, James Watt and Matthew Boulton used their steam powered presses to strike 450 tons of the new "cartwheel" pennies, at 1 ounce of copper per coin. The penny was found to be too heavy for regular use and was only struck for that single year.

Similar boxes made from American silver dollars are sometimes called "Opium Dollars."

Valentine's Day present from my wife!

PURCHASED FROM FORVM
Sosius
Floor_-_Delos.jpg
Greece, Delos - Mosaic Floor in the Maritime Quarter246 viewsInterestingly this mosaic floor features the symbol of Tanit a Carthaginian goddess.Lloyd T
velia1.JPG
GREEK, Italia, Velia Lucania, AR Didrachm 109 viewsStruck 293 - 280 B.C.
The obverse with the head of Athena facing left, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with griffin. Monogram behind neckpiece, Φ on neck.
The reverse with lion stalking right caduceus above. The legend reading: YEΛHTΩN = "Of Elea"
Williams 515

Elea was the ancient name of the town of Velia. According to Herodotus, in 545 B.C. a group of Ionian Greeks fled Phokaia in modern Turkey, after it was besieged by the Persians. They settled in Corsica until they were attacked by a force of Etruscans and Carthaginians. The surviving 6000 took to the sea once more before finally settling on the coast of Italy and founding the town of Hyele, later to be renamed Ele, and then, eventually, Elea.
Diameter: 22 mm. Weight: 7.20 g.
4 commentssuperflex
Vlasto_976.jpg
GREEK, Italy, Calabria, Taras. Time of Hannibal, c. 212-209 BC. Nomos32 views3.34 gm. Magistrate Sogenes. Nude youth on horseback left, crowning horse with wreath; IΩ to right, ΣΩΓENHΣ below / Taras astride dolphin left, holding cornucopia and Nike, who crowns him with wreath. Vlasto 975-7. HN Italy 1079. Struck on a broad flan and attractively toned. Extremely Rare.
The climax of the Carthaginian invasion of Italy was reached when Tarentum changed sides in 212 BC. The takeover of the city was a carefully planned coup by Hannibal and members of the city's democratic faction who opened the gates to Hannibal's army. The Carthaginians failed to take the citadel, but subsequent fortifications around this enemy stronghold enabled the city to remain under Punic control. Hannibal installed his own magistrates and struck coinage based on the Punic half shekel standard.
1 commentsLeo
1379_carteia.JPG
GREEK, PHOENICIA, Iberia, Carteia11 viewsTyche with crown
Neptune with trident and dolphin
Franz-Josef M
gela482.jpg
Greek, Sicily, Gela, AR Tetardrachm circa 415-405 BC 24mm 16.75g71 viewsSlow quadriga driven right by charioteer,the nearside horse with head held high,the farside horse head lowered.Wreath of olive above,crane flying right in exergue.Rev forepart of man-headed bull right{river god Gelas}with thick wavy beard,swimming,large barley grain above.This coin was struck just before the destruction of the city by the Carthaginian in 405 BC,from which Gela never fully recovered,and it is thought that the quadriga on the obv is to show Gelons victory in the Olympic games of 488 BC.This coin is the only specimen recorded from this die combination,and is the plate coin in the standard reference Jenkins the coinage of Gela.Group IX 482 O95/R1921 commentsGrant H
untitled.png
GREEK, Sicily, Gela, AR Tetradrachm.182 viewsSicily Gela AR Tetradrachm circa 415-405 BC 24 mm 16.75 g Slow quadriga driven right by charioteer,the nearside horse with head lowered,the farside horse head held high,wreath of olive above crane flying right in exergue.Reverse forepart of man-headed bull{river-god Gelas} with thick wavy beard,swimming right,{CEAAE} retrograde and large barley-grain above.This coin was struk just before the destruction of the city by the Carthaginian invaders in 405 BC,and which Gela never fully recovered.And it is thought that the quadriga on the obverse is to show that Gelons victory in the Olympic games of 488 BC.This coin is the only specimen recorded from this die combination,and is the plate coin in the standard reference Jenkins the coinage of Gela group 9 482 O95/R192 and from the A,D,M collection2 commentsGrant H
Kartago tetradrakme.jpg
GREEK, Zeugitania, Carthage, Tetradrachm150 viewsCarthage
Tetradrachm
350-325 BC
Sear 643.
1 commentsJan Terje Rafdal
Carthage,_Zeugitania,_North_Africa,_c__300_B_C_,_Sicilian_mint.jpg
GREEK, Zeugitania. Sicilian mint. c. 300 B.C. 31 viewsCarthage, Zeugitania (North Africa). Sicilian mint. c. 300 B.C. Bronze AE 15, 2,38 g, 14.6mm, VF. Nice green patina. Obv: date-palm. Rev: Pegasos right. Ref: SNG Cop 1018 var (Pegasos left), BMC -. Rare1 commentsBard Gram Okland
LarryW8015.jpg
GS Zeugitana, Carthage, c. 216-211 BC (Time of Hannibal)69 viewsSilver quarter-shekel, 13mm, 1.84g, gVF
Head of Tanit left, wreathed with grain, wearing pendant earring and necklace / Horse stands right on exergual line
Ex: Apollo Numismatics
Jenkins pl.28, 2
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
075~4.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Douzain6 viewsDouzain de Béarn, 1er type, argent (billon), 1,97 g.
A/ HENRICVS 4 D G FRANC ET NAV REX, croix cantonnée de deux lis et de deux couronnes.
R/ GRATIA DEI SVM Q D SVM 1590, écu écartelé de France-Navarre-Béarn couronné et accosté de deux H.
Réfs : Sb 4446 (505.872 ex.)
Gabalor
135~2.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Liard5 viewsLiard du second type, billon, 0,46 g.
A/ +HE D G F ET NA REX, champ écartelé, aux 1 et 4 de Béarn, aux 2 et 3 une H couronnée
R/ GRATIA D SVM Q D SVM, croix dans un quadrilobe tréflé .
Réfs : Sb-4222
Gabalor
sb871_.jpg
Heraclius AR half siliqua Carthage Sear 871 24 viewsTask_Force
byzant_sil.jpg
Heraclius Half siliqua24 viewsHeraclius,
Silver half siliqua. Carthage mint, 614-618 A.D. or less likely 628-629 A.D.; obverse D N ERACLIO PP AV, bust of Heraclius facing, beardless, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with pendilia and cross; reverse no inscription; to left bust of Heraclius Constantine, Heraclius' son, wearing chlamys with tablion and crown with pendilia and cross, to right bust of Martina, Heraclius' wife, wearing robes and crown with long pendilia and cross, cross between heads

DO class III, SB-871, DO-233, MIB 149, DO 233, MIB 149, BMC 343-6, Tolstoi 319-20, Ratto 1460-64, Morrison (CBN) 3-11, S 871

scarce
Tanit
Byzant silver.jpg
Heraclius Half siliqua32 viewsHeraclius
Silver half siliqua, 0.66g, 11.6mm, 100º, Carthage mint, 614-618 A.D. or less likely 628-629 A.D.; obverse D N ERACLIO PP AV, bust of Heraclius facing, beardless, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with pendilia and cross; reverse no inscription; to left bust of Heraclius Constantine, Heraclius' son, wearing chlamys with tablion and crown with pendilia and cross, to right bust of Martina, Heraclius' wife, wearing robes and crown with long pendilia and cross, cross between heads;

DO class III, SB-871, DO-233, MIB 149, DO 233, MIB 149, BMC 343-6, Tolstoi 319-20, Ratto 1460-64, Morrison (CBN) 3-11, S 871

Scarce
Tanit
heraclius~0.jpg
Heraclius Half siliqua8 viewsHeraclius,
Silver half siliqua. Carthage mint, 614-618 A.D. or less likely 628-629 A.D.; obverse D N ERACLIO PP AV, bust of Heraclius facing, beardless, wearing cuirass, paludamentum, and crown with pendilia and cross; reverse no inscription; to left bust of Heraclius Constantine, Heraclius' son, wearing chlamys with tablion and crown with pendilia and cross, to right bust of Martina, Heraclius' wife, wearing robes and crown with long pendilia and cross, cross between heads

DO class III, SB-871, DO-233, MIB 149, DO 233, MIB 149, BMC 343-6, Tolstoi 319-20, Ratto 1460-64, Morrison (CBN) 3-11, S 871

scarce
Tanit
Biz.jpg
Heraclius Solidus42 viewsAU Solidus
Obv: dNERACOMTPP (indictional year mark) - Crowned facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine.
Rev: VICTORIAAVCC(indictional year mark) Exe: CONOB - Cross potent on steps. c.625-627 (Carthage)
Tanit
herac D.jpg
Heraclius Solidus56 viewsAU Solidus
Obv. Crowned & cuir bust facing holding gl. cr., D.N. ERAC [Greek_Lambda] IO PP [Greek_Delta] I (=yr 14 indiction, 625-6 AD)
Rev. Cross potent on two steps, VICTORIA AVGG IE (=yr 15 indiction, 626-7 AD), CONOB in ex.

S.866 from Carthage

Sear notes that some of these coins have different years on obverse and reverse.
Tanit
Biz2.jpg
Heraclius Solidus17 viewsAU Solidus
Heraclius 610 - 641 AD - Mint Carthage
Obv: DNERACLIOETERACONSTPP ; Facing busts of Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, wearing chlamys and elaborate crown with cross on top, Heraclius has a short beard and Heraclius Constantine has no beard and is smaller and a Cross between their heads
Rev: VICTORIAAGG(Delta), CONOB in exergue ; Cross Potent on two steps

Ref: W65, S-867 var, DOC-204, Berk-132, MIB-84a, R-1371, BMC-324, BN-3
Tanit
HeracliusSBCV876.JPG
Heraclius, SBCV 87614 viewsDN ERACLIO PP AVG
Helmeted bust facing wearing crown
Large X, N M to sides, Cross above, Star below
AE decanummium, Carthage
15mm, 2.76g
novacystis
Heraclius_sbcv872.jpg
Hericlius, SBCV 8726 viewsDN ERACLIO PP AV
Helmeted and cuirassed bust, facing beardless, holding globus cruciger
Large X•X, Cross above, star left, E right
KRTS in ex.
Carthage
AE half follis, 17.5mm, 3.15mm
novacystis
croix 1.jpg
Hilderic (523-530) - AE435 views[...] P.F. [AVG.] ?
Cross in wreath

Vandalic coin minted in Carthage
Ginolerhino
Hilderic_ab.jpg
Hilderic - Carthage, Vandal kingdom84 viewsHilderic (460s-533), king of the Vandals and Alans (523-530). Æ nummus (8 mm, 0.62 g), Carthage. Obverse: diademed head right, [HILD]IRIX. Reverse: cross in wreath. Grierson/Blackburn 24-5.1 commentsjbc
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Himera. Tyranny of Theron & Thrasydaios13 viewsSicily, Himera. 480-470 BC. AR Didrachm (8.79 gm). Cock standing l. HIMERA to l. / Crab.  nEF.  Westermark & Jenkins Himera #4; SNG ANS 4 #155ff; SNG Cop 1 #302-303; SNG Lloyd 1011-1012; BMC 2 24; ACNAC: Dewing 613-614, Rosen 55; HGC 2 #438. cf. Nomos 1 #20 (same dies).
Theron of Akragas and Gelon of Syracuse defeated Carthage in the Battle of Himera in 480 BC. Theron deposed the local tyrant of Himera and ruled over the city. The pairing of the crowing rooster on the obverse (Himera’s name means ‘day break’) and the crab of Akragas on the reverse aptly captures this political situation. Theron's son, Thrasydaios, succeeded him as tyrant in 472 BC, but Thrasydaios was defeated in battle by Hieron of Syracuse in 470 BC. The Carthaginians had their revenge in 408 BC when Himera was utterly destroyed.
1 commentsAnaximander
Unidentified.jpg
I sense an African theme...24 viewsTop left: Can I sing some U2? "I stillllll haven't found... what I'm looking forrrrrr..."

Top and bottom right: Ptolemaic, not sure exactly which Ptolemy. Gorgeous though.

Bottom left: Carthaginian.
Bronze, 17 mm at widest, 4 grams (by my terrible kitchen scale)
Head of Tanit left, obverse
Prancing (or rearing?) horse right, reverse
60-75 degree die axis (ish)
EvaJupiterSkies
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IBERIA, Carthago Nova, Quarter shekel39 viewsStruck after 221 B.C.
The description for this coin is quite interesting, as has been discussed on this forum. Most descriptions doubt whether this was a person of importance on the coin, however, the ancient puncture holes seem to suggest a possibility that the coin may have been worn by a political supporter of this person. If this is indeed a real person of power, it could be a Barcid or even Hannibal himself.
Rev. Elephant walking r.
Weight: 1.7 g Diameter: 14 mm
2 commentssuperflex
Caracalla-Denar-INCARTH-RIC130a.jpg
II-CARACALLA -a- 006 Denar RIC IV/I/130a16 viewsAv) ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Laureated and draped bust right

Rv) INDVLGENTIA AVGG
Exergue: IN CARTH
Dea Caelestis riding on lion to the right holding sceptre and thunder-bolt; und her water is gushing from a rock

Weight: 2,9g; Ø: 21mm; Reference. RIC IV/I/130a;ROME mint; struck: 201-206 A.D.
sulcipius
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Iran, Zand Dynasty: 'Ali Murad Khan (1781-1785) AR Type A Rupi, Shiraz Mint (Album-2816; KM#560.4)11 viewsObv: Persian legend around beaded border, شد آفتاب و ماه زر و سیم در جهان از سکه امام بحق صاحب زمان; (Silver and Gold through all the world have now become the moon and sun, Thanks to the true Imam's imprint the Age's Lord (the rightful one))
Rev: Mint and date inside cartouche with ruler's evocation in Persian, یا علی ضرب دارالعلم شیراز ۱۱۹۸; (Ya Ali, Struck at Shiraz, AH1198)
SpongeBob
Thurium_AR_Stater.jpg
Italy, Lucania, Thurium52 viewsAR Stater, 7.79g. 22mm. c.410-400 B.C.

Engraver, Phrygillos (?). Head of Athena to right wearing crested helmet decorated with Skylla; "phi" in field to right. Rv. Bull pawing ground with head down to right; fish in exergue. SNG Oxford 871. HN 1782; a few small marks and some small metal breaks in front of face. Toned and of fine style

Ex: Numismatica Ars Classica, Zurich, Auction O, 2004, lot 1157.

Located on a fertile plain on the Gulf of Taranto near the site of Sybaris, Thurium was founded by Achaeans late in the 8th Century B.C. At the peak of its success, Sybaris had amassed a population nearly equal to that of Athens, had a six-mile defensive wall, and according to Strabo had as many as 25 cities and four native peoples under its authority. However, the thriving settlement was destroyed by Croton in 510 B.C. After two attempts to establish a new foundation on the ruined site that had been thwarted by Croton, a fresh attempt was made in the period 446 to 444/3 B.C. This remarkable undertaking was originally conceived by descendants of the Sybarites, but when the Crotonites opposed that enterprise as well, help was sought from Athens. Pericles came to their aid by sending colonists whom he had gathered from throughout Greece to participate in what he envisioned as a Panhellenic experiment in colonization. With financial and military support from Athens, the colonists set up their city, drawing on the talents of Protagoras of Abdera for its civil laws, Lampon of Athens for its sacred laws and Hippodamus of Miletus for its city-plan. Even the historian Herodotus is counted among the talented participants. As Thurium began to flourish its colonists from Greece soon ejected their co-founding Sybarites (who established another city on the river Traeis) and eventually distanced themselves even from their benefactor Athens. The city continued to prosper even after it came under Roman control following the defeat of Tarentum in 272. During the Second Punic War, Thurium was still a regional power and it held out as a Roman ally until the spring of 212, when resisting the Carthaginians became impossible. It was the last Greek city to fall to Hannibal, yet it also was the last city outside of Bruttium to remain in his camp. This was not appreciated by the Romans who consequently added its land to their ager publicus and, in 194 or 193, by which time the site was largely abandoned, founded in its place the Latin colony of Copia. Thurian coinage is substantial, and is renowned for the fine artistry of its dies. The head of Athena as an obverse type clearly is inspired by the coinage of Athens. The standing bull on the city’s early coins likely was derived from the old badge of Sybaris, yet the charging version of that animal may refer to the local spring Thuria, from which the new foundation took its name. On this example the bowl of Athena’s helmet is vividly decorated with Scylla, whose ribbed serpent-tail and dog foreparts are particularly well-engraved. Athena’s face retains the severe dignity of even the earliest issues of Thurium, making it a fine example of Attic-inspired art. The bull, as on all Thurian issues of this era, is fully animated with its tail lashing as it charges forth to engage some unseen foe.
Ex: A.D.M. Collection
2 commentsLeo
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Italy, Pompeii - Stored artefacts14 viewsA selection of the items found and stored in Pompei.

Of primary interest in this one is the wooden cart.

From my visit to Pompeii in August 2015
maridvnvm
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Italy, Rome, Republican temples150 viewsLargo di Torre Argentina

Wikipedia: "Temple of Juturna built by Gaius Lutatius Catulus after his victory against the Carthaginians in 241 BC. It was later rebuilt into a church, whose apse is still present.

Circular temple with six columns remaining, was built by Quintus Lutatius Catulus in 101 BC to celebrate his victory over Cimbri; it was Aedes Fortunae Huiusce Diei, a temple devoted to the "Luck of the Current Day"."

Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Sicily, Agrigento - Temple of Juno331 viewsbuilt in the 5. century BC and burnt in 406 BC by the Carthaginians
used for the celebration of weddings
Johny SYSEL
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Italy, Sicily, View of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra)64 viewsView of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra), Sicily

Solus (or Soluntum, near modern Solanto) was an ancient city on the north coast of Sicily, one of the three chief Phoenician settlements on the island, about 16 kilometers (10 miles) east of Panormus (modern Palermo). It lay 183 meters (600 ft) above sea level, on the southeast side of Monte Catalfano 373 meters (1,225 ft), in a naturally strong situation, and commanding a fine view. The date of its founding is unknown. Solus was one of the few colonies that the Phoenicians retained when they withdrew to the northwest corner of the island before the advance of the Greek colonies in Sicily. Together with Panormus and Motya, it allied with the Carthaginians. In 396 B.C. Dionysius took the city but it probably soon broke away again to Carthage and was usually part of their dominions on the island. In 307 B.C. it was given to the soldiers and mercenaries of Agathocles, who had made peace with the Carthage when abandoned by their leader in Africa. During the First Punic War it was still subject to Carthage, and it was not until after the fall of Panormus that Soluntum also opened its gates to the Romans. It continued to under Roman dominion as a municipal town, but apparently one of no great importance, as its name is only slightly and occasionally mentioned by Cicero. But it is still noticed both by Pliny and Ptolemy, as well as at a later period by the Itineraries. Its destruction probably dates from the time of the Saracens.

Excavations have brought to light considerable remains of the ancient town, belonging entirely to the Roman period, and a good deal still remains unexplored. The traces of two ancient roads, paved with large blocks of stone, which led up to the city, may still be followed, and the whole summit of Monte Catalfano is covered with fragments of ancient walls and foundations of buildings. Among these may be traced the remains of two temples, of which some capitals and portions of friezes, have been discovered. An archaic oriental Artemis sitting between a lion and a panther, found here, is in the museum at Palermo, with other antiquities from this site. An inscription, erected by the citizens in honor of Fulvia Plautilla, the wife of Caracalla, was found there in 1857. With the exception of the winding road by which the town was approached on the south, the streets, despite the unevenness of the ground, which in places is so steep that steps have to be introduced, are laid out regularly, running from east to west and from north to south, and intersecting at right angles. They are as a rule paved with slabs of stone. The houses were constructed of rough walling, which was afterwards plastered over; the natural rock is often used for the lower part of the walls. One of the largest of them, with a peristyle, was in 1911, though wrongly, called the gymnasium. Near the top of the town are some cisterns cut in the rock, and at the summit is a larger house than usual, with mosaic pavements and paintings on its walls. Several sepulchres also have been found.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soluntum

Photo by Allie Caulfield from Germany.
Joe Sermarini
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum 1.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum 163 viewsThe Forum
ENTRANCE TO THE FORUM Forum of Pompeii After 80 B.C. One of the two arches originally covered with marble which flank the Temple of Jupiter and are the main entrances to the forum. The temple was built under the Samnites in the second century B.C.
FORUM OF POMPEII After 80 B.C. The Forum of Pompeii has a central rectangular space, 466 feet long by 124 feet wide, surrounded by the most important public buildings in the city. Like other forums, it is set up on an axial plan. A colonnade lines three sides. In the center of the fourth side, visible in the distance, is the Temple of Jupiter, known as the Capitolium. The forum was paved with travertine stone and only pedestrians were permitted in its precinct. Situated on an old site, it was largely rebuilt after 80 B.C. when Pompeii became a Roman colony. The forum was again in the process of rebuilding after the earthquake of 62 AD. It was buried under the eruption of Vesuvius seen in the distance in 79.

FORUM (VII,8)
The first monumental arrangement dates from the 2nd cent. BC, with a few buildings and the porticos with their double row of tufa columns, replaced with white limestone in the imperial age, when the site was repaved and buildings added on the east side where shops had previously stood. Located at the intersection between the two main streets of the original urban center, the Forum was the city's main square, where cart traffic was forbidden: it was surrounded on all sides by religious, political, and business buildings. In the 1st cent. AD the Forum highlighted the celebratory intention of the imperial house, where the monumental bases for commemorative statues were placed on the south side, in front of the city's administrative buildings, while those of illustrious citizens stood along the porticos : the sculptures have not been found, perhaps because they were removed by the people of Pompeii who returned after the eruption to take whatever they could. In the center of the western side stands an orators' tribune.
MEMORIAL ARCHES
In opus latericium, at one time covered with marble, these elegantly enclose the Forum to the north, in celebration of the imperial family. Of the two built on either side of the Temple of Jupiter, the one to the west is attributed to Augustus, the east to Nero, perhaps demolished following the death (68 AD) and sentencing of the emperor, or simply to avoid blocking the view of the other arch behind it, at the north entrance to the Forum. This has two niches on one side that once held statues of Nero and Drusus, on the other side two fountains; an equestrian statue (perhaps of the emperor Tiberius) topped this arch. The other arch, in the back at the start of Via di Mercurio, is called the Caligula Arch because an equestrian statue was found nearby, that may have depicted the emperor Caligula and probably stood on the arch.
John Schou
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum  columns 1.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum columns 136 viewsThe Forum
ENTRANCE TO THE FORUM Forum of Pompeii After 80 B.C. One of the two arches originally covered with marble which flank the Temple of Jupiter and are the main entrances to the forum. The temple was built under the Samnites in the second century B.C.
FORUM OF POMPEII After 80 B.C. The Forum of Pompeii has a central rectangular space, 466 feet long by 124 feet wide, surrounded by the most important public buildings in the city. Like other forums, it is set up on an axial plan. A colonnade lines three sides. In the center of the fourth side, visible in the distance, is the Temple of Jupiter, known as the Capitolium. The forum was paved with travertine stone and only pedestrians were permitted in its precinct. Situated on an old site, it was largely rebuilt after 80 B.C. when Pompeii became a Roman colony. The forum was again in the process of rebuilding after the earthquake of 62 AD. It was buried under the eruption of Vesuvius seen in the distance in 79.

FORUM (VII,8)
The first monumental arrangement dates from the 2nd cent. BC, with a few buildings and the porticos with their double row of tufa columns, replaced with white limestone in the imperial age, when the site was repaved and buildings added on the east side where shops had previously stood. Located at the intersection between the two main streets of the original urban center, the Forum was the city's main square, where cart traffic was forbidden: it was surrounded on all sides by religious, political, and business buildings. In the 1st cent. AD the Forum highlighted the celebratory intention of the imperial house, where the monumental bases for commemorative statues were placed on the south side, in front of the city's administrative buildings, while those of illustrious citizens stood along the porticos : the sculptures have not been found, perhaps because they were removed by the people of Pompeii who returned after the eruption to take whatever they could. In the center of the western side stands an orators' tribune.

John Schou
Italy- Rome- Largo (di Torre) Argentina.jpg
Italy- Rome- Largo (di Torre) Argentina47 viewsLargo di Torre Argentina is a square in Rome that hosts four Republican Roman temples, and the reminings of Pompey's Theater. It is located in the ancient Campus Martius.

Common knowledge refers the name of the square to a Torre Argentina, which is not related to the South American country, but to the city of Strasbourg, whose original name was Argentoratum. In 1503, in fact, John Burckhardt from Strasbourg built in via del Sudario a palace (now at number 44), Casa del Bucardo, annexing a tower, called Torre Argentoratina from the name of his hometown.

After Italian unification, it was decided to reconstruct part of Rome (1909), demolishing the zone of Torre Argentina, where the remainings of a medieval tower, Torre Papito or Torre Boccamazzi, and of one temple were to be included in the new buildings. During the works (1927), however, the colossal head and arms of a marble statue were discovered. The archeological investigation brought to light the presence of a holy area, dating to the Republican era, with four temples and part of Pompey's Theater.

The buildings
The four temples, designated today by the letters A, B, C, and D, front onto a paved street, which was reconstructed in the imperial era, after 80 AD fire.

Temple A was built in the 3rd century BC, and is probably the Temple of Juturna built by Gaius Lutatius Catulus after his victory against Carthaginians in 241 BC. It was later rebuilt into a church, whoes aprses are still present.

Temple B, a circular temple with six columns remaining, was built by Quintus Lutatius Catulus in 101 BC to celebrate his victory over Cimbri; it was Aedes Fortunae Huiusce Diei, a temple devoted to the Luck of the Current Day. The colossal statue found during excavations and now kept in the Capitoline Museums was the statue of the goddess herself. Only the head, the arms, and the legs were of marble: the other parts, covered by the dress, were of bronze.

Temple C is the most ancient of the three, dating back to 4th or 3rd century BC, and was probably devoted to Feronia the ancient Italic goddess of fertility. After the fire of 80 AD, this temple was restored, and the white and black mosaic of the inner temple cell dates back to this restoration.

Temple D is the largest of the four, dates back to 2nd century BC with Late Republican restorations, and was devoted to Lares Permarini, but only a small part of it has been excavated (a street covers the most of it).

Teatro Argentina is a 18th century theater, where Gioachino Rossini's The Barber of Seville debuted in 1816, as well as Giuseppe Verdi's I due Foscari (1844) and La battaglia di Legnano (1849).

Located in the Largo Argentina is the Torre Argentina Cat Sanctuary, a no-kill shelter for homeless cats (of which Rome has many). The presence of the shelter proves to be a point of interest for both tourists and locals, as the historical area abounds with various breeds of cat, cavorting and lounging about on the ancient (and semi-ancient) ruins.
John Schou
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Jaques Nicolas Bellin (1702-1720) - Carte du District de Tranquebar (ca. 1760)10 viewsSpongeBob
23.JPG
Jean III (1286-1341)9 viewsDenier de Nantes
0,77g
17-18mm
+ IOHANNES DVX
"Jean Duc"
Champ écartelé, aux 1 et 4 de Bretagne, aux 2 et 3 de Dreux
+ BRITANNIE
"Bretagne"
Croix cantonnée au 2 d'une moucheture d'hermine, au 3 d'une N
Jézéquel 87b
de Mey 112
Bigot 354
PYL
juba_II_a.JPG
Juba II, King of Mauretania (25 BC-23 AD).130 viewsObverse: REX IVBA, diademed head right
Reverse: Elephant walking right
Mint : Carthage
Date : 25 BC-23 AD
Reference : SNG Copenhagen 577; Mazard 1350
Grade : VF
Weight : 3.79g
Denom: Denarius
Metal : Silver

Comments: The elephant is possibly taken from denarius minted by Julius Caesar or Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio both struck during the civil war period ca. 48-46 B.C, both of which showed an elephant and would have been used extensively in Mauritania (N. Africa.)
3 commentsBolayi
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Julia Domna, unofficial40 viewsJulia Domna
Ar unofficial Denarius; 22mm; 2.18g

IVLIA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

INDVLGENTIA AVGG
Dea Caelestis riding right on lion, holding thunderbolt & scepter; below, water gushing from rocks left

IN CARTH in exergue

Julia Domna obverse, paired with Reverse used by both Caracalla and Septimius Severus
1 commentsRobin Ayers
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Julius Caesar Denarius, RRC 458/1, Aeneas34 viewsOBV: Diademed head of Venus right
REV: CAESAR - Aeneas advancing left, carrying Anchises and palladium
4.0g, 17mm

Minted at Carthage, 47-46 BC
1 commentsLegatus
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Justin II16 viewsDecanummium ; issued at Carthage during the years 572-574.

Obverse:facing busts of Justin and his wife Sophia; in ex VITA

Sear 400
Tanit
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Justin II25 viewsDecanummium ; issued at Carthage during the years 572-574.

Obverse:facing busts of Justin and his wife Sophia; in ex VITA

Sear 400
Tanit
Byzant.jpg
Justin II19 viewsDecanummium ; issued at Carthage during the years 572-574.

Obverse:facing busts of Justin and his wife Sophia; in ex VITA

Sear 400
Tanit
Justin II.jpg
Justin II decanummium26 viewsDecanummium of Justin II.
Justin II, AE 10 nummi (decanummim), Carthage Mint,
D N IVSTINVS P P A; Diademed and draped bust right. / Large X, PR to left, ANNO to right, * below, CAR in exergue.

SB. 397
Tanit
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Justin II half Follis21 viewsJustin II half Follis

Carthage, reference SBCV 396 

Scarce
Tanit
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Justin II pentanummim19 viewspentanummium minted by Justin II in Carthage.
Obv: D. N. IVSTINUS PP. Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: Large V; to left P/R; to right A/N/N/O; above, cross; in ex., CAR or KAR.

Sear 401.
Tanit
Byzantine.jpg
Justinian I35 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261
Scarce
Tanit
BYZ D 1.jpg
Justinian I67 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261

1 commentsTanit
Justinian I D.jpg
Justinian I45 viewsAE follis. Justinian the Great , Carthage Mint, D N IVSTINI ANVS P P AVG Facing, cuirassed bust, cross to right, holding globe with cross. / Large M, ANNO XIII at sides, + above, S below, CAR in exergue.
Sear 261
Scarce
Tanit
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Justinian I - Carthage15 viewsJustinian I (527-565). Æ nummus (8 mm, 0.60 g), Carthage mint c. 534-565. Obverse: diademed bust facing, flanked by two stars. Reverse: Christogram with flanking alpha and omega. DOC 374; MIB 208.Jan
Justinian_I.JPG
Justinian I AE Decanummium35 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINI ANVS P P A Diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VICTO RIA AG Victory standing facing holding wreath and globus cruciger
Exe: *X8
Mint : Carthage
Date : 548 – 549AD
Reference : SB 271
Grade : EF
Weight : 5.73g
Denom : Nummi
Metal : Bronze
Acquired: 20/04/05
Comments : ex William B. Porter collection, 19 x 21mm
Bolayi
Justinian_I.jpg
Justinian I Decanummium38 viewsJustinian I Æ Decanummium. Carthage mint. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large I, cross above, star & cross flanking; KART.
Decanummium of Carthage, Justinian I, year 14 (540-41).

Sear 269

Tanit
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Justinian I Follis24 viewsJustinian I AE Follis of Carthage second workshop. D N IVSTINIANVS P P AG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / large M, star left, crosses above and right, officina letter below, KART in ex.

Sear 259
Tanit
Byz1.jpg
Justinian I Follis29 viewsJustinian I Æ Follis. Carthage mint. D N IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped, & cuirassed bust right / Large M, cross above, star & cross flanking; KART.

Sear 257. DOC I 283; MIB I 185b-c;
Tanit
BYZ 7 D.jpg
Justinian I Half follis42 viewsJustinian I Æ Half Follis. Carthage mint, dated RY 13 (539/40 AD). D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG, diademed, helmeted, & cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger & shield; cross to right / Large K; cross above, ANNO X/VI across field; S/CAR.

DOC I 295. Sear 266.
1 commentsTanit
justinian~0.jpg
Justinian I half follis24 viewsJustinian I half follis, Carthage mint

Sear 263



Tanit
ByzSilver.jpg
Justinian I half siliqua30 viewsSilver half siliqua of Justinian I from Carthage, Sear 256.
V-O/ M-T in angles of cross, CONOS beneath.

Carthage, Sear 256.
Tanit
BIZ 31 D.jpg
Justinian I pentanummium33 viewsAE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274

Tanit
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Justinian I pentanummium26 viewsAE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274

Tanit
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Justinian I pentanummium25 viewsJustinian I pentanummium
AE pentanummium, Carthage mint.

Sear 274
Tanit
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Justinian I, SBCV 25916 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed bust right
Large M, star left, Cross right, Cross above, Γ below
KART in ex.
AE follis, 29mm, 15.52g
Carthage mint
uneven strike
novacystis
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King GEORGE III4 viewsKing GEORGE III (1760-1820) Cartwheel Twopence Dated-1797

Obverse : features George III facing left, text Georgius III. D. G. REX.

Reverse : features Britannia, seated on a rock and facing right, with shield, trident and holding a branch.
discwizard
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Krannon, Thessaly46 views350-300 B.C.
Bronze Dichalkon
3.87 gm, 17.0 mm
Obv: Horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys
Rev: K-PA/NNO, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart, crow standing on right wheel
Sear 2073; BMC Thessaly p.16, 4;
BCD Thessaly 1085 var.
[Rogers 194; SNG Cop 44 var.]

Ex-Forum GB49210, Ex-BCD Collection
Jaimelai
41248q00.jpg
Krannon, Thessaly, Greece, (350 - 300 B.C.)85 viewsÆ Dichalkon
O: Horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys.
R: “KR-AN/NO”, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart.
Krannon mint
4.605
17.4
Rogers Thessaly 197, SNG Cop 43, SGCV I 2073

It was customary in time of drought to take a sacred chariot with Hydria in procession through the City to supplicate Apollo for rain, and if a crow settled on the wheels, that was the sign that Apollo would grant the prayers of the faithful. -- Rev. Edgar Rogers in The Copper Coinage of Thessaly
5 commentsMat
49199p00.jpg
Krannon, Thessaly, Greece, c. 350 - 300 B.C.8 viewsBronze dichalkon, VF, 4.366g, 17.1mm, 315o, Krannon mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.
Obv: Horseman galloping right, wearing petasos and chlamys.
Rev: [K]-PA/NNO, hydria (water carrying vessel) mounted on cart, crow standing on right wheel.
Ref: Rogers 193; BMC Thessaly p. 16, 4 var (KP-A); BCD Thessaly 1085 var (obv K); SNG Cop 44 var (P above); SGCV I 2073.
ex BCD collection with his handwritten round tag. Found at Cholorema (near Halmyros) in Thessaly.
VF
mjabrial
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L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²130 BC
¹128 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
(XVI)
Pax in biga right, holding branch, reins and scepter, elephant head below
ROMA
¹Crawford 262/1, RSC I Caecilia 38, Sydenham 496, SRCV I 138
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
ex Gabinet Numizmatyczny D. Marciniak

Head of elephant, emblem of Caecilia family, commemorates victory of L. Caecilius Metellus over Hasdrubal near Panormus in 251 BC. Captured carthaginian elephants were displayed in following triumph.
Johny SYSEL
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L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²57 BC
¹56 BC
diademed head of Ancus Marcius to right, lituus behind
ANCVS
equestrian statue right on 5 archs of aquaduct (Aqua Marcia), flower below
PHILIPPVS
A-Q-V-A-(MAR)
¹Crawford 425/1, SRCV I 382, Sydenham 919, RSC I Marcia 28
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,7g
ex Lucernae

Coin shows moneyer's ancestors. Ancus Marcius on obverse was the fourth legendary king who rulled 642 – 617 BC from who Marcii claimed their origin. On reverse there could be statue of Preator Q. Marcius Rex on aquaduct Aqua Marcia which he repaired in 144-140 BC. It was the longest Roman aquaduct which bringed water to Rome from 91 km far source. Aquaduct was financed from money gained by looting of Carthage and Corinth.
Moneyer became consul in 38 BC. He was half-brother of Octavianus Augustus.
Johny SYSEL
Inde.jpg
La France et ses colonies: Atlas illustré cent cartes dressées d'après les cartes de Cassini, du Dépot de la guerre, des Ponts-et-chaussées et de la Marine Texte redigé d'après les documents officiels Par Ernest Poirée14 viewsMap of French India by Alexandre Aimé Vuillemin and Ernest Poirée, Published by Migeon, Paris, 1852SpongeBob
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LIMOUSIN - Vicomté de Limoges - Jean III de Bretagne (1301-1339). 4 viewsDenier, argent, 0,77 g
Monnaie frappée en 1328-1329
Av./ +I DVX BRITAnIE, champ écartelé aux 1 et 4 de Bretagne, aux 2 et 3 de Dreux.
Rv./ +VICE C LEmOVIC, croix cantonnée au 4 d’un L.
Réfs : PA-2317
Gabalor
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Lorraine - Charles III, Duc de Lorraine (1545-1608), France.14 viewsTeston, argent, 9,02 g.
A/ CARO D G CAL LOTAR B GEL DVX, buste du Duc à droite.
R/ MONETA NOVA NANCEI CVSA, écu couronné écartelé, au 1 mi parti de Hongrie et de Naples, au 2 mi parti de Jérusalem et d'Aragon, au 3 mi parti d'Anjou et de Gueldre, au 4 de Flandre et de Bar, brochant sur le tout un écu de Lorraine.
Réfs : Boudeau 1527
1 commentsGabalor
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Lorraine, duché de Lorraine, Charles IV (1625-1675) France.8 viewsTeston, argent, 8,50 g.
Monnaie frappée à Nancy
A/ CAROLVS D G DVX LOTH MARCH DVX C B G, buste à droite.
R/ MONETA NOVA NANCEII CVSA 1627, écu écartelé d'Hongrie, Naples, Jérusalem, Aragon, Anjou, Gueldre, Flandre, Bar et Lorraine couronné.
Réfs : Boudeau 1557
Gabalor
198~0.JPG
Louis XII Roi de France (1498-1514) - Douzain6 viewsDouzain du Dauphiné, argent, 2,27 g
Point sous la 3ème lettre pour Montélimar
A/ LVDOVICVS FRANCORV REX F, écu écartelé de France-Dauphiné.
R/ SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDICTV, croix cantonnée de deux lis et de deux dauphins.
Réfs : Duplessy 671
Gabalor
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Louis XII Roi de France (1498-1514) - Douzain8 viewsDouzain du Dauphiné, argent, 2,15 g
A/ LVDOVICVS FRANCORV REX G, écu écartelé de France-Dauphiné.
R/ SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDICTV G, croix cantonnée de deux lis et de deux dauphins.
Réfs : Duplessy 671
Gabalor
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Lucania, Velia. (Circa 340-334 B.C.)34 viewsAR nomos (22 mm, 7.24 g, 2 h).

Obverse: Head of Athena left, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with a griffin; between neck guard and crest, Θ

Reverse: YEΛHTΩN (of Elea), lion prowling right; below, X.

Williams 262 (O151/R207); SNG ANS 1293 (same dies); HN Italy 1284.

Velia was the Roman name of an ancient city of Magna Graecia on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea. It was founded by Greeks from Phocaea as Hyele around 538–535 BC. According to Herodotus, in 545 BC Ionian Greeks fled Phocaea, in modern Turkey, which was being besieged by the Persians under Cyrus the Great. They settled in Corsica until they were attacked by a force of Etruscans and Carthaginians. The surviving 6000 took to the sea once more, first stopping in Reggio Calabria, where they were probably joined by the poet/philosopher Xenophanes, who was at the time at Messina, and then moved north along the coast and founded the town of Hyele, later renamed Ele and then, eventually, Elea.

Elea was not conquered by the Lucanians, but eventually joined Rome in 273 BC and was included in ancient Lucania.
1 commentsNathan P
ISL_Mamluks_Balog_461_al-Ashraf_N_#257;s_#803;ir_al-D_#299;n_Sha__ban_II.jpg
Mamluk (Bahri). Sha`ban II (al-Ashraf Nasir al-Din Sha`ban) (764-778 A.H. = 1363-1377 A.D.)8 viewsBalog 461, Plate XVII, No. 461; SNAT Hamah 581-584; Album 958

AE fals; Ḥamāh mint, undated; 2.67 g., 19.69 mm. max., 90°

Obv.: Circular line in border of dots. In it, oblong cartouche, lateral ends pointed inwards, on upper and lower sides, convexity; الملك (= al-Malik) / الاشرف (= al-Ashraf) in two rows in center.

Rev.: No border. Double circular line, connected with 12 spokes; on the external circle, 24 short radiating rods, crowned with a pellet; بحماة (= Hamah) in center.

Sha'ban II was a grandson of Muhammad I, being the son of one of Muhammad's sons who never held office. In 1363, the senior Mamluk emirs, led by Emir Yalbugha, deposed Sultan Muhammad II on charges of illicit behavior and installed ten-year-old Sha'ban as his figurehead replacement. In 1366 Sha'ban, who sought to wield power, supported a successful revolt against Yalbugha. One year later, Sha'ban, who still had few mamluks of his own but was supported by the common people, quelled a rebellion. Again in 1373, the commoners assisted Sha'ban in defeating a rebellion. Because of their loyalty and key support during these revolts, Sha'ban treated the commoners well throughout his reign, including efforts to provide food for the poor during a two-year famine in Egypt. In 1376, Sha'ban went on the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. In his absence emirs again rebelled against Sha'ban, which was followed by a rebellion of Sha'ban's own mamluk guard, who murdered him in 1377.
Stkp
ISL_Mamluk_Balog_458_Shaban.jpg
Mamluk (Bahri). Sha`ban II (al-Ashraf Nasir al-Din Sha`ban) (764-778 A.H. = 1363-1377 A.D.)20 viewsBalog 458, Plate XVII, Nos. 458a-458b; Album 958

AE fals; Dimashq/Damascus mint, undated; 2.89 g., 19.43 mm. max., 0°

Obv.: Circular line border. Clockwise circular legend, السلطان الملك الا شرف شعبان (= al-Sultan al-Malik al-Ashraf Sha`ban), in the center, spindle-shaped cartouche with fleur-de-lis edges; in it حسن بن (= bin Hasayn).

Rev.: Circular line border. Concave-sided linear octolobe with floweret on the edges. Pellets between the flowerets. In the center: ضرب / مشق بد (= darab=struck / in Dimashq).

Sha'ban II was a grandson of Muhammad I, being the son of one of Muhammad's sons who never held office. In 1363, the senior Mamluk emirs, led by Emir Yalbugha, deposed Sultan Muhammad II on charges of illicit behavior and installed ten-year-old Sha'ban as his figurehead replacement. In 1366 Sha'ban, who sought to wield power, supported a successful revolt against Yalbugha. One year later, Sha'ban, who still had few mamluks of his own but was supported by the common people, quelled a rebellion. Again in 1373, the commoners assisted Sha'ban in defeating a rebellion. Because of their loyalty and key support during these revolts, Sha'ban treated the commoners well throughout his reign, including efforts to provide food for the poor during a two-year famine in Egypt. In 1376, Sha'ban went on the Hajj pilgrimage to Mecca. In his absence emirs again rebelled against Sha'ban, which was followed by a rebellion of Sha'ban's own mamluk guard, who murdered him in 1377.
1 commentsStkp
mumlak-fals.jpg
Mamluk sultan Al-Ashraf Nasir al-Din Sha'ban II AE Fals13 viewsIslamic Empire, Mamluk, al-Ashraf Sha'ban II, (1363-1377 AD), AE fals, Dimashq, 2.7g, 20.28mm

Obverse: Eye-shaped cartouche with Arabic al-sultan al-malik al-Ashraf Sha'ban clockwise around perimeter; at center, bin Hasan.

Reverse: Floreated octolabe with zarb Dimashq at center.

Reference: Balog 458
Gil-galad
Masinissa.JPG
Masinissa - Horse galloping135 viewsMasinissa ruler of the North African kingdom of Numidia, and an ally of Rome in the last years of the Second Punic War SNG Cop 510 13 Obverse: Bust of king l. Reverse: Horse galloping l., Punci letter below
Size: 27.86 mm Weight: 12.3 grams Typical crude

Comments: Masinissa grew up in Carthage as a hostage to keep his father loyal to Carthage. He fought for Carthage against the Romans in Spain from 212 to 206 and then when Hasdrubal Barca left for Italy, Masinissa took command of the Carthaginian cavalry in Spain. When the Carthaginians were forced out of Spain in 206 Africanus released Masinissa captive nephew and Masinissa defected to Rome and the rest is history.
1 commentsBolayi
MASS.png
MASSALIA - MARSEILLE Obole MA, tête à gauche12 viewsMASSALIA - MARSEILLE
(Ve - Ier siècle avant J.-C.)
Marseille, la "Massalia" des Grecs, fondée par les Phocéens en 600 avant J.-C., est née de la volonté des Grecs de promouvoir des comptoirs commerciaux afin de rivaliser avec les Carthaginois et les Étrusques pour la domination de la Méditerranée occidentale. Marseille n'est absolument pas une création celtique ou gauloise et appartient au monde grec.
Ségusiaves
BIZ 30 D.jpg
Maurice Tiberius20 viewsMaurice Tiberius, decanummium (X below cross) of Carthage, Sear 566

Obv Bust left, D.N. MAVRICI P or similar round, IND S (sixth indiction, = 587-88 or 602 AD)
Rev: Cross on steps, N - M at sides, X below

Tanit
MTiberius.jpg
Maurice Tiberius Solidus29 viewsMaurice Tiberius AV Solidus.
Struck indictional year 14 (=595/596 AD), Carthage mint.
D N mAVRI-C T P P AN I­, helmeted facing bust, holding globus cruciger / VICTORI-A AVGG, angel standing facing, holding long P-headed cross & globus cruciger; I­/CONOB.

Sear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb0549
RARE
Tanit
Maxentius_as_Caesar_RIC_Carthage_51a.jpg
Maxentius as Caesar - RIC VI 51a (Carthage)10 viewsDenomination: Follis
Era: Late 306 AD
Metal: AE
Obverse: M AVR MAXENTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right

Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAES FEL KART, Carthage standing facing, head left, holding up fruits in both hands; H in left field, Δ in exergue.
Mint: Carthage
Weight: 10.20 gm.
Reference: RIC VI Carthage, 51a.
Provenance: Purchased from Mike Vosper, March 28, 2019; ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 46, lot 804 (subsequently processed, removing dirt and deposits).

RIC: “The mint of Carthage, previously administered as part of Severus’ territories, passed into new control with Maxentius’ revolt at Rome in October 306…The immediate response to Maxentius’ revolt was a coinage in gold and Aes, in which Herculius appears as the sole legitimate Augustus, styled AVG or IMP…AVG; the title ‘Caesar’ is given to Maxentius (who receives it nowhere else at all)…”

GVF. Clean smooth surfaces, with no evidence of recent surface crud removal after the sale by Roma Numismatics.
Steve B5
mricvucarthage_37bOR.jpg
Maximian, RIC VI Carthage 37b18 viewsCarthage mint, Maximian, 286 - 305, 306 - 308, and 310 A.D. AE, 23mmx19mm (odd shaped, wavy, flan) 2.17g, RIC VI Carthage 37b
O: IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust r.
R: VOT XX FK, surrounded by wreath

casata137ec
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Maximianus22 viewsFirst reign, AD 286-305. Æ Follis (28mm, 9.26 g, 6h). Carthage mint, 2nd officina. Struck circa AD 299-303. Laureate head right / Carthago standing facing, head left, holding fruits in both hands; B. RIC VI 31b. nearly full silvering, small scuff on reverse.

1 commentsTLP
CollageMaker_20180531_122510323.jpg
Maximianus11 viewsFirst reign, 286-305 AD
AE Follis, Carthage mint, 2nd officina. Struck 297-298 AD
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
Reverse: FELIX AD-V-ENT AVGG NN, Africa standing facing, head left, wearing elephant skin headdress and holding signum and tusk; at feet to left, lion with captured bull; H in left field; PKS in exergue.
References: RIC VI 23b, RCV 3630, Van Meter 035
Justin L
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MAXIMIANUS AE Antoninianus15 viewsOBVERSE: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: FELIX ADVENT AVGG N N, Africa standing facing, looking left, wearing elephant-skin headdress, holding standard and elephant's tusk, lion with captured bull at feet, H in right field, mintmark PKB
Struck at Carthage. AD 298
RIC VI 25b
Legatus
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Maximianus AE Follis25 views299-303 AD. Carthage mint.
Obv.: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG - Laureate bust of Maximian right, hair and beard closely cropped.
Rev.: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART - Carthago standing facing, head left, in long robe, holding fruit in both hands, B in exergue.
RIC 31b.
Minos
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Maximianus AE Post Reform Radiate Fraction. 303 AD. Carthage 23 views3.20 grams.
20 mm.
Carthage
RIC 37b Maximianus AE Post Reform Radiate Fraction. 303 AD. IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right / VOT XX FK, three lines in wreath.
Antonio Protti
maximianus_FK.jpg
Maximianus FEL KART RIC VI 428, 39b37 viewsCarthage, 298-299.
Obv: laureate head right, IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
Rev: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART Carthage, draped, standing right, head left, holding fruit(?) in both hands
B in exergue
RIC 428, 39b
areich
maximianus +.jpg
Maximianus Follis23 viewsAE Follis.
Ob: IMP MAXIMIANVS SEN AVG
Rv: CONSERVATO-RES KART SVAE - Carthago stg. facing, head l., holding up fruits in both hands, in hexastyle temple with plain pediment
mint: Carthage

RIC VI #59 Pag.432
Tanit
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Maximianus Follis Carthage13 viewsAE Follis
Maximianus, 286 - 305 CE
Diameter: 28 mm, Weight: 11.60 grams, Die Axis: 6h

Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
Laureate bust to right.

Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART
Personification of Carthage standing left, with fruits in both hands.

Mint: B, Carthage

Ex Incitatus Coins 2018
Pharsalos
H8b.jpg
Maximianus Herculius AR Argenteus73 viewsMaximianus Herculius AR Argenteus. Carthage mint. 300 AD. MAXIMIANVS AVG, laureate bust right / XC -VI, surrounded by laurel wreath, dot placed centrally between two lines of legend. RIC 16a
VERY RARE - R2
EXTREMELY FINE

Ex. Th. Voltz Collection
Ex. Münzen & Medaillen AG Basel 81 (1995), 326.
Ex. Hess-Divo 2007
3 commentsTrajan
Maximianus 2 D.jpg
Maximianus Post Reform Radiate Fraction41 viewsAE Post Reform Radiate Fraction. 303 AD. IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right / VOT XX FK, three lines in wreath.

RIC (VI=) Carthage 37b
Tanit
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Maximianus Post Reform Radiate Fraction53 viewsAE Post Reform Radiate Fraction. 303 AD.
IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right / VOT XX FK, three lines in wreath.
RIC (VI=) Carthage 37b

Tanit
Maximiano_-_RIC_VI_37b.jpg
Maximianus RIC VI 37b9 viewsCarthago 303 AD.
24x20 mm, 3.1 g.
IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG
VOT/XX/FK
xokleng
Maximinus II D 1~0.jpg
Maximinus II Follis32 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis, Carthage mint, 305-306 AD.

Obverse: GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SALVIS AVGG ET CAESS FEL KART, Carthage standing left holding
fruits in both hands, I in left field, Delta in exergue.

RIC VI 40b, Cohen 150..
Tanit
HGC_874_Tetras_MESSANA_Sicilia.jpg
MESSANA (Los Mamertini) - Sicilia - Italia14 viewsBajo dominación de Los Mamertinos
AE Tetras 18 mm 3,45 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada e imberbe del Joven Zeus Hellanos, viendo a izquierda,"ΔIOΣ" frente al busto.
Rev: Águila de pié sobre un trueno a izquierda, con sus alas desplegadas. "MAMEP (en campo derecho) TINΩN" (en campo izquierdo)

Los Mamertini o "Hijos de Marte" eran una banda de mercenarios de la Campania (o samnitas), que alrededor del 289 A.C. se apoderaron de Mesina, luego de haber sido contratados por Agatocles para defenderla.
Los mamertinos dominaron Messana por más de 20 años, convirtiendo este pueblo de agricultores y comerciantes en una base de incursiones de piratas en tierra y mar.
En el 265 A.C., después que Hierón de Siracusa los había derrotado y sitiada Messana, la mamertinos apelaron a Cartago por ayuda y poco después debieron solicitarla ayuda de Roma para librarlos de los cartagineses. Los Mamertinos luego desaparecen de la historia, hasta siglos más tarde cuando los habitantes de Messana fueron llamados Mamertinos.
El "Vino mamertino" de los viñedos de la punta noreste de Sicilia era el favorito de Julio César, quien lo hizo popular al servirlo en una fiesta para celebrar su tercer consulado. (Fuente Fórum Ancient Coins)

Acuñada 288 - 278 A.C.
Ceca: Messana - Sicilia - Italia

Referencias: HGC II #874 (R2) - Calciati I #15 Pag.66 - Särström Serie V, Grupo C #111 ff - BAR issue 9 - BMC Sicily #14 Pag.110 - Carollo Morello #20a
1 commentsmdelvalle
numidia_micipsa.jpg
Micipsa 148-118 B.C. AE 26mm; Micipsa/ Horse galopping12 viewsNumidian Kings, Micipsa 148-118 B.C. AE 26mm (13.94g) Bearded and laureate head of Micipsa l. Horse galopping l., Phoenician letters “MN” below. Mazzard 23; SNG Copenhagen 510-3; Fine. Ex Gert Boersema. Micipsa was a major (although wavering) ally of Rome during the third Punic War and Numidia benefited greatly when thousands of Carthaginians fled to Numidia following the Roman destruction of CarthagePodiceps
Middlesex_760.JPG
Middlesex 76052 viewsObv: ENGLISH SLAVERY, a fat man seated at a table eating, JACOBS below.

Rev: FRENCH LIBERTY, a skinny man seated on the floor gnawing on a bone.

Note: The design of this token was copied from an anti-revolution cartoon by James Gillray, published on 21 December 1792.

Edge: Plain

Thomas Spence, Halfpenny Conder token

Dalton & Hamer: Middlesex 760
SPQR Coins
tomis_sept_severus_Varbanov4813var.JPG
Moesia inferior, Tomis, Septimius Severus, Varbanov 4813 var.9 viewsSeptimius Severus, AD 193-211
AE 27, 10.44g, 26.90mm, 180°
obv. AVT K.L.CEP - .CEOVHROC. P
laureate head r.
rev. MHTRO - P - P - ONTOV TO - MEWC (from 12h clockwise to 9h)
Two-wheeled cart drawn by a bull pacing l.; in the cart a man, bearded, bare-
headed, in himation(?), std. r., upper part of the body and head turned l., r. hand
stretched out l., r. hand bent; in front of the bull a woman in double-chiton
advancing l., head turned r., with r. hand holding an unknown object (long
stick?) on r. shoulder, l. hand raised r.
in upper field Delta (for tetrassarion)
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/2, 2756 (depiction)
AMNG I/2, 2757 (legend)
obv. AMNG I/2, 2755 var. (Bust draped and cuirassed)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 4813 var. (= AMNG 2756)
very rare, F+, black brown patina, somewhat porous
Jochen
tomis_sept_severus_Varbanov4845var~0.JPG
Moesia inferior, Tomis, Septimius Severus, Varbanov 4845 var.11 viewsSeptimius Severus, AD 193-211
AE 26, 10.81g, 26.15mm, 195°
obv. AV K.L CEPTI - CEVHROC P
Head, laureate, r.
rev. MHTRO - P - P - ONTOV TO - MEWC (from 12h clockwise to 9h)
Two-wheeled cart drawn by a bull pacing l.; in the cart a man, bearded, bare-headed, in himation(?), std. r.,
upper part of the body and head turned l., r. hand stretched out l., l. hand bent; in front of the bull a woman in
double-chiton advancing l., head turned r., with r. hand holding an unknown object (long stick?) on r. shoulder, l.
hand raised r.
in upper field Delta (for tetrassarion)
ref. a) not in AMNG:
rev. AMNG I/2, 2756 (depiction)
AMNG I/2, 2757 (legend)
obv. AMNG I/2, 2757
b) Varbanov (engl.) 4845 var. (= AMNG 2757)
very rare, F/F+, brown patina, some porosity

For more information please take look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
Lixus_in_Morocco.jpg
Morocco, Lixus64 viewsLixus is the site of an ancient Roman city located in Morocco just north of the modern seaport of Larache on the bank of the Loukkos River. The location was one of the main cities of the Roman province of Mauretania Tingitana .

Ancient Lixus is located on Tchemmich Hill on the right bank of the Loukkos River (other names: Oued Loukous; Locus River), just to the north of the modern seaport of Larache. The site lies within the urban perimeter of Larache, and about three kilometers inland from the mouth of the river and the Atlantic ocean. From its 80 meters above the plain the site dominates the marshes through which the river flows. To the north, Lixus is surrounded by hills which themselves are bordered to the north and east by a forest of cork oaks.

Among the ruins there are Roman baths, temples, 4th century walls, a mosaic floor, a Christian church and the intricate and confusing remains of the Capitol Hill.

Lixus was first settled by the Phoenicians in the 7th century BC and was later annexed by Carthage. Lixus was part of a chain of Phoenician/Carthaginian settlements along the Atlantic coast of modern Morocco; other major settlements further to the south are Chellah (called Sala Colonia by the Romans) and Mogador. When Carthage fell to Ancient Rome, Lixus, Chellah and Mogador became imperial outposts of the Roman province Mauretania Tingitana.

The ancient sources agree to make of Lixus a counter Phoenician, which is confirmed by the archaeological discovery of material dating from 8th century BC. It gradually grew in importance, later coming under Carthaginian domination. After the destruction of Carthage, Lixus fell to Roman control and was made an imperial colony, reaching its zenith during the reign of the emperor Claudius I (AD 41-54).

Some ancient Greek writers located at Lixus the mythological garden of the Hesperides, the keepers of the golden apples. The name of the city was often mentioned by writers from Hanno the Navigator to the Geographer of Ravenna, and confirmed by the legend on its coins and by an inscription. The ancients believed Lixus to be the site of the Garden of the Hesperides and of a sanctuary of Hercules, where Hercules gathered gold apples, more ancient than the one at Cadiz, Spain. However, there are no grounds for the claim that Lixus was founded at the end of the second millennium BC.

Lixus flourished during the Roman Empire, mainly when Claudius established a Roman Colonia with full rights for the citizens. Lixus was one of the few Roman cities in Berber Africa that enjoyed an amphitheater: the amphitheater at Lixus. In the third century Lixus become nearly fully Christian and there are even now the ruins of a paleochristian church overlooking the archeological area. The Arab invasions destroyed the Roman city. Some berber life was maintained there nevertheless until one century after the Islamic conquest of North Africa by the presence of a mosque and a house with patio with the covered walls of painted stuccos.

The site was excavated continuously from 1948 to 1969. In the 1960s, Lixus was restored and consolidated. In 1989, following an international conference which brought together many scientists, specialists, historians and archaeologists of the Mediterranean around the history and archaeology of Lixus, the site was partly enclosed. Work was undertaken to study the Roman mosaics of the site, which constitute a very rich unit. In addition to the vestiges interesting to discover the such mosaics whose one of sixty meters representing Poseidon. Lixus was on a surface of approximately 75 hectares (190 acres). The excavated zones constitute approximately 20% of the total surface of the site.

This site was added to the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative List on July 1, 1995 in the Cultural category.
Joe Sermarini
nervse02a.jpg
Mules get vacation233 viewsNerva. 96-98 AD. Sestertius (24.7g, 32-33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck 97 AD.
Obv.: IMP NERVA CAES AVG - PM TR P COS III P P, laureate head right,
Rev.: VEHICVLATIONE ITALIAE REMISSA, two mules grazing back to back, cart behind with shaft pointing upwards.
RIC 93; Cohen 143.

One of the measures which Nerva took to reduce the burden of the citizens was the assumption by the government of the costs of imperial post, formerly assumed by the municipalities.
2 commentsCharles S
Vandal_4_ab.jpg
Municipal coinage of Carthage - Vandal kingdom98 viewsVandal kingdom. Æ 12 Nummi (19 mm, 5.01 g). Struck circa 480-523. Obverse: Karthago standing facing, holding three grain ears in each raised hand, all within laurel wreath. Reverse: NXII within laurel wreath. MEC 1, 42; BMC Vandals 9.
Jan (jbc)
Vandal21_ab.jpg
Municipal coinage of Carthage - Vandal kingdom80 viewsVandal kingdom. Æ 21 Nummi (24 mm, 9.69 g). Struck circa 480-523. Obverse: Karthago standing facing, holding three grain ears in each raised hand, all within laurel wreath. Reverse: NXXI within laurel wreath. MEC 1, 41; BMC Vandals 8.Jan (jbc)
Vandal_NIIII_ab.jpg
Municipal coinage of Carthage - Vandal kingdom103 viewsVandal kingdom. Æ 4 Nummi (12 mm, 1.57 g). Struck circa 480-523. Obverse: bust left holding palm branch. Reverse: dash above dot N/IIII. MIB 20; MEC 51; BMC I:17.

Ex Tintinna Auction 11, Lot 2502, 2011.
Jan (jbc)
Louis_XVI_-_Nantes.JPG
Nantes8 viewsargent
7,11g
29mm
Procureurs de la ville et comté de Nantes
LVD. XVI. REX CHRISTIANISS.
"Louis XVI roi très chrétien"
Tête à droite de Louis XVI non signée
PROCUREURS DE LA VILLE ET COMTE DE NANTES
Écu ovale aux armes de Nantes (vaisseau Nantais voguant à à gauche au chef semé de mouchetures d'hermines. Timbré d' une couronne murale à hauts créneaux), entourée de la cordelièresur un cartouche entouré de la cordelière
PYL
015~5.JPG
Navarre - Antoine de Bourbon et Jeanne d'Albret (1555-1562)7 viewsLiard, billon, 0,42 g
Av./ + A ET IOA D G RR NA D D B, champ écartelé, au 1 un A, aux 2 et 3 une vache, au 4 un I.
Rv./ + G D SVMVS Q D SVMVS, croix dans un quadrilobe tréflé.
Réfs : PA-3425
Gabalor
039~3.JPG
Navarre - Henri III de Navarre, II de Béarn (1572-1589) Royaume de Navarre et seigneurie de Béarn, France.4 viewsDemi teston, argent, 4,51 g.
A/ HENRICVS II D G REX NAVARRE, buste à droite.
R/ GRATIA DEI SVM QVD SVM 1575, écu couronné écartelé aux 1 et 4 de Navarre, au 2 de Béarn, au 3 de Bourbon, accosté de deux H couronnés.
Réfs : PA 3473
Gabalor
nervse02a~0.jpg
Nerva, RIC 93, sestertius of AD 97 (Vehiculatione Italiae remissa)70 viewsNerva. 96-98 AD. Sestertius (24.7g, 32-33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck 97 AD.
Obv.: IMP NERVA CAES AVG - PM TR P COS III P P, laureate head right,
Rev.: VEHICVLATIONE ITALIAE REMISSA, two mules grazing back to back, cart behind with shaft pointing upwards.
RIC 93; Cohen 143; BMCRE 119; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-1) 44 (14 spec.).

One of the measures which Nerva took to reduce the burden of the citizens was the assumption by the government of the costs of imperial post, formerly assumed by the municipalities.
Charles S
nervse02-2.jpg
Nerva, RIC 93, sestertius of AD 97 (Vehiculatione Italiae remissa)21 viewsNerva. 96-98 AD. Sestertius (24.7g, 32-33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck 97 AD.
Obv.: IMP NERVA CAES AVG PM TR P COS III P P, laureate head right,
Rev.: VEHICVLATIONE ITALIAE REMISSA around, S C in ex., two mules grazing back to back, cart behind with shaft pointing upwards.
RIC 93; Cohen 143; BMC 119; Banti 44 (14 spec.).

One of the measures which Nerva took to reduce the burden of the citizens was the assumption by the government of the costs of imperial post, formerly assumed by the municipalities. See also the NumisWiki article on this subject.
Charles S
Netherlands,_Imperial_City_of_Kampen,_Matthias,_Gulden_1618,_FLOR__ARG_CIV_28_IMP_CAMPEN,_MATTH_I_D_G_ROM_IMP_SEM_AVG_Q-001,_1h,_39,5mm,_20g-s.jpg
Netherlands, Imperial City of Kampen, Matthias, (1618 A.D.), Del.1113, AR-2/3Thaler/Gulden/28 Stuiver, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, #170 viewsNetherlands, Imperial City of Kampen, Matthias, (1618 A.D.), Del.1113, AR-Gulden/28 Stuiver, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, #1
avers: FLOR•ARG:CIV 28 IMP:CAMPEN, 1618 above the crown, Crowned weapons of the city of Campen.
reverse: MATTH•I•D•G•ROM•IMP•SEM•AV, Two-headed eagle stamped with a cartridge bearing the number 28, surmounted by a crown cutting the legend at 12 o'clock.
exergue: 1618//28, diameter: 39,5mm, weight: 20,0g, axis: 1h,
mint:City of Kampen, date: 1618 A.D., ref: Del.1113, AR-2/3Thaler/Gulden/28 Stuiver,
Q-001
"NETHERLANDS - IMPERIAL CITY CAMPEN - MATTHIAS,
(1612-20/03/1619):
Matthias is the third son of Maximilian II and Mary, daughter of Charles Quint. He was born in Vienna on February 24, 1557. At the expense of Spain, the States-General offered him the Netherlands in December 1577, but after the Battle of Gembloux, in January 1578, he took refuge in Antwerp before returning to Germany in 1581. His brother Rudolf II being unable to govern, he was assigned to Austria, then in 1608, Hungary and Bohemia Moravia and finally in 1611. Having no children of his union had with Anne Tyrol, he appointed as his successor his cousin Ferdinand of Styria, later Ferdinand II. Matthias died in Vienna on March 20, 1619."
quadrans
carthago_SNGcop109.jpg
North Africa, Carthago, SNG Cop. 10947 viewsAE 17, 3.19g
struck 400-350 BC
obv. Head of goddess Tanit, crowned with grain, l.
rev. Horse stg. r., palm-tree behind
SNG Copenhagen 109; Alexandropoulos 18
VF

Tanit was the main-goddess of Carthago. The Horse is a symbol for Carthago and the palm-tree stands for prosperity.
Jochen
Side.jpg
Pamphylia, Side (Circa 145-125BC)32 viewsAR Tetradrachm

29 mm, 15.94 g

Kleuch-, magistrate.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.

Reverse: ΚΛΕ - ΥΧ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath; pomegranate to left.

SNG BN 697.

In 333 BC, Alexander the Great occupied Side and introduced the population to Hellenistic culture, which became the dominant tradition until the 1st century BC. Ptolemy later overtook the city when he declared himself king of Egypt in 305 BC. Side stayed under Ptolemaic control until it was captured by the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BC. In 190 B.C., however, a fleet from Rhodes, supported by Rome and Pergamum, defeated the Seleucid fleet, which was under the command of the fugitive Carthaginian general, Hannibal (who was unskilled in naval warfare, but to his credit still almost won the battle). The Seleucid defeat solidified by the Treaty of Apamea (188 BC), left Side in an uncertain state of autonomy during which it minted its own money. This lasted until 36 BC when the city came under the rule of the Roman client King of Galatia, Amyntas.
2 commentsNathan P
BIZ 34 D.jpg
Phocas50 viewsPhocas, half follis, Carthage mint, year 6 (607-8 AD), Sear 686.Tanit
elagabal_sidon SNGcop255.jpg
Phoenicia, Sidon, Elagabal, SNG Cop. 255111 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 30, 20.23g
obv. IMP CAESAR - M AV ANTONINVS
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate r.
rev. AVR PIA - SID - COL MET
Two-wheeled cult cart of Astarte r., with roof on four columns, two palms emerging from
it; holy stone (baetyl) from Sidon within.
SNG Copenhagen 255
about EF, nice sand-patina
added to www.wildwinds.com

The holy stones (baetyls) were meteorites. Especially in Semitic religions they were worshipped as deities. The most famous was the stone of Emesa, worshipped as the sol god Elagabal, and the Kaaba in Mecca, a pre-islamic sanctuary.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
3 commentsJochen
1620.jpg
Poland, Sigismund III (1587-1632), Poltorak/3 Kruzierz, 1620, Bromberg Mint59 viewsPoland, Sigismund III (1587-1632), Poltorak/3 Kruzierz, 1620, Bromberg Mint
· SIGI · 3 · D · G ·-REX · P · M · D · L, Crowned shield of arms, 3 in frame below / · MONE · NO ·-· REG · POLO · Imperial orb inscribed with Z4, Z | 6 across fields, donkey head in cartouche below.
Plain edge
20mm, 1.20g, Silver
Mintage: Unknown
Kopicki 873; KM 41
oneill6217
jdjd.jpg
Poland, Sigismund III (1587-1632), Poltorak/3 Kruzierz, 1627, Bromberg Mint84 viewsPoland, Sigismund III (1587-1632), Poltorak/3 Kruzierz, 1627, Bromberg Mint
· SIGI · 3 · D · G ·-REX · P · M · D · L, Crowned shield of arms, 3 in frame below / · MONE · NO ·-· REG · POLO · Imperial orb inscribed with Z4, Z | 6 across fields, donkey head in cartouche below.
Plain edge
20mm, 1.20g, Silver
Mintage: Unknown
Kopicki 873; KM 41
oneill6217
1Ponzio_Pilato_prutah_completo.jpg
Pontius Pilatus, prutah (Boyd collection)31 viewsPonzio Pilato, prutah (30-31 d.C.)
AE, 15.32 mm, 2.3 gr., B
D/ Lituus
R/ Anno in corona non distinguibile
Hendin 649/650
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (15 dicembre 2008, numero catalogo 34), ex Marc Breitsprecher collection (Ancient imports, Grand Marais MN Usa, 2007), ex Baldwin's auction 42 (London, 2005), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, gennaio 1896). Precedente proprietario indecifrabile sul cartellino autografo.
paolo
087~2.JPG
Principauté de Sedan, Henri de la Tour d'Auvergne (1594-1623), France.6 viewsLiard, type 4, cuivre, 4,10 g.
A/ HENR DE LA TOVR D BVLLIONII 1614, buste à droite.
R/ SVP PRINCEPS SEDANI ET RAV, écu écartelé de la Tour d'Auvergne, d'Auvergne, de Turenne, de Bouillon et Boulogne couronné.
Réfs : PA 6328
Gabalor
028~8.JPG
Principauté de Sedan, Henri de la Tour d'Auvergne (1594-1623), France.5 viewsLiard, type 4, cuivre, 4,25 g.
A/ HENR DE LA TOVR D BVLLIONAEVS 1613, buste à droite.
R/ SVP PRINCEPS SEDANENSIS, écu écartelé de la Tour d'Auvergne, d'Auvergne, de Turenne, de Bouillon et Boulogne couronné.
Réfs : PA 6324
Gabalor
003~6.JPG
Provence, principauté d'Orange, Frédéric-Henri de Nassau (1625-1647), France.4 viewsTeston, argent, 8,99 g
Monnaie frappée à Orange.
A/ FRED HENR D G PRIN AV R CO NA, buste à droite.
R/ SOLI DEO HONOR ET GLORIA, écu couronné, écartelé de Nassau, de Katzenelnbogen, de Vianden, de Dietz, de Chalon, d'Orange, de Genève et de Buren.
Réfs : PA 4605
Gabalor
ptolemmée_1.JPG
Ptolémée de Maurétanie (de 23 à 40 ap. J.-C.)29 viewsSemis de ville autonome de Cartago Nova (Espagne - Hispanie):

Tête d'auguste à droite.
AVGVSTVS DIVI F
Augustus Divi Filius.

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q
Cnaius Laetilius Apalus Duumvir Quinquennalis.
Dans une couronne :
REX PTOL
rex Ptolemaeus.

Juba II et Ptolémée entretenaient avec le sud de l'Espagne des relations commerciales d'où ils tiraient notamment des lingots d'argent pour leurs monnayages.
Ici Ptolémée est magistrat de la ville de Carthagène avec le romain Apalus.

Carthagène a été fondée par les Phéniciens en 227 av. J-C sous le nom de Qart-Hadast (la ville nouvelle).
C'est pendant la deuxième guerre punique, en 209 av. J-C, que les Romains prennent la ville aux Carthaginois, et la renomment Cartago Nova (la nouvelle Carthage).
1 commentsPYL
P 3 D.jpg
Punic129 viewsShekel - Carthage - 215-201 BC
Diameter: 22 mm
Weight: 7 gms
Wreathed head of Tanit left / Horse standing right, head reverted;

SNG 307
2 commentsTanit
P 17+~0.jpg
Punic63 viewsCarthage ? - 350-320 BC
Diameter: 20 mm
Weight : 7 gms
Obv: Palm tree with two clusters of dates.
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 102
Tanit
punic.jpg
Punic52 viewsShekel - Carthage - 215-201 BC

Wreathed head of Tanit left / Horse standing right, head reverted;

SNG 307
Tanit
punic2~0.jpg
Punic24 viewsCarthage ? - 350-320 BC
Diameter: 21 mm
Weight : 7.3 gms
Obv: Palm tree with two clusters of dates.
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 102
Tanit
punic5.jpg
Punic - Carthage - AE 1541 viewsPunic - Carthage - 400-350 BC
AE 15 globular
15 mm, 6.6 gr.
Head of Tanit left
Horse jumping right

SNG 96
Tanit
punic4.jpg
Punic - Carthage - AE 1749 viewsCarthage, Zeugitania, North Africa, c. 310 - 290 B.C. Bronze AE 17
Obverse: head of Tanit left wearing wreath of grain and pendant necklace;
Reverse: horse standing right, date palm tree behind.
SNG 109

Tanit
P 16+.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel54 viewsTanit
P 1 D.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel71 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 20 mm
Weight : 6 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
1 commentsTanit
p20.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel31 viewsPunic - Carthago - Shekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC

Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
Tanit
P 14+.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel44 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 175
Tanit
P 13+.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel38 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
Tanit
P 12+.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel36 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
Tanit
Punic_6.jpg
Punic - Carthago - Shekel80 viewsPunic - Carthago - Shekel
Shekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 175
2 commentsTanit
punic +.jpg
Punic - SNG 40958 views3 Shekels - Carthage - 201-195 BC
Diameter: 27 mm
Weight: 17.7 gms
Obv.: Head of Tanit left ; Rev.: Horse standing right,

SNG 409
Tanit
Punique 5.jpg
Punic AE 1514 viewsHead of Tanit left, wearing necklace
Horse standing right, palm-tree behind
15 mm

Ginolerhino
Punique 4.jpg
Punic AE 1532 viewsHead of Tanit left
Horse jumping right
15 mm
1 commentsGinolerhino
Punique 3.jpg
Punic AE 1849 viewsHead of Tanit left, wearing necklace
Head of horse right
18 mm
1 commentsGinolerhino
Punique 2.jpg
Punic AE 2621 viewsHead of Tanit left
Horse pacing right
26 mm
Ginolerhino
Punique 1.jpg
Punic AE 2725 viewsHead of Tanit left
Horse pacing right, punic letter beneath
27 mm
Ginolerhino
P 9+~0.jpg
Punic Carthage40 viewsTanit
Punic_5~0.jpg
Punic Carthage33 viewsTanit
Punic_3~1.jpg
Punic Carthage73 views1 commentsTanit
Punic 13~0.jpg
Punic Carthage26 viewsTanit
Punic 10~0.jpg
Punic Carthage31 viewsTanit
Punic 12~0.jpg
Punic Carthage28 viewsTanit
Punic_7~0.jpg
Punic Carthage45 viewsTanit
Punic_8.jpg
Punic Carthage38 viewsTanit
Punic_5.jpg
Punic Carthage30 views21 mm - 5.60 g

Obv: Head of Tanit to the left.
Rev: Standing horse to the right, diverting the head. Bellow, globule.
Tanit
Punic_4.jpg
Punic Carthage31 viewsUnit - 400-350 B.C. - Carthage
15.4 mm - 2.15 g
Obv: Head of Tanit to the left
Rev: Standing horse to the right, palm tree

SNG 109
J.L. p. 132-133, n°1
Alexandropoulos, 18
Tanit
Punic_3~0.jpg
Punic Carthage64 viewsShekel - 220-215 B.C. - cARTHAGE
23 mm - 7.74 g
Obv: Head of Tanit to the left.
Rev: Standing horse to the right, diverting the head. In front of, Punic letter.

M. 205
Alexandropoulos 88b

1 commentsTanit
Punic_2~1.jpg
Punic Carthage43 viewsUnit - 400-350 B.C. - Carthage
15.8 mm - 2.5 g
Obv: Head of Tanit to the left
Rev: Standing horse to the right, palm tree

SNG 109
J.L. p. 132-133, n°1
Alexandropoulos, 18
Tanit
tanit_2.jpg
Punic Carthage AR Double Shekel with a Serrated Edge19 viewsPunic Carthage Double Shekel with a Serrated Edge
Silver

Obv.: Head of Tanit l. wreathed with corn, wearing a necklace, and a single-drop ear ring.

Rev.: Horse standing r., left foreleg raised. Pellet in front.

Müller 116 ; SNG /
1 commentsTanit
carthages.jpg
Punic Carthage Bronze Coin13 viewsA Punic Carthage bronze coin, minted in Carthage during the First Punic War, between 264-241 BC. 11 mm, 2.35 g.

Obverse: Head of Tanit left, wreathed in grain

Reverse: Horse standing right, palm tree behind

Attribution: SNG Copenhagen 113 ff
chuy1530
tanit~1.jpg
Punic Carthage Silver Shekel21 viewsPunic Carthage Silver Shekel
7.1 gr.
Wreathed head of Tanit left / Horse standing right, head reverted;

SNG 187
1 commentsTanit
auguste.jpg
Punic Carthago Augustus AE As 11 viewsCarthago Augustus AE As
8-10 BC - 25 mm
IMPCDFA PM PP ; head of Augustus right / CICPISPDVSPIIVIR - ppdd in field

RPC 746
Tanit
punic 5+.jpg
Punic Countermark28 viewsTanit
Punic_2~0.jpg
Punic First Punic War - Carthage91 viewsPUNIC. Carthage. 241 B.C. Shekel.
Obverse: Head of Tanit facing left.
Reverse: Ear.
SNG 235
1 commentsTanit
punic2~4.jpg
Punic First Punic War 2 Shekels10 viewsPUNIC. Carthage. 241 B.C.
2 Shekels.

Obverse: Head of Isis facing left.
Reverse: 3 ears.

SNG 226
Tanit
Punic3~0.jpg
Punic Mauretania, Iol-Caesarea15 viewsMauretania, Iol-Caesarea:
Æ unit, 3rd-2nd century BC, 10.1gm, 24 mm. Obv: Head of Isis left, wearing vulture crown and horned solar-disk headdress. Rev: Three grain ears; Punic letters in fields.

Muller 286 ; SNG 548

RARE

Mauretania - IOL (CAESAREA)
(III - II century BC)
The city was founded by the Phoenicians and the Carthaginians. Its name comes from the hero Iolaus, nephew of Hercules and guide. The city was one of the two capitals Bocchus. Iol before becoming the capital of the kingdom of Mauretania in the first century BC in Juba II - Caesarea or modern Cherchell - the city was part of the independent Numidia. Iol was the main workshop area.
Tanit
Spain,_Carthago_Nova,_Scipio_Africanus,_209-206_BC,_Æ_25.jpg
Punic Spain, Carthago Nova, Second Punic War, struck ca. 209 BC, Æ25 20 viewsBare male head left (Scipio Africanus?).
Horse standing right, palm tree behind.

Burgos 425; Villaronga CHN Class XI, 282; SNG BM Spain 127-128; Robinson 7(p); Muller III, 13, 4; Sear GCV 6575.

(25 mm, 11.6 g, 12h).
Freeman & Sear.

The coins of Robinson’s Series 7 are of two styles, one Punic in character, the other more Roman in character. Robinson suggested that the latter represents the coinage of Carthago Nova after its capture by Scipio in 209 BC, and that the head on the obverse is a portrait of Scipio himself, while the heads of Punic type basically reflect the features of Hannibal. Villaronga simply calls both male heads.
1 commentsn.igma
Punique D 1.jpg
Punic Tanit - SNG 351149 viewsBillon 2 Shekels - Carthage - 205-203 BC
Weight: 11.8 gms
Obv.: Wreathed head of Tanit left ; Rev.: Horse standing right, palm behind.

SNG 351
2 commentsTanit
Tanit.jpg
Punic Tanit Punic - SNG 351124 viewsZEUGITANA, Carthage. Time of the First Punic War. Circa 264-241 BC.

Billon Double Shekel (11.8 gm).
Obv.: Wreathed head of Tanit left, wearing triple-pendant earring and necklace
Rev;: Horse standing right, palm behind, pellet below.

SNG Copenhagen 190; Müller 104
2 commentsTanit
P 4 D.jpg
Punic Zeugitana47 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
Tanit
P 2 D.jpg
Punic Zeugitana63 viewsShekel - Carthage - 300-264 BC
Diameter: 18 mm
Weight : 5 gms
Obv: head of Tanit left
Rev: horse's head right

SNG 149
1 commentsTanit
Punic 8.jpg
Punic Zeugitane31 viewsTanit
punique.jpg
PUNIC, Carthage, AE Shekel, c.300-275 BC37 viewsCARTHAGE. Circa 300-275 BC. Æ Shekel (18mm, 6 g, 3h).
Obv: Wreathed head of Tanit left.
Rev: Forepart of horse right; Punic "o" to right.
MAA 57x; SNG Copenhagen 151.
moneta romana