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Search results - "Victrix"
PLAUTILLA-1.jpg
34 viewsPLAVTILLA - Denarius - 204 AD
Obv.:PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 19,3x20
Cohen 25, RIC 369
Maxentius
DenMCatone.jpg
19 viewsDenarius - 89 BC. - Mint of Rome
M. PORCIVS CATO - Gens Porcia
Obv.: Female bust right (Roma?). ROMA (MA in monogram) behind. M. CATO below
Rev.:Victoria seated right, holding palm and patera. In ex. VICTRIX (TR in monogram)
Gs. 3,8 mm. 17,7
Crawf. 343/1, Sear RCV 247, Grueber II 657



Maxentius
rjb_sal7_05_07.jpg
23321 viewsAntoninianus
Rome
Issue 1 - 5
VENVS VICTRIX
G 233
mauseus
pl369.jpg
Plautilla, Denarius, Rome 204 C.E. Wife of Caracalla16 viewsPlautilla ar denarius, Rome RIC IV 369. Struck 204 C.E.
Obverse - PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA. Draped bust right.
Reverse - VENVS VICTRIX. Venus standing left, breast exposed, holding apple and palm and resting left elbow on shield. Cupid standing left at her feet.
19.5 mm diam., 3.0 g. Scarce
sold 2-2018
NORMAN K
00013x00.jpg
36 viewsROME
PB Tessera (19mm, 2.71 g, 12 h)
Imperial issue (?)
Venus Victrix standing right, resting arm on cippus and holding transverse scepter and clasping hands with Mars, standing left
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Rostowzew 153, pl. III 2; München 16-7; Kircheriano 572, 582, 738, and 741

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae capitibus et nominibus imperatorum signatae" on the basis of type. In my studies, I have noticed that many of the types bearing Imperial portraiture or names are much more finely engraved, often with a centering dot and pronounced rims.
Ardatirion
plautilla.jpg
(0203) PLAUTILLA22 views(wife of Caracalla)
d. 211 AD
AR DENARIUS 2.05 mm max., 2.87 g
O: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA
DR. BUST RIGHT
R: VENVS VICTRIX
VENUS STANDING L HOLDING APPLE AND PALM, SHIELD AT SIDE, CUPID HOLDING HELMET AT FEET
laney
ABH_617_AS_CELSA_Augusto.jpg
01-64 - Celsa - Hispania - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)30 viewsHoy Velilla del Ebro, Tarragona, España
CN.Domitius y C.Pompeius duoviri

AE AS 28 mm 8.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR DIVI F AVGVSTVS COS XII" (Leyenda anti-horaria)- Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: Toro estante a derecha, "CN DOMIT" arriba, "C POMPEI" debajo, "II VIR" delante y "C V I CEL" detrás.

Acuñada 05 - 03 A.C.
Ceca: Colonia Lépida Victrix Iulia - Hispania

Referencias: RPC I #278, ACIP #3169e, SNG Cop #541, ABH #811/2, ABH (Ant) #1486 P.184, Vv Pl.CLXI #8, Cohen Vol.1 #700 Pag.156, Guadan #446, Ripolles #3159 P.368
mdelvalle
0122.jpg
0122 - Denarius Gordian III 241 AC20 viewsObv/ IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of G. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing half-l., leaning on shield, holding helmet and transverse scepter.

Ag, 19.9 mm, 3.45 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC VI/131 [R]
ex-Roma Numismatics, jul 2011 – art. #12264
dafnis
0127.jpg
0127 - Denarius Lucilla 166-9 AC16 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding Victory and leaning on shield.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.13 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0131.jpg
0131 - Denarius Julia Mamaea 222-35 AC13 viewsObv/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust of J.M. r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet and scepter; shield at her l.

Ag, 20.2 mm, 3.10 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.2/358 [C]
ex-Áureo & Calicó, auction jul 2011, lot 108
dafnis
0142.jpg
0142 - Denarius Caracalla 213-17 AC15 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head of C. r.
Rev/ VENUS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., draped, r. breast naked, holding Victory and transverse scepter, leaning l. shoulder on shield over helmet on ground.

Ag, 20.8 mm, 3.10 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/85 – RIC IV.1/311b [C]
ex-Global Aste, auction 5, lot 248
dafnis
0151.jpg
0151 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet on extended r.h. and palm on l.h., leaning arm on column; to the l., shield on the ground.

Ag, 20.0 mm, 3.34 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/90 – RIC IV.1/581 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #230650283511
dafnis
0157.jpg
0157 - Antoninianus Caracalla 213-17 AC25 viewsObv/ ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiated and togate bust of C. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., hlding helmet and scepter, leaning on shield; captives to the l. and r.

Ag, 24.9 mm, 5.04 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/86 – RIC IV.1/312a [S]
ex-Auctiones, auction e2, lot 102 (T.Kunsch Caracalla colln.)
dafnis
0159.jpg
0159 - Denarius Plautilla 202-5 AC18 viewsObv/ PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of P. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus naked to waist, holding apple and palm, leaning on shield; to the l., Cupid holding helmet.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.31 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/429 – RIC IV.1/369 [S]
ex-CNG, auction e272, lot 390
dafnis
Vespasian_AE-Dup_IMP-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-IIII_ROMA_VICTRIX_S-C_RIC-II-742-RIC-New-397_C-430_72-3_AD_Q-001_7h_27,0-27,7mm_12,12g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, Rome, AE-Dupondius, -/-//SC, ROMA VICTRIX, Roma seated left, 164 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, Rome, AE-Dupondius, -/-//SC, ROMA VICTRIX, Roma seated left,
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right.
reverse: ROMA VICTRIX, S C below, Roma seated left, holding Victory and spear.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 27,0-27,7mm, weight: 12,12g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, C-430,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
0203_RICIII_786.jpg
0203 - Denarius Lucilla 166-169 AC12 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing r., holding Victory on r.h., leaning l.h. on engraved shield.

Ag, 18.4 mm, 3.21 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C] – BMCRE IV/353
ex-Savoca Coins, auction e1, lot 326
1 commentsdafnis
__57(1)-1.jpg
03 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - VENUS VICTRIX - Frontal bust9 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.1 gr, 28mm
rexesq
__57(1).JPG
03 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - VENUS VICTRIX - Frontal bust27 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.1 gr, 28mm
2 commentsrexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_bothsides~0.JPG
04 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - 'Venus Victrix'120 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.

5.2 grams - 26mm.

*Notes: Well struck and well centered coin on a very large flan.
Take a look at the detail on the
shield Venus is standing next to on the reverse.
4 commentsrexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_bust-close.JPG
04 - Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Frontal bust close40 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.
5.2 grams.
rexesq
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_VENVS-VIC-TRIX__RIC-III-(M_Aur)-786_C-89_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-h_16-17mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #188 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VIC TRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,94g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
040_Lucilla,_RIC_III(M_Aur)_786,_AR-Den,_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA,_VENVS_VICTRIX,__RSC-89,_Rome_166-67-AD,_Q-002,_h,_17mm,_2,84g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #283 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #2
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 2,84g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
48d.jpg
048d Caracalla. AR antoninianus14 viewsobv: ANTONINIVS PIVS AVG GERM radiate drp. cuir. bust r
rev: VENVS VICTRIX Venus std. l. holding victory and spear,
leaning on shield set in helmet
hill132
Caracalla_AR-Den_IMP-CAE-M-AVR-ANT-AVG-P-TR-P_MIN-ER-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-25a-p-215_C-158-59_Rome_198-AD_Q-001_axis-1h_18-19mm_3,15g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 025a, Rome, AR-Denarius, MINER VICTRIX, Rare!!!,142 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 025a, Rome, AR-Denarius, MINER VICTRIX, Rare!!!,
avers:- IMP-CAE-M-AVR-ANT-AVG-P-TR-P, Laureate and draped bust of Caracalla to right.
revers:- MIN-ER-VICTRIX, Minerva standing left, holding victory and reversed spear; at her feet, shield; behind, trophy.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 198 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-25a, p-215, C-158-59,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-311b-p-_C-606_Rome_216-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_20,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311b, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,347 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311b, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and spear with shield.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-311b, p-, C-606,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_RIC_IV-I_311d,_AR-Ant,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_RSC_608c,_BMC_80cf,_Rome_213-17-AD_Q-001_6h_22,5-25,0mm_5,75g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311d, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,144 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311d, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate and draped bust right, seen half from back.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,5-25,0mm, weight: 5,75g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-317 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-311d, RSC 608c, BMC 80cf,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla,_RIC_IV-I_311v(bust-not_in),_AR-Ant,_ANTONINVS_PIVS_AVG_GERM,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_312-17_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_22,8-23mm,_5,64g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311v, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,164 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 311v, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate, and cuirassed bust right seen half from the back.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,8-23,0mm, weight: 5,64g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-317 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 311v, RSC 608a-c, var.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Caracalla_AR-Ant_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM_VENVS-VICTRIX_216_Roma-RIC-312c_Q-001_23mm_5_02g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 312c, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,86 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 312c, Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-GERM, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen half from back.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter with shield; seated captive on either side.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 23mm, weight: 5,02g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-312c, p-259,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-001_axis-5h_17,5-18,5mm_3,35g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #1277 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #1
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-001
quadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-002_axis-6h_18-19mm_2,78g-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #2102 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #2
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 2,78g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-002
quadrans
Plautilla_AR-Den_PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-I-369-p270_C-24-25_Roma_Q-x01_axis-6h_18-20mm_3_60gx-s.jpg
052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #3113 views052 Plautilla (?-211 A.D.), Rome, RIC IV-I 369 (Caracalla), AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, Scarce!, #3
Wife of Caracalla,
avers: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,60g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 204 A.D., ref: RIC IV 369, p-270, Issue II, RSC 24-25., BMC 429, Sear 7074,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans
RI 064dt img~0.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01345 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XIII GEM / TR P COS, Legionary eagle between two standards.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– Cohen 269. BMCRE 17, RIC 13 (Scarce)

Legion XIII Gemina was stationed at Apulum in Dacia. It is important for collectors to distinguish carefully issues of this scarce legion from the common Legion XIIII Gemina Marti Victrix. Legion XIII coins never have 'MV' following 'LEG XIII GEM' while Legion XIIII coins always have 'MV' following 'LEG XIIII GEM'.
maridvnvm
RI_064lf_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01735 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XXX VLP, TR P COS in exergue, legionary eagle between two standards
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– BMCRE 25. RIC 17 (Rated Rare). RSC 278. No examples in RD so this would tend to agree with the scarcity rating given by RIC.

Legio XXX Ulpia Victrix
maridvnvm
RI_065ao_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -25 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column with cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC -. RSC -. BMCRE -.

This reverse type not mentioned in any of the major references.
maridvnvm
RI 066bc img.jpg
066 - Caracalla Antoninianus - RIC 313 var (unlisted, probably in error)68 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Radiate, cuirassed bust right, seen half from the back
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and spear, shield at side
Minted in Rome circa A.D. 215
Reference:– RIC 311 var (Unlisted in RIC with Cuirassed bust, probably in error)
A nice example of one of the earliest of the Ants. produced by Caracalla.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 066ai img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 025b41 viewsObv:– IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TR P, Laureate bust right
Rev:– MINER VICTRIX, Minerva standing half-left, holding Victory and spear, shield at his feet, trophy behind
Minted in Rome. A.D. 198
Reference:– Van Meter 49. RIC 25b. RCV02 6820. RSC 159.
maridvnvm
RI 066az img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 311b43 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate bust right,
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory, shield and spear, a helmet at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 213 - 217
References:- VM 97/1, RIC 311b (Common), RCV02 6890, RSC 606
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 067a img.jpg
067 - Plautilla denarius - RIC 369 15 viewsObv:– PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENUS VICTRIX, Venus left holding apple and palm, resting elbow on shield; Cupid at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 204
References:– RIC 369 (Scarce), RCV02 7074, RSC 25
maridvnvm
07-Gordian-III-RIC-131.jpg
07. Gordian III / RIC 131.19 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding helmet and sceptre, leaning on shield.
3.12 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #131; Sear #8683.
Callimachus
072_Gordianus-III__(238-244_A_D_),_RIC_131_AG-Den__IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-IV-III-131-p-28_4th-iss_C-347_Rome_241-3-AD_Q-001_1h_20-22mm_3,28g-s.jpg
072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 131, AR-Denarius, Rome, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Rare!, #186 views072 Gordianus-III. (238-244 A.D.), RIC IV-III 131, AR-Denarius, Rome, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Rare!, #1
avers: IMP-GORDIANVS-PIVS-FEL-AVG, Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
revers: VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left with helmet & scepter, leaning on shield
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 241-243 A.D.(4th Issue), ref: RIC IV-III 131, p-28, C-347,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 079e img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 35841 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, with helmet & scepter, shield at feet
References:– RIC 358, RSC 76
maridvnvm
RI 087y img.jpg
087 - Gordian III Denarius - RIC 13141 viewsObv:– IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, Laureate, draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, and leaning on shield
Minted in Rome. Summer A.D. 241
Reference:– RIC 131, RSC 347
Weight 2.59 gms
Dimensions 21.04mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Caracalla-RIC-311c.jpg
087. Caracalla.17 viewsAntoninianus, 215-217 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Radiate bust of Caracalla.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding Victory and spear, leaning on a shield set on a helmet.
4.87 gm., 23.5 mm.
RIC #311c.

The reverse is unusual for an Emperor, and may refer to Caracalla's plan to solve the Parthian problem by marrying the daughter of the Parthian king (RIC Vol. IV, pt, 1, p, 88).
Callimachus
Republic_Ar-quinar_M-CAO_M-Porcius-Cato_RRC_343-2d__Rome_89-BC_Q-001_axis-3h_16mm_1,68ga-s.jpg
089 B.C., M.Porcius Cato, Republic AR-Quinar, Crawford 343/2d, Rome, VICTRIX, Victory seated right, #170 views089 B.C., M.Porcius Cato, Republic AR-Quinar, Crawford 343/2d, Rome, VICTRIX, Victory seated right, #1
avers: Head of Liber right. wearing ivy wreath; behind, M•CATO downwards, border of dots.
reverse: Victory seated right, holding patera and palm branch, border of dots.
exergue: -/-//VICTRIX, diameter: 16mm, weight: 1,68g, axis: 3h,
mint: Rome, date: 89 B.C., ref: Crawford 343/2d, Sydenham 597c, Porcia 7,
Q-001
quadrans
089_B_C_,_M_Porcius_Cato,_Repulic_AR-Quinar,_M_CATO,_VICTRIX,_Crawford_343-2d,_Q-001,_0h,_13mm,_1,80g-s.jpg
089 B.C., M.Porcius Cato, Republic AR-Quinar, Crawford 343/2d, Rome, VICTRIX, Victory seated right, #2176 views089 B.C., M.Porcius Cato, Republic AR-Quinar, Crawford 343/2d, Rome, VICTRIX, Victory seated right, #2
avers: Head of Liber right. wearing ivy wreath; behind, M•CATO downwards, border of dots.
reverse: Victory seated right, holding patera and palm branch, border of dots.
exergue: -/-//VICTRIX, diameter: 13mm, weight: 1,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 89 B.C., ref: Crawford 343/2d, Sydenham 597c, Porcia 7,
Q-002
quadrans
816_P_Hadrian_Strack41.jpg
089 Hadrian Denarius 128-29 AD Roma Victrix Eastern mint29 viewsReference.
Strack *41; (for Rome mint RIC 333)

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Laureate head right

Rev. COS III
Roma Victrix, helmeted, draped, seated left on cuirass and round shield, holding Victory in right hand and cornucopiae in left

2.89 gr
17 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
Plautilla-RIC-369.jpg
089. Plautilla.16 viewsDenarius, 202-205 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA / Bust of Plautilla.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding apple and palm branch, resting elbow on shield; Cupid at her feet.
3.25 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #369; Sear #7004.
Callimachus
Salonina-Billon-Ant_SALONINA-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_RIC-68_Gobl-899c_C-129_Koln_Q-001_7h_20-22,5mm_3,45g-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068, Cologne, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,72 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068, Cologne, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- SALONINA-AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, shield on ground behind her, holding apple in right hand and grain ear in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 20-22,5 mm, weight: 3,45 g, axis: 7 h,
mint: Cologne, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-068, p-, Göbl-899c,
Q-001
quadrans
Salonina-Billon-Ant_SALONINA-AVG_VENVS-V(I)CTRIX_RIC-68_Gobl-899c_Cologne_Q-002_0h_21-22,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068var., Cologne, VENVS V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left,65 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-I 068var., Cologne, VENVS V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers:- SALONINA-AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-V(I)CTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple and vertical sceptre, shield at feet in left. Legend error I missing (VCTRIX).
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21-22,5 mm, weight: 3,28 g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Cologne, date: A.D., ref: RIC-V-I-068var., p-, Göbl-899cvar., C-
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_V-II_342_Magnia-Urbica_AE-Ant_MAGN-VRBICA-AVG_VENVS-VICTRIX_KASzigma_RIC-VII-II-343-p-184_C-17_Rome_284-AD_Scarce_Q-001_6h_20-22mm_4,17g-s.jpg
116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 343A, Rome, -/-//KAς, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,129 views116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 343A, Rome, -/-//KAς, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: MAGN-VRBICA-AVG, Diademed, draped bust right, on crescent.
revers: VENVS-VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter, shield to left.
exergo: -/-//KAς, diameter: 20-22mm, weight: 4,17g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, 5th. em., date: 284 (Nov.)A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-343A-p-184, C-17,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_V-II_347A_Magnia-Urbica,_AE-Ant,_MAGNIA_VRBICA_AVG,_VENVS_VICTRIX,_SXXIT,_Sear_12423,_C-15,_5th_em,_Ticinum,_283-AD,_S,_Q-001,_6h,_21,6-22,7mm,_3,46gx-s.jpg
116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 347A, Ticinum, -/-//SXXIT, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,127 views116 Magnia Urbica (??? A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 347A, Ticinum, -/-//SXXIT, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left,
avers: MAGNIA VRBICA AVG, Diademed bust right on crescent wearing Stephane and richly embroidered robe
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and slanted scepter, shield below her left elbow.
exergue: -/-//SXXIT, diameter: 21,6-22,7mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ticinum, 5th. em., date: 283 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 347A, C-15, Sear 12423,
Q-001
quadrans
Quinarius P.CATO.jpg
13-03 - M. PORCIUS CATO (89 A.C.)46 viewsAR Quinarius 14 mm 1.8 gr
Anv: Cabeza de joven Baco o Liber (Dios del Vino) de pelo largo, vistiendo corona de hojas de hiedra viendo a derecha - "M·CATO" (AT en ligadura) detrás de la cabeza. No se aprecia pero usualmente Marca de Control debajo.
Rev: Victoria alada sentada a derecha, portando palma en mano derecha y pátera en izquierda. "VICTRIX" (TR en ligadura) en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #248 Pag.119 - Craw RRC #343/2a-b - Syd CRR #597/597c -BMCRR #662/693 - RSC Vol.1 Porcia 7-7c Pag.80/81 - Kestner 2999 var.
mdelvalle
14-Gordian-III-RIC-116.jpg
13. Gordian III / RIC 116.25 viewsDenarius, 240 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: VIRTVTI AVGVSTI / Hercules standing, resting right hand on hip and left hand club set on rock; lion-skin beside club.
3.58 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #116; Sear #8684.

The chronology of the denarii coinage of Gordian III has been poorly understood because Roman Imperial Coinage (RIC) has it mixed up in its listings. For example, it will tell you that 5 denarii (Diana, Pietas, Salus, Securitas, and Venus) were issued in the summer of 241 to commemorate the marriage of Gordian and Tranquillina. Recent thinking tells another entirely different story. The following summary is based on a posting by Curtis Clay, November 25, 2011, on the Forum Ancient Coins Classical Numismatics Discussion Board.
Although antoniniani were issued for a while under Caracalla and Elagabalus, the denarius was the standard silver denomination throughout the reigns of Severus Alexander, Maximinus Thrax, and into the first part of the joint reign of Balbinus & Pupienus. (This, by the way, is when the PIETAS AVGG denarius of Gordian as Caesar was issued.) Sometime during the short reign of Balbinus & Pupienus, the antoninianus supplanted the denarius as the standard silver denomination. When Gordian III became emperor (July 238), his administration continued to follow the then current practice of issuing only antoniniani.

Early in 240, Gordian apparently decided to revert back to the traditional coinage of the Empire and began to issue only denarii. The denarii issued at this time were the following:

P M TR P III COS P P / Horseman
DIANA LVCIFERA
PIETAS AVGVSTI
SALVS AVGVSTI
SECVRITAS PVBLICA
VENVS VICTRIX

No antoniniani exist with these reverse types.

The next issue of denarii was issued in the summer of 240 after Gordian became COS II, and consists of these types:

P M TR P III COS II P P / Emperor standing
P M TR P III COS II P P / Apollo seated
AETERNITATI AVG
IOVIS STATOR
LAETITIA AVG N
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI

Within a short time, however, it was decided to go back to having the antoninianus as the standard silver denomination. Antoniniani were issued again, at first with the same reverse types as the second issue of denarii. That is why these reverse types exist on denarii and antoniniani even though they were not issued at the same time.

So the period the mint issued denarii rather than antoniniani as the standard silver denomination lasted from about March through August, 240. This was the last time denarii were issued for general circulation. The antoninianus lasted until Diocletian’s coinage reform of 295, after which Roman coinage was so vastly different that there was no question of returning to the denarius.

The 13 denarii of Gordian III are presented in this album in this order:
Gordian III as Caesar denarius - 1 coin.
First issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Second issue of denarii - 6 coins.
Callimachus
rjb_gor131_01_07.jpg
13119 viewsDenarius
Rome mint
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 131
mauseus
Craw_343_2a-b_Quinario_M_Porcius_Cato.jpg
14-03 - M. PORCIUS CATO (89 A.C.)10 viewsAR Quinarius 14 mm 1.8 gr

Anv: Cabeza de joven Baco o Liber (Dios del Vino) de pelo largo, vistiendo corona de hojas de hiedra viendo a derecha - "M·CATO" (AT en ligadura) detrás de la cabeza. No se aprecia pero usualmente Marca de Control debajo.
Rev: Victoria alada sentada a derecha, portando palma en mano derecha y pátera en izquierda. "VICTRIX" (TR en ligadura) en Exergo.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #248 Pag.119 - Craw RRC #343/2a-b - Syd CRR #597/597c -BMCRR #662/693 - RSC Vol.1 Porcia 7-7c Pag.80/81 - Kestner 2999 var.
mdelvalle
tiberius as.jpg
14-37 AD - TIBERIUS AE as - struck 22-23 AD39 viewsobv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST IMP VIII (bare head left)
rev: PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIII around large S.C.
ref: RIC I 44, C.24 (5 frcs), BMC91
9.44gms, 27mm

In 6 AD Tiberius was in Carnuntum military camp. He led at least eight legions (VIII Augusta from Pannonia, XV Apollinaris and XX Valeria Victrix from Illyricum, XXI Rapax from Raetia, XIII Gemina, XIV Gemina and XVI Gallica from Germania Superior and an unknown unit) against king Maroboduus of the Marcomanni in Bohemia (Czechia). At the same time, I Germanica, V Alaudae, XVII, XVIII and XIX, - led by Caius Sentius Saturninus (governor of Germania) -, moved against Maroboduus along the Elbe. Saturninus led his forces across the country of the Chatti, and, cutting his way through the Hercynian forest, joining Tiberius on the north bank of the Danube, and both wanted to make a combined attack within a few leagues from the Marcomannic capital Boviasmum. It was the most grandiose operation that ever conducted by a Roman army, but a rebellion in Illyria obstructed its final execution.
berserker
rjb_gallienus_1537_08_05.jpg
153717 viewsAntoninianus
Cyzicus
Issue 1
VENER VICTRIX
G 1537
mauseus
rjb_carac3_01_09.jpg
19824 viewsCaracalla 198-217 AD
AR antoninianus
Obv "ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "VENVS VICTRIX"
Venus standing left holding victoriola and resting on shield
Rome mint
RIC 311
2 commentsmauseus
CarIV312dLimes.jpg
198-217 AD - Caracalla - RIC IV 312d - Limes Denarius - Venus Reverse44 viewsEmperor: Caracalla (r. 198-217 AD)
Date: 213-217 AD
Condition: Fair
Denomination: Limes Denarius

Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Emperor Antoninus Pius (Caracalla) Germanicus
Head right; laureate

Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Victorious Venus
Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre and leaning on shield, captives seated right and left.

Limes Denarius of: RIC IV Caracalla 312d; VM 97/3 (Rome mint)
2.46g; 19.5mm; 0°
Pep
MagniaUrbicaAntVenus.jpg
1dr2 Magnia Urbica3 viewsWife of Carinus

AE Antoninianus

Diademed & draped bust right, resting on crescent, right, MAGNIA VRBICA AVG
Venus standing left, leaning against shield, & holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left VENVS VICTRIX

RIC 347
Blindado
coins123.JPG
202a. Plautilla62 viewsVenus

The Roman goddess of love and beauty, but originally a vegetation goddess and patroness of gardens and vineyards. Later, under Greek influence, she was equated with Aphrodite and assumed many of her aspects. Her cult originated from Ardea and Lavinium in Latium. The oldest temple known of Venus dates back to 293 BCE, and was inaugurated on August 18. Later, on this date the Vinalia Rustica was observed. A second festival, that of the Veneralia, was celebrated on April 1 in honor of Venus Verticordia, who later became the protector against vice. Her temple was built in 114 BCE. After the Roman defeat near Lake Trasum in 215 BCE, a temple was built on the Capitol for Venus Erycina. This temple was officially opened on April 23, and a festival, the Vinalia Priora, was instituted to celebrate the occasion.

Venus is the daughter of Jupiter, and some of her lovers include Mars and Vulcan, modeled on the affairs of Aphrodite. Venus' importance rose, and that of her cult, through the influence of several Roman political leaders. The dictator Sulla made her his patroness, and both Julius Caesar and the emperor Augustus named her the ancestor of their (Julian) family: the 'gens Julia' was Aeneas, son of Venus and the mortal Anchises. Ceasar introduced the cult of Venus Genetrix, the goddess of motherhood and marriage, and built a temple for her in 46 BCE. She was also honored in the temple of Mars Ultor. The last great temple of Venus was built by the emperor Hadrianus near the Colusseum in 135 CE.

Roman statues and portraits of Venus are usually identical to the Greek representations of Aphrodite.

AR Denarius. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RSC 25.
ecoli
Denarius P.CATO.jpg
22-01 - M. PORCIUS CATO (47/46 A.C.)60 views Mejor conocido como M. CATO UTECENSIS Propraetor y fiel adherente del partido de POMPEYO "El Grande" .

AR Denarius 18 mm 3.0 gr
Anv: Busto vestido de mujer (Roma o Libertas) viendo a derecha - "ROMA" (MA en ligadura) detrás y "M·CATO PRO·PR" delante del busto.
Rev: Victoria sentada a derecha portando Palma sobre hombro derecho y corona de laureles en mano izquierda. "VICTRIX" en Exergo.

Ceca: Utica - Tunez
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1381 Pag.263 - Craw RRC #462/1b - Syd CRR #1053a - BMCRR (Africa)#18 - RSC Vol.1 Porcia 10a Pag.81
mdelvalle
Craw_462_1b_Denario_M__Porcius_Cato.jpg
22-01 - M. PORCIUS CATO (47/46 A.C.)22 views Mejor conocido como M. CATO UTECENSIS Propraetor y fiel adherente del partido de POMPEYO "El Grande" .
AR Denarius 18 mm 3.0 gr

Anv: Busto vestido de mujer (Roma o Libertas) viendo a derecha - "ROMA" (MA en ligadura) detrás y "M·CATO PRO·PR" delante del busto.
Rev: Victoria sentada a derecha portando Palma sobre hombro derecho y corona de laureles en mano izquierda. "VICTRIX" en Exergo.

Ceca: Utica - Tunez

Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1381 Pag.263 - Craw RRC #462/1b - Syd CRR #1053a - BMCRR (Africa)#18 - RSC Vol.1 Porcia 10a Pag.81
mdelvalle
22068.jpg
22068 Julia Domna/Venus10 viewsJulia Domna/Venus
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA
draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing facing holding helmet and palm, leaning on column, shield at foot
Mint: Rome 18.1mm 2.9g

RIC IV Septimius Severus 581 (denarius)
Blayne W
345-magnia urbica-.jpg
283-285 AD - MAGNIA URBICA antoninianus 57 viewsobv: M[AGN.VRB]ICA.AVG (diademed & draped bust right)
rev: [VEN]VS.VICTRIX (Venus standing left, leaning against shield, & holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left)
ref: RIC343 v. RIC347, C.17 v.C.15
mint: Rome or Ticinum, struck 284-285 AD
1.98gms, 21mm
Scarce
She was the wife of Carinus. The coin broken, added shape.
1 commentsberserker
1371_P_Hadrian_Eastern_RIC--.jpg
3012A Hadrian Denarius 117-130 AD Ceres victrix Eastern Mint12 viewsReference.
RIC III, 3012A; die link with RIC III, 3008

Bust A2

Obv. AVGVSTVS HADRIANVS
Laureate head with drapery

Rev. III COS
Ceres victrix veiled and corn-wreathed holding victory and torch

3.25 gr
18 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
Denario_Lucilla_RIC_786.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)87 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_786_Denario_Lucila.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 Pag.432 (Plate 59 #10) - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 Pag.234 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
rjb_repub3_10_08.jpg
46221 viewsCato Uticensis d.46 BC
AR quinarius
Obv "M CATO PRO PR"
Head of Liber right
Rev "VICTRIX"
Seated Victory right
Rome mint
Crawford 462
mauseus
11347q00.jpg
661. Julia Domna denarius66 viewsRome Mint, 210 Ad
20 mm, VF
IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, floormat on head
VENVS VICTRIX, half naked Venus, holding helmet and palm, leaning on column, shield at feet
Zam
Mag-Urbica-RIC-247.jpg
96. Magna Urbica.12 viewsAntoninianus, 283 - 285 AD, Ticinum mint.
Obverse: MAGNIA VRBICA AVG / Diademed bust of Magnia Urbica.
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX / Venus standing, holding helmet and sceptre, shield at right. SXXIT in exergue.
3.76 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #347; Sear #12423.
Callimachus
As_venus_helmet,_shield_and_sceptre,_10_039g,_12h.jpg
As VENVS VICTRIX AVG48 viewsWeight 10.039g; Die axis, 12h3 commentsmix_val
AsVenus_Victrix_red.jpg
As VENVS VICTRIX AVGVSTA18 viewsObverse: IVLIA MAMAEA_AVGVSTA
Bust right, drape, wearing stephane
Reverse: VENVS VICT(R)IX, S and C, left and right, in midfield.
Venus draped, standing front, head turned left, holding helmet in right and a vertical sceptre in left; at foot, left, a shield.
BMC 723, RIC 707
Weight, 10.57 g; die axis, 6h

mix_val
4040468.jpg
Augustus18 viewsAugustus. 27 BC-AD 14. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.33 g, 7h). Rome mint; Q. Rustius, moneyer. Struck 19-18 BC. Jugate, draped busts right of Fortuna Victrix, wearing round helmet, and Fortuna Felix, diademed, set on bar with ram’s head finials / Ornamented altar inscribed FOR RE. RIC I 322; RSC 513. Fine, toned, light porosity, areas of weak strike.
2 commentsecoli
augustus_322.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 322682 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNA, ANTIAT (in ex., hard to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.
4 commentsJochen
augustus_322~0.jpg
Augustus RIC I, 32293 viewsAugustus 27 BC - AD 14
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 20mm, Rome 19 BC, by moneyer Q Rustius
obv. Q RVSTIVS - FORTVNAE (AE ligate)
in ex. ANTIAT (hardly to see!)
Busts, draped, jugate, r., of Fortuna Victrix, helmeted, holding patera in l.
hand, and Fortuna Felix, wearing stephane;
both busts rest on bar terminating at each end in a ram' s head
rev. CAESARI . AVGVSTO
A highly ornamented rectangular altar with a bowl on it, inscribed in front
FOR.RE
ex.: EX.S.C.
RIC I, 322; BMCR 2
R2; about VF, toned

FORTVNA ANTIATIS, Fortuna of Antium, one of the most important places of Fortuna worshipping, as two goddesses, sisters, FORTVNA VICTRIX, more male, and FORTVNA FELIX, more female. Or as two aspects of only one goddess?
On the rev. the altar of FORTVNA REDVX, erected by the Senatus for the lucky return of Augustus 19BC with the 53 standards from the Parthians in Rome near the Porta Capuana.
Q Rustius celebrates Augustus and his own hometown Antium.





Jochen
RSC25 Plautilla~0.JPG
bE6. RSC 25. Venus Victrix.50 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA

Rev. Venus standing semi-clothed golding apple and leaning on shield, cupid at feet VENVS VICTRIX.

RIC369, RSC 25. EF, lustrous.
LordBest
nikaia_sev_alex_SGI3287var.jpg
Bithynia, Nikaia, Severus Alexander, SGI 3287 var.40 viewsSeverus Alexander, AD 222-235
AE 22, 5.31g
obv. M AVR CEVH ALEZANDROC AVG (VG ligate)
bare head laureate r.
rev. NI-K-A-I separated by three standards, outer standards topped with
capricorn; in ex., EWN.
SGI 3287 var. (different rev. legend breaks), scarce variant with EWN below and
capricorn signa
VF, medium brown patina, well-centered with a solid strike.

The capricorn standards likely represent Legio XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix, the legion which had initially supported Septimius Severus in his bid for the purple. While rather distantly related to Septimius Severus through Julia Domna, though named after him, Alexander seems to have encouraged a rumor that he was in fact the illegitimate son of Caracalla and therefore the grandson of Septimius. This coin then suggests an interesting and subtle use of propoganda.
Jochen
Caracalla_RIC_336b_Laodicea.jpg
Caracalla46 viewsDenarius ( 3,5g - 18mm )
obv. IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TR P
laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
rev. MINER VICTRIX
Minerva standing left, holding Victory & spear, shield to left & trophy to right
Struck circa 196-197 AD
mint Laodicea Ad Mare
RIC 336b
1 commentsHolger G
316_Caracalla_antoninianus.jpg
Caracalla - AR antoninianus8 viewsRome
213-217 AD
radiate and draped bust right, from behind
ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield set on helmet
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC IV 311d
5,71 g
Johny SYSEL
395_Caracalla_Venus.jpg
Caracalla - AR denarius8 viewsRome
216 AD
laureate head right
ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Venus standing left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield set on helmet
VENVS VICTRIX
SRCV II 6890, RIC IV 311b, RSC III 606, BMCRE V 82 ff.
1,99g
Johny SYSEL
Caracalla.jpg
Caracalla - VENVS VICTRIX26 viewsDenarius, 2.72 g, 20 mm, 6 h, 213-217 AD

Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate head right

Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing facing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand, holding sceptre in left hand and leaning on shield

Rome mint

RIC IVi 311b
1 commentsdrjbca
criciv311cORweb.jpg
Caracalla Antoninianus, RIC IV 311c56 viewsRome mint, Caracalla Antoninianus, 213-217 A.D. AR, 23mm 5.12g, RIC IV 311c, RSC 608a
O: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from front
R: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet
5 commentscasata137ec
caracalla_AR-Antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_00.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives.38 viewsobv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.
RIC 312c
5.5 grams.
rexesq
caracalla_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_obv_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0133 viewsAD 212 - 217
obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams.
2 commentsrexesq
12.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0228 viewsAD 212 - 217
obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams
--------------------------
*Great portrait
1 commentsrexesq
caracalla_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_helmet_two-captives_obv_04.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus - Venus holding helmet, two captives. obv 0417 viewsobv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding helmet & scepter, shield set on right of two captives seated to either side.

5.5 grams
rexesq
caracalla_antoninianus.JPG
CARACALLA AR ANTONINIANUS 213 - 217 AD 40 viewsOne of the first Roman coins of this type (antoninianus)
Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM , radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX , Venus standing left, holding Victory & spear, leaning on shield set on helmet
weight 5,01 grams, diameter 24,05 mm, silver, fineness per thousand 500 ‰
Reference: RIC 311c, RSC 608

1 commentsAntonivs Protti
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.21 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
---------------------------------------
right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
----------------------------------
*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_03.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.28 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
---------------------------------------
right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
----------------------------------
*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
tyre-phoenicia_tet_AR-ant_AR-denarius_caracalla_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Tet, Tyre - AR Antoninianus, Rome mint, and AR Denarius, Rome Mint15 viewsbottom left:
---------------------------------------
Roman Empire, Tyre, Phoenicia. Emperor Caracalla
Silver Tetradrachm, Tyre Mint - 213 - 217 A.D.
Weight 13.379 Grams, Diameter 26.4 mm
obv: Laureate bust of Emperor right, cuirassed and seen from the front.
rev: Eagle standing on club facing, wings spread, tail and head left, wreath in beak, murex shell between legs
13.379 Grams
-----------------------------------
bottom right:
-----------------------------------

Roman Empire, Emperor Caracalla (AD 212-217)
Silver Antoninianus (double denarius) 'Venus Victrix'
obv: ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
5.2 Grams
------------------------------
top middle:
------------------------------
Caracalla Denarius. 213 AD.
OBV: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT - laureate head right.
REV: PROFECTIO AVG - Caracalla standing right, holding a transverse spear,
two standards behind him.
------------------------------
rexesq
tyre-phoenicia_tetradrachm_caracalla_13_79grams_murex-shell_AR-Ant_venus-victrix_obv_01.jpg
Caracalla AR Tetradrachm, Tyre - Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Rome Mint15 viewsleft:
---------------------------------------
Roman Empire, Tyre, Phoenicia. Emperor Caracalla
Silver Tetradrachm, Tyre Mint - 213 - 217 A.D.
Weight 13.379 Grams, Diameter 26.4 mm
obv: Laureate bust of Emperor right, cuirassed and seen from the front.
rev: Eagle standing on club facing, wings spread, tail and head left, wreath in beak, murex shell between legs
13.379 Grams
-----------------------------------
right:
-----------------------------------

Roman Empire, Emperor Caracalla (AD 212-217)
Silver Antoninianus (double denarius) 'Venus Victrix'
obv: ANTONINUS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding Victory & scepter, leaning on shield set on helmet.
5.2 Grams
--------------------------
rexesq
Caracalla_AR_Denarius_Venus.jpg
Caracalla Denarius "Venus"55 viewsAR Denarius
Obverse: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head right
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, Victory in right,
transverse scepter in left, resting left arm on shield set on helmet
SRCV II 6890, RIC IV 311b, RSC III 606, BMCRE V 82 ff.
Choice gVF, full-circles strike, Rome mint
Weight 2.746g, maximum diameter 19.2mm, 216 A.D.
ex. FORVM
4 commentsDanny Jones
caracalla_sold.JPG
Caracalla Denarius Venus16 viewsCaracalla Denarius. 216 AD. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory & sceptre, resting elbow on shield set on helmet. RSC 606.
Britanikus
Caracalla_RIC_25b~0.JPG
Caracalla, 198 - 217 AD17 viewsObv: IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TRP, laureate, draped bust of Caracalla facing right.

Rev: MINER VICTRIX, Minerva standing half left, holding Victory and a spear, shield at her feet, trophy behind.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 198 AD

3.5 grams, 17.5 mm, 0°

RIC IVi 25b, RSC 159, S6820, VM 49
1 commentsSPQR Coins
caracalla.jpg
Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.149 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 311b, RSC 606, BMC 82, choice VF, 2.689g, 19.7mm, 180o, Rome mint, 216 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, Victory in right, transverse scepter in right resting on shield set on helmet; ex Jean Elsen;b70
0190-220.jpg
Caracalla, Antoninianus107 viewsRome mint, AD 216
ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Caracalla right, seen from behind
VENVS VICTRIX, Victory standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, resting on shield set on a captive, another captive at her feet
4.87 gr
Ref : RCV # 6785, RIC # 312c, RSC # 612b
2 commentsPotator II
salonine_venus_victrix.jpg
Cologne, salonina19 viewsicos
PC200070_comp_sm.jpg
Comparison of two ases of the same type: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL 19 viewsLeft: Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h
Right: Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Seems RIC 1389a, Faustina Minor issue by Antoninus Pius, minted in Rome, possible minting dates 145-146 or 156-161.

For more details about Faustina Minor see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
Yurii P
Cato_Quinarius~0.jpg
Cr 343/2b - Cato Quinarius9 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
M Porcius Cato
AR quinarius. 89 BC.

Head of Liber right, crowned with an ivy wreath, M•CATO behind / Victory seated right, holding palm and patera. VICTRIX in ex.

Syd 597c, Cr343/2b, Porcia 7, Sear5 #248 gVF
RR0010
Sosius
MAntDeL14.jpg
Crawford 544/29, Marc Antony, for Legio XIV, Denarius, 32-31 BC.84 viewsMarc Antony, for Legio XIV (Gemina Martia Victrix), Patras mint (?), 32-31 BC.,
Denarius (16-17 mm / 3,63 g),
Obv.: above: [AN]T AVG , below: [III VI]R R P C , under oar right, filleted scepter or mast with fluttering banners on prow.
Rev.: LEG - XIV , Aquila (legionary eagle) between two military standards.
Crawf. 544/29 ; Bab. (Antonia) 123 ; BMC 208 ; Sear 369 ; Syd. 1234 .

Die Legio XIV wurde 41 v. Chr. von Augustus aufgestellt. Sie war seit 9 n. Chr. in Moguntiacum (Mainz) stationiert und kämpfte später unter Claudius in Britannien, wo sie 60 oder 61 n. Chr. half, Boudicca niederzuwerfen. Später war die Legion u. a. in Vindobona (Wien) und Carnuntum stationiert. Sie war an den Usurpationen des Saturninus und Regalianus beteiligt.

Legio XIV Gemina Martia Victrix was a legion of the Roman Empire, levied by Octavian after 41 BC. The cognomen Gemina (twin in Latin) suggests that the legion resulted from fusion of two previous ones, one of them possibly being the Fourteenth legion that fought in the Battle of Alesia. Martia Victrix (martial victory) were cognomens added by Nero following the victory over Boudica. The emblem of the legion was the Capricorn, as with many of the legions levied by Augustus.
Invasion of Britain
Stationed in Moguntiacum, Germania Superior, since AD 9, XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix was one of four legions used by Aulus Plautius and Claudius in the Roman invasion of Britain in 43, and took part in the defeat of Boudicca in 60 or 61. In 68 it was stationed in Gallia Narbonensis.
Rebellion on the Rhine
In 89 the governor of Germania Superior, Lucius Antonius Saturninus, rebelled against Domitian, with the support of the XIVth and of the XXI Rapax, but the revolt was suppressed.
Pannonian defense
When the XXIst legion was lost, in 92, XIIII Gemina was sent in Pannonia to substitute it, camping in Vindobona (Vienna). After a war with the Sarmatians and Trajan's Dacian Wars (101-106), the legion was moved to Carnuntum, where it stayed for three centuries. Some subunits of Fourteenth fought in the wars against the Mauri, under Antoninus Pius, and the legion participated to the Parthian campaign of Emperor Lucius Verus. During his war against the Marcomanni, Emperor Marcus Aurelius based his headquarters in Carnuntum.
In support of Septimius Severus
In 193, after the death of Pertinax, the commander of the Fourteenth, Septimius Severus, was acclaimed emperor by the Pannonian legions, and above all by his own. XIIII Gemina fought for its emperor in his march to Rome to attack usurper Didius Julianus (193), contributed to the defeat of the usurper Pescennius Niger (194), and probably fought in the Parthian campaign that ended with the sack of the capital of the empire, Ctesiphon (198).
In support of imperial candidates
In the turmoil following the defeat of Valerian, tXIIII Gemina supported usurper Regalianus against Emperor Gallienus (260), then Gallienus against Postumus of the Gallic empire (earning the title VI Pia VI Fidelis — "six times faithful, six times loyal"), and, after Gallienus death, Gallic Emperor Victorinus (269-271).
5th century
At the beginning of the 5th century, XIIII Gemina still stayed at Carnuntum. It probably dissolved with the collapse of the Danube frontier in 430s. The Notitia Dignitatum lists a Quartodecimani comitatensis unit under the Magister Militum per Thracias; it is possible that this unit is XIV Gemina.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
caracalla_AR_antoninianii_quarter_01.JPG
D - Caracalla AR Antoninianii31 viewsTwo different bust type Caracalla Silver Antoninianii - both have different ' VENUS VICTRIX ' reverses - next to a U.S.A. State Quarter for size comparison.
-----
Lower Left: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from the front.
5.2 grams. - *This coin is in a plastic flip in these shots.
------------------------------------
Top Right: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind.
5.5 grams.
rexesq
Denarius_Venus_victrix_dup.jpg
Denarius VENVS VICTRIX57 viewsmix_val
Denarius_Venus_victrix_shield_helmet_sceptre.jpg
Denarius VENVS VICTRIX shield helmet sceptre53 views1 commentsmix_val
Domitian_RIC_II_791.jpg
Domitian RIC II 079150 viewsDomitian 81-96 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. (3.23 g, 17.54 g, 6h). Sept 14, 95- Sept 13, 96 A.D. Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV, laureate head right. Obv: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP, Minerva Victrix, winged, flying l. with spear or javelin and shield. RIC II 791, RSC 294, BMC 237.

This coin, minted towards the end of Domitian’s reign, depicted his patron goddess, Minerva. Although listed as common, I don’t see as many of these as other Minerva types of Domitian. This is a decent specimen with good legends and devices.
2 commentsLucas H
D821sm2.jpg
Domitian RIC-821116 viewsAR Denarius, 3.42g
Rome mint, 96 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XVI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P; Minerva, winged, flying l., with spear and shield
RIC 821 (R2). BMC 237D. RSC 297b. BNC - .
Ex jerusalemhadaya2012, eBay, 4 March 2019.

Domitian achieved tribunician power for the 16th time on 14 September 96 AD. He was assassinated in a palace plot four days later on 18 September. In between those two dates the mint struck only one issue of denarii recording Domitian as TR P XVI, needless to say they are extremely rare! The Senate decreed Damnatio Memoriae within a day of Domitian's assassination which would have quickly halted production at the mint for his coinage. The months leading up to Domitian's assassination saw the mint at Rome experimenting with many new reverse designs (altar, winged Minerva, Maia, temple reverses), breaking the monotony of the four standard Minerva types that had previously dominated the denarius. These new types are exceedingly rare and were perhaps experimental in nature. This denarius shows one of these new reverse types, Minerva Victrix, a more warrior like attribute of the goddess. The fact that this new type which originally appeared on the denarius when Domitian was TR P XV carried over to the briefly struck TR P XVI issue alongside the Maia and the M1, M3, and M4 Minerva types may hint that there was indeed change in the air at the mint. Perhaps the mix of new types with the older ones hint at a transition regarding the typology on his precious metal coinage? Regardless, the experiment was cut short by an assassin's blade, so we shall never know. This denarius may very well be the last coin ever struck for Domitian.

Fine late style with good natural toning. Same dies as the BM specimen.
10 commentsDavid Atherton
faustina_filia_495.jpg
Faustina Filia RIC III, 495a71 viewsFaustina Filia, died 175, wife of Marcus Aurelius, daughter of Antoninus Pius
AR - Denar, 3.28g, 16.6mm
Rome 157 - 161
obv. FAVST[I]NA - AVGUSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. AVGVS - TI - [P]II FIL
Venus standing l., holding r. Victoriola, resting l. on shield set on helmet
RIC III, Antoninus Pius 495(a); C.15; BMCR. 1099
EF, uncirculated
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Venus with the attributes of Venus Victrix.
Jochen
U3141F1XGMOQIPG.jpg
Faustina II, AE Sestertius.33 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA; draped bust right

VENVS VICTRIX / SC; Venus standing left, holding Victoriola, resting left hand on shield

RIC 1688, Cohen 283, BMC 960

Patina that green in life too!
1 commentsGaiusCaligula
Lg3_quart_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
Lg004N_quad_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)11 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half.

Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

Another of this type:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
See more info there.

Their comparison:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151893
Yurii P
iulius_caesar_Cr480_13.jpg
G. Iulius Caesar, Crawford 480/1363 viewsGaius Iulius Caesar, 13.6.100-15.3.41 BC, gens Iulia
AR - Denar, 3.83g, 19.7mm, 90°
Rome, Feb.-Mar. 44 BC
moneyer P. Sepullius Macer
obv. Head of Caesar, wreathed and veiled, r.
before CAESAR, behind DICT PERPETVO
rev. r. P SERPVLLVS, l. MACER (both from top to bottom)
Venus Victrix with bare l. breast, stg. l., holding small Victory in xxtended r. hand and resting with raised l. hand on lpng sceptre on which is leaning the shield set on ground
ref. Crawford 480/13; Sydenham 1074; RSC Julius Caesar 39; BMCRR I Rome 4173; SRCV I 1414; Vagi 56; Sear CRI 107d
VF, portrait!, toned, scratches, somewhat excentric
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

From highest historical importance: The 1st portrait of Iulius Caesar and the coin that killed Caesar!

Please, take a look at http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=109646.0
5 commentsJochen
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar212 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
galeria_valeria_thessalonica_36.jpg
Galeria Valeria RIC VI, Thessalonica 3634 viewsGaleria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, 2nd wife of Galerius. killed AD 315 by Licinius I
AE - AE 3, 6.39g
Thessalonica 2nd officina, AD 308-310
obv. GAL VALE - RIA AVG
bust, draped and diademed, r.
rev. VENERI V - ICTRICI
Venus Victrix, draped, stg. l., holding up apple with r. hand, and raising hem of
her skirt over l. shoulder
star in l. field, B in r. field
in ex.: dot SM dot TS dot
RIC VI, Thessalonica 36
VF

I think this is one of the last depictions of Venus on Roman coins!
1 commentsJochen
GALVALER-1.jpg
Galeria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, wife of Galerius. Augusta, 293(?)-311 CE.176 viewsÆ Follis (26 mm, 6.64 gm). Nicomedia mint, 308-310 CE.
Obv: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VI-CTRICI CMH, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and drapery; in exergue, SMNA.
RIC VI 57; Sear 3730 var.
EmpressCollector
Gallienus_Venus~0.jpg
Gallienus - BI antoninianus5 viewsViminacium / Antioch
254-255 AD
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG
Venus half left leaning on shield, holding helmet and scepter
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC V 298
Johny SYSEL
1porcia_unita.jpg
Gens Porcia, quinarius (89 a.C.)12 viewsGens Porcia, quinarius coniato a Roma da M. Porcius Cato (89 BC)
AR, 1.59 gr, 13 mm, qBB
D/ M CATO (legato); testa di Libero con corona d'edera rivolta a destra; sotto, un simbolo
R/ VICTRIX (in ex, legato), Vittoria, seduta verso destra, con ramo di palma e patera.
Crawford 343/2b
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dall' 1 giugno 2017, numero catalogo 280), ex collezione Alessandro Vanni, Tinia numistatica (Follonica, Italia, fino al maggio 2017)
paolo
RIC_Gordian_III_SRCV_8683_venus.jpg
Gordian III (Marcus Antoninus Gordianus) (Caesar 238 A.D.; Augustus 238-244 A.D.)4 viewsSRCV 8683, RIC IV 131, Van Meter 76

AR Denarius, 2.67 g., 21.55 mm max., 180°

Rome mint, struck Summer 241 A.D. (special marriage issue)

Obv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX (= victorious Venus), Venus standing slightly left, head left, draped, helmet in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, left arm resting on a large oval shield grounded behind.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter BV1.
Stkp
Gordian_III_RIC_131_den.JPG
Gordian III, 238 - 244 AD33 viewsObv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian III facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding a helmet in her right hand and a scepter in her left, and leaning on a shield.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 241 - 242 AD

2.75 grams, 19.9 mm, 180°

RIC IViii 131, RSC 347, S8683, VM 76

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Gordvenus.JPG
Gordian III, 238-244 AD86 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 131
Rome, 240 AD
2 commentswhitetd49
0300-217.jpg
Gordian III, Denarius53 viewsRome mint, AD 241
IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate and draped bust right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet in right hand, scepter in left hand and leaning on shield
2.88 gr
Ref : RIC IV part III # 131, RSC # 347, RCV # 8683
Potator II
Gordian III Venus Victrix2.jpg
Gordian III- Venus Victrix110 viewsobv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG - Laureate, draped, and cuirassed right
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding globe and sceptre, leaning on shield.

Minted at Rome 240ce. (mistakenly attributed to 241)
20mm, 2.6g
RIC 131 (Rare); Cohen 347
wolfgang336
Caracalla-Denar-VENUSVICTRIX-RIC311b.jpg
II-CARACALLA -a- 015 Denar RIC IV/I/311b27 viewsAv) ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureated head right

Rv) VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding Victoriola and sceptre , she isleaning on a shield, which is placed on a helmet

Weight:3,4g; Ø: 17mm; Reference: RIC IV/I/311b; ROME mint; struck: 213-217 A.D.
2 commentssulcipius
JulDomVenVic.JPG
Julia Domna71 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA
VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 581, BMC 90, C 215
Rome, 210 AD
whitetd49
JulDomVenVict.JPG
Julia Domna22 viewsIVLIA DO/MNA AVG
Bust draped, right
VENERI VICTR
Venus Victrix draped below waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm
RIC 536, C 194, BMC 49
Rome, 194 AD, 2.40 g.
whitetd49
ju44~0.jpg
JULIA DOMNA (193 - 217 A.D.)45 viewsAR Denarius
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column, shield at feet.
Rome
17.5mm
2.8g
RIC 581 BMCRE p. 168, 90 RSC 215
1 commentsMat
venvs_victrix_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Denarius - VENVS VICTRIX 18 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
206 - 211 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS - VICTRIX / Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column, shield at feet
2,03 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 581, Coh. 215
nummis durensis
581_variante.jpg
Julia Domna - denarius - VENVS VICTRIX ("Variant")31 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
196 - 210 A.D.
Rome
Av.: IVLIA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right - Type "Arcus Argentariorum"
Rev.: VENVS - VICTRIX / Venus, naked to waist, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column with cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet
3,59 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC - (see 581 Var.), Coh. -

Also the hairstyle is different from RIC 581.
nummis durensis
venus_vitrix_I_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Venus Victrix26 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
194 A.D.
Alexandria
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENER - VIC / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column
2,54 Gr., 12 h die axis
RIC - , Coh. -
1 commentsnummis durensis
emesa_vener_vict_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Venus Victrix / VENER VICT13 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
194 or 195 A.D.
Emesa or Laodicea ad Mare(?)
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENER - VICT / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column
3, 08 Gr., 12 h die axis
RIC -, Coh. -

Perhaps it could be an issue from 'Laodicea ad Mare'.
nummis durensis
emesa_veneri_victr_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Venus Victrix / VENERI VICTR13 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
194 A.D.
Emesa(?)
Av.: IVLIA DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENER - I - V - ICTR / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column
2,75 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 632, Coh. 194
nummis durensis
venus_vitrix_II_fac.jpg
Julia Domna - Venus Victrix with Avers-Legend Error28 viewsJulia Domna
Denarius
early in 194 A.D.
Alexandria
Av.: IVLA(sic!) DO - MNA AVG / draped bust right
Rev.: VENER - VIC / Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm, resting elbow on column
1,80 Gr., 6 h die axis (!)
RIC - , Coh. -

Possible the first issue of Alexandria denarii for Julia with the Avers-Legend Error "IVLA" and 6 h die axis.
1 commentsnummis durensis
3753_3754_(1).jpg
Julia Domna, Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX25 viewsAR Denarius
Julia Domna
B. ca. 170 - D. 217AD
Augusta: 193 - 217AD
Issued: 210AD
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA: Draped bust, right.
R: VENVS VICTRIX; Venus standing left, naked to waist, learning on column to right, holding palm and helmet, shield at feet, left.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 140: B6, O2, R102, T129, M4.
RIC 581; Sear RCV, 6610; RSC 215; BMC 90.
Agora Auctions, Sale 64, Lot 64-213.
1/24/17 2/10/17
3 commentsNicholas Z
juliadomna090608b.jpg
Julia Domna, Venus46 viewsAr Denarius 2.59g;19mm

IVLIA AVGVSTA
draped bust right

VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left leaning on column, holding palm frond and helmet, shield at feet

RIC 581, BMC 90, C 215
1 commentsarizonarobin
43305p00.jpg
Julia Domna, Venus37 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, helmet in right, palm frond in left, resting elbow on column, cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet lef

Prov. Forvm Ancient coins:
Silver denarius, unpublished in major references, RIC IV -, BMCRE V -, Cohen -, RSC III -, SRCV -, VF, flat centers, scratches, 2.801g, 20.8mm, 180o, Rome? or unofficial? mint, 207 - 211 A.D.; very rare


RIC 581 var (no Cupid or cuirass); . C. - . BMC - . Hill 1199 var; RSC 218 var (no Cupid)
arizonarobin
Julia_Domna_RIC_S581.JPG
Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta42 viewsObv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Julia Domna facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, naked to waste, standing left, resting elbow on column, holding a helmet in her right hand and a palm in her left, a shield rests at her feet.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 210 AD

3 grams, 20.2 mm, 45°

RIC IVi S. Severus 581, RSC 215, S6610, VM 52/1

Ex: FORVM
4 commentsSPQR Coins
julia-mamaea_sestertius_two_01.JPG
Julia Mamaea 001 AE Sesterces - Venus, Felicitas19 viewsObverse photo of two Julia Mamaea Sesterces.
More photos of the reverses in my 'Roman Imperial Bronzes' Gallery.

On the right: Julia Mamaea Sestertius w/ 'Felicitas Publica' reverse. Scratches obverse.
19.6 grams.

On the left: Julia Mamaea Sestertius w/ 'Venus Victrix' reverse. VERY bold portrait!
24.9 grams.
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_06_rev_03.JPG
Julia Mamaea 002 - 01 - AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix 30 viewsEmpress Julia Mamaea, Mother of Emperor Severus Alexander (222-235 AD)
AE Sestertius. Struck 228-9 AD - Rome Mint.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

24.9 grams - HEAVY!
-----------

*Notes: This is a very thick and large sestertius of Julia Mamaea, great even patina and coloration as well as having a VERY bold and quite pleasant portrait of the Empress! despite some legend letters being worn or off the flan.
---
-
2 commentsrexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_01_rev_01.JPG
Julia Mamaea 002 - 01 AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix50 viewsEmpress Julia Mamaea, Mother of Emperor Severus Alexander (222-235AD)
AE Sestertius. Struck 228-9 AD - Rome Mint.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

24.9 grams - HEAVY!
-----------

*Notes: This is a very thick and large sestertius of Julia Mamaea, great even patina and coloration as well as having a VERY bold and quite pleasant portrait of the Empress! despite some legend letters being worn or off the flan.
---
-
5 commentsrexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_07.JPG
Julia Mamaea 002 - 02 - AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix 11 viewsEmpress Julia Mamaea, Mother of Emperor Severus Alexander (222-235 AD)
AE Sestertius. Struck 228-9 AD - Rome Mint.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

24.9 grams - HEAVY!
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_08.JPG
Julia Mamaea 002 - 03 - AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix 12 viewsEmpress Julia Mamaea, Mother of Emperor Severus Alexander (222-235 AD)
AE Sestertius. Struck 228-9 AD - Rome Mint.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

24.9 grams - HEAVY!
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_10.JPG
Julia Mamaea 002 - 04 - AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix 19 viewsJulia Mamaea AE Sestertius. 228-9 AD.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

24.9 grams - heavy
-----------

*Notes: This is a very thick and large sestertius of Julia Mamaea, great even patina and coloration as well as having a VERY bold and quite pleasant portrait of the Empress! despite some legend letters being worn or off the flan.
---
-
1 commentsrexesq
julia-mamaea-venus_sev-alexander-mars_sesterces_both-together_01.JPG
Julia Mamaea 004 Sestertius with Severus Alexander Sestertius 00217 viewsMother and Son.
Venus and Mars.

Julia Mamaea - VENUS VICTRIX -SC- - Venus holding helmet and sceptre, shield at her feet.
AD 228-9. 24.9 grams.
---
Severus Alexander - MARS ULTOR - Mars advancing, in the ready-for-action-position, holding spear and shield. 'S C' to either side of Mars.
AD 232. 22.3 grams.
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_two_edge_02.JPG
Julia Mamaea AE Sesterces - Venus, Felicitas - Edge 0134 viewsright - Felicitas Publica reverse - 19.6 grams

left - Venus Victrix reverse - 24.9 grams
2 commentsrexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_two_edge_04.JPG
Julia Mamaea AE Sesterces - Venus, Felicitas - Edge 0221 viewsright - Felicitas Publica reverse - 19.6 grams

left - Venus Victrix reverse - 24.9 grams
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_two_edge_01.JPG
Julia Mamaea AE Sesterces - Venus, Felicitas - Edge 0317 viewsright - Felicitas Publica reverse - 19.6 grams

left - Venus Victrix reverse - 24.9 grams
-----------
Showing the difference in thickness between these two Sesterces of the same Empress.
rexesq
julia-mamaea_sestertius_24_9gr_obv_01_rev_01~0.jpg
Julia Mamaea AE Sestertius - Venus Victrix - 24.9 grams134 viewsJulia Mamaea AE Sestertius. 228-9 AD.

obv: JULIA MAMAEA AUGUSTA - Diademed and draped bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC - Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.
24.9 grams - heavy
rexesq
Mamaea2.jpg
Julia Mamaea Denarius19 viewsJulia Mamaea Denarius.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.

RIC 358 , RSC 76.

1 commentsTanit
JuliaMamaea_Venus.jpg
Julia Mamaea Sestertius Venus Victrix19 viewsJulia Mamaea AE Sestertius. 228-9 AD. VENVS VICTRIX S C, Venus standing left holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet. Cohen 78.
Ref Julia Mamaea AE Sestertius, RIC 705, Cohen 78, BMC 718. Sear 8235
mattpat
Julia_Mamaea_RIC_358.JPG
Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander32 viewsObv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed, draped bust of Julia Mamaea facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding a helmet in her right hand and a scepter in her left; at her feet, to the left, is a shield.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 231 AD

2.8 grams, 19.15 mm, 0°

RIC IVii S. Alexander 358, RSC III 76, S8216, VM 10
1 commentsMatt Inglima
MAMAEA-6.jpg
Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander. Augusta, 222-235 CE.227 viewsOrichalcum Sestertius (30.6 mm). Rome mint, 230-231 CE.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, Diademed and draped bust, r.
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX SC, Venus standing l., holding helmet and scepter, shield at feet.
RIC 705; Sear 8235; BMC 718; Cohen 78.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
jmamaeavenusses.jpg
Julia Mamaea, Venus49 viewsJulia Mamaea

IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA
draped, diademed bust right

VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding scepter and helmet, shield at feet

Sestertius; 23.96g, 33mm
RIC IV 705 (Sev. Alexander); BMCRE 719 (Sev. Alexander); Cohen 7
3 commentsarizonarobin
x19.jpg
Julia Mamea 235 Denarius35 viewsOb. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG Head right
Rev. VENVS VICTRIX Venus standing left holding helmet and sceptre , shield at feet
Ref. RIC 358

IVLIA MAMAEA AVG Julia Mamaea is your Augustae
VENVS VICTRIX Venus the bringer of victory

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
pjimage_(9).jpg
Lucilla6 viewsAR Denarius, Struck 164-169 AD, Rome Mint
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in a bun
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing half left, right breast bare, Victory in right hand, left hand on grounded shield
References: RIC 786, Sear 5492, RSC 89
Justin L
luven.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)109 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: VENVS VICTRIX,Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield.
Rome
2.8g
18mm
RIC 786, RSC II 89, BMCRE IV 353
2 commentsMat
Lucilla_b.jpg
Lucilla denarius46 viewsVENVS VICTRIX
wife of Lucius Verus
1 commentsTibsi
Lucilla.png
Lucilla – RIC-786 (Aurelius)43 viewsLucilla Denarius (2mm - 3.4g). LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in a bun / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing, head left, holding Victory and resting hand on shield. RIC 786, RSC 89, BMC 353: RCV 54923 commentsBud Stewart
Lucilla_RIC_786.JPG
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus19 viewsObv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bare-headed, draped bust of Lucilla facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory in her right hand and resting her left on a shield.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 166 - 169 AD

2.3 grams, 17.7 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 786, RSC 89, S5492, VM 15
SPQR Matt
M Porcius Cato Denarius.JPG
M Porcius Cato Denarius34 viewsM. Porcius Cato AR Denarius, 89BC
Obverse: Diademed female bust facing right. ROMA behind and. M. CATO below.
Reverse: Victoria seated right, holding patera and palm... VICTRIX in exergue.
18mm, 3.8gm
Sear 247

1 commentsJerome Holderman
M__PORCIUS_CATO.jpg
M. PORCIUS CATO AR Quinarius; GENS PORCIA, Cr462/2, Porcia 11, Liber33 viewsOBV: M • CATO • PRO • PR, wreathed head of Liber right
REV: Victory seated right, holding palm branch over her left shoulder and patera in her right hand, VICTRIX in ex.
1.4 g, 13 mm

Struck at Utica, Africa, 47-46 BC
Legatus
Cato_Quinarius.jpg
M. Porcius Cato Uticensis - Quinarius - Sear Imperators 476 viewsObv: Head of Liber r., wreathed with ivy, his hair long, M CATO (AT ligatured) PRO PR around, below
Rev: Victory seated r., holding patera in extended r. hand, and palm-branch over shoulder in l., VICTRIX (TR ligatured) in ex.
Mint: Utica
Date: 47-46 BC
Ref: Crawford 462/2, Sydenham 1054, Porcia 11, Sear Imperators 47
vs1969
M__Porcius_Cato.png
M. Porcius Cato – Porcia-546 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC 89 BC. M. Porcius Cato AR Denarius (19mm, 4.05 g, 11h). Rome mint. Head of Roma right, her hair tied up at back of head M. CATO below, ROMA behind / Victory seated right on chair, holding patera and palm frond over shoulder VICTRIX in exergue. Crawford 343/1b; Sydenham 596; Porcia 5; RCV 247Bud Stewart
porcius_cato_Cr343.1b.jpg
M. Porcius Cato, Crawford 343/1b29 viewsM. Porcius Cato, gens Porcia
AR - Denarius, 17.98mm, 3.83g
Rome, 89 BC
obv. Female bust, draped, r., hair bound in knot behind
ROMA behind (MA as monogram)
M.CATO beneath
rev. Victory, std. r., holding patera and palm-branch
in ex. VICTRIX (TR as monogram)
Crawford 343/1b; Sydenham 596; Porcia 5
rare, VF

The rev. figure could be Victoria Virgo because M.Cato has built a temple for her near the temple of Victoria. This type is the prototype of Crawford 462/2; Porcia 11 from Utica.
Jochen
porcius_Crawford462.2.jpg
M. Porcius Cato, Crawford 462/238 viewsM. Porcius Cato, gens Porcia
AR - Quinarius, 13.8mm, 1.95g
Utica/North Africa, 47/46 BC
obv. M.CATO.PRO.PR
Youthful head of Bacchus, wearing ivy wreath, r.
rev. Victory, std. r., holding patera and palm-branch
in ex. VICTRIX (TR as monogram)
Crawford 462/2; Sydenham 1054a; Porcia 11
rare, VF+
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

This coin was struck under Senate authority in Utica, North Africa where Cato was propraetor at the beginning of the civil war. The design is copied from an issue by another M. Cato in 89 B.C. (Crawford 343)
Cato preferred to die with the Republic rather than outlive it. Defeated by Caesar he committed suicide in 46 B.C. (FAC)

Jochen
0078.jpg
M. Porcius Cato, Quinarius14 viewsRRC 343/2b
89 bc

Obverse: Head of Liber to right, wearing ivy-wreath; below, acrostolium.
Reverse: Victory seated right, holding patera in her right hand and palm-branch in her left; in exergue, VICTRIX

Another Porcius Cato and we do not know much about this one. Crawford even mentions one ‘Cato the wine merchant’ as a possible moneyer.

Ex Obolos 2, lot 168, 2014-06-14 (Nomos AG),
From the E. J. Haeberlin Collection, E. Cahn and A. Hess Nachf., 17 July 1933, 1042
Norbert
Mcato.jpg
M. Porcius Cato-Uticensis42 viewsM. Porcius Cato-Uticensis, AR Quinarius, minted in Africa, circa 47/6.
Obv: M. CATO. PRO.-PR Head of Liber r.; wearing ivy wreath.
Rev: Victory std. r., VICTRIX in ex.

Cr. 462/2. Syd. 1054a. Seaby Porcia 11.
Tanit
Portcia.jpg
M.Porcius Cato28 viewsObverse: head of Liber, crowned with ivy, M.CATO (in ligature) behind and club below
Reverse: Victory with palm and patera seated right
Exe: VICTRIX
Mint : Rome
Date : 89BC
Reference : Crawford 343/2 and Sear 248
Denom : Quinarius (half denarius)
Metal : Silver
Comments : Lovely cabinet toning.
1 commentsBolayi
magnia.jpg
MAGNIA URBICA27 viewsAntoninianus 285 AD. 4.32 gr, 12h. Draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent. MAGN VRBICA AVG. / Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; shield at side. VENVS VICTRIX. In exergue KA (pellet-in-crescent)z. RIC V 342.
CNG 72. Lot 1731
benito
magnia_urbica.jpg
MAGNIA URBICA27 viewsAntoninianus 285 AD. 4.32 gr, 12h. Draped bust right, wearing stephane, set on crescent. MAGN VRBICA AVG. / Venus standing left, holding helmet and scepter; shield at side. VENVS VICTRIX. In exergue KA (pellet-in-crescent)z. RIC V 342.

1 commentsbenito
artikel_pic482.JPG
Magnia Urbica Ticinum105 viewsMAGNIA VRBICA AVG, Diademed and draped bust right, resting on crescent.
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus st. left, holding Victory and sceptre, leaning on shield.
RIC347

Ex. SXXI

22mm, 3.6gr, Die 0

5th emission Aug.283.
Ed D
URBICA-1.jpg
Magnia Urbica, wife of Carinus. Augusta, 283-285 CE.154 viewsAE Antoninianus (22 mm, 3.26 gm). Rome mint, 284-285 CE.
Obv: MAGN VRBICA AVG, Diademed draped bust r., on crescent.
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX. Venus standing left, holding scepter and helmet, her shield leans against the front of her leg. Exe: KAS.
RIC, 343; Cohen 17; Sear 3490.
EmpressCollector
LEG_VI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VI 100 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG VI legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

The photo appears to show this as LEG VII but in hand you can see that the second I is a scratch
Background History on the VI Legion

Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 58 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title “Hispaniensis”.

Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Julius Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived.

Julius Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus. The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 BC and 47 BC. This culminated in the battle of Zela where victory was won by Legio VI.

During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.

The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea.

Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.

Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134); “Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him legio V Alaudae, legio VI Ferrata and legio X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a legio V (the later Macedonica), legio VI (the later Victrix) and legio X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, legio V and legio X, and less certainly legio VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the Battle of Actium, after this event the legio VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the legio VI Victrix was in Spain.

Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following the Battle of Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

From 9 BC to 73 AD the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea. It was in this time frame that Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.

From 54 AD to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War. As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius. Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War .
Titus Pullo
LEG_XI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XI90 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XI legionary eagle between two standards


Patrae mint 32-31BC

ex-Arcade Coins

An Antonian legion which was disbanded or lost its separate identity after the battle of Actium.

The two centurions Titus Pullo and Lucius Vorenus were from Legio XI (not XIII as the series Rome would have us believe). Pullo and Vorenus were fierce rivals for promotion to primus pilus, the most senior centurion in a legion. Both distinguished themselves in 54 BC when the Nervii attacked the legion under Quintus Cicero in their winter quarters in Nervian territory. In an effort to outdo Vorenus, Pullo charged out of the fortified camp and attacked the enemy, but was soon wounded and surrounded. Vorenus followed and engaged his attackers in hand-to-hand combat, killing one and driving the rest back, but lost his footing and was himself soon surrounded. Pullo in turn rescued Vorenus, and after killing several of the enemy, the pair returned to camp amid applause from their comrades.

In the Civil War of 49 BC, Pullo was assigned to the XXIV Victrix Rapax, a new Italian legion commanded by the legate Gaius Antonius. In 48 BC, Antonius was blockaded on an island and forced to surrender. Pullo was apparently responsible for most of his soldiers switching sides to fight for Pompey. Later that year, he is recorded bravely defending Pompey's camp in Greece from Caesar's attack shortly before the Battle of Pharsalus.

Titus Pullo
LEG_XX_002.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XX 47 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG XX legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

SOLD

The 20th legion was founded in 49 BC by Julius Caesar.

B. The 20th Valeria was founded by Pompey in 84 BC, it was given the vacant 20th number by Augustus in 31-30 BC. Augustus granted the legion the title "Victrix" in about 25 BC.

Unfortunately I can't link the 20th legion of Mark Antony to an exact Imperial Legion. David Sear writes that Legio XX may have been raised after Actium, in which case it could have contained some elements of Antony's disbanded twentieth.
Titus Pullo
LEG_XX.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG XX55 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley right, mast with banners at prow

LEG XX
legionary eagle between two standards

IE bankers marks on the reverse.

Patrae mint 32-31BC
2.89g

The 20th legion was founded in 49 BC by Julius Caesar.

B. The 20th Valeria was founded by Pompey in 84 BC, it was given the vacant 20th number by Augustus in 31-30 BC. Augustus granted the legion the title "Victrix" in about 25 BC.

Unfortunately I can't link the 20th legion of Mark Antony to an exact Imperial Legion. David Sear writes that Legio XX may have been raised after Actium, in which case it could have contained some elements of Antony's disbanded twentieth.
1 commentsJay GT4
DSCN7085.JPG
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI. AR 16-18mm17 viewsMark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., LEG VI.

Obv. ANT•AVG / III •VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots.

Rev. LEG - VI, legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots.

"The VI Ferrata, the "Ironclad", was an old legion of Caesar's that fought for Antony. It was retained by Augustus, and later served in Syria and Judaea. The VI Victrix, on the other hand, was one of Octavian's legions. This coin-type was 'restituted' by Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, presumably in connection with the latter's Eastern campaigns."
Lee S
Legionair.jpg
Miles Legio X, 58 - 57 B.C. (Gallic Wars)110 viewsMiles or Miles Gregarius was the Roman army rank for the basic private level foot soldier.

Legio X Equestris was one of the four legions used by Julius Caesar in 58 B.C. for his invasion of Gaul. In the Gallic wars, X Equestris played an important role on Caesar's military success, fighting under Caesar in virtually every battle. For this reason the Xth is sometimes said to be his favorite. Legio X saved the day in the battle against the Nervians in 57 BC. Together with the IXth, the Xth defeated the Atrebates, moved against the Belgians on the other side of the river and captured the enemy camp. From that position, the Xth could see how desperate the situation was for the XII Victrix as well as the VIIth. So, it quickly charged downhill, crossed the river, and attacked the Nervii from the rear, trapping them so that there was little hope of survival.

In Caesar's campaigns Legio X was present in the battle against the Nervians, the invasions of Britain, and the siege of Gergovia. They remained faithful to Caesar in the civil war against Pompey, being present in the battles of Pharsalus (49 BC) and Munda (45 BC). In 45 BC Caesar disbanded the legion, giving the veterans farmlands near Narbonne. During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus (winter 44/43), and fought for the triumvirs until the final Battle of Philippi.

The Xth later followed Mark Antony in Armenia, during his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for Mark Antony until the defeat in the Battle of Actium, after which the legion moved into Octavian's army. The veterans settled in Patras. When the legion rebelled under Augustus, it was disbanded, stripped of its Equestris title, and, being populated with soldiers from other legions, renamed X Gemina. (Source: wikipedia)

Scale of this model: 75mm (1/24)
1 commentsRomaVictor
RI 066ai img~0.jpg
Minerva (Alternate depiction)235 viewsCaracalla Denarius
Obv:– IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TR P, Laureate bust right
Rev:– MINER VICTRIX, Minerva standing half-left, holding Victory and spear, shield at his feet, trophy behind
Minted in Rome. A.D. 198
Reference:– Van Meter 49. RIC 25b. RCV02 6820. RSC 159.
maridvnvm
127~2.JPG
Monaco - Honoré II, 1/2 pezzetta9 viewsBillon, 1,40 g, 21 mm.
A/ HON.II.D.G.PRIN.MON.&C., écusson couronné
R/ CR V X. HOSTIVM. VICTRIX, croix pattée portant quatre fuseaux aux angles. 1648
Graveur : A. Montrozat
Réfs : Gad, 1981, n°7
Gabalor
0191-a00.jpg
Overview of Plautilla's Coinage by Potator II88 viewsThere are five main types of portrait for Plautilla’s denarii at the Rome mint :

A - With a draped bust right, hair coiled in horizontal ridges and fastened in bun in high position. Her facial expression is juvenile
B - Hair being coiled in vertical ridges, with bun in low position. Plautilla looks here more like a young beautiful woman
C - The third bust shows a thinner face of Plautilla with hair in vertical ridges and no bun but braids covering her neck
D - The fourth type has a similar appearance with the former, but the vertical ridges disappear, hair being plastered down, still showing the right ear
E - Plautilla appears with mid long hair plastered down and covering her ears

In the mean time there are seven different reverses :

1 - CONCORDIAE AETERNAE
2 - PROPAGO IMPERI
3 - CONCORDIA AVGG
4 - CONCORDIA FELIX
5 - PIETAS AVGG
6 - VENVS VICTRIX
7 – DIANA LVCIFERA

Not every combination exists, but some of the above reverses can be shared by several obverse portraits. Noticeable also is an evolution of the obverse legend, being PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE (a) in 202, and becoming PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA (b) soon after.

Taken with permission from the gallery of Potator II:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/index.php?cat=11724
LordBest
PlautVenVic.JPG
Plautilla85 viewsPLAVTILLA AVGVSTA
VENVS VICTRIX
Rome, 204 AD
RIC IV 369d, BM 429, C 25
whitetd49
Plautilla_Den_RIC_369.jpg
Plautilla - denarius RIC 36913 viewsPlautilla. AR Denarius, minted in Rome, ca 204 AD; 3.22g; obv. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; rev. VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RIC IV 369; RSC 25.Bartosz A
jula3.jpg
Plautilla 211 denarius23 viewsOb. PLAUTILLA AVGSTA Head Right
Rev. VENUS VICTRIX Venus standing left holding apple and palm, resting on shield & cupid
Ref. RIC 369

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
Plautilla_AR_denier.jpg
Plautilla AR Denarius, Superb.46 viewsRef Plautilla Denarius, RIC 369, RSC 25, BMC 429
Plautilla AR Denarius. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RSC 25.
2,57g.,19mm, _9353

2 commentsAntonivs Protti
Plautilla3.jpg
Plautilla Denarius16 viewsPlautilla AR Denarius. Rome
Obv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.

RIC IV, pt I, Caracalla 369, RSC 25.

Scarce
Tanit
rome_12.jpg
Plautilla Denarius - Rome - Venus Victrix - No.1226 viewsPlautilla
Denarius
204 A.D.
Rome
Av.: PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right (Hill: Lii)
Rev.: VENVS - VICTRIX / Plautilla as Venus Victrix standing left, holding apple and palm frond, resting arm on shield set on ground; to left, Cupid standing left, holding helmet
2,90 Gr., 6 h die axis
RIC 369, Coh. 25, Hill 661
nummis durensis
rome_15.jpg
Plautilla Denarius - Rome - Venus Victrix - No.12 (Variante)50 viewsPlautilla
Denarius
204 A.D.
Rome
Av.: PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right (Hill: Li)
Rev.: VENVS . VICTRIX / Plautilla as Venus Victrix standing left, holding apple and palm frond, resting arm on shield set on ground; to left, Cupid standing left, holding helmet
3,27 Gr., 12 h die axis
RIC -, Coh. -

An unusual hairstyle for this reverse-type
1 commentsnummis durensis
plautilla_369.jpg
Plautilla RIC IV, 36952 viewsPlautilla, killed 212, wife of Caracalla
AR - Denar, 3.6g, 18mm
Rome AD 204(?), struck under Septimius Severus
obv. PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. VENVS VICTRIX
Venus bare to waist, standing l., holding apple and palmbranch, and
resting left elbow on shield; at her feet l., Cupido, holding helmet
RIC IV/1, 369; C.25; BMCR. 429
Scarce; about VF

Plautilla came from Africa, was very proud and immeasurable rich. When her father was killed she was exiled to the Lipari islands and killed AD 212 by Caracalla. Her face on this coin is horrible!
BTW Due to Patricia Lawrence it is the only known issue where Cupido holds a helmet!
Jochen
PLAUTTOGETHER.jpg
Plautilla RIC#36927 viewsPlautilla AR Denarius. 20mm/2.66gr minted 204 AD

Obverse-PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right

Reverse- VENVSVICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple (pomegranite) & palm, leaning on shield,winged Cupid at her feet holding apple or pomegranite or helmet?

RIC# 369
1 commentsPaul R3
Plautilla_Venus_Victrix.jpg
Plautilla Venus Victrix22 viewsPlautilla Denarius, 3g, 20mm, RSC 25, RIC 369, SEAR 7074
OBV: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
REV: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Plautilla.jpg
Plautilla – RIC-369 (Caracalla)46 viewsPlautilla, wife of Caracalla. Augusta, 202-205 AD. AR Denarius (20mm - 3.43 g). Rome mint. Struck 202 AD. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, shield at her side, holding apple and palm, Cupid before. RIC IV 369 (Caracalla); BMCRE 429; RSC 25; RCV 7074Bud Stewart
028-3-horz.jpg
Plautilla, AR Denarius13 viewsAD 202 – 205
2.94 grams
Obv. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA draped bust of Plautilla right.
Rev. VENVS VICTRIX, Venus with Cupid at feet.
RIC 369 (A scarce variety): Sear #7074
Purchased on eBay
NGC AU Strike: 5/5 Surface: 4/5
Richard M10
Plautilla.jpg
Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla32 viewsPlautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla
Silver denarius . 3.85 g . Rome mint, 202 - 205 A.D
Obverse: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Plautilla right
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple & palm, resting her left elbow upon a shield. At her feet a Cupid stands facing left, holding a helmet.
RIC 369
Ex GB Collection
Vladislav D
66B278C04940406F99CEF28898EB1217.jpg
Plautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla35 viewsPlautilla, Augusta 202 - 22 January 205 A.D., Wife of Caracalla
Silver denarius . 3.15 g ; 21 mm . Rome mint, 202 - 205 A.D
Obverse: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Plautilla right
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple & palm, resting her left elbow upon a shield. At her feet a Cupid stands facing left, holding a helmet.
RIC 369
Vladislav D
0191-7074.jpg
Plautilla, Denarius - bE662 viewsRome mint, AD 204
PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet
3.4 gr
Ref : RCV # 7074, RIC IV # 369
Potator II
plautilla.jpg
Plautilla, Denarius, Rome 204 A.D.95 viewsPlautilla AR Denarius Rome RIC IV 369. Struck 204 A.D. 18 mm diam.
Obverse - PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA. Draped bust right
Reverse - VENVS VICTRIX. Venus standing left, brease exposed, holding apple and palm and resting left elbow on shield. Cupid standing left at her feet. Scarce
1 commentsNORMAN K
Plautillaobvrev.jpg
Plautilla, the wife of Caracalla. Augusta AD 202 - 205. AR Denarius44 viewsSize: 3.61g
AD 204 Rome
Obverse: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, her draped bust rt
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing lt., resting on shield, holding an apple and palm, Cupid before
RIC 369; BMCRE 429; RSC 25
1 commentsMarjan E
plautilla092308a.jpg
Plautilla, Venus66 viewsPlautilla,
Ar Denarius; Rome mint

PLAVTILLA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

VENVS-VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, palm in left, leaning on shield, cupid before

RIC 369
2 commentsarizonarobin
Plautilla_RIC_C369.JPG
Plautilla, wife of Caracalla22 viewsObv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Plautilla facing right, hair drawn into a coiled plait on neck.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, naked to waste, standing half left holding an apple and a palm, Cupid stands before her holding a helmet, a shield is at her side.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 204 AD

3.2 grams, 19.36 mm, 180°

RIC IVi Caracalla 369, RSC 25, S7074, VM 9
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Plautilla_VENVS_VICTRIX.jpg
Plautilla_Denar_VENVS_VICTRIX7 viewsNumis-Student
RIC_397_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0397 Vespasianus46 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, RIC_397_Vespasianus
Radiate head right
Rev: ROMA VICTRIX / S C (in exergue), Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory and spear
AE/Dupondius (26.38 mm 13.220 g 6h) Struck in Rome 72-73 A.D.
RIC 397 (R2), BMCRE - BNF unlisted
ex Artemide Auction 35E lot 161
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_397A_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0397A Vespasianus41 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right
Rev: ROMA VICTRIX / S C (in exergue), Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory and spear
AE/Dupondius (25.90 mm 11.606 g 6h) Struck in Rome 72-73 A.D.
Unpublished obverse legend variant. It will get # 397A in the next RIC update
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
DomitianVictrix.jpg
RIC 0791 Domitian denarius80 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
Laureate head right

IMP XXII COS XVII CENS PPP
Minerva, winged, flying left with spear and shield

Rome September 14, 95 AD-September 13, 96 AD

3.15g

RIC 791 (C)

Ex-Savoca 21st Blue Auction lot 1060
6 commentsJay GT4
Lucilla_10.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 786 - Lucilla, Denar, VENVS VICTRIX33 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and leaning on shield left.
Ag, 3.26g
Ref.: RIC III, p.276, 786, CRE 268 [C]
1 commentsshanxi
Julia_Domna_2.jpg
RIC 4a, p.171, 581 - Julia Domna, VENVS VICTRIX28 viewsJulia Domna
AR-Denar, Rome Mint
Obv.: IVLIA AVGVSTA, bust right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column, shield at feet.
Ag, 3.22g, 19.5mm
Ref.: RIC IV 581, CRE 402 [S]
shanxi
Plautilla_05.jpg
RIC 4a, p.270, 369 - Plautilla, Venus, Cupid22 viewsPlautilla
AR Denarius, Rome
Obv.: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple and palm and resting elbow on shield (no image on shield), at her feet Cupid
AR, 18mm, 3.39g
Ref.: RIC IVa 369, CRE 446 [C]
shanxi
Plautilla_R701_FAC.jpg
RIC 4a, p.270, 369 - Plautilla, Venus, Cupid8 viewsPlautilla
AR Denarius, Rome
Obv.: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple and palm and resting elbow on shield (crossed strokes and two vertical strokes on shield), at her feet Cupid
AR, 19mm, 3.75g
Ref.: RIC IVa 369, CRE 437-45 var. (shield symbol).
1 commentsshanxi
Plautilla_07.jpg
RIC 4a, p.270, 369var. - Plautilla, Venus, Cupid 13 viewsPlautilla
AR Denarius, Rome
Obv.: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS • VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding apple and palm and resting elbow on shield (no image on shield), at her feet Cupid
AR, 19mm, 3.23g
Ref.: RIC IVa 369var. (dot in reverse legend), CRE 446 var. (same)
shanxi
GIII-Ric131-victrix.jpg
Ric-131 Gordian III - Denarius - Venus Victrix53 viewsIMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG - Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left with helmet & scepter, leaning on shield

4th Issue. A scarcer type! Mistakenly attributed as struck in the summer of 241 as one of 6 issued to commemorate the marriage of Gordian III and Sabinia Tranquillina. Last issue of AR denarius produced for circulation in the Roman Empire.

RIC-131(r) Cohen-347
jimwho523
16936p00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - GORDIAN III87 viewsBronze "limes" denarius, cf. RIC 131, RSC 347, BMC 347, choice VF, 2.889g, 19.1mm, 45o, Rome mint, 241 A.D.; obverse IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple and transverse scepter, and resting left elbow atop and leaning on shield.2 commentsdpaul7
bpS1C9Caracalla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla122 viewsObv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureate and bare bust, right.
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter while left arm rests on shield set on helmet.
Limes Falsa, 2.3 gm, 18.8 mm, Uncertain mint in the style of Rome (RIC 311b)
Comment: Very little is understood of these base metal denarii. Theories run the gamut from frontier military script; fourree cores, and on to modern copy.
1 commentsMassanutten
a25.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla antoninianus36 viewsCaracalla AD 196-217 Silver Antoninianus VF
Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding Victory and spear and leaning on shield. Rome mint: AD 213-217 = RIC IVi, 311d (s) Scarce, page 259 - British Museum
1 commentsNico
9zusa.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla, AR Antoninianus27 viewsVENVS VICTRIX1 commentsNumis-Student
caracalla56LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla, AR Denarius52 viewsCARACALLA AR silver denarius. Struck at Rome, 216 AD. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right. Reverse - VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory & scepter, helmet on ground to right. RSC 606. Broad 19mm flan, 2.9g. Extremely Fine.sseverus
025-3-horz~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla, AR Denarius60 viewsAD 198 – 217
3.37 grams
Obv. IMP CAE M AVR ANT AVG P TR P, laureate, draped bust of Caracalla right
Rev. MINER VICTRIX, Minerva stg. L., holding Victory and spear, shield at feet, trophy behind
RIC 25b: Sear #6820
1 commentsRichard M10
Denarius04.JPG
Roman Empire, Caracalla, Rome mint, struck 213-217 AD, Silver Denarius60 viewsANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM laureate-headed bust right
VENVS VICTRIX Venus standing left holding victory and spear
RIC 311b, Cohen 606
dupondius
Caracalla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Caracalla, Silver Antoninianus65 viewsStruck 213-217 AD, Rome mint, 23mm, 6.4g, RIC IV 311c, EF

OBVERSE: Radiate head of Caracalla, bearded, draped, cuirassed, right. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG[USTUS] GER[MANICUS] (Antoninus Pius, the Revered One, Conqueror of the Germans).

REVERSE: Goddess of love, beauty, desire, sex, fertility, prosperity, and victory, Venus, draped, standing left, holding Victory in extended right hand and spear in left hand, leaning on shield set on helmet. VENUS VICTRIX (Venus Victorius).
3 commentsMichael H4
domric196.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Domitian, Denarius146 viewsSilver denarius, 18mm, 3.3g, Rome shortly before 13 September 96 A.D.

IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV laureate head right
IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Maia wearing winged hat, advancing left holdingcaduceus and dove; RIC 196, RSC 295

A most interesting coin, with a reverse that belongs to what would have become a major reform. Besides this type, Domitian introduced the "Minerva Victrix", the "altar" reverse and the "Domitian in military dress" reverse which is known from an unique coin. So far Maia was simply noted as "unknown woman", but recently, Prof. T.V. Buttrey properly identified her as Maia, the mother of Hermes, in his article that will appear this year in the Journal of Roman Archeology. From the few recorded specimens (less than ten, all struck with the same reverse die) this is most likely the finest.

4 commentsFORVM AUCTIONS
minvic~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Domitian, Denarius127 viewsSilver denarius, Rome shortly before 13 September 96 A.D.; IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P XV laureate head right
IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P P P, Minerva Victrix flying left, holding shield and spear; RIC 194, RSC 294

One of the reformed reverses mentioned above. Unlike the previous type, the coins were struck with more than one reverse die. So far I did not see a die match yet. It is interesting that most of these were engraved quite hastily in a poor style that perhaps would have been unacceptable in the previous years; perhaps Domitian ordered the reform to be carried out at a fast pace. Still, the specimen here was finelly executed.
3 commentsFORVM AUCTIONS
Gallienus_Cunetio_hoard_1104~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Gallienus - AE antoninianus211 viewsRome
260-268 AD
radiate head right
GALLIENVS AVG
Venus standing left, holding helmet and spear, shield to left
VENVS VICTRIX
Cunetio hoard 1104, Normanby hoard 151 (S)
R !
2,23 g 18-16 mm

this revers is unlisted in RIC for Gallienus - only for Salonina
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Lucilla Denarius Venus Victrix.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Lucilla, AR denarius120 views1 commentsOptimus
bpS1C7Plautilla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Plautilla45 viewsObv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA
Draped bust, right.
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing, left, holding apple and palm while resting arm on shield. Cupid stands at her feet with arms extended forward and holding a helmet.
Denarius, 2.9 gm, 18.5 mm, Rome RIC 369
Comment: Wife to Caracalla. Struck 204 A.D.
Massanutten
0191-bE6.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, PLAUTILLA Denarius RIC 36974 viewsRome mint, AD 204
PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet
3.4 gr
Ref : RCV # 7074, RIC IV # 369
2 commentsPotator II
Plautilla1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Plautilla, Denarius55 viewsPlautilla

Obv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX
RIC 369
Barry
Plautilla1_.jpg
Roman Plautilla Denarius20 viewsPlautilla AR Denarius. Rome
Obv: PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet.

RIC IV, pt I, Caracalla 369, RSC 25.

Scarce

Tanit
Screenshot_2018-08-27_13_32_21.png
Roman Republic, Gens: Porcia, M. Porcius Cato, AR Denarius.3 viewsRome 89 B.C. 3.72g - 18.5mm, Axis 11h.

Obv: ROMA / M•CATO - Female bust with diadem, ROMA behind, M•CATO beneath.

Rev: VICTRIX - Victoria Virgo seated right, holding patera, VICTRIX in ex.

Porcia 5; Crawford 343/1b; Syd 596.
Christian Scarlioli
AR_-_M__Cato-3~0.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius31 views89 BC
2.25 - grams
Obv.: Head of young Bacchus right, wearing ivy wreath
Rev.: Victory seated right on chair set on ground line, holding patera in right hand and palm frond over left shoulder; VICTRIX, partially ligate, in exergue.
Crawford 343/2b. King 46a-e. RSC Porcia 7a
Richard M10
catoquinariuscombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Porcius Cato, AR Quinarius - Crawford 343/2b21 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Porcius Cato, 89 BCE.
AR Quinarius (2.08g; 14mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: M.CATO; Liber head facing right wearing ivy wreath; rudder (control mark) below.

Reverse: VICTRIX; Victory seated left, holding patera in outstretched hand and palm over left shoulder.

References: Crawford 343/2b; Sydenham 597c; BMCRR (Italy) 677-93var (symbol); Porcia 7.

Provenance: Ex Elsen 141 (15 Jun 2019) Lot 152; Elsen List 60 (Oct 1983), Lot 37.

The precise identity of the moneyer is uncertain. Crawford believes the obverse head of Liber alludes to the Porcian Laws which broadened the rights of Roman citizens with respect to punishments and appeals. This issue of quinarii was huge, with Crawford estimating 400 obverse and 444 reverse dies. The obverse appears in two varieties: one with control marks below the head, and one without. The control marks include Greek and Latin letters, numbers and symbols.
4 commentsCarausius
caracalla_AD214_AR-antoninianus_venus-victrix_bothsides.JPG
Roman, Caracalla AR Antoninianus - 'Venus Victrix'297 viewsCaracalla AR Antoninianus.

obv: ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from front.
rev: VENVS VICTRIX - Venus standing holding victory and sceptre, shield by her side.
Well struck and well centered coin on a very large flan.
5.2 grams.
1 commentsrexesq
salonina.jpg
Salonina AR Antoninianus. 256-257 AD.8 viewsSalonina AR Antoninianus. 256-257 AD. VERY RARE!!!!!!Obv: SALONINA AVG, diademed, draped bust right on crescent.
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX,
Venus, naked to waist and seen from back, standing right, leaning left elbow on column, leaning on column, holding palm and apple. Sole Reign of Gallienus.
This reverse is not in RIC but published under Göbl 0904c Cologne, Cunetio hoard 735, Elmer 98, Stevenage hoard 519, Biglis, Dinas Powys hoard (1978/9): IARCW 440/2.

Ex CNG.
Britanikus
lady01.jpg
Salonina RIC 3131 viewsSalonina
RIC 31, C 129 Antoninianus Obv: SALONINAAVG - Diademed, draped bust right on crescent.
Rev: VENVSVICTRIX - Venus standing left, holding helmet and spear, shield to left.
Scotvs Capitis
salonina_86.jpg
Salonina, Göbl 167166 viewsSalonina, killed 268, wife of Gallienus
AR - Antoninianus, 4.39g, 22mm
Antiochia, AD 267
obv. SALONINA AVG
bust, draped and diademed, on crescent, r.
rev. VENV - S AVG
Venus standing frontal, head l., leaning with l. ellbow on shield,
holding transverse spear in l. and helmet in l. hand
in ex. PXV
ref. RIC V/1, 86; C.113; Göbl 1671
good VF

VENUS with these attributes reminds on VENUS VICTRIX
2 commentsJochen
salonina090508a.jpg
Salonina, Venus37 viewsAntoninianus; 2.31 g, 19-23 mm

SALONINA AVG
Draped bust right, wearing stephane, on crescent

VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing right, leaning on column

Goebl 904c; Cunetio hoard 735 (Not in RIC)
arizonarobin
Salonine_-_venus_victrix_3.JPG
Salonine - VENVS VICTRIX12 viewsSALONINA AVG
VENVS VICTRIX
Venus Callipyge de dos, accoudé à une colonne, elle tient un globe et une palme.
Trèves - 1ere Émission - automne 258
Bourdel 384
Göbl 904c
Eauze 1522
Elmer 98
PYL
Salonine_-_venus_victrix_2.JPG
Salonine - VENVS VICTRIX7 viewsSALONINA AVG
VENVS VICTRIX
Venus debout de face, accoudé à un bouclier, elle tient une palme et un globe.
Cologne - 1ere Émission - septembre 256
Bourdel 223
Göbl 899c
Eauze 1514
Elmer 61
PYL
Septimius_Severus_(193-211)_legionary_denarius_(Legio_XIV_Gemina_Victrix).png
Septimius Severus (193-211) legionary denarius (Legio XIV Gemina Victrix) (AR)17 viewsObv.: IMP CAES L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II (Laureate head of emperor) Rev.: LEG XIIII GEM M V (legionary eagly between two standards) Exergue: TR P COS Diameter: 16 mm Weight: 3,1 g RIC 397

Interestingly, the obverse legend says 'COS II' while the reverse exergue says 'COS', implying the coins honoring the 14th continued to be struck after the main legionary series in 193 CE.
Nick.vdw
Sestertius_Victrix_seated.jpg
Sestertius VENVS FELIX 30 views1 commentsmix_val
Sestertius_Helmet_Venus_Victirx_shield_sceptre.jpg
Sestertius VENVS VICTRIX shield sceptre and helmet24 viewsmix_val
Leg_XXX_VV_brick.jpg
Stamped Roof Tile from LEGIO XXX38 viewsA Roman roof tile, or brick, bearing XXX VV. This is part of the stamp LEG XXX VV from Legio XXX Ulpia Victrix. This tile fragment was found by my son in a ploughed farm field at Carnuntum. Legio XXX VV was never stationed at Carnuntum but was stationed at Brigetio (the next legionary base downstream on the Danube, now Komarom, Hungary) 103 - 118 AD. Other tiles from Legio XXX VV have been found at Carnuntum, including on in the collection of R.F. Ertl, and thus tiles must have been shipped upriver from Brigetio to the larger base and town at Carnuntum. 1 commentsotlichnik
JC_portrait_k.jpg
The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. January-February 44 BC19 viewsAR Denarius, 19mm, 3.9 g, 9h; Rome mint. L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer.
Obv.: Wreathed head of Caesar right; CAESAR • IM downwards before, large crescent dividing P M upwards behind.
Rev.: Venus Victrix standing left, holding Victory on extended right hand and holding scepter in left; L • AEMILIVS • BVCA around.
Reference: Crawford 480/4; 17-34-910
1 commentsJohn Anthony
VICTORIN-trêves-3_em_1er_phase_-pax_aug.JPG
Trèves - 3e Emission - 2e Phase - (270) - PAX AVG16 viewsIMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG
PAX AVG
V dans le champ gauche, en l'honneur de la XXXa Vlpia Victrix et de Victorin
une étoile dans le champ droite
EG 197
Cunetio 2530
RIC 118
Elmer 682
AGK 14b
de Witte 55
Cohen 79
PYL
R-01.jpg
Valerian I 253-260 CE, Æ 20mm, Antoninianus.56 viewsValerian I 253-260 CE, Æ 20mm, Antoninianus.

Obverse: IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped bust right.

Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX Venus standing left, holding helmet and sceptre, leaning on shield.

Reference: RIC 222, C 212.
Daniel Friedman
plautilla_369~0.jpg
Venus Victrix272 viewsPlautilla, killed 212, wife of Caracalla
AR - Denar, 3.6g, 18mm
Rome AD 204(?), struck under Septimius Severus
obv. PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. VENVS VICTRIX
Venus bare to waist, standing l., holding apple and palmbranch, and
resting left elbow on shield; at her feet l., Cupido, holding helmet
RIC IV/1, 369; C.25; BMCR. 429
Scarce; about VF

VENUS VICTRIX, the victorious Venus. It was first Sulla who in a dream saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her to his personal patroness. Pompeius then was inaugurating the cult of Venus Victrix in Rome. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 BC Pompeius was dreaming of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign -, whereas Caesar was sacrifying to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompeius!
2 commentsJochen
Caracalla-Denar-VENUSVICTRIX.jpg
VENUS VICTRIX99 viewsCARACALLA - Denar

A) ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
Laureated head right

R) VENVS VICTRIX
Venus standing left, holding Victoriola (?) and sceptre , she is leaning on a shield, which is placed on a helmet

Weight:3,4g; Ø: 17mm; Reference: RIC IV/I/311b; ROME mint; struck: 213-217 A.D.
sulcipius
venus victrix forum.jpg
Venus Victrix - the rear view536 viewsSabina, AR denarius, 128 AD.
RIC 412, RSC 89, Sear RCV II,3927.
A gorgeous rear view of the goddess of love, with an elegant "Grecian bend"-curve to the figure, much more pleasing than the dumpy little ladies normally found on denarii of Domna, etc.
- Britannicus
4 commentsBritannicus
Gordianus_VENVS_VICTRIX_go21_b2.jpg
VENVS VICTRIX7 viewsGordianus III. denarius
The die engraver almost forgot to engrave the X letter :)
Tibsi
MAmae_2.JPG
VENVS VICTRIX15 viewsObv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right
Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding helmet & scepter, shield at feet.
RSC 76, RIC 358, RSC 76, BMC 713
Podiceps
VENVS_VICTRIX.jpg
VENVS VICTRIX43 viewsobv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG laurate, draped and cuirassed bust of gordian right seen from behind

Rev: Venus standing left holding transversal sceptre in left hand leaning on shield and helmet in right hand.

RIC 131
C 347

refered R by RIC but seems more likely C
leseullunique
Gordianus_VENVS_VICTRIX_ei_b.jpg
VENVS VICTRIX14 viewsGordianus III. denariusTibsi
CIIGRICV197unlistedvar.jpg
[1114a] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.59 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 197 var (pellet in exergue), aEF, 3.880g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, • in exergue; full silvering, bold strike, excellent centering and eastern style, rare this nice; rare variety. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV214.jpg
[1114b] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.53 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC V 214, VF, 2.930g, 20.3mm, 180o, Antioch mint; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right; Reverse: NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident in left hand, • in exergue; excellent centering. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ClaudiusIIGothicusRIC34.jpg
[1114c] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.51 viewsAntoninianus. RIC 34. Weight, Size. F. Rome mint. Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right; Reverse: FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, holding two standards. Ex Maridvnvm


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
 
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