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DenTiVeturiobis.jpg
21 viewsAR Denarius - TI. VETVRIVS - 137 BC. Gens Veturia - Mint of Rome
Obv.: Helmeted bust of Mars right, X and TI. VE (VE in monogram) behind
Rev.: Youth kneeling holding pig, between two soldiers; ROMA above
Gs. 3,6 mm. 18,3
Crawf. 234/1, Sear RCV 111
Some dies of this coin have a crude style.
Maxentius
DenManlioTorquatoLSilla.jpg
87 viewsDenarius - 82 BC. - Mint moving with Sulla
L. MANLIVS TORQVATVS & L. CORNELIVS SVLLA - Gens Manlia & Cornelia
Obv.: Helmeted head of Roma right, PROQ behind; L MANLI T (T in horizontal position) before.
Rev.: Triumphator in quadriga right, crowned by flying Victory, L SVLLA IMP in ex.
Gs. 4,1 mm. 17,86x18,26
Crawf. 367/3, Sear RCV 287, Grueber II (East) 13

On the coins of this Sulla's issue, there is one of the best stylistic depictions of Rome's head
2 commentsMaxentius
Troas1.jpg
81 viewsTROAS, ALEXANDREIA, Third Century AD, AE 21
Turreted bust of Tyche right; behind, vexillum/Horse grazing right. 21 mm. Cf. SNG Cop 109 (obv. legend variant); cf. Grose 7763 (obv. legend variant); cf. Lindgren I, 326 (obv. legend variant).
Collecting Ancient Greek Coins 25b (this coin pictured).

Ex: Dr. Paul Rynearson
1 commentspaul1888
coin633.jpg
26 viewsIt is a copper lion of Mary Queen of Scots.
It is also known as a "hardhead", they were issued
1555-1560. It contains about 10% silver. they
were valued at three halfpence Scots, and were
equal in value to the french denier. The coin carries
the monogram FM, which appeared on her coinage
after her husband, the Dauphin, became Francis II
of France, on 10th July 1559. Francis died in 1560,
so this was issued within that period. Coin #633

cars100
coin630.jpg
24 viewsLooks to me like a *very* beat-up Macedonian Alex III
'standard' type - Alexander in lion-skin headdress on
obverse, bow-case and club on reverse with some
inscription (often ALEXANDROY) in between them.
This might be the 1/2-size of the typical 5-7gm
20mm piece. Coin #630
cars100
Pella.jpg
37 viewsMacedonia, Pella AE21. 158-149 BC. Bust of Pan / Athena Alkidemos advancing right. Ref.Sear 1445

( I was given this coin as a bonus by an experienced collector / dealer, to attempt electrolysis on, he had been attempting to clean it with conventional methods for 1½ years, however it remained a nugget... I know some members will object, but 10 minuets in the bath of evil, and the crust just flaked off revealing a pretty and detailed coin!!! How I wish it was always so easy!!)
Lee S
aajudaeabrit.jpg
31 viewsCaesarea, Paneas. AE23.
Obv : head of Claudius
Rev : His 3 children : Antonia, Britannicus and Octavia

Ref : RPC 4842
Hen-567
This coin type seems questionable to place under the coinage of Agrippa II since the legends do not mention Agrippa and the time of minting does not conform to the other Agrippa II coins. We will notice the absence of Agrippa's name in other issues as well. At the very least, though, it was struck at Caesarea-Paneas, so it is definitely part of the city coinage. It is catalogued in The Numismatic Legacy of the Jews in the city coinage section as #208.
R. Smits, Numismatist for Numismall
Valentinian_II.JPG
36 viewsValentinian II, AD 337-383, Antioch Mint
I suppose this is an AE Follis
Jon the Lecturer
112~0.JPG
98 viewsHistory of Thessalian League
The Thessalian League/confederacy was made up of several cities in the Thessalian valley in Northern Greece. This area was completely surrounded by mountains and isolated except for a few passes. It was one of the few areas of Greece self-sufficient in grain and produced livestock and horses. Thessaly had the best calvary in Greece. The league was frequently weakened by intercity rivalries and lost its strength in the 5th century BC. The league was re-established in 374 BC by the tyrant Jason. He was assassinated in 370 BC, when it became evident that he had plans of conquest against the rest of Greece. After the death of Jason, there was infighting in the league and some of the cities requested help from Philip II of Macedon to settle the rivalries, which he accomplished in 353 BC. A few years later (344 BC), Philip II simply took control of the entire area. Thessaly remained under Macedonian control until Macedonia was defeated by the Romans in 197 BC. A new league was established in 196 BC. The league continued until 146 BC, then became part of the Roman province of Macedonia.
Antonivs Protti
Philip_1_Lion_Ruby_A.jpg
69 viewsPHILIP I, AD 244-249, AR Antoninianus minted at Rome,
Obverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right of Philip I
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG Lion walking right I in exergue. 22.5mm. RIC 12; C. 173.
Ex Superior Ruby Part 2 Sale, June 17 through 22, 1974, lot 1045.
Ex. Dr. Charles L. Ruby Collection
Ex. Dr. Paul Rynearson

Note: The Ruby collection was purchase in 1971 by Superior Galleries for $1,000,000 and sold in three auctions. This coin was sold in auction two of the three auctions. This coin is pictured in the catalog and sold for $65.00.
paul1888
philip_I_temple_new.jpg
58 viewsPHILIP I. 244-249 AD. AR Antoninianus, Rome, struck 248 AD. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / Statue standing half-left within hexastyle temple. RIC IV 25b; RSC 198.
Ex. S. Beagle collection; Ex. Dorchester Hoard

This is a fairly common coin but difficult to find with both the obverse and reverse of good quality as well as having such good metal quality.
1 commentspaul1888
Troas_D.jpg
63 viewsTROAS, ALEXANDREIA, Third Century AD, AE 21
Turreted bust of Tyche right; behind, vexillum/Horse grazing right. 21 mm. Cf. SNG Cop 109 (obv. legend variant); cf. Grose 7763 (obv. legend variant); cf. Lindgren I, 326 (obv. legend variant).
Collecting Ancient Greek Coins 25b (this coin pictured).
1 commentspaul1888
UV2_full_web.jpg
21 viewsPossibly this is (dot) SMNA - see related picture in this album for other view of mintmarkMatthew W2
UV1_full_web.jpg
43 viewsExergue seems to be: (dot?) SM.... (this could possibly be cleaned a bit further to reveal more detail, but I am suspicious that the third letter in the exergue is H, so I am not sure that further cleaning would be worthwhile, at least not until my cleaning skills improve).4 commentsMatthew W2
Urbs_gloria.jpg
25 viewsThe seller identified this as from Trier, but now that I see the mintmark a bit clearer, I am thinking maybe it's an official issue from Heraclea?Matthew W2
constantius_ii_campgate_smts1.jpg
39 viewsThe patina on this one is a beautiful dark green and glossy
Constantine II CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C LDC left
PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS 2 6 to 8, three seen with a base, two of them with dots in top layer SMTS Delta Thessalonica RIC VII Thessalonica 157 C3 326-328
James b4
philip_I_on_horseback_sept.jpg
82 viewsPHILIP. 244-249 AD. AR Antoninianus. 4.47 grams
Rome, struck 244-247 AD.
Obverse: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG; / Bust of Philip right
Reverse: ADVENTVS AVGG; Phillip riding the horse, holding spear.

Note: The reverse of this coin makes refernce to the return of Philip I and his son to Rome after the death of Gordian III.
Ref: Historical References to Coins of the Roman Empire by E. A. Syndenham
3 commentspaul1888
ABM_Postumus.jpg
81 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, sestertius, 260

IMP C M CASS LAT POST[...],Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in arms
Weight 15.49g

A very rare early issue with Postumus' full name given on the obverse - normally this only occurs on radiate double-sestertii. This is struck from the same obverse die as a gold medallion in Paris with a SALVS PROVINCIARVM reverse.
Adrianus
9448.jpg
12 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10747.jpg
23 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10724.jpg
17 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
Postumus_sestertius_helmeted_bust.jpg
49 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, double sestertius
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, spurning captive
Weight 20.07g

A very rare obverse type - this coin from the same obverse die as the examples illustrated in Bastien
2 commentsAdrianus
britannicus01.jpg
47 viewsAE sestertius. Struck under Claudius, circa 50-54 AD, uncertain eastern provincial mint located in the modern-day Balkans.
Obv : TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG F BRITANNICVS, draped bust left.
Rev : - No legend, Mars advancing left, holding spear and shield, SC in fields. 35mm, 19.4g. Extremely Rare.

Ref : BMCRE 226
Cohen 2
RCV 1908, valued at $32,000 in Fine, which is a few multiples greater than any other sestertius issued during the several centuries the denomination was in use.
A large number of the surviving examples of this series (one may even suggest a majority of them), due to their rarity, have been subjected to modern alteration techniques such as smoothing, tooling, and repatination. As such, it's actually pleasant to see a bit of field roughness and a 'plain brown' patina of old copper on this example, evidence that it is just as ugly as it was the day it was last used in circulation back in Ancient Rome.
Britannicus, originally known as Germanicus after Claudius' older brother, was the emperor's original intended heir and natural son. Machinations by Agrippina II eventually saw Britannicus supplanted by her own son Nero, (by Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus) who took the throne upon Claudius' suspicious death. Britannicus himself died a few years later, reportedly poisoned by his step-brother. The future emperor Titus and Britannicus were close friends, and Titus became quite ill and nearly died after eating from the same poisoned dish that killed Britannicus.
R. Smits, Numismatist for Numismall
Copy_of_severus-alexander_ae-sestertius_quadriga_02.jpg
16 viewsSeverus Alexander
Ancient Rome
Emperor Severus Alexander(222 - 232 AD) AE (Bronze) Sestertius
Struck at the Rome Mint in AD 229 - 230.

obv: IMP SEV ALEXANDER AVG - Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder.

rev: P M TR P VIII COS III P P - Emperor riding in quadriga right holding eagle tipped sceptre in one hand and holding the reigns in the other.
'SC' below, in exergue.

Weight: 21 Grams
Size: 32 mm - 33 mm

References: Cohen 377, RIC 495
-----------------------

~*~I will most likely be taking this coin out of it's plastic prison soon. I will post more pics after doing so.~*~
rexesq
Phokis_Federal_Triobal.jpg
92 viewsPHOKIS FEDERAL COINAGE AR TRIOBOL
C. 445-420 BC
Obv: Facing bulls head
Rev: Head of Artemis in incuse square
Super metal and detail
Williams 242a pl 8 (this coin)
2.97g
14mm

Ex. Roderick T Williams Collection, Baldwin's Auction 75, September 26, 2012, lot 2274.

Published: Silver Coinage of the Phokians, Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication Number 7 (London, 1972), 242a Plate 8
5 commentspaul1888
argolis_wolf_weber.jpg
58 viewsPeloponnesos. Argolis, Argos. Triobol. Wolf. Weber Plate Coin.

Date: c. 90-50 B.C.
Denomination: AR Triobol.
Diameter: 15 mm.
Weight: 2.29 grams.
Obverse: Forepart of wolf at bay left.
Reverse: Large A; below, eagle standing right; within shallow incuse.
Reference: Weber 4192 (this coin). BCD Peloponnesos 1177. BMC 114.

Ex: Sir Hermann Weber Collection, Ex: Spink 1888

Published: Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber MD, 1823-1918, Described Volume II, page 476, pictured on plate 154, #4192

Link to Plate 154: http://people.virginia.edu/~jdk3t/WeberPlates/Weber154.html

1 commentspaul1888
Otacilia_hippo.jpg
62 viewsOtacilia Severa, wife of Philip I (A.D. 244-249), Silver Antoninianus, Rome mint, fourth officina, A.D. 248, diademed draped bust of Otacilia right, on crescent, OTACIL SEVERA AVG, rev., SAECVLARES AVGG, hippopotamus standing right, IIII in exergue, (RCV 9160; RIC 116b),

Ex Superior Ruby Part 2 Sale, June 17 through 22, 1974, lot 1048.
Ex. Dr. Charles L. Ruby Collection
Ex: Dr. Paul Rynearson
Ex: Kirk Davis Catalog of Ancient Coins, No. 61, Lot 84

Note: The Ruby collection was purchase in 1971 by Superior Galleries for $1,000,000 and sold in three auctions. This coin was sold in auction two of the three auctions. This coin is pictured in the catalog and sold for $95.00.
1 commentspaul1888
10278.jpg
13 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10185.jpg
10 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
9676.jpg
11 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10705.jpg
14 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10034.jpg
11 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10344.png
12 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
10327.png
14 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
11126.jpg
16 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me know.johnwcdc
11079.jpg
19 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me knowjohnwcdc
10923.jpg
17 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me knowjohnwcdc
10832.jpg
19 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me knowjohnwcdc
10778.jpg
24 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me knowjohnwcdc
11146.jpg
17 viewsIf anything wrong with this, please let me knowjohnwcdc
Metapont_Nomos1.jpg
45 viewsdidrachm, 330/290 BC
7.82 g
obv: head of Demeter left
rev: ear of grain, tongs to left, META to right
(Johnston C 4.20 (this coin); Rutter, Historia Numorum 1583)
from Ars Classica 15, Luzern 1930, No. 167, ex Künker e-Auction 17, No. 7
2 commentsareich
Samos_didrachm.jpg
110 viewsIslands off Ionia, Samos. Circa 310-300 BC. AR Didrachm (6.24 gm, 19mm). Asklepiades. Obv.: lion’s mask facing. Rev.: ΣΑ / [Α]ΣΚΛΗΠΙΑΔ[ΗΣ] Forepart of an ox to right, with a dotted truncation and an olive branch to right. Barron p. 214, 2 b (this coin). Ex:Münzen und Medaillen AG, Basel - fixed price list 169 (1957), lot 183 commentspaul1888
roman_tray3a.jpg
34 viewsPreparing to trim down my collection to one portait of each Roman family member that I can find this is the third tray to the end of the third century.mauseus
roman_tray2a.jpg
62 viewsPreparing to trim down my collection to one portait of each Roman family member that I can find this is the second tray, the first part of the third century. Compiled this tray then noticed that I'd forgotten to put in Trajan Decius (doh!).1 commentsmauseus
Philip_I_on_horseback_a.jpg
48 viewsPHILIP. 244-249 AD. AR Antoninianus. 4.47 grams
Rome, struck 244-247 AD.
Obverse: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG; / Bust of Philip right
Reverse: ADVENTVS AVGG; Phillip riding the horse, holding spear.

Note: The reverse of this coin makes refernce to the return of Philip I and his son to Rome after the death of Gordian III.
Ref: Historical References to Coins of the Roman Empire by E. A. Syndenham
1 commentspaul1888
Elis_Olympia_drachm.jpg
26 viewsELIS, Olympia. AR Drachm (4.63g), c. 245-210 BC.

Eagle flying with hare in talons / Thunderbolt, F A in field. BCD 250. good Very Fine, old toning.

Ex: Dr. Paul Rynearson, with his handwritten tag.
Collecting Ancient Greek Coins (Paul Rynearson) 16d (this coin pictured).
paul1888
PICT0242.JPG
128 viewsAn 18 tray cabinet with doors. This was one of five cabinets I built for this collector to house his collection of ancient electrum and gold.

www.CabinetsByCraig.net
cmcdon0923
Eion.jpg
74 viewsMacedon, Eion, trihemiobol, 5th century BC, goose standing right, head looking back; above, lizard, rev., quadripartite incuse square, 0.77g

Boston 610; K. Regling, Die Griechischen Munzen der Sammlung Warren, Berlin, 1906, 569 ; SNG ANS 274ff.

Provenance:
Ex: Morton and Eden Ltd, In association with Sotheby’s; A Collection of Exceptional Greek Coins, Catalog 51, Monday, October 24, 2011, lot 85
Ex: Numismatic Fine Arts VIII, 6 June 1980, lot 97
Ex: Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Collection (accession number 04.667). Published: Catalogue of Greek Coins in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 1955; 610 (this coin),
Ex: Edward Perry Warren collection; Published: Die Griechischen Munzen der Sammlung Warren, Berlin, 1906, 569 (this coin).
Ex: Canon Greenwell Collection


Note: Cannon Greenwell, a well-known Durham antiquarian, sold for £11.000 |$55.000) his fine collection of Greek coins to Edward Perry Warren in 1901.
Source: Los Angeles Herald, Volume XXVIII, Number 323, 19 August 1901, Page 7
4 commentspaul1888
Sear-336.jpg
21 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Decanummium (16mm, 2.75 g). Uncertain mint. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield / Large six-pointed star within wreath. DOC 368; MIBE 239 (Ravenna); SB 336. VF, dark green patina. An attractive example of this rare issue. Quant.Geek
stuff-01.jpg
13 viewsMassachusetts Treasury Loan Certificate £15 June 1, 1780 MA-8
This certificate is listed as MA-8 in Anderson's The Price of Liberty. It bears the Sword in Hand vignette encircled by a rattlesnake. Anderson rates this piece as a low R7, indicating only 7 to 12 examples are known.
1 commentsSpongeBob
lot943919.jpg
21 viewsFaustina II. Silver Denarius (3.27 g), Augusta, AD 147-175. Rome, under Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, AD 161-164/5. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Faustina II right, with single circle of pearls around head. Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing facing, head left, holding patera and scepter. RIC -; BMC -; RSC -. Unpublished in the standard references without the peacock. Normally a peacock is shown standing at the feet of Juno on the reverse. On this coin, the bird is missing.Quant.Geek
IMG_2767.JPG
32 viewsAE Onkia, 2.11 g, Sicily, Panormos, ca. 415-380 B.C. Obv: Forepart of Man-headed bull facing left, possibly ear of corn above or simply an encrustation divided from the man-faced bull by the tooler, in which case SYS should be above. Rev: Horse trotting right, ear of corn above. Calciati I, 272, no. 11. Hoover HGC 2, 1062 (this coin); Giuseppe Bucetti "Monete, Storia e topografia della Sicilia Greca," p. 344 (this coin); MSP I, 48b (this coin illustrated).

Definite tooling around the major devices, on the legs and back. Face apparently untouched though field in front has been smoothed.

Ex. Dr. Busso-Peus, Auction 386, No. 108 (unsold). Tooled.
2 commentsMolinari
Herrli-01_31.jpg
11 viewsSIKH EMPIRE: AE ¼ anna (7.35g), Amritsar, VS(18)96, KM-5var, Herrli-01.31, small cross in obverse field, pa anna nanakshahi on reverse, lovely strike, gorgeous EF, R, ex Paul Stevens Collection. Herrli divided these into a paisa (=¼ anna) and half paisa (11-12g, and 5.5g, respectively), but all coins are inscribed "pa anna" for ¼ anna, and all weigh in the range of 7.0g to 8.5g; thus there is only one denomination for this type.
Quant.Geek
Pseudo_Rhodian_Drachm.jpg
35 viewsMacedonian Kingdom. Perseus. 179-168 B.C. AR drachm (15 mm, 2.60 g, 12 h). ca. 171/0 B.C. Aristokrates, magistrate. Head of Helios facing slightly right / P-O, rose with bud to left; in left field, club; above, magistrate's name: [ΑΡΙ]ΣΤΟΚΡΑΤΗΣ. R. J. H. Ashton, ""Clubs, Thunderbolts, Torches, Stars and Caducei: more Pseudo-Rhodian Drachms from Mainland Greece and the Islands,"" NC 162 (2002), 17 (A6/P5; this coin). Toned. Very fine.
Ex Naville V (18 June 1923), 2669. British Museum Duplicate, Ex: British Museum


The Pseudo-Rhodian drachms were struck, probably by the Macedonians under Perseus but possibly by the Romans, to pay for Mercenaries from Crete and Rhodes who would have been familiar with Rhodian coinage. The coins in the name of the magistrate Aristokrates with the club symbol in the field is the largest known individual issue of pseudo-Rhodian drachms from the Third Macedonian War, and used at least twenty-nine obverse dies.
paul1888
_DSCCC3710.jpg
8 viewsivus Augustus (died AD 14). Orichalcum dupondius (30mm, 15.45 gm, 6h). Rome, under Claudius, AD 42-50. DIVVS AVGVSTVS, radiate head of the deified Augustus left between S – C /A, Livia seated to left holding grain ears in right hand and long torch wrapped in left arm. RIC (Claudius) 101 (R2). BMCRE (Claudius) 224. Cohen 93. Rare! Boldly struck on a large, heavy flan, from dies of exceptional style. Fantastic portrait and natural chocolate brown patina. Choice Extremely Fine. From The Lexington Collection. Ex UBS 78 (Basel, 9 September 2008), lot 1377. One of the first acts of Claudius, after his accession as emperor, was to propose that the late Livia, wife of Augustus, be deified. The Senate granted this honor in AD AD 42, 13 years after her death, and the appropriate celebrations were made. This attractive coin could be viewed as commemorating the event, depicting the long-deified Augustus along new, with his newly elevated wife. The work of cutting the dies was obviously considered important enough to be given to a master engraver, as both the portrait of Augustus and the graceful image of Livia are of outstanding quality.1 commentsRonald
REVERSESl.jpg
124 viewsThis "Otho" with "VÍCTORIA PR" reverse is an ingenious fabrication created by the famous forger "Tardani". He had obviously realized that there were a few VICTORIA OTHONIS dies recut from Galba's VICTORIA PR dies and created this fictitious but possible coin with copies of real dies. I used to have this coin and another with the same dies is in the Berlin coin cabinet. Both are overweight, around 3.9 gr. It took some time to find a Galba minted with this particular reverse die but finally I succeeded. The final proof is seen in this coin, there are a few regions were the die has broken, ie before the die ever could have been used for an Otho coin. The coin is quite convincing because of the dies, but the surfaces were a bit strange and the legends unusual in profile.jmuona
Klazomenai_Silver_Hemidrachm.jpg
24 viewsIonia, Klazomenai. Silver Hemidrachm (1.99 g), ca. 380-360 BC. Kronax, magistrate. Laureate head of Apollo facing slightly left. Reverse: KΛ-A below, swan standing left; around, magistrate's name: KPΩ-NAΞ. Cf. SNG Copenhagen 16ff; cf. BMC 23ff. Very Rare.
From the Lee Rousseau Collection; Ex Gorny & Mosch 200 (12 October 2011), 1799.
The dies used to strike this handsome hemidrachm of Klazomenai are possibly the work of the famous artist Theodotos: they are reminiscent of the tetradrachm from dies of his that he signed in the British Museum's collection.
2 commentspaul1888
6018D6F3-BC04-41A9-A906-DC5E1ACA59E5.jpeg
8 viewsROMAN EMPIRE. Philip I. 244-249 AD. AR Antoninianus (3.97 gm; 26mm x 23mm). Rome mint. Struck 248 AD. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Antelope advancing left; VI in exergue. RIC IV 21; RSC 189. Secular games issue.

This is an impressive example with sharp details, artistic dies and a large flan! Example of this quality are hard to come by!
paul1888
rjb_car_3_05_06.jpg
12?59 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
AE antoninianus
Obv: IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG?
Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: COHR(T) PRAET
Four standards
London? mint
-/-//ML
RIC 12?
There look to be traces of ML in the exergue. If not then this is RIC 741
mauseus
Caligula_Provincial_cassand.jpg
4 Caligula AE16 of Cassandrea15 viewsCassandrea, Macedonia
AE16, Time of Caligula

Standard/Vexilla with crescents above // CAS/SAN/DR within wreath

Thanks to FORVM member Quisquam for helping me attribute this little coin.
RI0017
Sosius
Nero_Den_RIC_60_reimaged.jpg
6 Nero27 viewsNERO
AR Denarius (19mm, 3.43 g, 6h)
Rome mint. Struck ~65-66 AD

O: Laureate head right

R: Salus seated left on throne, holding patera.

RIC I 60; RSC 314. aVF

Ex-CNG Sale 35, Lot 737, 9/20/95

In AD 65-66 two new types appear on the coins of Nero, Jupiter Custos- “Guardian”, and Salus- “Well-Being” (of the emperor). Nero gave thanks for surviving the Pisonian Conspiracy, which got its name from G. Calpurnius Piso, a senator put forward as an alternative emperor by senior military officers and government officials who feared the increasingly erratic Nero. The plot was discovered, many prominent Romans were executed, and others, such as the philosopher Seneca, were forced to commit suicide. This delayed the emperor’s fate for a few years.

RI0043
1 commentsSosius
rjb_car_844.jpg
88cf119 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
Antoninianus
Obv “IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG”
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev “MARS VICTOR”
Mars walking right holding spear with trophy over shoulder
Unmarked mint
-/-//[III]
RIC - (cf 88 & 844)
Reverse die duplicate of Normanby Hoard 1582 and 1583. Its is evident from the form of the mint mark (off flan on this specimen) that the die engraver was copying the reverse of a Lyon mint coin of Probus.
mauseus
Vitellius_RIC_73.jpg
9 Vitellius Denarius, 69 AD18 viewsVITELLIUS
AR denarius, Rome Mint (3.13g)
January 2 - December 20, 69 A.D.

O: A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right

R: CONCOR-DIA P R, Concordia seated left holding patera and cornucopia;

RIC I 73 scarce, Cohen 20

I am unsure of authenticity. The only way to determine once and for all will be to clean this one...
RI0072

Sosius
clsud478.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE.25 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Minister 478
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, garlanded altar with flames above, no decoration on front. 16.7 mm., 1.8 g.
Note: Although a variation of this coin is in the RIC and Cohen, these sources generally refer to the type with a front divided into four sections (RIC 261). This type of garlanded altar, lit altar was not described and published until the discovery of the Minister Hoard, discovered after RIC was written.
NORMAN K
Scipio_Bronze.jpg
Scipio Africanus29 viewsSCIPIO AFRICANUS
Æ15, Spain, Carthago Nova, (2.4g) c. 209 B.C.

Male Roman style head left, probably Scipio Africanus before he was given title Africanus / Horse head right

SNG Cop. 298, Lindgren Eur. Mints 6. Toynbee p. 18-19. VF, green patina, encrust.

This coin may be the earliest depiction of a living Roman. Carthago Nova also produced rare likely portraits of Hannibal.
RR0029
Sosius
RI_064sv_obva.JPG
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - error - obv16 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I - I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FELICITAS TEMPOR, grain ear between crossed cornucopiae / VICTOR SEVER AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 194-195
Reference:– BMCRE 347 note/ BMCRE 399. RIC 347A/RIC 428. RSC 141b/RSC 749

The reverse of this coin has been struck with two diffrerent reverse dies during the strking process. The coin was originally struck, not removed and then struck again with a different reverse die.
maridvnvm
Diocletian12.jpg
1 Diocletian Pre-Reform Radiate40 viewsDiocletian
AE Antoninianus, 293-295, Antioch, Officina 9
IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MIL_ITVM, Emperor standing right, short scepter in left hand, receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter standing left, scepter in left, ED in lower middle field, XXI in exergue
RIC V, Part II, 322
Ex Max Mehl Coins
Ex Andreas Reich

Thanks to FORVM members stinats and Genio Popvli Romani for helping to attribute this coin!
Sosius
Gordian_III_Ant_RIC_XXX.jpg
1 Gordian III11 viewsGordian III
AR Antoninianus, Antioch Mint

O: Radiate bust r.

R: FORTVNA REDVX. Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopiae

Very similar to RIC 210, but bust on this coin is not draped.
Sosius
Gordian_Sear_2523.jpg
1 Gordian III31 viewsGordian III
AE of Nicea

O: M ANT GORDIANOC AVG, Radiate, draped bust r.

R: N-I-K-A-I, EWN in ex.; Two standards surmounted by capricorns between two standards

Rec. Gen 711

Rare. According to Dane Kurtz's list, copies include this coin, plus: "Geoff Hintze's collection, another sold on ebay in June 2006 by del550 (DRG Coins, England), another sold on ebay in Dec. 2008 by biggyg2"

Sosius
Vespasian_RIC_732.jpg
10 Vespasian AE As, 74 AD20 viewsVESPASIAN
AE As. 74 AD.

O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS, laureate head right

R: VICTORIA AVGVST S-C, Victory standing right on prow of galley, holding wreath and palm.

Cohen 638, RIC 732

Sadly, this coin suffered from bronze disease, and the patina was lost when the coin was treated.
RI0060
Sosius
63430q00.jpg
10 Vespasian and Titus29 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Antioch, Syria

Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 113, McAlee 336, RPC II 1947, Wruck 86, aVF, Antioch mint, weight 13.89g, maximum diameter 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 70 - 71 A.D.; obverse ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤ ΚΑΙΣΑ ΟΥΕΣΠΑΣΙΑΝΟΥ, laureate bust right; reverse ETOYC Γ IEPOY (Holy Year 3), eagle standing left on club, wings spread, palm frond left; ex CNG auction 149, lot 286; ex Garth R. Drewry Collection, ex Harmer Rooke (26-28 March 1973), lot 488 (part of).

Struck to pay Titus' legions during and after the First Jewish Revolt. RPC notes c. 320 different dies indicate 6,500,000 Syrian tetradrachms might have been minted. This was the quantity Titus would have needed to pay his four legions. Hoard evidence finds many of these types in Judaea confirming they were used to pay the legions.

Purchased from FORVM!
RI0002
Sosius
rjb_car_101_02_05.jpg
101cf48 viewsCarausius 287-93 AD
Antoninianus
Obv "[IMP CA]RAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "PAX AVG"
Pax standing left holding vertical sceptre
London mint
L/-//ML
RIC - (cf 101)
ML not visible on this coin but reverse die duplicate CNG eAuction 424, lot 527
mauseus
rjb_car_cf121.jpg
121cf51 viewsCarausius 287-93 AD
AE antoninianus
Obv "IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "PAX AVG"
Pax standing left with transverse sceptre
Uncertain mint
V/star//-
RIC - (cf 121)
This coin clearly copies the coins of Victorinus from Mint I (Trier), third issue.
mauseus
Trajan_BMC_62.jpg
14 Trajan AR Drachm of Caesarea20 viewsTRAJAN
AR Drachm of Bostra, Arabia
AVTOK P KAIC NEP TRAIAN CEB ΓEPM ΔAK, Laureate bust right, drapery over left shoulder (die crack on chin) / ΔHMAPX EΞΥΠATOC, Arabia standing facing, looking left, holding branch and bundle of cinnamon sticks, to left a camel
SNG ANS 1155
Thanks you FORVM member Benito for helping attribute this coin.
RI0114
Sosius
57314q00~0.jpg
15 Hadrian73 viewsHADRIAN
BI tetradrachm, Alexandria mint, 11.1g, 25.1mm
29 Aug 125 - 28 Aug 126 A.D.
ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ Α∆ΡΙΑ CΕΒ, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis, from behind / L ∆Ε KATOV (year 10), Canopus jar of Osiris, ornamented with figures, wearing crown of horns, uraei disk, and plumes
Kampmann-Ganschow 32.351; Geissen 903; Dattari 1326; Milne 1154; BMC Alexandria p. 75, 630; Emmett 827
Choice gVF
Purchased from FORVM

Note that at some point in this coin's history, it seems to have been used a host for very poor quality fakes. After discussion on the FORVM board, I am comfortable that this coin is indeed the original. Shame on the former owner that used it for copies!

During the mummification process, large organs, such as the liver, lungs, stomach and intestines were extracted and placed in four jars. In the Ptolemaic period, the Greeks called these jars "canopic jars," relating them to the deity of the old city Canop (now a village in Abu Kyr). The heart was left in the body because it held the spirit, understanding and senses and would be needed on the Day of Judgment in the underworld. -- FORVM
RI0073
3 commentsSosius
Hadrian_RIC_848.jpg
15 Hadrian As, travel series, Cappadocia44 viewsHADRIAN
AE As
HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP, draped bust right / CAPPADOCIA S-C, Cappadocia, towered, in tunic & cloak with tassles, standing left holding a miniature of Mount Argaeus & standard.
RIC 848; gVF, pitting
This coin seems to have suffered from bronze disease in the past, and appears to have lost its patina as a result of the BD treatment.
RI0096
1 commentsSosius
Ant_Pius_Sester_RIC_906.jpg
17 Antoninus Pius26 viewsANTONINUS PIUS
AE Sestertius, 152-153 AD
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XVI, laureate head right / SALVS AVG COS IIII S-C, Salus standing feeding snake arising from altar.
RIC 906, Cohen 732, BMC 1925
This coin looks like someone hit it with brass polish (not me!) but I like how you can see the true color of the metal. It's also a hefty coin that's fun to hold.
RI0081
Sosius
Ant_Pius_Nand_I_Prov.jpg
17 Antoninus Pius AE22 of N&I15 viewsANTONINUS PIUS
AE22 Nicopolis ad Istrum
Bare head r, AV T AI ADRIA ANTONEINOS / Artemis alone, moving slightly and facing r., pulling arrow from quiver with her r. and holding bow in her l. hand, NEIKOPO LEITON. No magistrate's name.
Pick AMNG I, 1, no. 1222; HrHJ (2012) 8.6.13.3
Thanks to FORVM Members slokind and Jochen for their help attributing this coin
RI0080
1 commentsSosius
rjb_car_188cf_05_05.jpg
18858 viewsCarausius 287-93
Antoninianus
Obv"IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "[PM T]RP II COS PP"
Emperor togate seated left in curule chair
Camulodunum mint
-/-//C
RIC 188?
This is the only known coin with "TRP II COS", all other extant specimens except the coin below are "TRP IIII COS". A discussion of this coin in relation to the other dated coins of Carausius can be found here.
mauseus
rjb_car_dated_11_06.jpg
189bis43 viewsCarausius 287-93
Antoninianus
Obv"IMP CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "PM TRP III CO[S PP]"
Lion walking left
Camulodunum mint?
-/-//XXI [?]
RIC - (189 bis)
Mint attribution made on the basis of the other (few) known dated coins. It may be that the mark on this coin is a variation of the MCXXI mark, recorded on a SAECVLARES AVG (lion walking right) coin of Carausius in the Vogelaar collection.
mauseus
rjb_2016_05_06.jpg
18bis16 viewsAllectus 293-6
Antoninianus
IMP C ALLECTVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right viewed from rear
FELICITAS AVG
Felicitas standing left holding caduceus and cornucopia
RIC lists FELICITAS SEC as a reverse, however this looks to read AVG. Similarly Burnett only lists FELICITAS SEC but then only with a cuirassed bust on the obverse
London mint
S/A//ML
RIC 22
mauseus
Philip_AE_25_of_Antioch.jpg
2 Philip I18 viewsPhilip I
Æ25 of Antiochia, Pisidia
244-249 AD

Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r. / The river-god Anthios reclining l. on urn, holding reed and cornucopia.

SNG von Aulock 4971. VF

This coin may be a die match with this coin: http://www.acsearch.info/record.html?id=602309
Sosius
Philip_I_barbarous.jpg
2 Philip I16 viewsPhilip I
AR Antoninianus
Barbarous Imitation
4.59g

I can't imagine this coin would have fooled many people!
Sosius
rjb_car_06_09.jpg
235cf39 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
Antoninianus
Obv "IMP C CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev "FORTVN AVG"
Fortuna standing left holding baton and cornucopia
Camulodunum mint
S/C//C
RIC - (cf235)

The 4 o'clock die axis and slope in Fortuna's stance mean that this is, in all probability, an irregular issue
mauseus
Sep_Sev_RIC_288.jpg
24 Septimius Severus14 viewsSeptimius Severus
AR Denarius. 201-210 AD

SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / RESTITVTOR VRBIS, Roma seated left on shield, holding palladium & spear.

RSC 606, RIC 288, Sear 6358

I think this was my very first denarius!
Sosius
Sept_Sev_AMNG_I1,_1373.jpg
24 Septimius Severus Æ 18mm of Nikpolis ad Istrum13 viewsSeptimius Severus
Æ 15.2mm of Nikpolis ad Istrum, 3.5g

AV KAI - CEVHROC, bust r. / NIKOPOLI - PROC ICT, Hermes standing left, wearing petasos, holding purse & caduceus.

AMNG I/1, 1373, rare

Thanks to FORVM members Steve Minnoch and Jochen for their help attributing this coin!
Sosius
Unident_Prov_-_30mm.jpg
25 Caracalla24 viewsCARACALLA
AE 31, Mopsus, Cilicia
Year 265=198 AD

Youthful Caracalla as Augustus, bust r. / Mule standing l., wreath and quiver on his back

SNG Levante 1344 (according to Curtis Clay: could be same obv. die, but different rev. die)

Thanks to FORVM member Curtis Clay for his assistance attributing this coin.
Sosius
Caracalla_or_Geta_AE18_of_Nicop.jpg
25 Caracalla AE 18 of Nicopolis22 viewsCaracalla
AE 18, Nicopolis

Bust right / Tripod with snake

HrHJ (2012) 8.18.47.15

Thanks to FORVM member Jochen for his help identifying this coin.
1 commentsSosius
Geta_Mysia_Parium.jpg
26 Geta8 viewsGeta
AE of Mysia, Parium
198-209 A.D.

SEP GETAS CAI, bust r. / C G I H, PA in ex., colonist plowing

SNG AUL 1341(1), BMC 12 S106,110

This was my first Geta. Not pretty, but I sure did think it was at the time!
Sosius
Roman_Prov.jpg
26 Geta?21 viewsNever nailed this one down. It was discussed here:

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=70693.msg443086#msg443086

From FORVM member Pscipio:
"Probably Geta as Caesar rather than Caracalla, cf. SNG Aulock 7165 for what looks like an obverse die match (different reverse type). Note that a similar left facing portrait also exists for Caracalla, but laureate, thus as Augustus: SNG Aulock 7162, which is clearly from the same hand and therefore probably belongs to the same emission.

The countermark appears to be Howgego 68."
Sosius
Aurelian_unident_.jpg
3 Aurelian32 viewsAURELIAN
AE Antoninianus, Siscia Mint
SECOND SPECIMEN KNOWN?
IMP CAES L DOM AVRELIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right (with huge nose) / ANNONA AVG, Annona stg. l., holding corn-ears in r. hand and cornucopiae in l. hand; at feet to l., prow of ship., P in r. field.
RIC temp #1927

Attributed with help from FORVM member Mauseus, who pointed to the following website, which indicates that this may be the second specimen known of this coin: http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coin/1927

UPDATE: According to S. Estiot & J. Mairat of ric.mom.fr: "It is indeed the second specimen known of RIC temp 1927, and your coin is from the same pair of dies as the coin in Zagreb (Komin hoards)."
1 commentsSosius
Decius_Babylon_103.jpg
3 Trajan Decius17 viewsTrajan Decius
AE20, Edessa, Mesopotamia

O: AVG DEKIC CEB. Radiate bust of Decius, R.

R: KOL EDICCA. Turreted bust of Cybele, l.

Babylon 103, BMC 168

Thanks to Helvetica for translating Babylon, without which I would not have been able to attribute this coin.
Sosius
Her_Etruscilla_RIC_59b.jpg
3.1 Herennia Etruscilla18 viewsHERENNIA ETRUSCILLA
Wife of Trajan Decius
AR Antoninianus.

HER ESTRVSCILLA AVG, diademed & draped bust right on crescent / PVDICITA AVG, Pudicitia seated left holding sceptre & drawing veil from her face.

RIC 59b, RSC 19, Sear5 #9495

aVF, Green deposits. This coin would probably clean up beautifully. Need to put that on the to-do list.
Sosius
Tacitus_Ant_Estiot_2228_not_in_RIC-sm.jpg
4 Tacitus47 viewsTacitus.
A.D. 275-276.
Æ antoninianus (22.6 mm, 3.62 g, 12 h). Siscia Mint
IMP C M CL TACITVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding branch and transverse scepter; Q in right field. Estiot 2228; La Venera 2228-30; RIC temp 3651 (http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coin/3651).
gVF, silvered.
Ex Agora Auctions
Thanks for FORVM member Quadrans for his help attributing this coin!
1 commentsSosius
rjb_2014_07_04.jpg
435bis46 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
AE Antoninianus
Obv: "IMP C CARAVSIVS AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: "VIRTVS AVG"
Emperor standing left holding globe and vertical sceptre
Colchester mint
S/P//C
RIC -
Another example of this reverse noted in the Ashmolean Museum collection
1 commentsmauseus
rhodes.jpg
6023 viewsPseudo-Autonomous
Rhodes
AE 35mm (drachm)
c.31BC - 60AD
Obverse: Head of Dionysus right, radiate and with ivy leaf wreath
Reverse: Nike, right, with palm and aphlastron, on prow
Magistrate: Hypsikles
RPC I 2761
As this coin is listed in RPC I there is enough justification, for me at least, to include it in my "Diverse Roman" gallery.
mauseus
rjb_car_secvrit_07_07.jpg
674cf43 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
Antoninianus
Obv "IMP C M A CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "SECVRITA[S PERP]"
Securitas stg left leaning on a short column
"Continental" mint
RIC - (cf 674ff)
This is a very odd coin. It is of the style that RIC calls "Continental" but not Rouen (702-5), although the reverse type is one of Rouen. It is also noteworthy for the obverse nomenclature M A CARAVSIVS.
mauseus
rjb_2014_11_02.jpg
68236 viewsDenarius
Rome
Issue 9
ORIENS AVG
G 682 var
Whilst this is typologically 682 the obverse legend/bust type isn't noted in MIR
1 commentsmauseus
Gallienus_Unident_Prov.jpg
7 Gallienus38 viewsGallienus
Æ27 of Smyrna, Ionia

O: AVT K Π ΛIK_[IN] ΓAΛΛIHNOC, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right

R: CMYPNAIΩN Γ N_EΩKOPΩN[..] IΠ[ΠIKOV] ΦIΛH_TOV, the Amazon Smyrna, turreted and cuirassed, standing left, holding bipennis and pelta right.

SNG Copenhagen 1410var

Thanks to FORVM member Andreas Reich and www258pair.com for help IDing this coin.
Sosius
Gallienus_SNG_Cop_355.jpg
7 Gallienus11 viewsGallienus
AE23 of Thessalonica.

O: AYT K PO LIE GALLNOVC, radiate, draped bust right.

R: KOINON QECCALWN, Athena, with aegis and spear,
advancing r. Delta in l. field.

SNG Cop. 355
(This coin on wildwinds.com)
Sosius
Maxentius_RIC_202a_or_212.jpg
7 Maxentius38 viewsMAXENTIUS
AE Follis, Rome Mint, 308-310 AD
IM[P C] MAXENTIUS PF AVG, Laureate bust right / CONSERV-VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe and scepter, shield at side, in hexastyle temple, with victories in acrotera and wreath in pediment. H in left field. Mintmark R T
RIC 202a, third workshop

Thanks to FORVM members stinats and quadrans for helping attributing this coin!
3 commentsSosius
rjb_car_982cf_02_05.jpg
82238 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
Antoninianus
Obv "IMP C CARAVSIVS PF AVG"
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "LAETITI AVG"
Laetitia standing left holding wreath and baton
Unmarked mint
RIC 822
This coin is an obverse and reverse die duplicate of the coin illustrated in "Some Stratified Coins Of c. AD 390-400 From Bourton-On-The-Water" by O'neil in Numismatic Chronicle 1935 pp 275-81. The Bourton specimen plus an obverse brockage die duplicate of this coin can be seen here.
mauseus
Avitus__AE4.jpg
90 Avitus?55 viewsAVITUS?
AE4/5, Rome mint

O: DN AVIT-VS PF AVG, bust right

R: VICTOR-IA AVGG, Victory standing, left, holding wreath and palm branch, RM in ex., S in left field

RIC X 2412 or 2413, R5. Sear (2014) 21581 or 21582 (extremely rare)

Like many late Roman coins, this could be a barbarous issue, but it has many of the features of genuine Avitus coins. Still not enough detail or legends to remove the question mark after Avitus, though!
Sosius
Zeno_Solidus.jpg
98 Zeno Solidus23 viewsZeno, First Reign
AV Solidus. Constantinople Mint

D N ZENO-PERP AVG, facing helmeted and cuirassed bust, holding shield, spear behind / VICTORI-A AVGGG and officina letter, Victory standing left, holding long cross, star in right field, CONOB in exergue.

RIC 910. Sear (2014) 21514. Broad flan. Holed, but otherwise VF.

Thanks to FORVM member Rick2 for his help identifying this coin!
Sosius
39792q00.jpg
AHG 234 . The Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.23 viewsGallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.
Billon antoninianus . 2.927g, 19.7mm, 180o, Antioch mint, 254 - 255 A.D.
Obverse : IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse VICTORIAE AVGG, soldier standing right, vertical spear in right, resting left on shield
Göbl MIR 1566d (Antioch), SRCV III 10397 (Antioch), RIC V 300 (Viminacium), AHG 234 (this coin)
From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Ex Forum
Vladislav D
55535q00.jpg
AHG 272 . The Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Salonina, August 254 - c. September 268 A.D.22 viewsSalonina, August 254 - c. September 268 A.D.
Billon antoninianus . 2.763g, 20.1mm, 0o, Syrian mint, 258 - 260 A.D.
Obverse : CORN SALONINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind
Reverse : CONCORDIA AVGG, emperor and empress standing confronted, clasping hands
Göbl MIR 1691p (Samosata), SRCV III 10630 (uncertain Syrian mint), RIC V 63 (Antioch), Cohen 31, AHG 272 (this coin)
From the Antioch Hoard of Gallienus . Ex Forum
Vladislav D
Intaglio.jpg
Asclepius Intaglio49 viewsMale figure Asclepius? holding two snakes.

Asclepius was the god of healing though he, like Heracles, was born as a mortal. Athena gave Asclepius two types of blood to help with his healing work, both from the gorgon, Medusa. One took life quickly but the other restored life. When Asclepius used this life restoring blood he encroached on the preserve of the gods and Zeus struck him down with a thunderbolt. One of the most famous centres for Asclepius worship was at Epidaurus on the Peloponnese. Snakes were sacred to the god and when the Romans embraced him as one of theirs his cult was supposedly taken to Rome in the body of a snake. He was preserved in the heavens as the constellation Ophiuchus, the serpent holder. The Romanised version of his name is Aesculapius.

0.34g

Greek or more likely Roman Provincial

Ex-Time Machine

Sold Forum Auctions December 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
AUGUSTUS_Cistophorus_Pergamum.JPG
AUGUSTUS. AR Cistophorus (3 denarii) of Pergamum. Struck c.19 - 18 B.C.604 viewsObverse: IMP IX TR PO V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298.

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who was defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.) Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests may actually have incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.

This is the rarest cistophorus struck during the reign of Augustus with the exception of the exceedingly rare issues featuring a sphinx.
6 commentsdivvsavgvstvs
Baktria.jpg
Baktria23 viewsAlexander the Great's empire split into rival Hellenistic kingdoms ruled by his generals. The most far-flung part was Baktria, his conquests in what is today Afghanistan, western India and Pakistan. Greek settlers ruled over a much larger indigenous population. As centuries went by, this isolated outpost of Greek culture combined elements of both Greek and native traditions, oftentimes reflected in their bilingual coins. The main mints include Aï Khanoum, Bactra, and Pushkalavati.2 commentsChristian T
Baktria,_Diodotos_I,_AR_tetradrachm_-_Holt_A6_4_(this_coin)~0.jpg
Baktrian Kingdom, Diodotos I, ca. 255/250-240 BC, AR Tetradrachm 27 viewsDiademed head of Diodotos I right.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY Zeus advancing left hurling thunderbolt, eagle at feet, ΙΔΤ (Iota, Delta, Sampi) monogram in inner left field.

Holt A6.4 (this coin); Kritt A6 (plate 2 A6 this coin); CSE 1294 (this coin); SNG Lockett 3109 (this coin ID: SNGuk_0300_3109); Pozzi 2945 (this coin); ESM 717α (this coin); SNG ANS 77; SC 631.a; Bopearachchi 2E; Mitchiner 64d; Qunduz 6; HGC 9, 243.
Mint "A" - Ai Khanoum

(26 mm, 15.73 g, 6h).
Herakles Numismatics; ex- Houghton Collection (CSE 1294); ex- Lockett Collection (SNGLockett 3109); ex- Pozzi Collection: Naville Sale I (1921) 2945 (sold for CHF 35).

This coin has a very distinguished provenance and has been published as plate coin in four reference works.

The emission with the ΙΔΤ (Iota, Delta Sampi) mint control mark is the most abundant of the Diodotid issues, representing about 13% of known Diodotid precious metal coins. The same control carries over into the early coinage of Euthydemos, although eventually displaced by the PK control monogram after 208/6 BC when Antiochos III captured Ai Khanoum while Euthydemos remained besieged at Baktra, after which it appears that Baktra/Balkh assumed the role of primary royal mint in Baktria. In is notable that the Archaic Greek letter Sampi forms the bottom of the ΙΔΤ monogram. It is an Archaic Greek form of a double Sigma that persisted in Greek dialects of Asia Minor. Many Greek settlers from Asia Minor migrated to Baktria, including the illustrious ruler Euthydemos from Magnesia in either Lydia, or Ionia. The archaic Greek Sampi possibly traveled to Baktria with the earliest Greek settlers from Asia Minor.
n.igma
coin755.JPG
Caracalla, Stobi14 viewsReverse: Serapis with snake

From whitetd49

I think I see MVNICI STOB on the reverse, this die is unlisted, unique!
ecoli
vrbs1s.jpg
City Commemorative, RIC VII 187 Thessalonica, AE 324 viewsObverse:VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma wearing imperial cloak. Plume on front of helmet.
Reverse:She-wolf standing left, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, O on wolf's shoulder, 2 stars above.
Mintmark SMTS epsilon, 16.1 mm., 2.5 g.
Ref: RIC VII Thessalonica 187

Notes: This variation with O on wolf's shoulder
NORMAN K
dcl.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, 268-270 CE.20 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Minister 478
Obverse: DIVO CLAUVDIO, radiate head right.
Reverse: CONSECRATIO, garlanded altar with flames above, no decoration on front. 16.7 mm., 1.8 g.
Note: Although a variation of this coin is in the RIC and Cohen, these sources generally refer to the type with a front divided into four sections (RIC 261). This type of garlanded altar, lit altar was not described and published until the discovery of the Minister Hoard, discovered after RIC was written.
NORMAN K
claud41a.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus, RIC 41 Rome25 viewsBronze Antoninianus, Claudius II Gothis
Obverse: IMP CLAUVDIO AVG , radiate head right.
Reverse: FORTVNA, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia. Z in right field.
RIC 41, Rome. 20.5 mm., 3.1 g.
NORMAN K
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Crispus RIC VII 69 Thessalonica, 319 CE31 viewsObverse: IVL CRIS-PVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRT EXERC, Sol raising right hand and holding globe in left, standing in center of plan of roman camp.
TS dot E dot in ex. Thessalonica mint
19.53mm., 2.2g. rare
The true meaning of this reverse type has never been fully deciphered. The latest theory being the X shaped pattern represents Constantine's vision before the battle of Milvainbridge. This does not seem likely since the type is known on coins of Licinius a pagan and Constantine's enemy
sold 4-2018

NORMAN K
hand2s.jpg
Divus Constantine I, Posthumous commemorative AE4, 337-341 CE26 viewsObverse: DN CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG, veiled head right.
Reverse: No legend, the deified Constantine driving quadriga right, hand of god reaching down from above, star at upper left.
SMANS in ex. Antioch mint, 2nd officina. RIV VIII 37, 16.6 mm, 1.4 g.

It is ironic that Constantine, who tradition tells us was the first Christian emperor (although he only actually became one on his death bed), should have been honored with pagan deification and commemorated posthumously with traditional pagan symbolism as found on this coin. He was the last emperor to be so honored.
NORMAN K
Victorinus_Cunetio_2957.jpg
Gallic 4 Victorinus13 viewsVICTORINUS
268-270 AD
IMP C VICTORINVS PF AVG, RDC Bust r. / PAX AVG; Pax standing left, holding olive-branch and sceptre, V in left field, star over palm branch in right field
Similar to Cunetio hoard 2957, but star and palm branch inverted on this coin
Sosius
ga283bo.jpg
Gallienus VI 283 Rome 253-268 CE33 viewsGallienus, AE Antoninianus. Rome mint, sole reign.
Obverse - GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
Reverse – SOLI CONS AVG, Pegasus springing right, heavenward.
Mintmark A. 20.47 mm., 3.7 g. Cohen 979, Sear 10362
Cohen 979 comment: one of Gallienus last issue. Gallienus was assassinated near Mila while attempting to deal with the userper Aureolus. This coin was a talisman called fo the protection of Gallienus and Rome.
*Some believe the horse to be one of Sol's chariot horesus and the reverse inscription indicates this is probably the case.
1 commentsNORMAN K
Gordian-III-RIC-177-87.jpg
Gordian III / RIC 177 over 187, 1'st series.31 viewsAntoninianus, 238-239 AD, Antioch mint.
Obverse: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gordian.
Reverse: AEQVIT LIBER / Body and feet of Aequitas holding scales; Body and feet of Libertas holding pileus (Liberty cap) .
5.00 gm, 22 mm.
RIC #177 over #187.

This coin has two different reverses: the Aequitas type (RIC #177) is overstruck at 180 degree rotation on top of the Libertas type (RIC #187). Or, perhaps it is the other way around: The Libertas type (RIC #187) is overstruck on top of the Aequitas type (RIC #177).

The T of AEQVITAS AVG is almost flattened out and is just barely visible. At Antioch, Libertas with the pileus always has the legend LIBERALITAS AVG rather than LIBERTAS AVG.

There is a footnote to RIC #231 (vol. IV, part III, p. 39) which is quite intriguing:

"231. A strange Antoninianus (G. B. Pears Coll.) shows rev. type of AEQVIT[AS] apparently overstruck with type of LIBER[TAS] -- obv. of Gordian III, rev. of Philip overstruck with rev. of Trebonianus Gallus (?)."

I posted this coin on Forvmancientcoins.com and got this reply from Curtis Clay:

"A neat example of this error, and one I hadn't been aware of before, despite its mention in the RIC footnote!
As you expected, you now own the coin formerly in the Pears collection: we know because there is a plaster cast of it so labeled in the BM, which is illustrated in Roger Bland's dissertation, pl. 10, 18/21 !
One of the reverse types is Libertas with cap, but its legend must have been LIBERALITAS not LIBERTAS AVG: the Eastern mint always mislabeled its Libertas type as Liberalitas. RIC made the same mistake regarding the reverse legend; corrected by Bland, who lists the coin under the type LIBERALITAS AVG.
I had never heard of G. B. Pears or his collection before, so can supply no information in that regard."
Callimachus
HUN_Lajos_I_Huszar_547_Pohl_89-7.JPG
Huszár 547, Pohl 89-7, Unger 432h, Réthy II 89A41 viewsLouis I (Lajos I, in Hun.) (1342-1382). AR denar, .49 g., 13.94 mm. max., .28 gr., 90°

Obv: + [MO]nETA LODOVICI, Saracen head left, pellets flanking.

Rev: + REGIS hVnGARIE, Patriarchal cross with random pellets.

The type was struck 1373-1382 (per Huszár, Pohl & Unger, although Huszár later wrote that the Saracen-head coinage incepted in 1372). This privy mark was struck at Pécs by one of the Saracenus brothers, probably by Johannes, who took over the mint after the death of Jacobus (per Pohl).

Huszár/Pohl rarity rating 3.

The Saracen's head is a pun on the surname of Jacobus Saracenus (Szerechen, in Hun.) and his brother, Johannes, courtiers of Italian descent who were ennobled by Louis. The image of a Saracen's head appeared on their coat of arms. Jacobus became the kammergraf at the Pécs mint in 1352, and the Comes Camerarum Regalium in 1369. He died in the early 1370s, at which time Johannes succeeded him as kammergraf.
Stkp
Jan.PNG
Judaea, Alexander Jannaeus (103-76 BC), Æ Half Prutah21 viewsObv. anchor. Rev. star.
References: TJC group L.
13mm and 1.06 grams
This coin is typically referred to as the Biblical Widow's mite.
Canaan
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Alexander_III_The_Great,_AR_teradrachm_Amphipolis_Mint~0.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Amphipolis Mint under Antipater91 viewsHead of Herakles right, wearing lion skin headdress.
AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; janiform head vase in left field. Graffiti in upper left field - Aramaic kaph (k) and sadhe (s).

Price 6; Troxell, Studies, Issue A3; SNG Cop 660; Muller 853.
Struck at Amphipolis in the period 332-329 BC.

(29 mm, 17.15 g, 2h)

This is one of the first emissions of Alexander’s coinage struck in his homeland, albeit about three years after he departed for Asia Minor. Recent scholarship places the start of Alexander’s distinctive coinage in 333/2 BC at Tarsos, in eastern Asia Minor, shortly after which the design was transferred to Macedonia where Alexander’s coinage was struck under the authority of his regent in Greece, Antipater. Die studies indicate that this coin was from the fourth tetradrachm emission of a mint in Macedonia, most probably Amphipolis. It was most probably struck in the period 332-329 BC. The Aramaic graffiti on the reverse, plus the obverse reverse rim test cut are pointers to the likelihood that this coin travelled beyond its location of issue in Macedonia, into the eastern Mediterranean where Aramaic was the main spoken language.
3 commentsn.igma
sear1966clipped.jpg
Manuel I Komnenus clipped billion aspron trachy SB196666 viewsObverse: IC-XC (bar above) in field, Christ bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and colobion, seated upon throne without back; holds gospels in left hand.
Reverse: MAN(monogram)HA AECIIOT or var, MP OV bar above in upper right field, Full-length figure of emperor, bearded on left, crowned by Virgin nimbate. Emperor wears stemma, divitision, collar-peice, and jewelled loros of simplified type; holds in right hand labarum-headed scepter, and in left globus cruciger. Virgin wears tunic and maphorion.
four main varieties:
Mint: Constantinople
Date: 1167-1183?
Sear 1966 Var d, Fourth coinage; H 16.14,15; 17.1-4
rev: Jewel within circle on loros waist
16mm .89gm
As discussed in the Byzantine forumThese are the "neatly clipped" trachies.
During the reign of Manuel I the silver content of the trachy was dropped from c.6% to c.3%, but later types were sometimes issued with the higher silver content.
In Alexius III's time these high silver types were clipped down to half size, probably officially, presumably so as to match the lower silver content of the later issues.
Of course this would only have worked as long as the populace accepted the idea that the clipped coins were all high silver versions to start with. Once smarties started clipping ordinary coins these types would soon have have fallen out of favour and been withdrawn.

Ross G.


During the reign of Alexius III were reused coins of previous releases, clipping its border in a very regular mode and thus reducing to half their weight. Regularity of shearing and the fact that they were found to stock uniforms, suggesting that this clipping is a formal issuance of mint. Based on the stocks found in Constantinople , some of which consist only of clipped coins, it may safely be dated between 1195 and 1203.
Hendy and Grierson believe that this shearing was a consequence of the devaluation of trachy mixture during the reign of Isaac II and Alexius III. They reduced by half the already low silver content of this coin: shearing coins of previous emperors, still widely in circulation, made their trachy consistent with the intrinsic value of current emissions. Of course, this does not justify the clipping of coins already degraded of Isaac II and Alexius III. Therefore, reason for their declassification is not understood. I think that reason of Ross is right!
The structure of their dispersion in hoards indicates that, however, were made after the other emissions. Clipped trachys appear in small amounts along with regular trachy in hoards, represents a rarity. Were clipped trachys of Manuel I, Andronicus I, Isaac II and Alexius III, and perhaps of John II; those of Manuel are less scarce. In principle, we must believe that all trachys after Manuel I have been clipped, although many have not yet appeared.

Antvwala
wileyc
IMG_2204_-_____.JPG
Phoenicia, Akko-Ptolemais Valerian I. 253-260 AD. AE 2663 viewsValerian I. 253-260 AD. AE 26 . Phoenicia, Akko-Ptolemais.
Obv: IMP C P L - [VALERIANVS] AVG Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from front.
Rx: COL - P - T - OL Sacred tree between serpents rising from two altars or baskets; to right, winged caduceus. Rare: this type missing in BM, Lindgren, Berk photofile, and Wildwinds. CoinArchives includes a specimen from the same reverse die, but with radiate portrait on obverse: Heritage 357, Long Beach, 9 September 2004, lot 12092. Cohen 374 (de Saulcy Collection). Adjustment marks on obverse.
1 commentsMaritima
phraatesIV.jpg
Phraates IV (38 -2 BC) AR Tetradrachm 286 SE /26 BC51 viewsObv: Phraates diademed and cuirassed bust left with long pointed beard - no royal wart on forehead.
Rev: The king enthroned r. being presented with a palm branch by Tyche, standing l. before him holding cornucopiae with pellet above arm. Seleucid date 286 (C Pi Sigma) above palm. Greek inscription in 7 lines BASILEOS/BASILEON; on r. ARSAKOY/EUERGETOY' below [DIKAOY]; on l. EPIPHANOUS/PHILELLANOS; month off flan below
Wt 14.1 gm, 26.3 mm, Sellwood type 55

The coin could be that of Tiridates I who also ruled for a few months in 26 BC. The features of the king on this coin are much closer to that of Phraates than of much rarer Tiridates I according to a reclassification of Sellwood types by deCallatay and this is the most believable. The lower lines of the inscription would also settle the issue but are lost on this coin.
Early coins of the Parthian empire showed strong Greek empahasis on classical Greek forms and humanism which is gradually lost as the empire matured and finally decayed. The coins become schematic and emphasize suface ornament rather than sculptural quality. One senses from the portrait of Phraates that brutality was a prerequisite for Parthian kings who routinely bumped off fathers and brothers in their rise to power. Like the Spartans, they had a powerful empire in their time but its contribution to civilization was limited in the long term.
1 commentsdaverino
0191-a00.JPG
Plautilla, overview295 viewsThere are five main types of portrait for Plautilla’s denarii at the Rome mint :

A - With a draped bust right, hair coiled in horizontal ridges and fastened in bun in high position. Her facial expression is juvenile
B - Hair being coiled in vertical ridges, with bun in low position. Plautilla looks here more like a young beautiful woman
C - The third bust shows a thinner face of Plautilla with hair in vertical ridges and no bun but braids covering her neck
D - The fourth type has a similar appearance with the former, but the vertical ridges disappear, hair being plastered down, still showing the right ear
E - Plautilla appears with mid long hair plastered down and covering her ears

In the mean time there are seven different reverses :

1 - CONCORDIAE AETERNAE
2 - PROPAGO IMPERI
3 - CONCORDIA AVGG
4 - CONCORDIA FELIX
5 - PIETAS AVGG
6 – DIANA LVCIFERA

Not every combination exists, but some of the above reverses can be shared by several obverse portraits. Noticeable also is an evolution of the obverse legend, being PLAVTILLAE AVGVSTAE (a) in 202, and becoming PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA (b) soon after

You can see the evolution of this interesting coinage in my Plautilla's gallery.
3 commentsPotator II
ptolemyxiiTD.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes AR Tetradrachm, 72 BC73 viewsOBV: Diademed head right in aegis
REV: Eagle standing left on Thunderbolt; PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, [Pi A] in right field; Dated L.Theta (Year 9)

This coin was minted in the ninth year of Ptolemy XII Auletes. Svoronos originally ascribed this coin type to year 9 of Cleopatra VII (43 BC) but was reattributed by Regling to her father. This re-attribution is generally accepted. The coin is of relatively low-grade silver (ca 30%) and flat-struck on the obverse.
Svoronos 1856, Ref. Svoronos on-line
wt 13.8 gm
1 commentsdaverino
Dolphindidrachm.jpg
Punic occupation half shekel77 viewsNude youth on horseback to left, crowning horse with wreath; IΩ to right, ΣΩΓENHΣ below

Taras astride dolphin to left, holding cornucopiae and Nike who crowns him with wreath; TAPAΣ below.

Calabria, Tarentum ; Punic occupation, circa 212-209 BC

AR Reduced didrachm or Half-Shekel.

2.69g chipped otherwise VF+

Vlasto 975-7; HN Italy 1079.

Ex-ANE

Rare!

The climax of the Carthaginian invasion of Italy was reached when Tarentum changed sides in 212 BC. The takeover of the city was a carefully planned coup by Hannibal and members of the city's democratic faction who opened the gates to Hannibal's army. The Carthaginians failed to take the citadel, but subsequent fortifications around this enemy stronghold enabled the city to remain under Punic control. Hannibal installed his own magistrates and struck coinage based on the Punic half shekel standard.
8 commentsJay GT4
Domitian_Horseback.jpg
RIC 0539 variant Domitian denarius71 viewsCAES AV DOMIT COS II
Laureate head right

Domitian on horse left; right hand raised, sceptre in left

Rome? 73 AD

3.34g

RIC 539 (R2) variant?: Missing G and F in legend.

Ex-Jerusalem Haydaya

Stylistically this coin resembles some others of this type but without the legend errors. The fabric is similar to those from Antioch. Is this an ancient imitation or perhaps an apprentice cut the legend? Or is it an unknown type from Antioch?
3 commentsJay GT4
Vespasian_Prow_star.jpg
RIC 0941 Vespasian denarius97 viewsIMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Laureate head right

COS VIII
Prow of galley right, star above.

Rome 77-8 AD

3.39g

RIC II 941 (C); BMCRE 210; RSC 136.

Rated common but tough to find on the market.

Ex-Ancient Treasures, Ex-ANE.

This reverse type copied from aurei and denarii of Ahenobarbus struck for Mark Antony in 40 BC, Crawford 521 .
7 commentsJay GT4
Pupeinus ric 10a.jpg
RIC-10(a) Pupienus Clasped Hands829 viewsIMP CAES M CLOD PVPIENVS AVG - Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
CARITAS MVTVA AVGG - (Mutual Clarity of the Emperors), clasped hands

This is the scarcer variant of RIC 10. Superb portrait. David Sear ANCCS certified.
From Forum ancient Coins
12 commentsjimwho523
ThoriusBalbus.jpg
#L. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius32 viewsRome mint. ISMR behind, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress / L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue, bull charging right.

"The obverse refers to the the cult of Juno Sospita at Lanuvium, the moneyer's birthplace. The reverse is likely a play on the moneyer's name (Taurus sounds like Thorius). Cicero described L. Thorius Balbus as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. This is one of the most common republican denarii." -- Roman Silver Coins edited by David Sear and Robert Loosley
ancientone
Sklavengeld_Karneol.jpg
'Slave money', carnelian66 views25,4x13.60x11.90mm, 7.87g

This so-called 'slave money', part of a chain, was made in the first half of the 19th century in Idar-Oberstein/Germany for London. From London it was shipped to West Africa to buy black slaves.
Jochen
007n.jpg
Δ in circular punch240 viewsARABIA PETRAEA. Petra. Septimius Severus. Æ 22. A.D. 193-211. Obv: (…)-CEOYHPON(…). Laureate head right; countermark on shoulder. Rev: (…)-MHTPOΠ(…). Tyche seated left on rock, holding trophy in right hand and stele in extended left hand (?). Ref: Spijkerman 28v; BMC -. Axis: 360°. Weight: 7.24 g. CM: Δ in circular punch, 5 mm. Howgego 801 (19 pcs). Note: May bave been countermarked during reign of Elagabalus, although this is uncertain since the coins of Elagabalus were too small to be countermarked Δ, and no coins were issued after his reign. Collection Automan.Automan
047n.jpg
Δ in circular punch274 viewsBITHYNIA. Tium. Civic. Æ 24. First half of 3rd century A.D. Obv: .TE-IOC. Diademed and draped bust of Teos right; countermark on neck. Rev: TIAN-ΩN. Dionysus standing facing, head left, emptying contents of cantharus, holding thyrsus. Ref: BMC -; SNG von Aulock 928ff (obverse).Axis: 30°. Weight: 5.72 g. CM: Δ in circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 789 (34 pcs). Note: The latest coin bearing this countermark was issued for Hostilian. Collection Automan.Automan
126.jpg
ΘEC in rectangular punch180 viewsMACEDON. Thessalonica. Nero. Æ 23. A.D. 54-68. Obv: NE(PΩNC)EBAΣΣ-TOΣKAIΣAP (sic.). Bare head left; countermark across neck. Rev: ΘECCAΛ-ONIKH-ΩN in three lines in oak-wreath, eagle at top. Ref: BMC -; RPC 1603 (5 pcs); Axis: 180°. Weight: 7.36 g. Note: The name and face of Nero have been erased (damnatio). CM: ΘEC in rectangular punch, 7 x 3 mm. Howgego 537 (7 pcs). Note: Howgego notes that the countermark was probably applied in A.D. 68/69, sanctioning coins of Nero. He also notes that the application of the countermark was not directly connected with the erasure of the name and face of Nero, since this was done to only one of the seven specimens he identified. Collection Automan.Automan
042n.jpg
ΛΓΓ179 viewsSYRIA: SELEUCIS & PIERIA. Gabala. Caracalla. Æ 22. A.D. 198-217. Obv: (AVKMAANTΩNEINOC) or similar. Laureate bust right; countermark across shoulder. Rev: Γ(ABAΛEΩ)N. Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia. Ref: BMC –Axis: 180°. Weight: 7.53 g. CM: ΛΓΓ in rectangular punch, 7.5 x 4 mm. Howgego 551 (5 pcs). Note: Howgego describes the countermark as either ΛΠ or ΛΓI, while this specimen reads ΛΓΓ. Collection Automan.Automan
Chi_ro.JPG
ΧΡ52 viewsIn hoc signo vinces
Eν τούτω νίκα
V tomto zvítěz
By this sign conquer

Eusebius Pamphili Εὐσέβιος ὁ Καισάρειος wrote
Flavius Iustinus I. Augustus Ἰουστίνος minted
:Chi-Rho:
Bohemian
00017x00~1.jpg
37 viewsSPAIN
PB Tessera (14mm, 2.62 g)
Fly, seen from above
Blank
Stannard, Evidence 26-7 = Stannard, Parallels 99-100; Minturnae 34-5

Found in Southern Spain

This type is found both in Baetica and in central Italy, at Minturnae, demonstrating the close economic ties between the two areas. Stannard notes numerous parallels in the lead tokens and unofficial bronze coinage in the two areas. He also sees a stylistic difference between issues of the two regions, but I have not personally seen enough specimens from both regions to say.
Ardatirion
00026x00~1.jpg
18 viewsSPAIN
PB Tessera (12mm, 2.22 g)
ISI within beaded square cartouche
Blank
Unpublished

Found in Southern Spain

This is a part of a small group of leads of similar module that were found in Southern Spain. They appear to be distinct from the series described by Casariego et al and Stannard.
Ardatirion
00025x00~0.jpg
21 viewsSPAIN
PB Tessera (13mm, 1.56 g)
Radiate [bearded?] head right
Blank
Unpublished

Found in Southern Spain

This is a part of a small group of small leads of similar module that were found in Southern Spain. They appear to be distinct from the series described by Casariego et al and Stannard.
Ardatirion
00011x00.jpg
19 viewsGAUL, Lugdunum (?)
PB Tessera (14mm, 2.13 g)
CPF, palm frond below
Blank
Cf. Turcan 221, 225-6, and others.

Found in Southern Spain.

This struck piece shares its general engraving style and palm frond motif with a number of specimens in the museum of Lyons. Perhaps, considering its Spanish provenance, the type saw circulation along the coast of the western Mediterranean.
Ardatirion
00031x00.jpg
25 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.84 g)
Amor standing left, holding an ucnertain object
Wreath
Rostovtsev 2006.1, pl. VIII, 24 = Scholz 368 (this coin, illustrated)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00037x00~1.jpg
37 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 4.49 g, 12h)
Apollo standing facing, holding lyre
Clasped hands within wreath
Rostovtsev -; Scholz 382 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
1 commentsArdatirion
00036x00~1.jpg
20 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 4.72 g, 12h)
Apollo standing left, holding branch, resting left arm on tripod
TCE
Rostovtsev 2035 = Scholz 1784 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00035x00~0.jpg
22 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 2.99 g, 12h)
Palm frond and cornucopia
Clasped hands
Rostovtsev -; München 297; Scholz 1126 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00034x00~1.jpg
20 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 1.82 g, 12h)
DHS
PR PR
Rostovtsev 3443 = Scholz 1715 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00028x00~0.jpg
21 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 2.38 g, 12h)
Dog standing right
Poppy
Rostovtsev -; Scholz 994 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00032x00~0.jpg
21 viewsROME. The Two Lucii
PB Tessera (20mm, 3.12 g, 12 h)
DVO
LL
Rostovtsev 1358 = Scholz 1422 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00033x00~0.jpg
23 viewsROME
PB Tessera (14mm, 3.58 g, 12h)
Galley
Anchor
Rostovtsev -; Scholz 577 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00010x00.jpg
19 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 6.62 g, 12h)
Galley
TAP/COC
Rostovtsev, “ΔΩPEA CITOY TAPCΩ,” in NC 1900, p. 103; Rostovtsev –

Despite the Greek legend naming Tarsus, the fabric of this piece confirms that it is from the city of Rome.
Ardatirion
uncertain.jpg
39 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 4.33 g)
Contemporary counterfeit
Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopia, GPR (Genio populi Romani) around
Blank
Rostowzew -

This tessera was cast from fractured molds, likely after the they had been discarded by the mint. It is the only possibly counterfeit tessera I have discovered to date.
Ardatirion
00029x00~1.jpg
19 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.99 g, 12h)
G P R F in circle within wreath
Palm frond
Rostovtsev -; Scholz 1858 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00002x00~6.jpg
21 viewsROME. P. Glitius Gallus
PB Tessera (20mm, 2.89 g, 12h)
P GLITI GALLI, bare head right
Rooster standing right, [holding rostral crown in beak and palm frond in claws]
Rostowzew 1238, pl. IV, 33; BM 932

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1201 (part of)

Though the exact identity of this individual is unknown, he is undoubtedly a member of the gens Glitia. It is tempting to associate him with the P. Glitius L.f. Gallus who was implicated in the Pisonian Conspiracy against the emperor Nero and ultimately exiled to the island of Andros, or his son, P. Glitius P.f. Gallus.
Ardatirion
00006x00~2.jpg
14 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 5.35 g, 12h)
Draped bust of Hercules left, wearing lion's skin and holding club over shoulder, with hair and beard in Antonine-Severan style
The Dioscuri standing facing one another, each holding spear and bridle of horse
Rostovtsev 2085; Rostovtsev & Prou 377

Rostovtsev suggests that the obverse may depict Caracalla. This interpretation is somewhat plausible, but unlikely, considering the additional object on the obverse, and the bare head of the figure.
Ardatirion
phallus1.JPG
45 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 2.92 g, 12 h)
Horse standing right; C above
Erect phallus; A V flanking
Rostovtsev -

Rostovtsev1 gathers into one group all tesserae depicting the phallus, various iterations of the word Amor, and the extremely rare pieces depicting sexual acts. He assumes that these pieces were entrance tickets to the Lupanaria, ancient brothels. This association has caused many scholars to refuse to accept tesserae as currency, as they feel that such crude themes would never have been depicted on currency. Thornton2, however, convincingly argues that, as Mercury is sometimes depicted as a herm, a statuary type consisting of a bust set on a square pedestal adorned with only genitalia, the phallus is in fact an emblem of the god in his guise as a fertility deity.


1. Rostovtzev, Mikhail. 1905. Römische Bleitesserae. Ed. C.F. Lehmann and E Kornemann. Beiträge z. Liepzig: Theodor Weicher.

2. Thornton, M. K. 1980. “The Roman Lead Tesserae : Observations on Two Historical Problems Author.” Historia: Zeitschrift für Alte Geschichte 29 3: 341-3
1 commentsArdatirion
00027x00~0.jpg
26 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 5.05 g, 12h)
LIC
(MA)(NV)
Rostovtsev -; Scholz 1540 (this coin)

Ex Trau Collection
Ardatirion
00005x00~0.jpg
98 viewsROME. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161.
PB Tessera (22mm, 5.09 g, 11 h)
The Lighthouse of Portus
ANT
Rostowzew 64, fig. 2; Kircheriano 66

Possibly ex Trau collection.

The Lighthouse of Portus was restored during the reign of Antoninus Pius. This tessera was likely distributed during the ceremony.
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41 viewsROME
PB Tessera (15mm, 2.37 g, 3 h)
Lion leaping right; S above, RV below
Dolpin right; S above, RV below
Rostowzew 604, fig. 47 var. (arrangement of letters)


Although it initially appears to be struck, close examination reveals that this piece was cast, with insufficient metal filling the mold.
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51 viewsROME
PB Tessera (13mm, 3.30 g, 12 h)
Facing head of Medusa
Bestiarius standing facing, holding net and spear
Rostowzew 589 = Kircheriano 1167

The Roman bestiarii were arena fighters who fought against animals while wielding the spear and net. While professional schools for this role eventually developed, most animal fighters were condemned prisoners who barely survived a single match. They should be distinguished from the traditional gladiatiores, who fought only other men. It was in the role of bestiarius that Commodus won his arena fame and Herculean title.
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18 viewsROME
PB Tessera (20mm, 5.77 g, 12 h)
Mercury standing facing, holding bag and caduceus
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Rostowzew 2647.1 = Rostowzew & Prou 300

The style of this piece is finer than one would expect for a common Roman type. Although difficult to tell without an illustration, Rostowzew 2647.1 is the only listed specimen near the size and is persumably of the same style.
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25 viewsROME
PB Tessera (12mm, 2.26 g, 6h)
Mercury advancing right, holding bag and caduceus
PR/OG
Rostovtzev -

The small, round fabric of this issue is not usual for an issue from Rome. Additionally, the attribution of the obverse figure as Mercury is uncertain. Though he appears to bear the bag and caduceus, the figure is in a pose more traditionally held by Eros.
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11 viewsROME
PB Tessera (23mm, 6.90 g, 12h
Rudder
Flaccid male genitals (or leaf?)
Rostovtsev –

The obverse type differs from the phallic imagery sometimes scene on Roman tesserae. This example depicts a flaccid, rather than engorged penis, often conservatively described in numismatics as a "pudenda virilia." The unusual shape of this piece, combined with the differing obverse type, makes me think this may be a fertility amulet.
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17 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 3.65 g, 12h)
Rudder
TI
Rostovtsev 2444; Scholz 1794 (this coin); München 438

Ex Trau Collection
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41 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 2.60 g)
Head of Sol right
Head of horse right, flail behind
Rostowzew 757. fig. 64; München 166; Milan 134; Kircheriano 1017; BM 413-6

Ex J.S. Wagner Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 250), lot 484 (part of)

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae speculatorum" for use in the Circus.
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29 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 2.54 g, 12h)
Head of Sol right
Head of horse right, flail behind
Rostovtsev 757. fig. 64 = Scholz 619, pl. III (this coin, illustrated); München 166; Milan 134; Kircheriano 1017; BM 413-6

Ex Trau Collection
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31 viewsROME. Durmius Successus
PB Tessera (19mm, 2.74 g)
Three aspects of Hekate
DVR/ SVC
Rostowzew 1210, pl. XI 4 (cast from same mold as illustrated specimen); Turcan 174

Ex Mark Staal Three Graces Collection; Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 232, Lot 515 (part of); purchased from Divus Numismatic, May 2007

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae nominibus virorum et mulierum signatae."
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24 viewsROME. L. Volusi Primi
PB Tessera (20mm, 3.65 g)
Three aspects of Hekate
LVOLV/ SIPRIMI
Rostowzew 1345, pl. XI 23 (cast from same mold as illustrated specimen); München 237; Kircheriano 405-8; BM 1349-50

Ex Mark Staal Three Graces Collection; Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 232, Lot 515 (part of); purchased from Mediterranean Coins, April 2004

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae nominibus virorum et mulierum signatae."
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32 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.96 g, 12 h)
The Charites (the Three Graces) standing, the left and right facing, the middle with back to view
Modius with three grain ears
Rostovtzev 358; Milan 52; München 67-70; BM 1330-3, 1335-8, 1340-1; Staal Appendix A, p. 148 (this coin illustrated)

Ex Mark Staal Three Graces Collection (Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 300), lot 432 (part of)
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23 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 2.80 g, 12h)
The Charites (the Three Graces) standing, the left and right facing, the middle with back to view
Modius with three grain ears
Rostovtzev 358.72 = Scholz 461 (this coin); Milan 52; München 67-70; BM 1330-3, 1335-8, 1340-1

Ex Trau Collection
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36 viewsROME
PB Tessera (19mm, 2.71 g, 12 h)
Imperial issue (?)
Venus Victrix standing right, resting arm on cippus and holding transverse scepter and clasping hands with Mars, standing left
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Rostowzew 153, pl. III 2; München 16-7; Kircheriano 572, 582, 738, and 741

Rostowzew places this with the "Tesserae capitibus et nominibus imperatorum signatae" on the basis of type. In my studies, I have noticed that many of the types bearing Imperial portraiture or names are much more finely engraved, often with a centering dot and pronounced rims.
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62 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 2.53 g, 12h)
Victory standing right, foot on helmet, inscribing shield set on palm tree
Apex; palm frond to left
M. & B. Overbeck, “Romische Bleimarken als Zeugnis des Ersten Jüdischen Krieges,” in Helas und der Grechen Osten, p. 211-216, 1; Rostovtsev 1840, pl. VII, 37; BMC 802-4

The similarities between the obverse of this piece and the Judaea Capta issues of Caesarea Maritima cannot be overstated. This type, as well as a few others that bear the portrait of Vespasian or palm trees, undoubtedly played some role in the triumph that followed the conclusion of the First Jewish War.
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39 viewsTiberius. AD 14-37
Æ As (26mm, 9.14 g, 12 h)
Gaul? Imitating Rome mint issue struck AD 21-22
[TI CAESAR DIV]I AVG F AVGVST IMP [VII or VIII]
Bare head right
PONT[IF MAXIM TRIBVN] POTEST XXXIIII
Livia seated right, holding patera and long scepter; SC flanking
Cf. Cohen 19

The authors of RIC I do not recognize this type as being official. Cohen likely saw a similar imitation, assuming it to be an original mint issue.
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23 viewsClaudius. AD 41-53.
Æ As (27mm, 9.39 g, 6 h). Western Europe (Spain?). Struck circa AD 43-64.
Bare head left
Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear and holding round shield; S C flanking
Sutherland grade IV

The style of this piece is reminiscent of earlier Spanish provincial issues.
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17 viewsATTICA, Athens
PB Tessera. (15mm, 4.00 g)
Struck circa 200-263 AD
Helmeted head right
Blank
Lang & Crosby 246

The style of the bust on this token closely matches one discovered in the Stoa at the Athenian Agora, firmly dated to the mid 3rd century AD.
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34 viewsCORINTHIA, Corinth
PB Tessera (15mm, 3.37 g)
Pegasos flying left; [COR?] below
Blank
BCD Corinth 529 (this coin)

Ex BCD Collection (Lanz 105, 26 November 2001), lot 529

This intriguing piece stands out from the main series of countermarked bronze type tesserae found at Corinth.
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145 viewsIONIA, Ephesos. 1st-2nd century AD
Æ Tessera (18mm, 2.74 g)
KHPIΛIC ωΔE ΠPOC ΠAΛVPIN
Bee
CKωΠI, recumbent stag; E to left, Φ to right
BMC 186; SNG Copenhagen 355


Head interprets the legend ΠAΛYPIN as related to υρoν, beehive, and ύppις, basket and conflated with πaλιν, bring back. From this, he suggests that the token would have been placed in a jar and shaken to produce a ringing sound, while the magical words were spoken. Thus, the piece would be a magical token, related to the folk tradition of ringing the bees into their hives. Such an explanation is perhaps overly fanciful.
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36 viewsIONIA, Ephesos. Alexander.
PB Tessera (17mm, 3.95 g, 4h)
Artemis kneeling right, bathing, within grotto surmounted by half-length figure of Aktaion, wearing antlers and raising arms
Hippocampus right, AΛЄ Ξ around
Gülbay & Kireç –; Gorny & Mosch 212 (5 March 2013), lot 3333 (same dies); Vossen 35 (this coin)

Ex Tom Vossen Collection, 35
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26 viewsIONIA, Ephesos. Marchos, grammateus of the Boule.
PB Tessera (18mm, 8.88 g)
MAR ΓP BOV, composite head of Silenos facing right and young horned Pan facing left; c/m: bird (stork?) standing right
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç –; Vossen 42 (this coin)

Ex Tom Vossen Collection, 42; Münzzentrum Rheinland 161 (11 January 2012), lot 315; Münzzentrum Rheinland 159 (4 May 2011), lot 357
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13 viewsIONIA, Ephesos.
PB Tessera (21mm, 6.53 g) Dated SE 469 (AD 157/8?)
Rider on horseback right, holding whip; YΞΘ below
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç –; Vossen 57 (this coin)

Ex Tom Vossen Collection, 57; Münzzentrum Rheinland 150 (7 January 2009), lot 263; Münzzentrum Rheinland 134 (30 August 2006), lot 404
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35 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
PB Tessera (16mm, 4.22 g, 2 h)
Hermit crab right; wheat ear below
Lion advancing right
Gülbay & Kireç 40 var. (figure on reverse – same obverse die)

My special thanks to BCD for withholding his bid and allowing me to acquire this piece.
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40 viewsIONIA, Ephesos
PB Tessera (19mm, 4.90 g)
Togate figure standing left, sacrificing at altar before tholos containing cult statue
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç -; Hirsch 279, lot 4922

The engraver of this die betrays no small skill in his execution of the obverse type; the circular shrine is shown in perspective, with the columns arranged so as to suggest distance while still leaving room for the statue to be visible. I was surprised to find that another specimen of this type from different, though equally elegant dies had recently sold in a Hirsch auction, there misidentified as a “bleiplombe,” or lead seal.
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57 viewsUNITED STATES TOKENS, Hard Times. Political issues.
CU Token (27mm, 6.59 g, 11 h)
Dies by Joseph B. Gardiner. Belleville (New Jersey) or Scoville mint. Struck 1840.
HENRY CLAY AND THE AMERICAN SYSTEM
Draped bust of Henry Clay right; IBG below
UNITED/ [WE]/ STAND within wreath
Rulau HT 79; Low 192

Rulau gives a struck date of 1840 for this issue, and assigns it to the Belleville mint. However, documentary evidence shows that Gardiner was by this time working at the Scoville mint in Waterbury, CT. Either the coin was struck prior to spring 1839, or it is an issue of the Scoville mint.
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20 viewsUNITED STATES, Hard Times. Political issues.
CU Token (28.5mm, 8.53 g, 12h). Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1838.
AM I NOT A WOMAN & A SISTER, hained female slave kneeling right, raising arms in supplication; * 1838 * below UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, LIBERTY/ 1838 within wreath
Rulau HT 81; Low 54

Ex Album 33 (17 January 2019), lot 2542

June 1900 saw a brief flurry of journalistic interest in the "Am I Not A Woman & A Sister" tokens. A specimen had been found in a garden in Indiana, apparently in one of the many towns that claim a connection to the Underground Railroad, and received a glowing and fanciful write up in the local newspaper. The paper claimed that it was a "Talisman of Slavery," and used as a token to ensure safe passage along the escaped slave's route, and that it was a very rare piece. The following week a newspaper in Maine recorded that a local collector had another example, again drawing a purported connection to the Underground Railroad. Astutely, the July 1900 edition of the American Journal of Numismatics pointed out that, while an isolated use like this was possible, it was not what the tokens were originally intended for.
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74 viewsINDONESIA, Kingdom of Srivijaya.
7th-13th centuries AD
Æ (17mm, 0.32 g).
Cirebon or Tegal area. Struck in the early 11th century
Xian Ping Yuan Bao in crude Hànzì
Blank
Zeno 124661


The kingdom of Srivijaya (San Fo Chi, in Chinese) apparently petitioned the Emperor Zhēnzōng of China, seeking protection from the Chola Kingdom and permission to strike coins. This type, known only from recent finds near Palembang, likely represents the earliest native coinage of that area.
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80 viewsINDONESIA, Sultanate of Palembang. Circa AD 1790's-1821
Tin Cash (20mm, 0.61 g)
Palembang mint
Shi Dan Li Bao in Hànzì
Blank
T.D. Yih, "Tiny Pitis Inscribed 'Shi-Dan' (Sultan) from Palembang," in ONS Newsletter 204 (Summer 2010), type I-1

Found in Palembang

Hang Li Po first appears in the Malay Annals as a Chinese princess sent to be the fifth bride of sultan Mansur Shah of Malacca. However, there is no reference to this event in official Ming documents. Li Po may merely be a beautiful concubine given to the Sultan. Alternatively, she may be the daughter of an otherwise unknown Chinese ruler in the area, to whom this coin may perhaps be attributed.
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92 viewsUNITED STATES TOKENS, Hard Times. Belleville, New Jersey. “T. Duseaman, butcher”
CU Token (28mm, 10.84 g, 1h)
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Struck 1837
AGRICULTURE & COMMERCE/ * BAS CANADA *
Bouquet
T. DUSEAMAN BUTCHER/ * BELLEVILLE *
Eagle standing left, with wings spread and head left, holding shield emblazoned with anchor; thirteens stars around
Rulau HT 204; Low 148; Corteau 71; Charlton LC-45; Breton 670

T. Duseaman never existed. This type was struck from a rejected die for the token of one Tobias Seaman, a butcher in Belleville. Mint workers added a U to the name and combined it with a damaged die from the Lower Canada series to produce this currency issue. Breton notes that the type is most often found in Canada, suggesting that it was deliberately produced at minimal cost for sale to Canadian brokers.
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24 viewsUNCERTAIN EAST
Circa 300 BC - 100 AD?
PB Tessera (20mm, 3.79 g)
Two punches: bee, Λ A flanking; Nike advancing facing, head right
Blank
Gülbay & Kireç -; Lang & Crosby -; Howgego -

The first punch depicts a bee with a long, cylindrical body, triangular pointed wings, and globular eyes with the letters Λ and A flanking. A second, added later over the edge of the first, shows Nike striding boldly forward with her head slightly to the right. The elegant engraving of the punches, both unlisted as countermarks in Howgego, contrasts starkly with the rough, unfinished flan. Although the basic types of Nike and a bee are common at Ephesos, the fabric and style differ from the issues of that city. Neither does the piece fit with the tokens found in the Athenian Agora. All considered, this piece appears consistent with what one would expect from a temporary token or entry pass, possibly of the pre-Roman period.
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64 viewsEAST AFRICA, Kilwa Sultanate. 'Ali bin al-Hasan. Late 5th century AH / 11th century AD
Æ Fals (21mm, 2.68 g, 3 h). Kilwa Kisiwani mint.
Inscription in two lines; star at center
Inscription in three lines
Album 1180; Walker, Kilwa 12; SICA 10, 589-91; Zeno 87054 (this coin)

Acquired in the 1960's, likely through circulation in Dar-es-Salaam.

Chittick ("On the Chronology of the sultans of Kilwa" in NC 13, 1973), the excavator of Kilwa Kisiwani, notes that these issues were found in the earliest stratigraphic layers and accordingly reassigns them to the first sultan of Kilwa. Walker and Freeman-Grenville gave them to an otherwise unattested 13th century ruler of the same name. However, the picture is muddled by finds from the excavations at Songo Mnara, occupied only between the 14th and 16th centuries, where this type was among the most numerous to be found. The type is unlikely to have remained in circulation for such a long period and may been reissued by subsequent rulers.
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83 viewsEAST AFRICA, Kilwa Sultanate. Suleyman bin al-Hasan. AH 702-717 / AD 1302-1316
Æ Fals (23mm, 2.06 g, 11 h). Kilwa Kisiwani mint.
Inscription in two lines; star at center
Inscription in three lines
Album 1183; Walker, Kilwa 3; SICA 10, 602-11; Zeno 87052 (this coin)

Acquired in the 1960's, likely through circulation in Dar-es-Salaam.

The dating is adapted from Chittick ("On the Chronology of the sultans of Kilwa" in NC 13, 1973) - Bosworth (The New Islamic Dynasties) gives different dates. However, considering the uncertain nature of both the chronologies and how they relate to the coinage, particularly in light of the finds at Songo Mnara, all dates should be considered hypothetical.
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26 viewsEGYPT, Antinoöpolis
PB Tessera – Dichalkon
Draped bust of Antinous right, wearing hem-hem crown(?);[Δ]/I downward to left, X/A downward to right
Tyche standing right, holding rudder and cornucopia; [Λ/K] downwards to left, [O/N] downwards to right

This piece is extremely important for the study of lead tokens in Roman Egypt. The legend reads DIXALKON, normally a bronze denomination. Leads bearing denominational names are known from only a few specimens (see Köln 3502, for one such piece from Memphis), including one of this type in Dattari (Savio).
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39 viewsEGYPT, Arsinoe (Krokodilopolis)
PB Tessera. (25mm, 7.23 g)
Head of Pharoah right
Serapis seated left on throne, holding scepter
Milne 5442 (Fayûm class); Dattari (Savio) -; Köln 3614

Ex Classical Numismatic Group Electronic Auction 238, lot 295

Milne gives this type to an uncertain city in the Fayûm. Considering the thematic and stylistic similarities with the named piece of Arsinoe, an attribution to this city is probable.
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27 viewsEGYPT, Uncertain
PB Seal (?) (21mm, 4.19g)
Dated year 3 of an uncertain era.
ANTWNINOV[KAITOVNY]
Hermes standing facing, nude, head left, disk or globe in right, caduceus in left; ibis at his feet; LΙΓ in left field
Traces of attached metal
Milne , “Egyptian Leaden Tokens” in NC 1930, p. 310 note 3; Milne -; Dattari (Savio) 6413; Köln -

With an old Galiere Antiker Kunst ticket.

Milne does not regard this piece as a token. The attached metal on the reverse is characteristic of certain types of lead seals.
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93 viewsCANADA, Tokens. Nova Scotia. William IV. King of Great Britain, 1830-1837.
CU Penny Token (34.5 mm, 14.27 g, 6 h)
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1832, but struck circa 1835.
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
ONE PENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 below
Charlton NS-4A2; Breton 870

Canadian catalogs traditionally give this issue to an illicit mint in Montreal. Wayne Jacobs1 argues that these were struck in Belleville. While his methodology is somewhat questionable - most of his theory is based off a unreliable editorial in an 1893 edition of the Newark Sunday Call - his reasoning regarding this series is sound. He is able to clearly demonstrate that the halfpenny and penny tokens in question are a product of a single, cohesive establishment which could not have been located in Lower Canada. Finally, Jacobs' claim can be supported by documentary evidence from the Belleville mint's primary competitor, the Scoville Company of Waterbury, Connecticut. A letter from J.M.L. to W.H. Scoville, dated April 4 1839, states that, "a competitor was stamping Canada Nova Scotia and Southern coins at 35 cents a pound."

1. Jacobs, Wayne. 1996. “The Shadowy Issues of the Belleville Mint.” Canadian Numismatic Journal 41 1: 13–26.
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26 viewsCANADA, Nova Scotia. William IV King of Great Britain, 1830-1837
CU Halfpenny Token
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1832, but struck circa 1835
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
HALFPENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 below
Charlton NS-3A1; Corteau 277; Breton 871

The first obverse die for the series. This obverse would be extensively reused, eventually rusting, being polished and re-engraved, and develop the diagnostic die break before the nose.
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37 viewsCANADA, Nova Scotia. William IV King of Great Britain, 1830-1837
CU Halfpenny Token
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1832, but struck circa 1835
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
HALFPENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 below
Charlton NS-3A2; Corteau 278, tentative die state 6; Breton 871

“Old residents state that these counterfeits were brought, in large quantities to St. John, N.B., and from thence distributed through fishing vessels to Nova Scotian out ports. And informant tells of having seen a fisherman from Yarmouth paid for his catch in this coin.” R.W. McLachlan (Annals of the Nova Scotian Coinage, p. 37)
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16 viewsCANADA, Nova Scotia. William IV King of Great Britain, 1830-1837
CU Halfpenny Token
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1832, but struck circa 1835
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
HALFPENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 (over 1382) below
Charlton NS-3C; Corteau 281; Breton 871

This reverse die was initially engraved with the anachronistic date 1382, but was quickly caught and corrected, leaving only a handful of that extremely rare variety known today.
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23 viewsCANADA, Nova Scotia. William IV King of Great Britain, 1830-1837
CU Halfpenny Token
Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1832, but struck circa 1835
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
HALFPENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 below
Charlton NS-3D1; Corteau 282; Breton 871
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73 viewsCANADA, Tokens. Nova Scotia. William IV. King of Great Britain, 1830-1837
CU Halfpenny Token (28mm, 8.47 g, 6 h)
John Walker & Company's mint. Dated 1832
PROVINCE OF NOVA SCOTIA
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of George IV right
ONE PENNY TOKEN, thistle with two leaves; 1832 below
Charlton NS-1D1; Breton 871
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14 viewsLIBERIA, American Colonization Society. 1820-1847.
CU Cent. Belleville (New Jersey) mint. Dated 1833.
LIBERIA, nude man standing before shore, cutting at tree to left; brush to right; in distance, ship under sail right; 1833 in exergue
AMERICAN COLONIZATION SOCIETY/ ONE CENT. FOUNDED/ A.D./ 1816
Snyder dies 1/D; Colver & Harley –; KM Tn2

Ex Katz E-Auction 24 (14 August 2019), lot 900

The obverse of this token is from the first regular circulation issue, here heavily repolished and paired with a die from one of the final strikes, linking the two otherwise distinct sets of obverse dies. Only seven examples of this pairing are known. Snyder notes that die pairing 3/C, presently unlinked to others, could place between the first (obv 5 & 1) and second group (obv 2 &4). As obverses 3 and 4 both occur with significant breaks, this 1/D pairing may have been struck to replace either 3 or 4, with the later being more likely considering the sequence, and the 3/C pair the final set of dies used.
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35 viewsUNITED STATES TOKENS, Civil War. Wooster, Ohio. James B. Childs
CU Token (19mm, 3.06 g, 6 h)
Thistle; UNITED WE STAND above, DIVIDED WE FALL below
JAMES B. CHILDS/ CLOTHING/ HATS, CAPS/ &/ TRUNKS/ WOOSTER OHIO
Rulau 975D-1a
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64 viewsUNITED STATES, Native proto-currency. Seneca tribe.
Ganounata village (Honeoye Falls, NY). Circa AD 1625-1687
White wampum beads (apx. 5mm, 0.10g each)
Carved white shell beads with lateral hole for suspension in belt
Cf. William Martin Beauchamp, Wampum and Shell Articles Used by the New York Indians, p. 369

Found at the Dann Farm site in Honeoye Falls, NY.


In 1687 combined French and Huron forces, lead by the Marquis de Denonville, set out to undermine the strength of the Iriquois Confederacy. The main strike was made against Seneca villages in Western New York. Ganounata was burned during the campaign. This episode was only one in a long line of conflicts fought over control of the North American fur trade.

Wampum was used by Native Americans in woven belts of white and black beads. The white beads were crafted from the columella of the Channeled Whelk, the black from the quahog. Traditionally, wampum belts were used as a ceremonial object to initiate a trade contract. It was only with the coming of the Europeans that wampum began to function as coinage. In 1673, New York state officially set the value of wampum at six white beads to the Dutch stuiver, or three black until they fell out of use.
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48 viewsUNITED STATES, Native proto-currency. Northern Pacific coast. 18th-early19th century
Shell “kop-kop” (29mm by 6mm, 0.38 g)
Tubular shell of the dentalium genus of mollusks
Robert Stearns, Ethno-conchology: A Study of Primitive Money p. 314-321

Ex Detroit Museum of Art

Kop-kops were smaller or damaged pieces of hi-qua shells and circulated as a fraction of the hi-qua. Use of this shell type as currency ranged from northern California to Alaska.
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32 viewsBRITISH TOKENS, Tudor. temp. Mary–Edward VI.1553-1558.
PB Token (27mm, 5.29 g). St. Nicholas (‘Boy Bishop’) type. Cast in East Anglia (Bury St. Edmund’s?)
Mitre, croizer to right; all within border
Long cross pattée with trefoils in angles; scrollwork border
Rigold, Tokens class X.B, 1; Mitchiner & Skinner group Ra, 1

Ex Classical Numismatic Review XXXIX.1 (Spring 2014), no. 973330

Britain in the late middle ages played host to a popular regional variant of the ‘Feast of Fools’ festival. Every year on the feast of St. Nicholas, a boy was elected from among the local choristers to serve as ‘bishop.’ Dressed in mitre and bearing the croizer of his office, the young boy paraded through the city accompanied by his equally youthful ‘priest’ attendants. The ‘bishop’ performed all the ceremonies and offices of the real bishop, save for the actual conducting of mass. Though this practice was extinguished with the Dissolution of the Monasteries in 1539, it was briefly revived under Queen Mary, who took particular interest in the festival, when the lucky boy was referred to as ‘Queen Mary’s Child.’ The celebration of the boy bishop died out completely early in the reign of Elizabeth.

Evidence of this custom is particularly prevalent in East Anglia, specifically at Bury St. Edmunds. Beginning in the late 15th century, the region produced numerous lead tokens bearing the likeness of a bishop, often bearing legends relating to the festival of St. Nicholas. Issued in sizes roughly corresponding to groats, half groats, and pennies, these pieces were undoubtedly distributed by the boy bishop himself, and were likely redeemable at the local abbey or guild for treats and sweetmeats. Considering the endemic paucity of small change in Britain at the time, it is likely that, at least in parts of East Anglia, these tokens entered circulation along with the other private lead issues that were becoming common.
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25 viewsUNCERTAIN
PB Tessera (14mm, 3.62 g, 12 h)
Pilei of the Dioscuri
Caduceus; LLL(?) to left

This piece is significantly thicker than expected for a small coin of the Roman era. There is a possibility this is an unpublished Hellenistic lead denomination.
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D.175 Charles the Great [Charlemagne] (denier, class 3, Bourges)16 viewsCharles the Great, king of the Franks (768-840) and Holy Roman emperor (800-814)
Denier (Bourges, class 3, 781-800)

Silver, 1.18 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O/ [+CA]RLVS REX FR; cross pattée with a crescent in each quarter
R/ [+B]ITVRICA[S]; carolingian monogram KRLS

For the 3rd type of his coinage, Charles the Great introduced the famous KRLS monogram. This one contains all the letters of Karolvs : the consonants are clearly written at the edges and bound by a lozenge. The vowels are at the center of the monogram: A (using the upper part of the lozenge, O as the whole lozenge and V as the down part of the lozenge).
This monogram still appeared two centuries later in the coinage of Hugh Capet, first capetian king.
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D.609 Louis the Pious (denier, Melle, class 2)49 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
Denier (Melle, class 2, 819-822)

Silver, 1.48 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 3 h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS IMP; cross pattée
R/ META / . / LLVM

Louis' deniers correspond to his father's (Charles the Great) ``novus denarius'', whose weight is supposed to be near 1.7 g with a certain variability.

This denier is typical of Class 2 of Louis' coinage (819-822).
A circular inscription of the name of the ruler surrounds a cross pattée on the observe. The quite surprising Hlvdovvicvs initially comes from the germanic name Chlodowig ("Clovis"). This one was first transcribed to latin as Chlodowicvs. The initial C then disappeared, which explains the H at the beginning. The w(=vv) finally became a standard v, which gave Lvdovicvs (Louis). The imperial title imp is also given.

The reverse consists of the mint name, in field. The mint name may be split in 2 or 3 lines.
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D.611 Louis the Pious (denier, Melle, class 2)33 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
Denier (Melle, class 2, 819-822)

Silver, 1.77 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 6 h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS IMP; cross pattée
R/ +METALLVM; cross pattée

The obsverse is similar to the previous denier. The difference is that the mint name is around a cross pattée on the reverse. This type is scarer than the one with the mint name in the field. The presence of both types in a hoard shows that both date from the beginning of Louis' reign and belong to the same Class 2.
Grierson and Blackburn suggest that this difference is due to a misunderstanding of the mint instructions.
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D.612var Louis the Pious (obol, Melle, class 2)32 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
Obol (Melle, class 2, 819-822)

Silver, 0.78 g, 15.5 mm diameter, die axis 2 h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS MP; cross pattée
R/ +METALLVM; cross pattée

The obol of this type is simply a reduced size version but is identical to the related denier.

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D.1179 Louis the Pious (denier, class 3)51 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
"Temple" denier (unknown mint, class 3, 822-840)

Silver, 1.56 g, 20.5 mm diameter, die axis 3 h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS IMP; cross pattée with 4 pellets
R/ +XPISTIANA RELIGIO; temple

The XPISTIANA should be read "χρISTIANA", nice mix of greek and latin letters.

This is the most common carolingian coin (Class 3 of Louis' coinage).
The obverse is the same as Class 2. However, the reverse is a signature of the alliance between the Carolingians and the Roman Church, which began with Louis' father (Charles the Great) and the systematic introduction of a cross on coins. Louis carried on...

There is no indication of the mint name on this coinage. This fact is generally interpreted as a reinforcement of the imperial autority. Many people tried to localize the precise location of mints. Simon Coupland proposed an attribution, using stylistic similarities to other coins of well known mints. Some cases are easy to attribute but not this one (maybe Quentovic or Verdun ?)...

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D.1180 Louis the Pious (obol, class 3)10 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
"Temple" obol (unknown mint, class 3, 822-840)

Silver, 0.69 g, 16 mm diameter, die axis 2 h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS MP; cross pattée with 4 pellets
R/ +PSTIΛNΛ REICIO; temple

This obol is a reduced version of the temple denier.
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D.abs Louis the Pious (obol, class 3)19 viewsLouis the Pious, king of the Franks and Holy Roman emperor (813-840)
Obol (unknown mint in the south-east of France?, class 3, 822-840)

Silver, 0.77 g, 15 mm diameter, die axis 5 h

O/ +PISTIΛNΛ PI; cross pattée with 4 pellets
R/ +OPISTIΛNΛ PE; cross pattée

This obol may be due to a double reverse error because of the absence of the sovereign's name and the legend repetition on both sides. However several dies were used to strike this type (I could find 3 obverse and 3 reverse dies), one side always bears 4 pellets as the other does not. One of the reverse dies is associated to the more typical obverse legend +HLVDOVVICVS I. Consequently an error does not seem to be likely. Because of hoard localizations, these obols seem to come from a single mint, in the south-east of France (Lyon, Arles?).
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Louis IV: denier (Angoulême)12 viewsAs Louis d'Outremer, king of the Franks (936-954)
Immobilized denier (10th-12th century)

Billon, 0.81 g, 18.5 mm diameter, die axis 9h
O/ +LODOICVS; cross pattée
R/ +EGOLISSIME; 4 rings around a small cross pattée

This type of coin was immobilized from the end of the 10th century till the 13th century by the counts of Angoulême.
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D.621 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1a, Melle)25 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle, class 1a, 840-864)

Silver, 1.70 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 9h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX FR; cross pattée
R/ META / • / LLVM

Class 1 of Charles the Bald's coinage is made of totally different types of coins, which may reflect the state of the kingdom after 3 years of civil war and the division of the Empire.

Class 1a: mint in the field, with a linear legend
Class 1b: bust
Class 1c: city gate
Class 1d: KRLS monogram
Class 1e: temple

Coupland suggests that this particular scarce type (with META/LLVM on the reverse) had been minted from June 848, just after Charles the Bald finally defeated his nephew Pippin II for Aquitaine's control. The aim of minting a special type like this was to show a clear difference with the previsous coinage of Pippin II. A little later, Charles the Blad went on with the typical coinage of Melle (monogram ; circular mint name).
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D.197 Charles II the Bald (obol, class 1a, Bourges, Aquitaine)20 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Obol (Bourges, Aquitaine, class 1a, 848-849 ?)

Silver, 0.80 g, 17 mm diameter, die axis 5h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX ; cross pattée
R/ AQUI / • / TANIA

The obols of Charles the Bald with AQUITANIA on the reverse are thought to have been minted in Bourges due to hoard studies. For instance, Chaumoux-Marcilly (small village near Bourges) hoard was found in 1930. It had in it 40 coins of Charles the Bald: 20 from Bourges, 17 obols with AQVITANIA, 2 from Melle and one from Orléans. This hoard is consequently supposed to be made of local coins, and AQVITANIA obols of Charles the Bald are supposed to have been minted in Bourges.

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D.606 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1d, Melle)49 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle, class 1d, 840-864)

Silver, 1.35 g, 20.5 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX FR; cross pattée
R/ +METVLLO; carolingian monogram

The KRLS monogram was first introduced by Charles' great father, Charles the Great (Charlemagne). Charlemagne's son (Louis the Pious) never used a monogram, contrary to most carolingian rulers as Charles the Bald in particular.

This is the second most common carolingian coin.

Charlemagne minted exactly similar coins (Class 3). The question of the attribution to Charles the Great or the Bald has of course been widely discussed on grounds of style, weight, composition (work of Guillaume Sarah), position of the legend... These studies didn't lead to any clear conclusion although these deniers may often be attributed to Charlemagne. New hoards have to be found to resolve this issue.
By then, these coins have to be attributed to Charles the Bald by reason of the relative number of minted coins.
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D.626 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1d, Melle)25 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle, class 1d, 840-864)

Silver, 1.73 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 5h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX; cross pattée
R/ +METVLLO; carolingian monogram

This coinage with the shorter legend CΛRLVS REX is much rarer than the common one with the legend CΛRLVS REX FR. The composition of a hoard in Poitou suggests that this type can be unambiguously attributed to Charles the Bald. This coinage may have been minted at the beginning of Charles the Bald's reign, just before Pippin II took the control of Melle in 845.
Among the 12 known specimens, 5 have a deformed monogram, with the L and the S exchanging places, and on their sides. This feature, the shorter legend, as well as the unusual position of the legend opening cross on top of the monogram may suggest that there was some confusion in Melle at this time, when Charles gave back (temporarily) Aquitaine to Pippin.
The reverse is slightly double struck.
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D.627 Charles II the Bald (denier ?, class 1d, Melle)16 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle ?, class 1d, 840-864)

Silver, 1.35 g, 20.5 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX R; cross pattée
R/ +METxVLLO; carolingian monogram

The x in METxVLLO on the reverse has been widely discussed.
For instance, Depeyrot understands it as an immobilization/feudal issue. The crude style of theses deniers and the lightly degenerate legend of this one (CARLVS REX R instead of REX FR) seems in coherence with this hypothesis. However, the x is always at the same place.
Moreover, this type of coin has been found in the Brioux hoard, which may be datable to the beginning of Charles the Bald's reign. Grierson and Blackburn suggest that these coins with x were mainly minted in Poitiers. Using the legend of the close Melle mint allowed to take advantage of the reputation of Melle coinage.
Coupland proposes that this METxVLLO type came after the METVLLO type after 860 and until round 925. Then, it was replaced by the MET/ALO type. In order to explain the differences of interpretation, Coupland thinks that several hoards were wrongly dated or described.
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D.1189 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1e,Orléans)40 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
"Temple" denier (Orléans, class 1e, 840-864)

Silver, 1.64 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 8h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX FR; cross pattée
R/ +XPISTIΛNΛ RELIGIO; temple

This other example of Class 1 is the continuation of Louis the Pious' temple denier. XPISTIANA RELIGIO is then most often replaced by the mint name.
Although this is not the case for this specimen, the mint attribution is very clear. It is Orléans, because of the exaggerated S of XPISTIANA and the first I of RELIGIO is in the angle of the L.
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D.375 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Courcessin?)35 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Courcessin?, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.43 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +I.CVRTISΛSONIEH; cross pattée

In 864, Charles the Bald promulgated the edict of Pîtres, huge reform whose aim was to protect the kingdom from Viking raids. It also reinforced royal authority on minting, and created a new type of deniers . The new coins could be only struck at 10 mints (Palace, Chalon sur Saône, Melle, Narbonne, Orléans, Paris, Quentovic, Reims, Rouen and Sens). This limitation had never been applied, more than 110 mints struck the new coinage. This can be understood as a lack of control of the central autority. However it seems that several mints shared dies... Grierson and Blackburn proposed that only 10 main mints produced dies and partially outsourced coinage production ?
On the obverse is written GRATIA D-I REX (GDR) around a carolingian monogram. The alliance with Roman Church goes on... The reverse already existed for Class 1, with the mint name around a cross pattée.
Class 2 of Charles' coinage is made of these GDR deniers.

The precise localization of the mint in Normandie (north of France) is still not clear. According to Grierson and Blackburn, Courti(s) Sasonien(sis) may come from some groups of Saxons settled in northern part of Gaul.
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D.727 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Orléans)14 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Orléans, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.80 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 5h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +ΛVRELIΛNIS CIVITΛS; cross pattée

This is another typical example of Class 2 (GDR type).
Cenabum was a gallic stronghold of the Carnute tribe. It was conquered and destroyed by Caesar in 52 BC, and then maybe rebuilt by the emperor Aurelian. This may be the origin the city's name.
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D.811 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Quentovic)37 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Quentovic, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.64 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 6h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +QVVENTOVVCI; cross pattée with 2 globules

This is another typical example of Class 2 (GDR type).
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D.399 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Dijon)21 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Dijon, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 0.91 g, 19.5 mm diameter, die axis 2h

O/ +C[RATIA] D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +DIVIONI C[AST]RE; cross pattée

This is another less common example of Class 2 (GDR type).
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D.559 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Le Mans)12 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Le Mans, class 2, 864-875 or end of the 8th/beginning of the 10th century)

Silver, 1.42 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O: +G I RΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R: +CINOMΛNIS CIVITΛS; cross pattée

Due to the degenerate legend and monogram, this coin may be an immobilization.
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D.198 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 3, Bourges)27 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877) and Holy Roman Emperor (875-877)
Denier (Bourges, class 2, 876-877)

Silver, 1.47 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +CΛRLVS IMP ΛVG; cross pattée
R/ +BITVRICES CIVIT; carolingian monogram

In 875, after the death of his nephew, the Emperor Louis II, Charles received the imperial crown.
The related coinage clearly shows the imperial title in a roman way, IMP AVG. This coinage may be undistinguishable from the one of Charles the Fat (885-887), when he assumed West Francia kingship (before being chased by Eudes, count of Paris and next king of the Franks).
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D.1007 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 3, Toulouse)13 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877) and Holy Roman Emperor (875-877)
Denier (Toulouse, class 2, 876-877)

Silver, 1.59 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 7h

O/ +CΛRLVS IMP R- ; cross pattée
R/ +TOLOSΛ+CIVI ; CA / RL in the center

The presence of the name of the sovereign on the reverse is quite rare for carolingian coins. This is also the case for Toulouse deniers of Charles the Bald's Louis II (or grandson Louis III) with LV / DO.

This coinage is also sometimes attributed to Charles the Fat.
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Dy.001 Hugh Capet: denier (Beauvais)19 viewsHugh Capet, king of the Franks (987-996) and Hervé, Bishop of Beauvais (987-998)
Denier (Beauvais)

Silver, 1.19 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 9h
O: [HERV]EVS HVGO RE[X] ; cross pattée with 2 pellets
R: BE[LVΛC]VS CIVITΛS ; carolingian monogram KRLS

Although Hugh Capet was the founder of the capetian dynasty, his coinage contains a carolingian monogram. It may have been a way to show the continuity of the royal authority. The presence of the bishop Hervé is not really understood on this nearly only coinage of Hugh Capet as king of the Franks (obols of the same type are also known, as well as a unique denier of Laon).
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Dy.081 Philip I: denier (Mâcon)31 viewsPhilip I, king of the Franks (1060-1108)
Denier (Mâcon, 2ond type)

Billon, 1.10 g, diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 5h
O: +PIIIPVS RX; lozenge with 4 pellets
R: +MATISCON; S with 2 pellets

Although Mâcon (Bourgogne) was not in the royal domain, this denier was struck in the name of Philip I, king of France.
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Dy.134 Louis VII (the Young): denier (Bourges)27 viewsLouis VII, king of the Franks (1137-1180)
Denier (Bourges)

Billon, 0.70 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 1h30
O/ +LVDOVICVS REX; facing bearded and crowned head of the king
R/ +VRBS BI - TVRICA; latine flowered cross that interrups the legend

This type of coin with the king's face is quite unusual for the Capetian coinage. However, it was hard to recognize the king's face !
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Dy.177 Philip II (Augustus): denier tournois (Tours)23 viewsPhilip II, king of France (1180-1223)
Denier tournois (Tours)

Billon, 0.92 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 10h30
O: PHILIPVS REX; croix pattée
R: +TVRONVS CIVI; châtel tournois

This is the first denier tournois, nearly with the standard and final legend TVRONVS CIVI(S).
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Dy.178 Philip II (Augustus): denier (Déols)21 viewsPhilip II, king of France (1180-1223)
Denier (1206-1207, Déols)

Billon, 1.18 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 7h
O: +REX FILIPVS; croix pattée
R: +Dε DOLIS; hexalpha (star) around a ringlet

Déols (in the Centre-Val de Loire, region of France) was not in the royal domain.This denier was struck by Philip II, as guardian of Denise of Déols. Surprinsigly, the king title (rex) arrives before the name of the king.
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Dy.184 Philip II (Augustus): denier (Laon)20 viewsPhilip II, king of France(1180-1223) and Roger de Rosoi, bishop of Laon (1174-1201)
Denier (1180-1201, Laon)

Billon, 1.18 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 3h
O: +PHILIPVS REX; facing crowned head of the king
R: +R[OG]ERVS εPE; facing head of the bishop with miter

The denier was minted by both the king and the bishop of Laon (north of France, out of the royal domain at this time).
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Dy.187 Louis VIII (the Lion) or IX (Saint Louis): denier tournois19 viewsLouis VIII, king of France (1223-1226) or Louis IX, king of France (1226-1270)
Denier tournois (1223-1250)

Billon, 0.81 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 4h30
O: +LVDOVICVS REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS CIVI; châtel tournois

The question of the attribution of this denier to Louis VIII or to the first part of Louis IX's reign is difficult. Indeed, Louis VIII only ruled for 3 years and both the father and the son have the same name...
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Dy.190C Louis IX (Saint Louis): Gros tournois57 viewsLouis IX, king of France (1226-1270)
Gros tournois (1266-1270)

Silver (958 ‰), 3.94 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 12h
O: inner circle: +LVDOVICVS REX; cross pattée; outer circle: BHDICTV⋮SIT⋮HOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI⋮IhV.XPI
R: inner circle: +TVRONVS CIVIS; châtel tournois; outer circle: a circlet of 12 fleur-de-lis

The full transcription of the obverse is: benedictvm sit nomen domini nostri dei Jesu Christi, which means ``blessed is the name of our Lord Jesus Christ'' (XPI is in fact a mix of greek and latin letters: χρI[STI]). This choice of religious legend is not surprising for a king as pious as Louis IX.

The value of the denier had become too small for use in commerce. So Louis IX introduced the Gros Tournois in 1266, with a value of 12 deniers tournois (12 is the number of lis, and also of letters of the obverse and reverse legends !). Gros means ``big'' or``thick'', and tournois ``of Tours'' (Tours is a french city). The inner part of a Gros tournois is similar to a denier tournois. An outer circle has been added with the christian legend on the obverse and 12 fleur-de-lis (symbol of French kingship) on the reverse.

Gros tournois were struck in France and entire Europe during one century.
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Dy.202A Philip III (the Bold): Gros tournois 38 viewsPhilip III, king of France (1270-1285)
Gros tournois (1270-1280)

Silver (958 ‰), 4.04 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 1h30
O: inner circle: +PhILIPVS.REX; cross pattée; outer circle: BNDICTV⋮SIT⋮HOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI⋮IhV.XPI
R: inner circle: +TVRONV.S.CIVIS; châtel tournois; outer circle: a circlet of 12 fleur-de-lis

This type exactly continued the Gros tournois of Saint Louis, Philip's father.
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Dy.204 Philip III (the Bold): denier tournois 18 viewsPhilip III, king of France (1270-1285)
Denier tournois (1270-1280)

Billon (299 ‰), 1.00 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 1h30
O: +PhILIPVS.REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS.CIVIS.; châtel tournois

This is the exact continuation of previous denier tournois types.
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Dy.204 Philip III (the Bold): denier tournois 18 viewsPhilip III, king of France (1270-1285)
Denier tournois (1270-1280)

Billon (299 ‰), 0.85 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 11h
O: +PhILIPVS.REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS.CIVIS.; châtel tournois

Another example of this type, quite hard to find in a very good state.
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Dy.213 Philip IV (the Fair): Gros tournois with a round O37 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Gros tournois with a round O (1280-1290)

Silver (958 ‰), 4.07 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 12h
O: inner circle: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée; outer circle: BNDICTV⋮SIT⋮HOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI⋮IhV.XPI
R: inner circle: +TVRONVS.CIVIS; châtel tournois; outer circle: a circlet of 12 fleur-de-lis

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign). The only difference with the Gros tournois of the first part of Philip III's reign is PHILIPPVS, spelled with 2 P intead of 1.
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Dy.214 Philip IV (the Fair): Gros tournois with a long 032 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Gros tournois with long 0 (1290-1295)

Silver (958 ‰), 3.96 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 11h
O: inner circle: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée; outer circle: BNDICTV⋮SIT⋮HOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI⋮IhV.XPI
R: inner circle: +TVR0NVS CIVIS; châtel tournois; outer circle: a circlet of 12 fleur-de-lis

The only difference between this emission and the previous one is the 0 in TVR0NVS, which is now long instead of round.
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Dy.221 Philip IV (the Fair): denier parisis with a round O 9 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Denier tournois with round O (1280-1290)

Billon (359 ‰), 0.94 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 7h
O: PhILIPPVS REX; FRA/OCN
R: +PARISIVS CIVIS; croix pattée

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign).
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Dy.223 Philip IV (the Fair): denier tournois with a round O 16 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Denier tournois with round O (1280-1290)

Billon (299 ‰), 1.00 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 4h
O: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS CIVIS; châtel tournois

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign). The only difference with the denier tournois of the first part of Philip III's reign is PHILIPPVS, spelled with 2 P intead of 1.
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Dy.223A Philip IV (the Fair): denier tournois with a round O 11 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Denier tournois with round O (1280-1290)

Billon (299 ‰), 1.10 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 7h
O: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS•CIVISx; châtel tournois

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign). The only difference with the denier tournois of the first part of Philip III's reign is PHILIPPVS, spelled with 2 P intead of 1.
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Dy.224 Philip IV (the Fair): obol tournois with a round O 7 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Obol tournois with round O (1280-1290)

Billon (270 ‰), 0.55 g, diameter 15 mm, die axis 2h
O: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée
R: +TVRONVS CIVIS; châtel tournois

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign).
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philippe6-gros-lis.JPG
Dy.263 Philip VI (of Valois): Gros à la fleur de lis, 2ond emission ?11 viewsPhilip VI, king of France (1328-1350)
Gros à la fleur de lis (3 emissions between 1341 and 1343)

White billon (479 ‰), 2.50 g, diameter 24 mm, die axis 6h
O: inner circle: +PhILIPPVS.REX; cross pattée with a fleur-de-lis in the NE quadrant; outer circle: BnDICTV⋮SIT⋮HOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI
R: inner circle: +FRANCORVm; fleur-de-lis; outer circle: a circle of 10 fleur-de-lis

The 3 emissions are very similar, the weight is the only difference. This coin may belong to the 2ond emission.
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Dy.265 Philip VI (of Valois): Gros à la queue33 viewsPhilip VI, king of France (1328-1350)
Gros à la queue (09/27/1348 and 01/15/1349)

White billon (479 ‰), 3.33 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 6h
O: inner circle: (crown)PhILIP-PVS.REX; legend interrupted by a cross pattée; outer circle: BnDICTV⋮SIT⋮nOmЄ⋮DNI⋮nRI⋮DЄI⋮IhV⋮XPI
R: inner circle: +TVRONVS.CIVIS; châtel tournois with 3 archs under a crown; outer circle: a circlet of 12 fleur-de-lis

This Gros was struck at the end of Philip's reign and contains a quite small amount of silver.
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D.1155 Louis II the Stammerer (denier, Visé)5 viewsLouis II the Stammerer, king of the Franks (877-879)
Denier (Tours)

Silver, 0,79 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 8h

O/ +HLVDOVVICVS REX; KRLS monogram of Charles (legend beginning at 10h)
R/ +IN VICO VIOSΛTO; croix pattée

The KRLS (Karolus) monogram appears on this coinage of Louis II. One can imagine that there hadn't been much time to think about a new monogram just after Charles II's death.

Louis II was physically quite weak and died 2 years after his father Charles II. His reign was consequently very short.
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Tetricus II: minimi (Pax Avgg)19 viewsTetricus II, Gallic caesar (usurper) (272-274)
Antoninianus : Pax Avgg (274?)

Bronze, 1.90 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 6h

A/ [C PIV] ESV T[ETRICV]S CAES; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ PAX-A[VGG]; Pax standing left, wearing a helmet (!), holding a flower and a sceptre

Curious representation of Pax on this local imitation.

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Saint Martin abbey: denier (Tours)9 viewsSaint Martin of Tours abbey
Denier (second half of the XII th century, Tours)

Billon, 0.67 g, diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 10 h
O/ +SCS MARTINVS ; châtel tournois
R/ +TVRONVS CIVI ; cross pattée

Philip II has been inspired by this coin to create the denier tournois.
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D.163 Eudes (denier, Blois)15 viewsEudes, king of the Franks (888-898)
Denier (Blois)

Silver, 1.59 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O/ +MISERICORDIΛ DE-I; monogram
R/ +BIESIΛNIS CΛSTR◊; cross pattée

Eudes was not a Carolingian. As count of Paris, he obtained successful results against the Viking attacks. He was then chosen by frankish noblemen to be the king. The legitimate heir Charles III the Simple was then too young to rule.

This type of coinage is a very Carolingian one.
Eudes made his own monograms. This one is quite elaborate, with ◊DO above and RX below. Still on the obverse, the inscription is Misericordia Dei instead of the traditional Gratia Dei Rex. These two features (monogram and legend) make this coin very similar to Louis III's coins of Touraine (Blois and Tours mainly).

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D.1012 Eudes (denier, Toulouse)31 viewsEudes, king of the Franks (888-898)
Denier (Toulouse)

Silver, 1.45 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O/ +ODDO REX FR-C; cross pattée
R/ +TOLOSA CIVI; OD/DO monogram

Eudes'monogram is quite simple on this coin. It is made of 2D's and 2 O's (Oddo, which is Eudes in latin). The legend is a very traditional one.
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D.511 Eudes (denier, Limoges, immobilization)17 viewsEudes, king of the Franks (888-898)
Denier (Limoges)

Silver, 1.77 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 2h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ DI RE; odonic monogram + / ◊D◊ / + (legend beginning at 5h)
R/ +LIM◊VICΛS CIVIS ; cross pattée

This type was immobilized for 50 years ('til the middle of the 10th century).
2 commentsDroger
raoul-denier-paris.JPG
D.774 Rudolph (denier, Paris)9 viewsRudolph (or Raoul, Radulf), king of the Franks (923-936)
Denier (Paris)

Silver, 1.13 g, 18 mm diameter, die axis 11h

O/ +CRATIA DI REX; monogram
R/ + / PΛRISI / CIVITΛ / +

Rudolph was elected king of Franks by noblemen in 923, after his father-in-law (Robert I)'s death.

Although Rudolph wasn't a carolingian, his coinage used a monogram.This monogram is clearly inspired by the habitual KRLS monogram. The letters seem to be R(?)DFS. Anyway, the F on the bottom can be cleary distinguished, and this coin can be attributed to Rudolph.

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D.733 Rudolph (denier, Orléans)8 viewsRudolph (or Raoul, Radulf), king of the Franks (923-936)
Denier (Orléans)

Silver, 1.27 g, 18 mm diameter, die axis 6h

O/ +CRΛTIΛ D-I REX; monogram RDFS (legend beginning at 9h)
R/ +ΛVRELIΛNIS CIVITΛ cross pattée

This monogram is clearly an imitation of the tradition KRLS Charles' one. As often in Orléans' coinage, the I after an L in Avrelianis is in the angle of the L.
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D.308B Rudolph (denier, Château-Landon)19 viewsRudolph (or Raoul, Radulf), king of the Franks (923-936)
Denier (Château-Landon)

Silver, 1.16 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 4h

O/ +CRΛTIΛ D-I; odonic monogram of Rodolf (legend beginning at 9h)
R/ +CΛSTIS LIΛNDNI; cross pattée

The R on the top of the monogram and the F below are for Rodulfus. The 2 lozenges on the sides may come from Eudes' monogram (Oddo). Eudes was the brother of Rudolph's father-in-law... sort of family alliance against Carolingians (although Rudolph's aunt had been married to Charles the Bald...). The I and the X are more mysterious.

According to Dumas, this coinage may have been struck after Rudolph's dead, by Hugues the Great, his brother-in-law... family business still.
1 commentsDroger
raoul-orleans.JPG
D.abs Rudolph (denier, Orléans)49 viewsRudolph (or Raoul, Radulf), king of the Franks (923-936)
Denier (Orléans)

Silver, 1.14 g, 18 mm diameter, die axis 11h

O/ +CRΛTI[Λ D-I R]EX; monogram (legend beginning at 9h)
R/ +ΛVRELIΛNIS CIVITΛ cross pattée

Same monogram as the previous coin minted in Château-Landon.
Same conclusions: according to Dumas, this coinage may have been struck after Rudolph's dead, by Hugh the Great.

As often in Orléans' coinage, the I after an L in Avrelianis is in the angle of the L.
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LT abs, Gaul, Massalia16 viewsMassalia (Marseille, south of France)
Circa 385-310 BC ?

Silver obol, 0.67 g, 10 mm diameter, die axis 8h

O/ youthful head of Apollo, right, with a visible ear and sideburns
R/ wheel with four spokes, M and A in two quarters

Marseille was founded by the Phocean Greeks circa 600 BC. This obol has obviously more greek than celtic origins.
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D.268 Lothair (denier, Chalon-sur-Saône)16 viewsLothair, king of the Franks (954-986)
Denier (Chalon-sur-Saône)

Silver, 1.26 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 1h

O/ +LOTARVS.REX; B
R/ +CAVILON.CIVT; cross pattée

The B on the obverse means Bourgogne.

Although Lothair's reign had lasted more than 30 years, his coins are quite scarce. Moreover, they are often hard to distinguish from feudal issues. The types are varied, as well as the spelling of the king's name, depending on the mint. This is an evidence of a lack of central control.
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D.207 Lothair (denier, Bourges, immobilization ?)11 viewsLothair, king of the Franks (954-986)
Denier (Bourges)

Silver, 1.31 g, 22 mm diameter, die axis 9h

O/ +IOTERIVS REX; cross pattée
R/ +BITVRICES CIVIT; degenerated monogram

This type was immobilized 'til the beginning of the XI century.
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S.1257 William I the Conqueror (PAXS penny, London)15 viewsWilliam I the Conqueror, king of England (1066-1087)
PAXS penny (moneyer: Alfred, mint: London, 1083-1086?)

A/ +PILLELM RE; crowned bust facing, sceptre to right; clasp on shoulder
R/ +IELFRE ON LVNDN; cross with the letters PAXS in circles in the angles

silver, 1.40 g, diameter 18 mm, die axis 6h

This type may have been struck by William II, son of William I.


2 commentsDroger
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Charles II the Bald (denier, Melle, immobilization)46 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Melle, 10th century)

Silver, 1.15 g, 21 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX R; cross pattée (S retrograd)
R/ MET / . / ALO

Not really a type that can be attributed to Charles the Bald... this type was immobilized and struck from the middle of the 10th century to the end of the 11th century ! Minting was then totally in the hands of of the counts of Poitou and out of control of the royal administration.
The obverse is similar to previous coinage, but with a retrograd S on most of the specimen. On the contrary, the mint name (in the field on the obverse) had never been used by Charles the Bald (METALO instead of METALLVUM).
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"8 Zhu" Ban Liang of Qin Kingdom (Eastern Zhou Dynasty)24 viewsMinted 300-220 BCE.

Two huge Chinese characters - Ban Liang ("Half an ounce"), no rims or other marks / Blank, no rims. Unfiled edges.

This very large thin coins of variable weight were made under the very late Zhou dynasty - they are local issues, and might belong either to the late "Warring States" period or the early Qin period.

31mm, 3.52 grams. Hartill #7.4.
Belisarius
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"As de Nîmes" or "crocodile" Ӕ dupondius of Nemausus (9 - 3 BC), honoring Augustus and Agrippa33 viewsIMP DIVI F , Heads of Agrippa (left) and Augustus (right) back to back, Agrippa wearing rostral crown and Augustus the oak-wreath / COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm-shoot with short dense fronds and tip right; two short palm offshoots left and right below, above on left a wreath with two long ties streaming right.

Ӕ, 24.5 x 3+ mm, 13.23g, die axis 3h; on both sides there are remains of what appears to be gold plating, perhaps it was a votive offering? Rough edges and slight scrapes on flan typical for this kind of coin, due to primitive technology (filing) of flan preparation.

IMPerator DIVI Filius. Mint of COLonia NEMausus (currently Nîmes, France). Known as "As de Nîmes", it is actually a dupontius (lit. "two-pounder") = 2 ases (sometimes cut in halves to get change). Dupondii were often made out of a golden-colored copper alloy (type of brass) "orichalcum" and this appears to be such case.

Key ID points: oak-wreath (microphotography shows that at least one leaf has a complicated shape, although distinguishing oak from laurel is very difficult) – earlier versions have Augustus bareheaded, no PP on obverse as in later versions, no NE ligature, palm with short fronds with tip right (later versions have tip left and sometimes long fronds). Not typical: no clear laurel wreath together with the rostral crown, gold (?) plating (!), both features really baffling.

But still clearly a "middle" kind of the croc dupondius, known as "type III": RIC I 158, RPC I 524, Sear 1730. It is often conservatively dated to 10 BC - 10 AD, but these days it is usually narrowed to 9/8 - 3 BC.

It is a commemorative issue, honoring the victory over Mark Antony and conquest of Egypt in 30 BC. The heads of Augustus and Agrippa were probably positioned to remind familiar obverses of Roman republican coins with two-faced Janus. Palm branch was a common symbol of victory, in this case grown into a tree, like the victories of Augustus and Agrippa grown into the empire. The two offshoots at the bottom may mean two sons of Agrippa, Gaius and Lucius, who were supposed to be Augustus' heirs and were patrons of the colony. Palm may also be a symbol of the local Nemausian deity, which was probably worshiped in a sacred grove. When these coins were minted, the colony was mostly populated by the settled veterans of Augustus' campaigns, hence the reminiscence of the most famous victory, but some of the original Celtic culture probably survived and was assimilated by Romans. The crocodile is not only the symbol of Egypt, like in the famous Octavian's coins AEGYPTO CAPTA. It is also a representation of Mark Antony, powerful and scary both in water and on land, but a bit slow and stupid. The shape of the crocodile with tail up was specifically chosen to remind of the shape of ship on very common "legionary" denarius series, which Mark Antony minted to pay his armies just before Actium. It is probably also related to the popular contemporary caricature of Cleopatra, riding on and simultaneously copulating with a crocodile, holding a palm branch in her hand as if in triumph. There the crocodile also symbolized Mark Antony.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was born c. 64-62 BC somewhere in rural Italy. His family was of humble and plebeian origins, but rich, of equestrian rank. Agrippa was about the same age as Octavian, and the two were educated together and became close friends. He probably first served in Caesar's Spanish campaign of 46–45 BC. Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to train in Illyria. When Octavian returned to Rome after Caesar's assassination, Agrippa became his close lieutenant, performing many tasks. He probably started his political career in 43 BC as a tribune of the people and then a member of the Senate. Then he was one of the leading Octavian's generals, finally becoming THE leading general and admiral in the civil wars of the subsequent years.

In 38 as a governor of Transalpine Gaul Agrippa undertook an expedition to Germania, thus becoming the first Roman general since Julius Caesar to cross the Rhine. During this foray he helped the Germanic tribe of Ubii (who previously allied themselves with Caesar in 55 BC) to resettle on the west bank of the Rhine. A shrine was dedicated there, possibly to Divus Caesar whom Ubii fondly remembered, and the village became known as Ara Ubiorum, "Altar of Ubians". This quickly would become an important Roman settlement. Agrippina the Younger, Agrippa's granddaughter, wife of Emperor Claudius and mother of Emperor Nero, would be born there in 15 AD. In 50 AD she would sponsor this village to be upgraded to a colonia, and it would be renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium (colony of Claudius [at] the Altar of Agrippinians – Ubii renamed themselves as Agrippinians to honor the augusta!), abbreviated as CCAA, later to become the capital of new Roman province, Germania Inferior.

In 37 BC Octavian recalled Agrippa back to Rome and arranged for him to win the consular elections, he desperately needed help in naval warfare with Sextus Pompey, the youngest son of Pompey the Great, who styled himself as the last supporter of the republican cause, but in reality became a pirate king, an irony since his father was the one who virtually exterminated piracy in all the Roman waters. He forced humiliating armistice on the triumvirs in 39 BC and when Octavian renewed the hostilities a year later, defeated him in a decisive naval battle of Messina. New fleet had to be built and trained, and Agrippa was the man for the job. Agrippa's solution was creating a huge secret naval base he called Portus Iulius by connecting together lakes Avernus, Avernus and the natural inner and outer harbors behind Cape Misenum at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples. He also created a larger type of ship and developed a new naval weapon: harpax – a ballista-launched grapnel shot with mechanisms that allowed pulling enemy ships close for easy boarding. It replaced the previous boarding device that Romans used since the First Punic War, corvus – effective, but extremely cumbersome. A later defence against it were scythe blades on long poles for cutting ropes, but since this invention was developed in secret, the enemy had no chance to prepare anything like it. It all has proved extremely effective: in a series of naval engagements Agrippa annihilated the fleet of Sextus, forced him to abandon his bases and run away. For this Agrippa was awarded an unprecedented honour that no Roman before or after him received: a rostral crown, "corona rostrata", a wreath decorated in front by a prow and beak of a ship.

That's why Virgil (Aeneid VIII, 683-684), describing Agrippa at Actium, says: "…belli insigne superbum, tempora navali fulgent rostrata corona." "…the proud military decoration, gleams on his brow the naval rostral crown". Actium, the decisive battle between forces of Octavian and Mark Antony, may appear boring compared to the war with Sextus, but it probably turned out this way due to Agrippa's victories in preliminary naval engagements and taking over all the strategy from Octavian.

In between the wars Agrippa has shown an unusual talent in city planning, not only constructing many new public buildings etc., but also greatly improving Rome's sanitation by doing a complete overhaul of all the aqueducts and sewers. Typically, it was Augustus who later would boast that "he had found the city of brick but left it of marble", forgetting that, just like in his naval successes, it was Agrippa who did most of the work. Agrippa had building programs in other Roman cities as well, a magnificent temple (currently known as Maison Carrée) survives in Nîmes itself, which was probably built by Agrippa.

Later relationship between Augustus and Agrippa seemed colder for a while, Agrippa seemed to even go into "exile", but modern historians agree that it was just a ploy: Augustus wanted others to think that Agrippa was his "rival" while in truth he was keeping a significant army far away from Rome, ready to come to the rescue in case Augustus' political machinations fail. It is confirmed by the fact that later Agrippa was recalled and given authority almost equal to Augustus himself, not to mention that he married Augustus' only biological child. The last years of Agrippa's life were spent governing the eastern provinces, were he won respect even of the Jews. He also restored Crimea to Roman Empire. His last service was starting the conquest of the upper Danube, were later the province of Pannonia would be. He suddenly died of illness in 12 BC, aged ~51.

Agrippa had several children through his three marriages. Through some of his children, Agrippa would become ancestor to many subsequent members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. He has numerous other legacies.
Yurii P
107-1a-NAC61.jpg
"C" Denarius, Crawford 107/1a - My favorite Coin26 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 209-208 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with splayed visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri r.; Above, “C”; in linear frame, “ROMA”.
Mint: Etruia(?)
Weight: 4.44 gm.
Reference: Crawford 107/1a
Provenance: NAC 61; 25-OCT-2011, Privately purchased by RBW from CNG in 1989


Comments: This is one of my favorite coins. It is not high grade, neither the obverse nor the reverse is well centered. The dioscuri are really just blobs, and this coin would be overlooked in any sale but the NAC 61 sale of RBW’s finest and rarest coins, perhaps the greatest Roman Republican auction of our generation. Nevertheless, the coin has a lovely tone and a style that is very characteristic of this issue which is quite rare.

Unique to this variety and the related staff issue, are the braided locks extending from the helmet to the hair binding. The stars are simple dots above the dioscuri, and ROMA is cut into the die with very large letters with a very fine line tool. There has been much speculation on the significance of the “C” insignia, but few with any real merit.
1 commentsSteve B5
107-1b-Naville-6-6-2015-wht.jpg
"C", larger head, Denarius, Crawford 107/1b17 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 209-208 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with splayed visor; “X” behind; Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri r.; above, “C” symbol; in linear frame, “ROMA”.
Mint: Etruria(?)
Weight: 4.32 gm.
Reference: Crawford 107/1b
Provenance: Naville auction, 7-MAY-2017

Comments:
This type with a “C” symbol is of the same fundamental style as the staff symbol 106/3c. presumably both issues from the same mint. The type is somewhat scarce, but the most common of the three other “C” sub-varieties.
Near complete on a large flan, GVF.
Steve B5
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"EVMENEΩN" and "ΦIΛΩNIΔOY" (monograms to be read as)182 viewsPHRYGIA. Eumeneia. Fulvia. Æ 19. Ca. 41-40 B.C. Obv: Draped bust of Fulvia as winged Nike r.; 2 cm’s, (1) on head, (2) above head. Rev: (ΦYΛOYIANΩN) to right, ΣMEPTOPIΓ(OΣ)/(ΦIΛΩNIΔOY) in 2 lines to l. Athena adv. l., hld. spear and shield. Ref: BMC 20-21 (?); RPC 3139 (7 pcs). Axis: 330°. Weight: 6.84 g. Magistrate: Zmertorigos Philopatris. Note: Eumeneia changed its name to Fulvia on the occasion of Mark Antony's journey to the east in 41 B.C., likely propmting the issue of coins. After Fulvia died the city took back its old name. On BMC 21 the ethnic "ΦYΛOVIANΩN" may be purposefully erased, which also seems to be the case on this specimen! Both coins are countermarked, and the cm's may be read "EVMENEΩN" and "ΦIΛΩNIΔOY". The purpose of countermarking in combination with the erasure of the city name, thus, seems to have been to make note of second name change. CM(1): Monogram of EVMNO (?), in circ. punch, 4 mm. CM(2): Monogram of ΦIΛNΔ (?), in circ. punch, 3.5 mm. Collection Automan.1 commentsAutoman
2012-07-151.jpg
"Obol" As of Marcus Aurelius117 viewsThis as of Marcus Aurleius with reverse of Providentia holding wand over globe has a layer of thick blue crystals on both sides. Many believe that this kind of patina comes from contact with the dead and such coins are therefore know as "obol" coins from the practice of placing payment for the afterlife in the deceased's mouth. It is not certain if there is any truth to these rumours. When coins, like this one, come from ploughed field contexts it is impossible to determine what their original deposition context was. 2 commentsotlichnik
86A_1.jpg
"Q" Quinarius, RRC 86A/124 viewsDenomination: Quinarius
Era: c. 211 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma r. with splayed visor. Hair curl visible on far side of Roma’s neck. Behind, “V”. Border of dots
Reverse: Dioscuri r.; “ROMA” in exergue. “Q” symbol below horses
Mint: S. E. Italy
Weight: 2.11 gm.
Reference: Crawford 86A/1
Provenance: Nomisma E-Live Auction 12, October 2, 2019, Lot 2034

Comments: “Q” symbol quinarius, Not to be confused with the more common Crawford 102/2 Q quinarius varieties. Very scarce, 6 examples in ACSearch at this writing.

Glossy jet black patina(?) Some reverse corrosion, otherwise GVF.
3 commentsSteve B5
faustina_1_B_4_20.jpg
(0138) FAUSTINA I34 views(wife of Antoninus Pius)
FAUSTINA SR.
d.141 AD
AE As 25.5 mm 9.57 g
O: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA
R: AETERNITAS S C
AETERNITAS STANDING LEFT, ALTAR AT FEET

UNLISTED (Not in RIC with this obv. legend)
laney
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(0177) COMMODUS11 views177-192 AD
AE 18 mm, 3.3 g
O: [ ] C KOMODO Laureate head r.
R: [ ] PROC ICTRON Homonoia in long garment and mantle, wearing kalathos(?), standing left with cornucopia and holding patera over burning altar
Moesia Inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum; Varbanov (engl.) 2166c, Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.10.36.1, not in AMNGb
(RPC lists this as 10522, incorrectly identifying rev. as Tyche holding rudder and cornucopia)
laney
commodus_aug_tria_b.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS--AUGUSTA TRAIANA37 views177 - 192 AD
struck 191-192 AD
AE 29.5 mm; 15.36 g
Magistrate: L. Aemilius Iustus (Legatus Augusti pro praetore provinciae Thraciae)
O: AV KAI [M] AV KOMOΔOC (or similar) Laureate bust right
R: ΗΓΕ Λ ΑΙΜ ΙΟVСΤ ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС City gate with 3 towers
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
cf RPC online 10823, citing a Freeman & Sear sale of 2005, without picture.
Note: (from C. Clay, 3.21.2015) "Governor Aem. Justus is rare at this mint, yours may be just the second specimen recorded. Not known to Varbanov, or to Stein in his 1926 monograph on Thracian officials. Apparently not in Schoenert-Geiss's Augusta Traiana corpus, or Varbanov would have known it from there."
d.s.
laney
julia_dom_artemis_markian~0.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA20 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
193 - 211 AD
AE 26 mm; 8.26 g
O:. IOVLIA - AVGOVCTA draped bust r.
R: MARKIANO - POLITWN Artemis as huntress advancing r., holding bow in extended l. hand and pulling with
r. hand arrow from quiver over r. shoulder
Markianopolis mint
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.): this obv. legend not listed
c) not in Hristova/Jekov: (new obverse type)
No.6.17.13.1 has IOVLIA DOMNA CEB. The legend IOVLIA AVGOVCTA
is not listed
laney
geta_res.jpg
(0198) GETA48 views198 - 212 AD
Struck 209 AD*
AE 29.5 mm 14.99 g
O: AVT K P CEP MIOC GETA laureate head right
R: PAVTA (right) LIAC (below) OVLPIAC (left) Septimius, togate, handing globe to Geta, in military dress, laureate, holding a spear. Between them, a seated captive, hands tied behind back, wearing Phrygian cap.
Pautalia
Varbanov 5404, same dies as this specimen.
Ruzicka, Pautalia 909, recording five specimens from two reverse dies. The reverse he illustrates, pl. VII, is from the same die as this specimen.
Very Rare
*(Geta is Augustus on the obverse, so reverse type probably refers to his promotion to joint emperor late in 209)
laney
geta_pautalia_-_Copyb.jpg
(0198) GETA29 views198 - 212 AD
Struck 209 AD*
AE 29.5 mm 14.99 g
O: AVT K P CEP MIOC GETA laureate head right
R: PAVTA (right) LIAC (below) OVLPIAC (left) Septimius, togate, handing globe to Geta, in military dress, laureate, holding a spear. Between them, a seated captive, hands tied behind back, wearing Phrygian cap.
Pautalia
Varbanov 5404, same dies as this specimen.
Ruzicka, Pautalia 909, recording five specimens from two reverse dies. The reverse he illustrates, pl. VII, is from the same die as this specimen.
Very Rare
*(Geta is Augustus on the obverse, so reverse type probably refers to his promotion to joint emperor late in 209)
laney
augustus_dena.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS74 views27 BC - 14 AD
struck 2 BC - 4 AD
AR DENARIUS 3.81 g
O: CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE Laureate head of Augustus, right
R: C L CAESARES, AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT Togate figures of Gaius and Lucius standing facing, holding spear and shield between them. Lituus on left, facing right; and simpulum on right, facing left
Lugdunum, RIC (I) 210.
(this is the scarcer mirror-image version of this reverse type, and shows the lituus on the left; and Gaius, with his shield in front of Lucius’ shield and the ladle by his head on the right)

3 commentslaney
macrinus_deult_cerberc.jpg
(0217) MACRINUS43 views217 - 218 AD
AE 25 mm 10.84 g
O: IMP CM OPEL SEV MACRINVS PI Radiate bust right
R: COL FL PAC DEVLT Hades-Serapis seated left, Cerberus at feet on left
Thrace, Deultum
SNG (Bulg.) Ruse 1, Deultum, no. 120, pl. 9 (=Jurukova 46)
(Draganov cites just one die pair, apparently the same as this coin; provincials at Deultum start with Caracalla, so Macrinus is an early issue)
laney
elagab_markianop_lion.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS24 views218 - 222 AD
AE 17.5 mm; 2.14 g
O: AVT KM AVP ANTWNEINOC Laureate head right
R: MARKIANOPOLI/ TWN Lion standing left
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis mint
Ref: (all apparently from the same dies as this coin)
Pfeiffer, Münzen aus Markianopolis, 2nd ed., Kaarst 2013, 443.
AMNG 915: Paris, rev. ill. pl. XX.1; Hristova-Jekov, Marcianopolis, 2006, p. 149, ill. 6; Lanz 82, 1997, lot 546
d.s.

laney
Janus119BCCrawford281_1.jpg
(500a) Roman Republic, 119 BC, M. Furius Philius - Furia 1881 viewsRoman Republic, 119 BC, M. Furius Philius - Furia 18. Crawford 281/1, Sydenham 529; 19mm, 3.23 grams. aVF, Rome; Obverse: laureate head of Janus, M FORVRI L F around; Reverse: Roma standing left erecting trophy, Galic arms around, PHLI in exergue. Ex Ephesus Numismatics.

Gauis Marius
As a novus homo, or new man, Marius found the rise in the Roman cursus honorum ( "course of honours"-- the sequential order of public offices held by aspiring politicians in the Roman Republic) a daunting challenge. It is certain that he used his old family client contacts and his military relations as a source of support. Among these contacts were the powerful Metelli family, and their early support was to prove to be a disaster for them. Just a few short years after his service as Quaestor, Marius was elected Tribune of the Plebes in 119 BC. In this position so soon after the political turmoil and murder of the Gracchi brothers (Gaius murdered 123 BC), Marius chose to follow the populares path, making a name for himself under similar auspices. As Tribune, he would ensure the animosity of the conservative faction of the Senate, and the Metelli, by passing popular laws forbidding the inspection of ballot boxes. In do doing, he directly opposed the powerful elite, who used ballot inspection as a way to intimidate voters in the citizen assembly elections.

Marius would go on to be elected Consul seven times and figure prominantly in the civil unrest of the early eighties as Lucius Cornelius Sulla's opponent. In 88 BC, Sulla had been elected Consul. There was now a choice before the Senate about which general to send to Asia (a potentially lucrative command): either Marius or Sulla. The Senate chose Sulla, but soon the Assembly appointed Marius. In this unsavory episode of low politics, Marius had been helped by the unscrupulous actions of Publius Sulpicius Rufus, whose debts Marius had promised to erase. Sulla refused to acknowledge the validity of the Assembly's action.

Sulla left Rome and traveled to "his"army waiting in Nola, the army the Senate had asked him to lead to Asia. Sulla urged his legions to defy the Assembly's orders and accept him as their rightful leader. Sulla was successful, and the legions murdered the representatives from the Assembly. Sulla then commanded six legions to march with him opon Rome and institute a civil war.

This was a momentous event, and was unforeseen by Marius, as no Roman army had ever marched upon Rome—it was forbidden by law and ancient tradition.

Sulla was to eventually rule Rome as Dictator. In his book Rubicon, historian Tom Holland argues that Sulla's actions had no lasting negative effect upon the health of the Republic, that Sulla was at heart a Republican. However, once a Roman general has defied Republican tradition, once a Roman general has used his command to combat fellow Romans, once a Roman general has set-up himself as Dictator--it follows that the decision to replicate these decsions (think: Caesar and Rubicon) is that much more easiely taken.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





Cleisthenes
P.Licinius Nerva voting.jpg
(500a113) Roman Republic, P. Licinius Nerva, 113-112 B.C.86 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC: P. Licinius Nerva. AR denarius (3.93 gm). Rome, ca. 113-112 BC. Helmeted bust of Roma left, holding spear over right shoulder and shield on left arm, crescent above, * before, ROMA behind / P. NERVA, voting scene showing two citizens casting their ballots in the Comitium, one receiving a ballot from an attendant, the other dropping his ballot into a vessel at right. Crawford 292/1. RSC Licinia 7. RCTV 169. Nearly very fine. Ex Freeman and Sear.

Here is a denarius whose reverse device is one that celebrates the privilege and responsibility that is the foundation of a democratic society; it is a forerunner to the L. Cassius Longinus denarius of 63 B.C. Granted, humanity had a long road ahead toward egalitarianism when this coin was struck, but isn't it an interesting testimony to civil liberty's heritage? "The voter on the left (reverse) receives his voting tablet from an election officer. Horizontal lines in the background indicate the barrier separating every voting division from the others. Both voters go across narrow raised walks (pontes); this is intended to ensure that the voter is seen to cast his vote without influence" (Meier, Christian. Caesar: A Biography. Berlin: Severin and Siedler, 1982. Plate 12). This significant coin precedes the Longinus denarius by 50 years.

J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
2 commentsCleisthenes
Denarius91BC.jpg
(501i) Roman Republic, D. Junius L.f. Silanus, 91 B.C.58 viewsSilver denarius, Syd 646a, RSC Junia 16, S 225 var, Cr 337/3 var, VF, 3.718g, 18.6mm, 0o, Rome mint, 91 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, X (control letter) behind; reverse Victory in a biga right holding reins in both hands, V (control numeral) above, D•SILANVS / ROMA in ex; mint luster in recesses. Ex FORVM.

Although the coin itself does not commemorate the event, the date this coin was struck is historically significant.

MARCUS Livius DRUSUS (his father was the colleague of Gaius Gracchus in the tribuneship, 122 B.C.), became tribune of the people in 91 B.C. He was a thoroughgoing conservative, wealthy and generous, and a man of high integrity. With some of the more intelligent members of his party (such as Marcus Scaurus and L. Licinius Crassus the orator) he recognized the need of reform. At that time an agitation was going on for the transfer of the judicial functions from the equites to the senate; Drusus proposed as a compromise a measure which restored to the senate the office of judices, while its numbers were doubled by the admission of 300 equites. Further, a special commission was to be appointed to try and sentence all judices guilty of taking bribes.

The senate was hesitant; and the equites, whose occupation was threatened, offered the most violent opposition. In order, therefore, to catch the popular votes, Drusus proposed the establishment of colonies in Italy and Sicily, and an increased distribution of corn at a reduced rate. By help of these riders the bill was carried.

Drusus now sought a closer alliance with the Italians, promising them the long coveted boon of the Roman franchise. The senate broke out into open opposition. His laws were abrogated as informal, and each party armed its adherents for the civil struggle which was now inevitable. Drusus was stabbed one evening as he was returning home. His assassin was never discovered (http://62.1911encyclopedia.org/D/DR/DRUSUS_MARCUS_LIVIUS.htm).

The ensuing "Social War" (91-88 B.C.) would set the stage for the "Civil Wars" (88-87 & 82-81 B.C.) featuring, notably, Marius & Sulla; two men who would make significant impressions on the mind of a young Julius Caesar. Caesar would cross the Rubicon not thirty years later.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
LPisoFrugiDenarius_S235.jpg
(502a) Roman Republic, L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi, 90 B.C.157 viewsSilver denarius, S 235, Calpurnia 11, Crawford 340/1, Syd 663a, VF, rainbow toning, Rome mint, 3.772g, 18.5mm, 180o, 90 B.C. obverse: laureate head of Apollo right, scorpion behind; Reverse naked horseman galloping right holding palm, L PISO FRVGI and control number CXI below; ex-CNA XV 6/5/91, #443. Ex FORVM.


A portion of the following text is a passage taken from the excellent article “The Calpurnii and Roman Family History: An Analysis of the Piso Frugi Coin in the Joel Handshu Collection at the College of Charleston,” by Chance W. Cook:

In the Roman world, particularly prior to the inception of the principate, moneyers were allotted a high degree of latitude to mint their coins as they saw fit. The tres viri monetales, the three men in charge of minting coins, who served one-year terms, often emblazoned their coins with an incredible variety of images and inscriptions reflecting the grandeur, history, and religion of Rome. Yet also prominent are references to personal or familial accomplishments; in this manner coins were also a means by which the tres viri monetales could honor their forbearers. Most obvious from an analysis of the Piso Frugi denarius is the respect and admiration that Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who minted the coin, had for his ancestors. For the images he selected for his dies relate directly to the lofty deeds performed by his Calpurnii forbearers in the century prior to his term as moneyer. The Calpurnii were present at many of the watershed events in the late Republic and had long distinguished themselves in serving the state, becoming an influential and well-respected family whose defense of traditional Roman values cannot be doubted.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi, who was moneyer in 90 B.C., depicted Apollo on the obverse and the galloping horseman on the reverse, as does his son Gaius. However, all of L. Piso Frugi’s coins have lettering similar to “L-PISO-FRVGI” on the reverse, quite disparate from his son Gaius’ derivations of “C-PISO-L-F-FRV.”

Moreover, C. Piso Frugi coins are noted as possessing “superior workmanship” to those produced by L. Piso Frugi.

The Frugi cognomen, which became hereditary, was first given to L. Calpurnius Piso, consul in 133 B.C., for his integrity and overall moral virtue. Cicero is noted as saying that frugal men possessed the three cardinal Stoic virtues of bravery, justice, and wisdom; indeed in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae, a synonym of frugalitas is bonus, generically meaning “good” but also implying virtuous behavior. Gary Forsythe notes that Cicero would sometimes invoke L. Calpurnius Piso’s name at the beginning of speeches as “a paragon of moral rectitude” for his audience.

L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi’s inclusion of the laureled head of Apollo, essentially the same obverse die used by his son Gaius (c. 67 B.C.), was due to his family’s important role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares, the Games of Apollo, which were first instituted in 212 B.C. at the height of Hannibal’s invasion of Italy during the Second Punic War. By that time, Hannibal had crushed Roman armies at Cannae, seized Tarentum and was invading Campania.

Games had been used throughout Roman history as a means of allaying the fears
of the populace and distracting them from issues at hand; the Ludi Apollinares were no different. Forsythe follows the traditional interpretation that in 211 B.C., when C. Calpurnius Piso was praetor, he became the chief magistrate in Rome while both consuls were absent and the three other praetors were sent on military expeditions against Hannibal.

At this juncture, he put forth a motion in the Senate to make the Ludi Apollinares a yearly event, which was passed; the Ludi Apollinares did indeed become an important festival, eventually spanning eight days in the later Republic. However, this interpretation is debatable; H.H. Scullard suggests that the games were not made permanent until 208 B.C. after a severe plague prompted the Senate to make them a fixture on the calendar. The Senators believed Apollo would serve as a “healing god” for the people of Rome.

Nonetheless, the Calpurnii obviously believed their ancestor had played an integral role in the establishment of the Ludi Apollinares and thus prominently displayed
the head or bust of Apollo on the obverse of the coins they minted.

The meaning of the galloping horseman found on the reverse of the L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi coin is more complicated. It is possible that this is yet another reference to the Ludi Apollinares. Chariot races in the Circus Maximus were a major component of the games, along with animal hunts and theatrical performances.

A more intriguing possibility is that the horseman is a reference to C. Calpurnius Piso, son of the Calpurnius Piso who is said to have founded the Ludi Apollinares. This C. Calpurnius Piso was given a military command in 186 B.C. to quell a revolt in Spain. He was victorious, restoring order to the province and also gaining significant wealth in the process.

Upon his return to Rome in 184, he was granted a triumph by the Senate and eventually erected an arch on the Capitoline Hill celebrating his victory. Of course
the arch prominently displayed the Calpurnius name. Piso, however, was not an infantry commander; he led the cavalry.

The difficulty in accepting C. Calpurnius Piso’s victory in Spain as the impetus for the galloping horseman image is that not all of C. Piso Frugi’s coins depict the horseman or cavalryman carrying the palm, which is a symbol of victory. One is inclined to believe that the victory palm would be prominent in all of the coins minted by C. Piso Frugi (the son of L. Calpurnius Piso Frugi) if it indeed signified the great triumph of C. Calpurnius Piso in 186 B.C. Yet the palm’s appearance is clearly not a direct reference to military feats of C. Piso Frugi’s day. As noted, it is accepted that his coins were minted in 67 B.C.; in that year, the major victory by Roman forces was Pompey’s swift defeat of the pirates throughout the Mediterranean.

Chrestomathy: Annual Review of Undergraduate Research at the College of Charleston. Volume 1, 2002: pp. 1-10© 2002 by the College of Charleston, Charleston SC 29424, USA.All rights to be retained by the author.
http://www.cofc.edu/chrestomathy/vol1/cook.pdf


There are six (debatably seven) prominent Romans who have been known to posterity as Lucius Calpurnius Piso:

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: (d. 261 A.D.) a Roman usurper, whose existence is
questionable, based on the unreliable Historia Augusta.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Licinianus: deputy Roman Emperor, 10 January 69 to15 January
69, appointed by Galba.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 27 A.D.

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 1 B.C., augur

Lucius Calpurnius Piso: Consul in 15 B.C., pontifex

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus: Consul in 58 B.C. (the uncle of Julius Caesar)

Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi: Moneyer in 90 B.C. (our man)


All but one (or two--if you believe in the existence of "Frugi the usurper" ca. 261 A.D.) of these gentlemen lack the Frugi cognomen, indicating they are not from the same direct lineage as our moneyer, though all are Calpurnii.

Calpurnius Piso Frugi's massive issue was intended to support the war against the Marsic Confederation. The type has numerous variations and control marks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lucius_Calpurnius_Piso
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/indexfrm.asp?vpar=55&pos=0

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


2 commentsCleisthenes
CnCorneliusLentulusMarcellinusARDenariusSear323.jpg
(503f) Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus Silver Denarius87 viewsCn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus Silver Denarius, Sear-323, Cr-393/1a, Syd-752, RSC-Cornelia 54, struck 76-75 BC at Spanish Mint, 3.94 grams, 18 mm. EF. Obverse: GPR above Diademed, draped and bearded bust of the Genius of the Roman People facing right, sceptre over shoulder; Reverse: EX in left field, SC in right field; CN LEN Q in exergue, Sceptre with wreath, terrestrial globe and rudder. An exceptional example that is especially well centered and struck on a slightly larger flan than normally encountered with fully lustrous surfaces and a most attractive irridescent antique toning. Held back from the Superb EF/FDC by a small banker's mark in the right obverse field, but still worthy of the finest collection of Roman Republican denarii. Ex Glenn Woods.

Re: CORNELIA 54:

“Cn. Cornelius Lentulus Marcellinus may be the same moneyer whose issues have been already described (no.s 702-704). Mommsen suggested that these coins were struck in 74 B.C. as a special issue, authorized by the Senate, to defray the cost of armaments against Mithridates of Pontus and the Mediterranean pirates. But Grueber’s view that they were struck in 76 B.C. by Cn. Cornelius Lentulus acting in the capacity of quaestor of Pompey, seems more in accordance with the evidence of finds" (see: G. ii, p. 359n and The Coinage of the Roman Republic, by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 1).

H. A. Seaby shows the coin with the smaller head (Roman Silver Coins Vol. I, Republic to Augustus pg. 33) while David R Sear shows a coin sporting a larger version (Roman Coins and Their Values, pg. 132).

“Cn. Lentulus strikes in Spain in his capacity as quaestor to the proconsul Pompey, who had been sent to the peninsula to assist Q. Caecillus Metellus Piusagainst sertorius”(Roman Coins and Their Values, by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 132).

This is not an imperatorial minted coin for Pompey. At the time these coins were minted the Procounsel Pompey was sent to Spain to aid in the war against Sertorius. The moneyer Cn Lentulus served as his Quaestor where he continued to mint coins for Rome.

CN = Cneaus; LEN = Lentulus

Cneaus was his first name. His last, or family name is Lentulus and this clan is a lesser clan within the Cornelii, which is what his middle name of Cornelius implies.

Q = This tells us that he was a Quaestor, or Roman magistrate with judicial powers at the time when the coin was issued, with the responsibility for the treasury. Had this been a position that he once held it would be noted on the coin as PROQ or pro [past] Questor.

For Further Reading on the Cornelia 54 & 55:

Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum, by H. A. Grueber. London, 1910, Vol. II, pgs. 358, 359, 52, 57

Roman Silver Coins Vol. I, Republic to Augustus, by H.A.Seaby 1952, pgs. 32-33

The Coinage of the Roman Republic, by Edward A. Sydenham, 1976, pgs. 122, 241

Roman Coins and Their Values, by David Sear, Vol.1, 2000, pg. 132, 133

Roman Republican Coinage Volume I by Michael H. Crawford 2001, pg. 407

by Jerry Edward Cornelius, April 2006, THE 81 ROMAN COINS OF THE CORNELIA
http://www.cornelius93.com/Cornelia54.html
1 commentsCleisthenes
LonginusDenarius.jpg
(504c) Roman Republic, L. Cassius Longinus, 63 B.C.68 viewsSilver denarius, Crawford 413/1, RSC I Cassia 10, SRCV I 364, aVF, struck with worn dies, Rome mint, weight 3.867g, maximum diameter 20.3mm, die axis 0o, c. 63 B.C. Obverse: veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, L before; Reverse: LONGIN III V, voter standing left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista.

The reverse of this Longinus denarius captures a fascinating moment when a Roman citizen casts his ballot. "The abbreviation III V [ir] indentifies Longinus as one of the three annually appointed mintmasters (officially called tres viri aere argento auro flando feriundo). A citizen is seen casting his vote into the urn. On the ballot is the letter 'U', short for uti rogas, a conventional formula indicating assent to a motion. The picture alludes to the law, requested by an ancestor of the mintmaster, which introduced the secret ballot in most proceedings of the popular court" (Meier, Christian. Caesar, a Biography. Berlin: Severin and Siedler, 1982. Plate 6).

The date that this denarius was struck possesses unique significance for another reason. Marcus Tullius Cicero (politician, philosopher, orator, humanist) was elected consul for the year 63 BC -- the first man elected consul who had no consular ancestors in more than 30 years. A "new man," Cicero was not the descendant of a "patrician" family, nor was his family wealthy (although Cicero married "well"). Cicero literally made himself the man he was by the power of the words he spoke and the way in which he spoke them. A witness to and major player during the decline of the Roman Republic, Cicero was murdered in 43 BC by thugs working for Marc Antony. But Cicero proved impossible to efface.

Cicero's words became part of the bed rock of later Roman education. As Peter Heather notes, every educated young man in the late Roman Empire studied "a small number of literary texts under the guidance of an expert in language and literary interpretation, the grammarian. This occupied the individual for seven or more years from about the age of eight, and concentrated on just four authors: Vergil, Cicero, Sallust and Terence" (Heather, Peter. The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. 17).


Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul. And yet amidst these actions he did justice in one thing, by delivering up Philologus to Pomponia, the wife of Quintus; who, having got his body into her power, besides other grievous punishments, made him cut off his own flesh by pieces, and roast and eat it; for so some writers have related. But Tiro, Cicero's emancipated slave, has not so much as mentioned the treachery of Philologus.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
IMITATIVE OTTOMAN.jpg
*IMITATION OTTOMAN Cedid Mahmudiye968 viewsThis piece came in a bag of modern Foreign coins - 21 pounds! May be gold inside!!!
The dating did not seem right to me! From the experts at Zeno, I found a similar issue..... This attribution from Zeno:
Imitation of gold cedid mahmudiye (KM, Turkey #645) with distorted inscriptions and fantasy regnal year 78. Made for jewelry purposes throughout the 19th and early 20th century, very likely outside Turkey: similar imitations are met in abundance in South Russia and Ukraine, along the shores of Black and Azov seas, where they were widely used for adorning Gypsy and native Greek women's garments.

So, as you see, it is not exactly a FAKE or a COUNTERFEIT - it is an IMITATION, so the makers could not get into trouble. The regnal years alone would show that the coin was not "real" -

An interesting piece that may turn up from time to time!
dpaul7
Constantine_I_31.jpg
*SOLD*72 viewsConstantine I AE3 Follis

Attribution: RIC VII 167, Ticinum
Date: AD 322-325
Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: DN CONSTANTINIMAX AVG, VOT dot XX and crescent below within wreath,
ST in exergue
Size: 17.2 mm
Weight: 2.82 grams

This was my gift to my father on Father's Day 2010...a history fan himself, he LOVED it!!
3 commentsNoah
ZeugInHandSideSmaller.jpg
...and another shot of the Carthaginian crusher63 viewsLooks a lot like a Reese's Peanut Butter Cup, doesn't it?

YUM!

ZEUGITANA, Carthage. 15 shekel.
AE45, 95.4g
circa 200 BC
Obverse: head of Tanit
Reverse: horse standing right, left foreleg up; above, radiate disc flanked by uraei

I don't have a reference book and the only other picture of one I've found is on the magnagraecia.nl site. Their list indicates four specimens known to them. Don't know if this is one of the four.
TIF
prutahjanfull1.jpg
0 - Alexander Jannaeus Prutah - H. 469110 viewsThis coin, minted under the reign of Alexander Jannaeus (103 BCE - 76 BCE), is a bronze prutah.
OBV. Upside-down achor reading BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔΡOY.
REV. Eight ponted star, letters in the spokes, reading 'Yehonatan the King'.
aarmale
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0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria Tetradrachm #438 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Caracalla (198 - 217 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. - #4

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate head of Emperor facing right.
rev: Eagle standing facing, head left, tail left, holding wreath in beak. Prow of ship between legs.

Weight: 13.0 Grams
Size: 28 mm
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*Note: Wonderful portrait of the emperor on the obverse and the eagle on the reverse, I am very proud of this coin.
4 commentsrexesq
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0 - M - Diadumenian - AR - Silver Tetradrachm - Lion beneath Eagle39 views~
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Ancient Roman Empire
Diadumenian as Caesar, Coin Struck AD 218.
Son of Emperor Macrinus (8 April 217 AD – June 218 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Heirapolis.

(Titles in Greek)
obv: Radiate bust of Diadumenian facing right. Draped and Cuirassed, Seen from Behind.
rev: Eagle standing facing, wings spread, holding wreath in beak. Lion walking right beneath.

Weight: 11.3 Grams
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*****~ HUGE PHOTO - CLICK PICTURE TO ENLARGE FULLY ~ *****
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Reference: Prieur 947
I want to thank Mat and Potator for their help with the ID of this coin.
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6 commentsrexesq
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0 - Roman Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria435 views~~~
Ancient Roman Empire

Silver Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. RARE type.

(Titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust of Emperor facing right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.
rev: Eagle standing with body facing right, head and tail facing left, holding wreath in beak.
Greek letters to either side of eagle's head.
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*notes: AMAZING PORTRAIT!!! Very Rare type, I have only ever seen ONE other example with this bust style.
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1 commentsrexesq
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0 Constantius II (Gaming Token?)38 viewsConstantius II, AE3, 22mm, Rome mint. DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, holding globe, N behind bust / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor nimbate and in military dress, with shield on left arm, on horseback galloping right, thrusting his spear at two barbarians wearing Phrygian helmets, who kneel before him with their arms raised towards him. N in right field. Mintmark R dot S. RIC VIII Rome 184 var (unlisted officina, RIC lists only officina T for this "R dot.. officina" issue.)4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53991 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
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000 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Clasped Hands97 viewsVespasian Silver Denarius - Clasped Hands
Rome Mint, AD 73
obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII CEN - Laureled head right.

rev: FIDES PVBL - Clasped hands holding wheat ears, opium poppies and caduceus.
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A bit off-center, but a beautiful portrait of the Emperor, and great detail on the poppy heads.
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**
**More photos of this Vespasian Denarius below, in Alphabetical order...
4 commentsrexesq
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000 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Clasped Hands 30 viewsVespasian Silver Denarius - Clasped Hands
Rome Mint, AD 73
obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII CEN - Laureled head right.

rev: FIDES PVBL - Clasped hands holding wheat ears, opium poppies and caduceus.
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A bit off-center, but a beautiful portrait of the Emperor, and great detail on the poppy heads.
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** These photos slightly bright and off-color due to lighting
**More photos of this Vespasian Denarius below, in Alphabetical order...
1 commentsrexesq
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000a. L. Sulla and L. Manlius Toruatus33 viewsL. Sulla and L. Manlius Torquatus. 82 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.89 g, 7h). Military mint moving with Sulla. Helmeted head of Roma right / Sulla driving triumphal quadriga right, holding branch and reins, being crowned by Victory flying left. Crawford 367/5; Sydenham 757 or 757a; Manlia 4 or 5. Near VF, toned, a few light scratches on the obverse.

From the Elwood Rafn Collection.

As consul for the year 88 BC, Sulla was awarded the coveted assignment of suppressing the revolt of Mithradates VI of Pontus, but political maneuvers resulted in this assignment being transferred to Marius. In response, Sulla turned his army on Rome, captured it, and reclaimed his command against Mithradates. His prosecution of the first Mithradatic War was successful, but he spared the Pontic king for personal gain. In 83 BC, Sulla returned to Italy as an outlaw, but he was able to win the support of many of the leading Romans. Within a year, he fought his way to Rome, where he was elected dictator. It was during this campaign to Rome that this denarius was struck. The obverse type represents Sulla's claim to be acting in Rome's best interest. The reverse shows Sulla enjoying the highest honor to which a Roman could aspire: the celebration of a triumph at Rome.
ecoli
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000b. Pompey the Great54 viewsThe Pompeians. Sextus Pompey. 37/6 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.49 g, 9h). Uncertain Sicilian mint, possibly Catana. Bare head of Pompey the Great right; capis to left, lituus to right / Neptune, holding aplustre and resting right foot on prow, standing left between the Catanaean brothers Anapias and Amphinomus running in opposite directions, bearing their parents on their shoulders. Crawford 511/3a; CRI 334; Sydenham 1344; RSC 17 (Pompey the Great). Fine, lightly toned, bankers’ marks on obverse.

AMPHINOMUS and ANAPIS (or Anapias), two brothers, of Silicy, respecting whom it is related that they saved their parents, at the peril of their own lives, from the flames of Etna, at the moment when an eruption of that volcano threatened their immediate destruction. This was a favourite subject with the ancients, in symbolising filial piety; and is often represented on Greek coins of Catana (Catania), where this noble action is alleged to have been performed. Of these two Sicilian brothers, types of that devoted love, which is ever cherished by good children towards the earthly anthors of their being, Cornelius Severus, alluding to Mount Edna, thus expresses himself: "Amphinomus and his brother, both equally courageous in the performance of a duty, whilst the flames murmured their threats against the neighbouring houses, rescue their decrepid father, and their aged mother."
1 commentsecoli
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000c. Sextus Pompey76 viewsSextus Pompeius Magnus Pius, in English Sextus Pompey, was a Roman general from the late Republic (1st century BC). He was the last focus of opposition to the second triumvirate.

Sextus Pompeius was the youngest son of Pompey the Great (Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus) by his third wife, Mucia Tertia. His older brother was Gnaeus Pompeius, from the same mother. Both boys grew up in the shadow of their father, one of Rome's best generals and originally non-conservative politician who drifted to the more traditional faction when Julius Caesar became a threat.

When Caesar crossed the Rubicon in 49 BC, thus starting a civil war, Sextus' older brother Gnaeus followed their father in his escape to the East, as did most of the conservative senators. Sextus stayed in Rome in the care of his stepmother, Cornelia Metella. Pompey's army lost the battle of Pharsalus in 48 BC and Pompey himself had to run for his life. Cornelia and Sextus met him in the island of Mytilene and together they fled to Egypt. On the arrival, Sextus watched his father being killed by treachery on September 29 of the same year. After the murder, Cornelia returned to Rome, but in the following years Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in the African provinces. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the younger, his brother Gnaeus and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army to the end.

Caesar won the first battle at Thapsus in 46 BC against Metellus Scipio and Cato, who committed suicide. In 45 BC, Caesar managed to defeat the Pompeius brothers in the battle of Munda. Gnaeus Pompeius was executed, but young Sextus escaped once more, this time to Sicily.

Back in Rome, Julius Caesar was murdered on the Ides of March (March 15) 44 BC by a group of senators led by Cassius and Brutus. This incident did not lead to a return to normality, but provoked yet another civil war between Caesar's political heirs and his assassins. The second triumvirate was formed by Octavian, Mark Antony and Lepidus, with the intention of avenging Caesar and subduing all opposition. Sextus Pompeius in Sicily was certainly a rebellious man, but the Cassius and Brutus faction was the second triumvirate's first priority. Thus, with the whole island as his base, Sextus had the time and resources to develop an army and, even more importantly, a strong navy operated by Sicilian marines.

Brutus and Cassius lost the twin battles of Philippi and committed suicide in 42 BC. After this, the triumvirs turned their attentions to Sicily and Sextus.

But by this time, Sextus was prepared for strong resistance. In the following years, military confrontations failed to return a conclusive victory for either side and in 39 BC, Sextus and the triumvirs signed for peace in the Pact of Misenum. The reason for this peace treaty was the anticipated campaign against the Parthian Empire. Antony, the leader, needed all the legions he could get so it was useful to secure an armistice in the Sicilian front. The peace did not last for long. Octavian and Antony's frequent quarrels were a strong political motivation for resuming the war against Sextus. Octavian tried again to conquer Sicily, but he was defeated in the naval battle of Messina (37 BC) and again in August 36 BC. But by then, Octavian had Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, a very talented general, on his side. Only a month afterwards, Agrippa destroyed Sextus' navy off Naulochus cape. Sextus escaped to the East and, by abandoning Sicily, lost all his base of support.

Sextus Pompeius was caught in Miletus in 35 BC and executed without trial (an illegal act since Sextus was a Roman citizen) by order of Marcus Titius, Antony's minion. His violent death would be one of the weapons used by Octavian against Antony several years later, when the situation between the two became unbearable.

Sicilian Mint
Magn above laureate Janiform head
PIVS above, IMP below, prow of galley right
Sear RCV 348, RPC 671, Sydenham 1044a, Cohen 16
43-36 BC

Check
ecoli
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001 - Anonymus follis class A2 - Sear 181346 viewsObv: +EMMANOVHA, Bust of Christ facing, wearing nimbus cross with two pellets in each limb of cross, pallium and colobium, and holding book of Gospels, the cover ornamented with central pellet in border of dots. To left IC and to right XC.
Rev: IhSYS / XRISTYS / bASILEY / bASILE in foyr lines. Dot above and below.
This type is attributed to the joint regin of Basil II and Constantine VIII 976-1025 AD.
30.0 mm. diameter.
pierre_p77
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001 - Probus Antoniniani - RIC 18763 viewsObv: PROBVS PF AVG, Radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding sceptre surmounted by eagle.
Rev: ROMA AETER, Roma seated in temple, holding Victory and sceptre.
Minted in Rome (RV Δ in exe) Emission 7 Officina 4, AD 282.

This coin is part of the AEQVITI series of Rome (V).
pierre_p77
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001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 443-1, Plated (Fouree), Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), #266 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), AR-denarius, Crawf 443-1, Plated (Fouree), Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), #2
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 17-20mm, weight: 2,66g, axes: 5h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-002
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
1 commentsquadrans
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001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, #1184 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, #1
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,65g, axes: 10h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-001
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
quadrans
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001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, Plated (Fouree), #2117 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 443-1, Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), AR-denarius, Plated (Fouree), #2
avers:-CAESAR in exergue, elephant right, trampling on serpent.
revers:- Simpulum, sprinkler, axe (surmounted by a wolf's head) and priest's hat.
exerg:-/-//CAESAR, diameter: 17-20mm, weight: 2,66g, axes: 5h,
mint: Military mint travelling with Caesar (Gaul), date: 49-48 B.C., ref: Crawford-443/1, Sydneham-1006, RSC-49, BMCRR (Gaul) 27
Q-002
"This is the first coin struck in the name of Julius Caesar. The symbolism on the obverse apparently alludes to the conquest of good over evil, Caesar's victory over the Gauls, while the reverse refers to Caesar's possession of the office of Pontifex Maximus."
quadrans
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_C·CAESAR_–_IMP·COS·ITER_A·ALLIENVS_–_PRO·COS_Syd-1022_Crawf_457-1_C-13_Sicily-mint_47-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_17-18,5mm_3,53g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,237 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,
avers:- C·CAESAR–IMP·COS·ITER, Diademed, draped Venus Head Right,
revers:- A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left, placing right foot on prow, holding trisceles in right hand and cloak in left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,59g, axes: 6h,
mint: Sicily, date: 47B.C., ref: Crawford-457/1, Sydneham-1022, Babelon-Julia-14, Alliena-1, C-1,
Q-001
"In late 47 BC Caesar was on Sicily, preparing for his assault on the Pompeian forces in north Africa. During this period a small issue of denarii was produced in his name by Aulus Allienus, then the proconsul of Sicily. The reverse shows a figure of Trinacrus, supposedly a son of Neptune, who may have been invented to account for the name Trinacria, commonly used for Sicily. The coins of Allienus must have seen considerable circulation: almost all surviving specimens are considerably worn."
3 commentsquadrans
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001. MARK ANTONY161 viewsJULIUS CAESAR and MARK ANTONY. 43 BC.

Hardly any of his assassins survived Caesar for more than three years, or died a natural death. They were all condemned, and they perished in various ways---some by shipwreck, some in battle; some took their own lives with the self-same dagger with which they had impiously slain Caesar.

Fourré Denarius (19mm, 3.63 gm).

Obv: Bare head of Mark Antony right; lituus behind
Rev: Laureate head of Julius Caesar right, jug behind.
Ref: Crawford 488/1; CRI 118; Sydenham 1165; RSC 2. Near VF, porous, several large breaks in plating revealing the copper core.
Source: Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1087.
Ex CNG Electronic Auction 105 lot 141 229/150
BFBV

I don't usually buy fourres; but in reality, I have no chance of owning this popular type given my budget.
1 commentsecoli
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002. AUGUSTUS31 viewsAUGUSTUS AE as. Lugdunum mint, 10 BC or after. CAESAR PONT MAX, laureate head right. Reverse - the Altar of Lugdunum, Victory on each pedestal, ROM ET AVG below. RCV 1690.

This early type was issued circa 10 BC and the years immediately following, to commemorate the completion of the altar at Lugdunum, which was inaugurated on August 1st, 10 BC. A later type of this series was also issued later in the reign of Augustus, and includes both Augustus and Tiberius as Caesar.
ecoli
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002. Augustus (31 BC- 14 AD)48 viewsAugustus

He suffered but two severe and ignominious defeats, those of Lollius [15 B.C.] and Varus [9 A.D.], both of which were in Germany. Of these the former was more humiliating than serious, but the latter was almost fatal, since three legions were cut to pieces with their general, his lieutenants, and all the auxiliaries. In fact, they say that he was so greatly affected that for several months in succession he cut neither his beard nor his hair, and sometimes he would dash his head against a door, crying: "Quintilius Varus, give me back my legions!" And he observed the day of the disaster each year as one of sorrow and mourning.

Lyons mint, 2 BC - ca 13 AD. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE. laureate head right / AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, C L CAESARES below, Gaius & Lucius standing front, each with a hand resting on a round shield, a spear, & in field above, a lituus right & simpulum left ("b9"). BMC 533, RSC 43

This is one of my first 12 caesar coins. I got this from an all text list from M&R coins.
ecoli
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002a, Aigina, Islands off Attica, Greece, c. 510 - 490 B.C.86 viewsSilver stater, S 1849, SNG Cop 503, F, 12.231g, 22.3mm, Aigina (Aegina) mint, c. 510 - 490 B.C.; Obverse: sea turtle (with row of dots down the middle); Reverse: incuse square of “Union Jack” pattern; banker's mark obverse. Ex FORVM.


Greek Turtles, by Gary T. Anderson

Turtles, the archaic currency of Aegina, are among the most sought after of all ancient coins. Their early history is somewhat of a mystery. At one time historians debated whether they or the issuances of Lydia were the world's earliest coins. The source of this idea comes indirectly from the writings of Heracleides of Pontus, a fourth century BC Greek scholar. In the treatise Etymologicum, Orion quotes Heracleides as claiming that King Pheidon of Argos, who died no later than 650 BC, was the first to strike coins at Aegina. However, archeological investigations date the earliest turtles to about 550 BC, and historians now believe that this is when the first of these intriguing coins were stamped.

Aegina is a small, mountainous island in the Saronikon Gulf, about midway between Attica and the Peloponnese. In the sixth century BC it was perhaps the foremost of the Greek maritime powers, with trade routes throughout the eastern half of the Mediterranean. It is through contacts with Greeks in Asia Minor that the idea of coinage was probably introduced to Aegina. Either the Lydians or Greeks along the coast of present day Turkey were most likely the first to produce coins, back in the late seventh century. These consisted of lumps of a metal called electrum (a mixture of gold and silver) stamped with an official impression to guarantee the coin was of a certain weight. Aegina picked up on this idea and improved upon it by stamping coins of (relatively) pure silver instead electrum, which contained varying proportions of gold and silver. The image stamped on the coin of the mighty sea power was that of a sea turtle, an animal that was plentiful in the Aegean Sea. While rival cities of Athens and Corinth would soon begin limited manufacture of coins, it is the turtle that became the dominant currency of southern Greece. The reason for this is the shear number of coins produced, estimated to be ten thousand yearly for nearly seventy years. The source for the metal came from the rich silver mines of Siphnos, an island in the Aegean. Although Aegina was a formidable trading nation, the coins seemed to have meant for local use, as few have been found outside the Cyclades and Crete. So powerful was their lure, however, that an old proverb states, "Courage and wisdom are overcome by Turtles."

The Aeginean turtle bore a close likeness to that of its live counterpart, with a series of dots running down the center of its shell. The reverse of the coin bore the imprint of the punch used to force the face of the coin into the obverse turtle die. Originally this consisted of an eight-pronged punch that produced a pattern of eight triangles. Later, other variations on this were tried. In 480 BC, the coin received its first major redesign. Two extra pellets were added to the shell near the head of the turtle, a design not seen in nature. Also, the reverse punch mark was given a lopsided design.

Although turtles were produced in great quantities from 550 - 480 BC, after this time production dramatically declines. This may be due to the exhaustion of the silver mines on Siphnos, or it may be related to another historical event. In 480 BC, Aegina's archrival Athens defeated Xerxes and his Persian armies at Marathon. After this, it was Athens that became the predominant power in the region. Aegina and Athens fought a series of wars until 457 BC, when Aegina was conquered by its foe and stripped of its maritime rights. At this time the coin of Aegina changed its image from that of the sea turtle to that of the land tortoise, symbolizing its change in fortunes.

The Turtle was an object of desire in ancient times and has become so once again. It was the first coin produced in Europe, and was produced in such great quantities that thousands of Turtles still exist today. Their historical importance and ready availability make them one of the most desirable items in any ancient coin enthusiast's collection.

(Greek Turtles, by Gary T. Anderson .
1 commentsCleisthenes
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002a. Agrippa 54 viewsAgrippa

A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 ) of Sextus Pompeius in the naval battles at Mylae and Naulochus (N Sicily). Agrippa took part in the war against Antony, and his naval operations were the basis of Octavian's decisive victory at Actium in 31 He was perhaps the most trusted of all Augustus' lieutenants and rendered many services, notably in putting down disorders in both the East and West. His third wife was Augustus' daughter Julia.

AS. M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown. / Neptune standing, head left, S C at sides.

It seems like the quality and price of Agrippa coins run the whole spectrum...I think a decent example can be had for as little as $20. This is a bit more than that but I am happy with the quality of the metal and portrait.
ecoli
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002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), (Time of Claudius or Nero, circa AD 41-68.??? ), Macedon, Phillipi, RPC I 1651, AE-18, (AE Semis), COHOR-PRAE-PHIL, Three military standards,108 views002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), (Time of Claudius or Nero, circa AD 41-68.??? ), Macedon, Phillipi, RPC I 1651, AE-18, (AE Semis), COHOR-PRAE-PHIL, Three military standards,
Augustus Macedon Phillipi Æ18 / Struck to Commemorate the Battle of Actium
avers:- VIC-AVG, Nike standing left holding wreath and palm branch.
revers:- COHOR-PRAE-PHIL, Three military standards.
exe: VIC/AVG//--, diameter:18mm, weight: , axis: h,
mint: Macedon, Phillipi, Pseudo-autonomous issue, date: Time of Claudius or Nero, circa AD 41-68., ref: RPC I 1651, SNG ANS 677; SNG Copenhagen 305, BMC 23, SGI 32.
Q-001
"This coin has traditionally been attributed to Augustus, but due to its copper composition, RPC attributes it as likely from Claudius to Nero; Philippi probably did not issue copper coins during the reign of Augustus."
1 commentsquadrans
002_Augustus_Thessaly,_Koinon-AE-21_RPC_I_1425,_Q-001_11h_21-21,5mm_6,75g-s.jpg
002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Thessaly, Koinon of Thessaly, RPC I 1425, AE-21,Æ Diassarion, Athena Itonia standing left, 143 views002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Thessaly, Koinon of Thessaly, RPC I 1425, AE-21,Æ Diassarion, Athena Itonia standing left,
avers:- Sosandros, son of Sosandros, strategos. ΣEBAΣTOΣ [ΘE]ΣΣAΛΩN, bare head of Augustus right.
revers:- ΣΩΣANΔPOΣ [ΣΩΣ]ANΔPOY, Athena Itonia standing left, holding Nike and shield set on ground; spear to left, AR monogram and Δ in fields.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-21,5 mm, weight: 6,75g, axis: 11h,
mint: Thessaly, Koinon of Thessaly, date: 27 B.C.-14 A.D., ref: RPC I 1425, Burrer Em. 1a, Series 1, 2.1 (A1/R2 – this coin, obv. and rev. illustrated on pl. 1); BCD Thessaly II 914.1 var. (rev. legend; same obv. die); CNG: eAuction 299.lot 2., McClean 4994; Leake 4898.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
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004 - Septimus Severus (193-211 AD), denarius - RIC 6358 viewsObv: L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP V, laureated bust right.
Rev: PART ARAB PART ADIAB, two bound captives each sitting on shield, between them a trophy. COS II P P in eregue.
Minted in Rome 195 AD.

This coin refer to Severus´victory over the Arabians and Adiabenians, maybe in the civil war against Pescennius Niger.
1 commentspierre_p77
996Hadrian_Strack3_eastern.jpg
004 Hadrian Denarius 117 AD Trajan and Hadrian standing vis-à-vis eastern mint34 viewsReference.
Strack *3; Paris 4616

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front.

Rev. PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P ADOPTIO in exergue
Trajan holding with both hands, Hadrian's right hand; left hand on hip

2.73 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
This early series celebrates the adoption of Hadrian by Trajan, therefore legitimizing Hadrian's succession to the people.
on Rome Mint Trajan or both would hold a volumen/rolls
2 commentsokidoki
Fontius-Syd-724.jpg
005. Mn. Fonteius, Cf15 viewsDenarius, ca 85-84 BC, Auxiliary Italian mint.
Obverse: MN FONTEI CF / Bust of Vejovis with hair in loose locks; thunderbolt below; AP monogram under chin.
Reverse: Winged Cupid or Genius seated on goat; caps of the Dioscuri above; thyrsus with fillet below; all within a laurel wreath.
3.89 gm., 20 mm.
Syd. #724; RSC #Fonteia 9; Sear #271.

Vejovis was an ancient deity whose early function was forgotten. At his shrine in Rome, his statue portrayed him as a young beardless youth with a goat. By the time this coin was issued, he was identified with Pluto, the god of the underworld. He was probably a god of expiation since a goat was sacrificed to him once a year. We know from other sources that this goat sacrifice was expiatory in nature.
Callimachus
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005. Nero 54-68AD. AE Sestertius, Rome mint, 63AD. DECVRSIO. 38.6mm200 viewsObv. Laureate ead right, wearing aegis NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P
Rev. Nero on horseback prancing right, wearing cuirass, short tunic, and billowing cloak, spear in right hand, to right soldier moving right. carrying vexillum; to leftin shallow relief, soldier running right DECVRSIO in ex
BMCRE 155; Cohen 94, RIC I 176 var (obv legend)
38.6mm, 180o, 63 A.D. Rome mint.
This sestertius was an early emission from the Rome Mint, which resumed striking bronze after about 10 years of inactivity. The talented engraver, perhaps with extra time for this initial project, produced one of the best dies in the entire imperial bronze series. The special style, complemented by superior execution, has similarities to later medallions.


The fine expressive portrait has higher relief than the more common Lugdunum issues.
The reverse uses the roundness of the flan and three geometric planes of relief to both present the scene in a format that draws the eye to the emperor and show movement that is lacking on almost all other Roman coins. The rare use of geometric planes was repeated on ADLOCVTIO sestertii of Galba five years later, perhaps the work of the same artist. Rome sestertii after 70 A.D. are of far less impressive style.


The lack of SC leaves the reverse fields uncluttered. SC stood for Senatus Consultum, "By Decree of the Senate" and signified the role of the Senate in the minting of brass and bronze coinage. Many sestertii of Caligula and some brass and bronze of Nero lack SC. Subsequent issues include SC again, until inflation produced the demise of the sestertius under Gallienus, c. 265 AD
5 commentsLordBest
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005a. Antonia35 viewsAntonia

she exposed a plot between her daughter Livilla and Sejanus, Tiberius's Praetorian Prefect. This led to Sejanus's downfall and to the death of Livilla. Claudius, her biggest disappointment (she once called him a "monster") was the only one of her children to survive her.

She committed suicide in 37 AD on Caligula's orders after expressing unhappiness over the murder of her youngest grandson, Tiberius Gemellus. There is a passage in Suetonius's "Life of Gaius" that mentions how Caligula may have given her poison himself. Renowned for her beauty and virtue, Antonia spent her long life revered by the Roman people and enjoyed many honors conferred upon her by her relatives.

Æ Dupondius (10.61 gm). Struck by Claudius. Draped bust right / Claudius standing left, holding simpulum. RIC I 92 (Claudius); BMCRE 166 (same); Cohen 6. Ex-CNG

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ecoli
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005c. Germanicus48 viewsGermanicus

After the death of Augustus in 14, the Senate appointed Germanicus commander of the forces in Germania. A short time after, the legions rioted on the news that the succession befell on the unpopular Tiberius. Refusing to accept this, the rebel soldiers cried for Germanicus as emperor. But he chose to honor Augustus' choice and put an end to the mutiny, preferring to continue only as a general. In the next two years, he subdued the Germanic tribes east of the Rhine, and assured their defeat in the Battle of the Weser River in 16.

Germanicus died in Alexandria, Egypt. His death was surrounded with speculations, and several sources refer to claims that he was poisoned by Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, governor of Syria, under orders of the emperor Tiberius.

AS, struck under Caligula. GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large SC. Cohen 1.

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ecoli
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005cc. Valeria Messalina48 viewsMessalina, 41-48 AD

Size/Weight: 17mm, 3.36g

AEOLIS, Aegae. Messalina. Augusta, AD 41-48. Draped bust right / Zeus Aëtophorus standing left. RPC I 2430; SNG Copenhagen 23.

Obverse: CЄBACTH MЄCAΛЄINA draped bust right
Reverse: AIΓAЄΩN Zeus standing left, holding eagle and scepter

This should look familiar, A. Reich :)

Attribution: RPC 2430, SNG Aulock -, SNG Leypold -, SNG Righetti -, Lindgren -, Sear GIC –
ecoli
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005d. Agrippina II89 viewsLYDIA, Hypaepa. Agrippina Jr., mother of Nero. Augusta, 50-59 AD. Æ 14mm (2.33 gm). Draped bust of Agrippina right / Cult statue of Artemis. RPC I 2541; SNG Copenhagen -.

Julia Vipsania Agrippina Minor or Agrippina Minor (Latin for "the younger") (November 7, AD 15 – March 59), often called "Agrippinilla" to distinguish her from her mother, was the daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina Major. She was sister of Caligula, granddaughter and great-niece to Tiberius, niece and wife of Claudius, and the mother of Nero. She was born at Oppidum Ubiorum on the Rhine, afterwards named in her honour Colonia Agrippinae (modern Cologne, Germany).

Agrippina was first married to (1st century AD) Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. From this marriage she gave birth to Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, who would become Roman Emperor Nero. Her husband died in January, 40. While still married, Agrippina participated openly in her brother Caligula's decadent court, where, according to some sources, at his instigation she prostituted herself in a palace. While it was generally agreed that Agrippinilla, as well as her sisters, had ongoing sexual relationships with their brother Caligula, incest was an oft-used criminal accusation against the aristocracy, because it was impossible to refute successfully. As Agrippina and her sister became more problematic for their brother, Caligula sent them into exile for a time, where it is said she was forced to dive for sponges to make a living. In January, 41, Agrippina had a second marriage to the affluent Gaius Sallustius Crispus Passienus. He died between 44 and 47, leaving his estate to Agrippina.

As a widow, Agrippina was courted by the freedman Pallas as a possible marriage match to her own uncle, Emperor Claudius, and became his favourite councillor, even granted the honor of being called Augusta (a title which no other queen had ever received). They were married on New Year's Day of 49, after the death of Claudius's first wife Messalina. Agrippina then proceeded to persuade Claudius to adopt her son, thereby placing Nero in the line of succession to the Imperial throne over Claudius's own son, Brittanicus. A true Imperial politician, Agrippina did not reject murder as a way to win her battles. Many ancient sources credited her with poisoning Claudius in 54 with a plate of poisened mushrooms, hence enabling Nero to quickly take the throne as emperor.

For some time, Agrippina influenced Nero as he was relatively ill-equipped to rule on his own. But Nero eventually felt that she was taking on too much power relative to her position as a woman of Rome. He deprived her of her honours and exiled her from the palace, but that was not enough. Three times Nero tried to poison Agrippina, but she had been raised in the Imperial family and was accustomed to taking antidotes. Nero had a machine built and attached to the roof of her bedroom. The machine was designed to make the ceiling collapse — the plot failed with the machine. According to the historians Tacitus and Suetonius, Nero then plotted her death by sending for her in a boat constructed to collapse, intending to drown Agrippina. However, only some of the crew were in on the plot; their efforts were hampered by the rest of the crew trying to save the ship. As the ship sank, one of her handmaidens thought to save herself by crying that she was Agrippina, thinking they would take special care of her. Instead the maid was instantly beaten to death with oars and chains. The real Agrippina realised what was happening and in the confusion managed to swim away where a passing fisherman picked her up. Terrified that his cover had been blown, Nero instantly sent men to charge her with treason and summarily execute her. Legend states that when the Emperor's soldiers came to kill her, Agrippina pulled back her clothes and ordered them to stab her in the belly that had housed such a monstrous son.

ecoli
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006a. Claudia17 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Nero, with Claudia. AD 54-68. BI Tetradrachm (22mm, 10.74 g, 12h). Dated RY 3 (AD 56/57). Laureate head of Nero right / Draped bust of Claudia Octavia right; L Γ (date) below chin. Köln 122-4; Dattari (Savio) 190; K&G 14.7; RPC I 5202; Emmett 127.3. Near VF. Ex - CNG

Furthermore, the carefully contrived marriage between Octavia and Nero was a disaster on a personal level. Nero soon embarked on a serious relationship with a freedman named Acte, and more importantly developed an active dislike for his wife. "Quickly feeling aversion to intimacy with Octavia, he replied to his friends who were finding fault with him that she ought to be satisfied with the outward trappings of a wife." This antipthy was not likely to produce offspring who would unite the Julian and Claudian lines. By 58 Nero was becoming involved with a freeborn mistress, Poppaea, whom he would want to make his empress in exchange for Octavia. But the legitimacy of his principate derived from his relationship with his predecessor, and he was not so secure that he could do without the connection with Claudius provided through his mother and his wife. In 59 he was able to arrange for Agrippina's death, but it was not until 62 that he felt free to divorce Octavia and marry Poppaea. The initial grounds for putting Octavia aside was the charge that she was barren because she had had no children. But a more aggressive attack was needed when opposition arose from those who still challenged Nero's prncipate and remained loyal to Octavia as the last representative of her family. With the connivance of Poppaea, charges of adultery were added, Octavia was banished to Campania and then to the island of Pandataria off the coast, and finally killed. Her severed head was sent to Rome.
2 commentsecoli
Crepusius-Syd-738.jpg
007. P. Crepusius.27 viewsDenarius, 82-81 BC, Rome mint.
Obverse: Laureate bust of Apollo; sceptre and E at left; symbol under chin.
Reverse: P CREPVSI / Horseman galloping, hurling spear. Roman numeral CCCXXXXVI above.
4.07 gm., 17.5 mm.
Syd. #738a; RSC #Crepusia 1; Sear #283.

The Roman numerals on this coin series run from I to DXXIII (1 - 523). Aside from numbering the reverse dies, their significance is unknown. The symbol under Apollo's chin is said to be a shell by Stevenson (p. 295), but it could easily be a turtle or even something else.
1 commentsCallimachus
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009. C. Mamilius Limetanus.64 viewsDenarius, 82-81 BC, Rome mint.
Obverse: Bust of Mercury wearing winged hat; caduceus and the letter I behind.
Reverse: C MAMIL LIMETAN / Ulysses, dressed like a Greek sailor, being recognized by his dog Argus upon returning to Ithaca.
4.06 gm., 19 mm.
Syd. #741; RSC #Mamilia 6; Sear #282.

The Mamilia gens claimed descent from Mamilia, the daughter of Telgonius, reputed son of Ulysses. Mercury is an ancestor of Ulysses.

The story as told in Homer's "Odyssey" is somewhat different from that portrayed on this coin. When Ulysses returned to Ithaca after twenty years, he found his dog Argus lying on a dung heap and nearly dead. Argus had only enough strength to wag his tail in recognition of his master's voice before he died. Be that as it may, this is still an elegant portrayal of this touching scene, the likes of which are rarely found on Roman coinage.

2 commentsCallimachus
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00a Domitian as Caesar RIC 541338 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 541 (R2). BMC 129 var. RSC 664. BNC 105 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 701. = Helios, ebay, 29 November 2010 (A. Lynn Collection).

This is an extremely rare denarius of Domitian as Caesar, the second earliest minted at Rome. Here the legend is clockwise, the much more common Domitian on horseback type has the legend anticlockwise. The reverse may allude to Domitian's participation in Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph where he rode a 'magnificent' steed. The obverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin from Oxford.

The early portrait on this one is quite outstanding.
18 commentsDavid Atherton
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01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed..10 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

*Bad photos, bad lighting, camera trouble.... hard to show the true colour of this coin with my camera.
rexesq
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01 - Philip I Tetradrachm - Laureate bust left, wearing balteus, seen from front, cuirassed..10 viewsPhilip I Tetradrachm. Regnal Year: 4

obv: Laureate and cuirassed bust left, wearing balteus (sword belt that hangs over the shoulder and across the chest). Seen from the front.
rev: Eagle facing left, tail right, holding wreath in beak and standing on city name.
SC below.

*Bad photos, bad lighting, camera trouble.... hard to show the true colour of this coin with my camera.
rexesq
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01 01 Julius Caesar 106 viewsJulius Caesar. 49-44 B.C. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in Gaul. c. 49-48 B.C. (3.72g, 19.0m, 4h). Obv: CAESAR in ex., elephant r. trampling serpent. Rev: simpulum, sprinkler, axe surmounted by wolf’s head, and apex. Cr 443/1; Syd. 1006.

This is the first issue in Caesar’s name. The obverse could symbolize the victory of good over evil in general, or the victory of Caesar’s forces over the Pompeians specifically. The reverse clearly refers to Caesar’s status as Pontifex Maximus.
3 commentsLucas H
Julius_Caesar,_Donative.jpg
01 05 Julius Caesar27 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Utica? Mint. 46 A.D. (3.7g, 16mm, 10h). Obv: DICT ITER COS TERT, head of Ceres right, wreathed with grain. Rev: AVGVR PONT MAX, emblems of the augurate and pontificate; aspergillum, guttus, and lituus; M (munus=gift) to right. Craw. 467/1b, Syd. 1024.

This was likely used as a donative by Caesar during his triumph of 46 B.C. While porous, this example is well centered, and the M is clearly on the flan.
Lucas H
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01 Augustus RIC 167a65 viewsAugustus 27 B.C. - 14 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint. 15 - 13 B.C. (3,71 gr) Obv: AVGVSTVS DIVI F, Bare head right. Rev: in ex. IMP X, Bull butting right.
RIC 167a, RSC 137, Sear 1610.

Ex: Poinsignon Numismatique

This coin has great beauty in its simplicity and it's also a great example of propaganda. Divi F (filius) means that Octavianus is not only Augustus but also the son of a god.
2 commentsPaddy
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01 Domitian as Caesar RIC 66927 viewsÆ As, 11.05g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 669 (C). BMC -. BNC 699.
Acquired from Musa Numismatics, August 2019.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be underestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This As struck for Domitian as Caesar shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess.

Tellingly, less than a decade later, Pax would not feature so prominently on Domitian's own coinage as Emperor.

Fine style early portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
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01 Julius Caesar, Captives19 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in Spain. c. 46-45 B.C. (3.71g, 19.5mm, 6h). Obv: Diademed head of Venus right, Cupid on shoulder. Rev: Gallia seated in attitude of mourning and a Gaulish male captive, hands bound, seated beneath trophy, possibly Vercingetorix. CAESAR in Exergue. RSC 13. Craw. 468/1.

This type was minted during Caesar’s final campaign against Pompeian forces in Spain. The obverse refers to Caesar's mythical descent from the goddess Venus. The reverse refers to Caesar's victories in Gaul and the male Gaulish captive may be Vercingetorix. Not perfect, but well centered, a good state of preservation, with a clear CAESAR on the reverse.
Lucas H
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01 Julius Caesar, Venus39 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in North Africa c. 47-46B.C. (3.88, 19.2mm, 6h). Obv: Diademed head of Venus right. Rev: CAESAR, Aeneas walking left, carrying Anchises and the Palladium. Craw. 458/1. RSC 12, Sear RCV 1402.

Minted to pay his legends during their African campaign against the Pomeians, this coin harkens to Caesar’s mythical origin from Venus. Aeneas, a survivor of Troy, was the son of Aphrodite’s liaison with the mortal Anchises. Aeneas lead a group of survivors, the Aeneads, ultimately to the Italian peninsula.
1 commentsLucas H
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01. Maximinus I / RIC 6.26 viewsDenarius, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.62 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #6; Sear 8314.

This coin dates from January 1 to March 19, 238, at which time Gordian I was proclaimed emperor and the mint at Rome stopped coining for Maximinus. It was not until June 24, however, that he was murdered by his soldiers.
1 commentsCallimachus
Philip-I-RIC-012.jpg
01. Philip I.18 viewsAntoninianus, 248 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG / Radiate bust of Philip I.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG / Lion facing right. I in exergue.
4.60 gm., 23 mm.
RIC #12; Sear #8956.

During the reign of Philip I, the Empire celebrated the millennium of the founding of the City of Rome. The thousandth year of Rome was calculated as running from April 21, 247 to April 21, 248. During this year, celebrations were held throughout the empire, and in the city of Rome itself. Spectacular games were held for the people and a series of coins was issued depicting the animals which appeared in these games. Other reverse types looked back a 1000 years (wolf & twins) or ahead to the future (SAECVLVM NOVVM / temple) as Rome entered a "new age." The first 8 coins in this album are the coins issued for this occasion.
Callimachus
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010 Augustus161 viewsDivus Augustus Æ As. Commemorative by Tiberius. DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, radiate head left, thunderbolt before / Eagle standing on globe facing, wings spread, head right, S C at sides. RIC 82 [Tiberius]


"I found Rome built of bricks; I leave her clothed in marble."


This was one of my first ancients, it was my first early imperial.
1 commentsrandy h2
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010. Vespasian34 viewsVespasian. AD 69-79. AR Denarius (20mm, 2.96 g). Ephesos mint. Struck AD 71. Laureate head right / Turreted and draped female bust right. RIC II 327 var.; BMCRE 450 var. ; RPC II 828 var.; RSC 293a var. This issue is normally accompanied by a mint mark below the bust on the reverse. No mintmark can be seen on this specimen, but striking weakness could have prevented it from being fully struck in this area. The obverse portrait is almost certainly from the same hand as RPC II 828, an issue marked with a BY monogram. Ex-CNGecoli
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010. Vespasian 69 AD - 79 AD36 viewsVespasian

The character of this emperor showed very little, if anything, of the pagan tyrant. Though himself a man of no literary culture, he became the protector of his prisoner of war, the Jewish historian Josephus, a worshipper of the One God, and even permitted him the use of his own family name (Flavius). While this generosity may have been in some degree prompted by Josephus's shrewd prophecy of Vespasian's elevation to the purple, there are other instances of his disposition to reward merit in those with whom he was by no means personally sympathetic. Vespasian has the distinction of being the first Roman Emperor to transmit the purple to his own son; he is also noteworthy in Roman imperial history as having very nearly completed his seventieth year and died a natural death: being in feeble health, he had withdrawn to benefit by the purer air of his native Reate, in the "dewy fields" (rosei campi) of the Sabine country. By his wife, Flavia Domitilla, he left two sons, Titus and Domitian, and a daughter, Domitilla, through whom the name of Vespasian's empress was passed on to a granddaughter who is revered as a confessor of the Faith.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century. In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!"

Denarius. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / VES-TA to either side of Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & scepter. RSC 574
ecoli
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011.Lucius Verus 161-169 AD42 viewsAR Denarius
Mint: Rome, Date: 162 AD
Obv: IMP LAVREL VERVS AVG- Bare-headed,draped,bust of Lucius Verus facing right.
Rev: PROV DEOR TRPII COSII - Providentia standing left, holding globe and cornucopia.
Size: 17.5mm; 3.3gms
Ref: Unlisted in RIC-Similar to RIC 482,which is bare necked and the IMP in the Obv legend begins at the shoulder. This issue is draped and the IMP in the legend begins closer to the chest.
"Only 1 spec. in Reka Devnia Hoard, compared to 148 spec. with obv "Head bare right"
Thanks for finding the reference, curtislclay
1 commentsbrian l
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012 - Hadrian (117-138 AD), denarius - RIC 39b41 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, laureate heroic bust right, draped on left shoulder.
Rev: P M TR P COS III and CONCORD in exe, Concordia seated left, holding patera, resting elbow on statue of Spes, cornucopia below throne.
Minted in Rome [119-122 AD?]

This coin has ben donated to Soderakra local historical society (Sweden) as there some years ago was found a denarius of this type in an Iron Age grave at this location. This enables the society to display a coin of the very same type even though the actual grave find is locked up in a central collection.
pierre_p77
Claudius_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP____EX-S-C-P-P-OB-CIVES-SERVATOS_RIC-I-112_C-38_Q-001_34-36mm_23,63g-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 112var. (?), Thracian ?, AE-Sestertius, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS, Rare !!!,370 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 112var. (?), Thracian ?, AE-Sestertius, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS, Rare !!!,
Claudius became “Father of the Country” in 50 AD, and this title was added to the coinage, at the end of the legend, with it’s abbreviation: PP. The reverse legend translates to “For Saving the Lives of Citizens.
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, laureate head of Claudius right
revers:- No legend - Wreath, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS within,
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 34-36mm, weight: 23,63g, axis:11h,
mint:Thracian ?, date: 50-54 A.D., ref: RIC-I-112, C-38,
Q-001
"RIC is in error to state that P P only appeared on Claudius' bronze coins in 50 AD. In fact Claudius became P P very early in 42 AD, and P P appeared immediately not only on his quadrantes, which are specifically dated to 42 by the title COS II, but also on his sestertii and middle bronzes.
Stylistically your coin should not be attributed to Rome, but to a Thracian mint perhaps active only towards the end of the reign. These coins, scarcer than the Rome-mint ones, are not recognized in RIC!" by Curtis Clay. Thank you "curtisclay".
5 commentsquadrans
Claudius_AE-Sest_TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P_EX-S-C-P-P-OB-CIVES-SERVATOS_RIC-I-112_C-38_Q-001_11h_34-36mm_23,63ga-s.jpg
012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 112var. (?), Thracian ?, AE-Sestertius, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS, Rare !!!, Re-Shot !342 views012 Claudius-I (41-54 A.D.), RIC I 112var. (?), Thracian ?, AE-Sestertius, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS, Rare !!!, Re-Shot !
Claudius became “Father of the Country” in 50 AD, and this title was added to the coinage, at the end of the legend, with it’s abbreviation: PP. The reverse legend translates to “For Saving the Lives of Citizens.
avers:- TI-CLAVDIVS-CAESAR-AVG-P-M-TR-P-IMP-P-P, laureate head of Claudius right
revers:- No legend - Wreath, EX-S-C/P-P/OB-CIVES/SERVATOS within,
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 34-36mm, weight: 23,63g, axis:11h,
mint:Thracian ?, date: 50-54 A.D., ref: RIC-I-112, C-38,
Q-001
"RIC is in error to state that P P only appeared on Claudius' bronze coins in 50 AD. In fact Claudius became P P very early in 42 AD, and P P appeared immediately not only on his quadrantes, which are specifically dated to 42 by the title COS II, but also on his sestertii and middle bronzes.
Stylistically your coin should not be attributed to Rome, but to a Thracian mint perhaps active only towards the end of the reign. These coins, scarcer than the Rome-mint ones, are not recognized in RIC!" by Curtis Clay. Thank you "curtisclay".
1 commentsquadrans
coin212.JPG
012. Domitian 81-96 AD60 viewsDomitian

As emperor, Domitian was to become one of Rome's foremost micro managers, especially concerning the economy. Domitian's reach extended well beyond the economy. Late in A.D. 85 he made himself censor perpetuus, censor for life, with a general supervision of conduct and morals. The move was without precedent and, although largely symbolic, it nevertheless revealed Domitian's obsessive interest in all aspects of Roman life. While the military abilities of Vespasian and Titus were genuine, those of Domitian were not. Partly as an attempt to remedy this deficiency, Domitian frequently became involved in his own military exploits outside of Rome. He claimed a triumph in A.D. 83 for subduing the Chatti in Gaul, but the conquest was illusory.

as Caesar, AR Denarius. 76 AD. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / COS IIII, Pegasus walking right. RSC 47
ecoli
Brutus-Syd-907.jpg
013. M. Junius Brutus.58 viewsDenarius, 54 BC, Rome mint.
Obverse: BRVTVS / Bust of L. Junius Brutus.
Reverse: AHALA / Bust of C. Servilius Ahala.
4.09 gm., 19 mm.
Syd. #907; RSC #Junia 30; Sear #398.

The moneyer of this coin is the same Brutus who killed Julius Caesar. However, this coin was minted about a decade earlier. It portrays two ancestors of Brutus:

1. L. Junius Brutus lead the Romans to expel their king L. Tarquinius Superbus. He was one of the founding fathers of the Roman Republic, and was elected one of the first consuls in 509 BC.

2. C. Cervilius Ahala. In 439 BC, during a food shortage in Rome, Spurius Maelius, the richest patrician, bought as much food as he could and sold it cheaply to the people. The Romans, always fearful of kings, thought he wanted to be king. So an emergency was declared and L. Cincinnatus was proclaimed Dictator. Maelius was ordered to appear before Cincinnatus, but refused. So Ahala, as Magister Equitam, killed him in the Forum. Ahala was tried for this act, but escaped condemnation by voluntary exile.
4 commentsCallimachus
M-Antony-Syd-1246.jpg
017. Marcus Antonius.77 viewsDenarius, 32-31 BC.
Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C / Galley with rowers, standard at prow.
Reverse: LEG XXIII / Legionary eagle between two standards.
3.62 gm.. 17 mm.
Syd. #1246; RSC #60; Sear unlisted.

Mark Antony minted a long series of legionary coins for the use of the army and navy prior to the Battle of Actium (Sept. 2, 31 BC). The legion depicted on this coin - Legion XXIII - is one that we know nothing about.
1 commentsCallimachus
Avr_Cyz.jpg
018 - Aurelian (270-275 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 349 (unlisted var.)47 viewsObv: IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right.
Rev: RESTITVTOR ORBIS, Woman standing right, presenting wreath to emperor standing left, holding spear, suppliant kneeling figure between them.
Minted in Cyzicus (* gamma in exe), 271-272 AD, third officina.

Obv. legend IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG on this coin insted of IMP AVRELIANVS AVG is not listed in RIC or any other reference that I am aware of, but it is not previously unknown.
1 commentspierre_p77
Commodus_denar2.jpg
018 - Commodus (177-192), denarius - BM 184, RIC unlisted48 viewsObv: M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT, laureate and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: P M TR P XI IMP VII COS V P P, Jupiter seated left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre.
Minted in Rome 186 AD

The cuirassed bust are rare on denarii. This particular type are unlisted in both RIC and Cohen, though the obverse legend and reverse type (not legend) are equal to RIC 117, Cohen 486. The only coin I know of with this bust and reverse legend is BM 184. The BM coin and this coin are struck with diferent obverse dies, hence ther must have been at least two pairs of dies striking this type. Thers should be more coins of this type out there, if anyone knows of one I´ll be very happy to hear about it! (Many thanks to mr Curtis Clay for information on this coin).
pierre_p77
Augustus-RIC-350.jpg
019. Caesar Augustus.21 viewsDenarius, 2 BC - 4 AD, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE / Laureate bust of Augustus.
Reverse: C L CAESARES AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT / Caius and Lucius, each holding spear and shield. Lituus and Simpulum above.
3.85 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #350; RSC 43c; Sear #1597.

The reverse of this coin is unusual in that the Lituus is on the left and the Simpulum is on the right. Most coins have it the other way around.
Callimachus
DSC08187_DSC08191_china_10-cash_ND_o-r.JPG
02 - China, Republic - 10 Cash coin26 views-
--
The Republic of China
1920 (ND) - Ten Cash

(Titles in Chinese, some in English)

obv: Crossed Flags.

Weight: 6.5 Grams
Size: 31 mm

ex Old Pueblo Coin Exchange, Tucson, Arizona. USA.
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-

*NOTE: Coin next to a modern USA State Quarter-Dollar (25 cents) in this photo for size comparison.
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rexesq
DSC08183_china_10cash_ND_w-US-25c_obv.JPG
02 - China, Republic - 10 Cash coin.19 views-
--
The Republic of China
1920 (ND) - Ten Cash

(Titles in Chinese, some in English)

obv: Crossed Flags.

Weight: 6.5 Grams
Size: 31 mm

ex Old Pueblo Coin Exchange, Tucson, Arizona. USA.
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-

*NOTE: Coin next to a modern USA State Quarter-Dollar (25 cents) in this photo for size comparison.
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rexesq
hadrian_AD123_AR-denarius_roma_obv_06.jpg
02 - Hadrian Denarius 'Roma AD123' - obv25 viewsHadrian
AR Denarius. 3.22 grams.

obv: IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG - Laureate head right.
rev: PM TR P COS III - Roma seated on cuirass left, holding Victory and spear, shield behind.
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This photo is off-color with a greenish tint.
rexesq
hadrian_AD123_AR-denarius_roma_rev_05_off-color.jpg
02 - Hadrian Denarius 'Roma AD123' - rev 0319 viewsHadrian
AR Denarius. 3.22 grams.

obv: IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG - Laureate head right.
rev: PM TR P COS III - Roma seated on cuirass left, holding Victory and spear, shield behind.
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This photo is off-color with a yellowish-green tint.
rexesq
Augustus_RIC_I_86a.jpg
02 Augusts RIC I 86a54 viewsAugustus. 27 B.C.-14 A.D.. Colonia Patricia Mint. 19 B.C. (3.13g, 18.4mm, 2h). Obv: CAESAR AVGSTVS, bare head right. Rev: SIGNIS RECEPTIS, Aquila on l. and standard on r. flanking SPQR arranged around shield inscribed CL V. RIC I 86a, BMC 417, RSC 265.

An important historical type commemorating the return of the legionary eagles lost by Crassus to the Parthians in the battle of Carrhae in 53 B.C. This example has wonderful toning, is perfectly centered, and retains complete legends, even the CL V on the shield is preserved better than the photograph shows.
3 commentsLucas H
Augustus_RIC_288.jpg
02 Augustus RIC 28821 viewsAugusts 27 B.C.- 14 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome mint, 19 B.C. P. Petronius Turpilianus, moneyer. (3.65g, 18.2m, 0h). Obv: TVRPILIANS IIIVIR FERON, Diad. and draped bust of Feronia r. Rev: CAESAR AVGVSTVS SIGN RECE, Parthian kneeling r. presenting standard w. X marked vexillum. RIC 288, BMC 14, RSC 484.

A historical type commemorating the return of the standards lost by Crassus at the battle of Carrhae during his Parthian campaign in 53 B.C. Rome was humiliated by the defeat and loss of several Legionary Eagles. Crassus and several of his generals were killed. Through diplomacy, Augusts secured the return of the Eagles, an important victory to tout on his coinage.

I've been wanting this type for some time because of it's historic significance, but as it's outside of my primary collecting area, I was willing to compromise on condition. This example is worn, but clearly recognizable. The obverse has banker's marks which seem to disappear or become much more scarce on denarii towards the end of the Republic and beginning of the Empire.
Lucas H
Augustus_RIC_37a.jpg
02 Augustus RIC I 0037a68 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. AR Denarius. Spanish Mint c. 19-18 A.D. (3.43g, 19.7m, 6h). Obv: AVGVSTVS CAESAR, oak-wreathed head right. Rev: DIVVS IVLIVS, to l. and r. of eight-rayed comet with tail upwards. RIC I 37a. RSC 98.

The Caesaris Astrum, or Star of Caesar, appeared in 44 B.C., mere months after Caesar’s assassination during the Ludi Victoriae Caesaris. The appearance of the comet was taken as a dramatic sign of the deification of Caesar, and not lost on Augustus as an ongoing propaganda opportunity as this coin demonstrates.
4 commentsLucas H
Augustus_RIC_220.jpg
02 Augustus RIC I 022047 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint 13-14 A.D. (3.57g, 19.5, 0 h). Obv: [CAESAR AVGVSTVS] DVI F PATER PATRRIAE, laureate head r. REV: [PONTIF] MAXIM, Liva as Pax seated r. on low-backed chair, vertical scepter in r., branch in left. RIC I 220 (R2), RSC 223.

Worn and on an irregular flan, I still wanted this example because of the reverse. Minted in his last year as emperor, this was Augustus’ precursor to Tiberius’ “tribute penny.” While this was one of many types during Augustus’ reign, it was one very few types for Tiberius.
1 commentsLucas H
Augustus_RIC_359.jpg
02 Augustus RIC I 035960 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.-14 A.D. Moneyer L. Vinicius. Rome Mint. 16 B.C. (3.72g, 18.8m, 5h). Obv: Anepigraphic, bare head right. Rev: L Vinicivs in ex., Triumphal arch inscribed SPQR IMP CAE in two lines sur. by Quadriga bearing Augustus, r. holding laurel-branch, l. scepter; smaller arch on sides w archer on l. and slinger on r. RIC I 359 (R2). RSC 544.

This coin depicts Augustus’ triple arch, perhaps the first in Rome. Beginning as a double arch to commemorate his victory at Actium, the third arch was probably added to commemorate the return of the lost standards from Parthia. For a scarce type, this example is well centered and has good details on the reverse including complete legends.
3 commentsLucas H
dom as caesar spes.jpg
02 Domitian as Caesar RIC 788157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVT; Spes, draped, advancing l., holding up flower in r. hand and with l. holding up her skirt.
RIC 788 (C). BMC 156. RSC 375. BNC 135.
Ex Harlan J Berk 155, 31 July 2007, lot 247.

During Vespasian's reign, Domitian was given the honorary title PRINCEPS IVVENTVT or 'Prince of Youth', celebrated here on this denarius from 74 AD. The title is one that was often given to young princes who were marked out as chosen heirs.

Spes, the personification of hope, is seen here on the reverse advacing left, holding a budding flower. The flower is a symbol of future well being.

Domitian's coinage during Vespasian's rule was unique. While Titus followed closely the types of his father, Domitian struck out on his own. One wonders how much of an input the young prince had on his own series.

A very likeable coin with a good portrait and excellent centring.


2 commentsVespasian70
KnidosARdrachm.jpg
020a, CARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm.65 viewsCARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm - 16mm (6.06 g). Obverse: forepart of roaring lion right; Reverse: archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia. Cahn 80 (V38/R53); SNG Helsinki 132 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 232 (same dies). Toned, near VF, good metal. Ex Barry P. Murphy.

While this coin falls within the time frame that numismatists call "Classical" Greek coinage, I have chosen to place it in both the "Archaic" (coin 020a) and "Classical" Greek sections of my collection. This specimen is one of those wonderful examples of transition--it incorporates many elements of the "Archaic" era, although it is struck during the "Classical" Greek period and anticipates characteristics of the later period.

As noted art historian Patricia Lawrence has pointed out, "[this specimen portrays] A noble-headed lion, a lovely Late Archaic Aphrodite, and [is made from]. . . beautiful metal." The Archaic Aphrodite is reminiscent of certain portraits of Arethusa found on tetradrachms produced in Syracuse in the first decade of the 5th century BC.

Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city probably of Lacedaemonian colonization. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum, Turkey) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.

The city was at first governed by an oligarchic senate, composed of sixty members, and presided over by a magistrate; but, though it is proved by inscriptions that the old names continued to a very late period, the constitution underwent a popular transformation. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic. They ultimately submitted to Cyrus, and from the battle of Eurymedon to the latter part of the Peloponnesian War they were subject to Athens.

In their expansion into the region, the Romans easily obtained the allegiance of Knidians, and rewarded them for help given against Antiochus by leaving them the freedom of their city.

During the Byzantine period there must still have been a considerable population: for the ruins contain a large number of buildings belonging to the Byzantine style, and Christian sepulchres are common in the neighbourhood.

Eudoxus, the astronomer, Ctesias, the writer on Persian history, and Sostratus, the builder of the celebrated Pharos at Alexandria, are the most remarkable of the Knidians mentioned in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidus

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Tiberius-RIC-3.jpg
021. Tiberius.23 viewsDenarius, ca 16 - 37 AD, Lugdunum mint.
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS / Laureate bust of Tiberius.
Reverse: PONTIF MAXIM / Livia seated, as Pax, holding branch and sceptre.
3.56 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #3; Sear #1763.

Because this is the denarius that was in circulation at the time of Jesus, this coin is often called the "Tribute Penny" -- a name which is derived from the Authorized (King James) Version of the Bible where the word denarius was translated as penny.
Callimachus
Titus_AE-Dup_T-CAES-VESPAS-dot-IMP-dot-P-dot-TRP-COS-II_S-C_ROMA_RIC-xx_C-xx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_axes-h_27mm_3,28g-2-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !, 514 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !,
avers:- T CAES VESPAS•IMP•P•TRP COS II, Radiate head right.
revers:- Roma seated left, holding wreath and parazonium, S-C across the field, ROMA in exergo.
exerg: S/C//ROMA, diameter: 27mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 72 A.D., ref: RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), C-Not in !!!,
Q-001

"Titus' coins with obverse legend T CAES VESPAS IMP P TR P COS II were struck in year 72, first issue.No ROMA reverse is listed in RIC for Titus in this issue, so you may have found a new type! "by FlaviusDomitianus. Thank you FlaviusDomitianus.
""Titus' issue of bronze coins with COS II and the abbreviations CAES VESPAS is altogether rare. RIC 411-417 only lists two sestertius types, R2 and R3; one dupondius type, FELICITAS PVBLICA, R2, unfortunately not illustrated, it would be nice to compare the obverse die with your coin; and four As types, all R2.

The same ROMA reverse die of your coin was apparently also used for dupondii with other obverse legends:

RIC 396, pl. 31, Vespasian COS IIII.

RIC 438, pl. 34, Titus CAES VESPASIAN P TR P COS II; also pl. 34, RIC 436 (rev. only), which should have ROMA around edge and SC in exergue, but in fact has ROMA in exergue and S - C in field, so seems to be another example of RIC 438.

Titus CAES VESPASIAN PON TR POT (instead of P TR P) COS II: my collection ex G. Hirsch 229, 2003, lot 2219; not in RIC."" by Curtis Clay, Thank you Curtis.
5 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-25a_C-318_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_18mm_3,28g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #1196 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Two curule chairs; wreath atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD p-119, RSC-318, BMC 66,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-25a_C-318_Rome_80-AD__Q-002_axis-5h_16,5-18mm_2,96g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #2114 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #2
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Two curule chairs; wreath atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18mm, weight: 2,96g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD p-119, RSC-318, BMC 66,
Q-002
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
quadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RICnew-112_RIC-II-26a_C-309_Rome_80-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_18mm_3,33g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor, #1265 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor, #1
avers:- IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor.
exe: -/-//-- , diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,33g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a p-119, RSC 309, BMC 72,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-xx_C-xxx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_20mm_3,20g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1301 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Elephant walking left.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,20g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a p-119, RSC 303, BMC 43,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RICnew-115_RIC-II-22a_C-303_Rome_80-AD__Q-002_19mm_3,25g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1144 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Elephant walking left.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,25g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a p-119, RSC 303, BMC 43,
Q-002
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
1 commentsquadrans
RICb_0119,_RIC_II(1962)_0023a,_022_Titus__AR-Den_IMP_TITVS_CAES_VESPASIAN_AVG_P_M,_TR_P_IX_IMP_XV_COS_VIII_P_P,_Rome,_80_AD_Q-001,_5h,_17,8-18,9mm,_3,02g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119, RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (winged) on the draped table, #111 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119, RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (winged) on the draped table, #1
avers: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (winged) on the draped table or chair with one, two or no crossbars.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,8-18,9mm, weight: 3,02g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0119, RIC II(1962) 0023a p-119, RSC 316, BMC 51,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-new-119_RIC-II-23a_C-316_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_18mm_3,28g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (wingless) draped table, #1181 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (wingless) on the draped table, #1
avers: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt (wingless) on the draped table or chair with one, two or no crossbars.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a p-119, RSC 316, BMC 51,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
4 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-242_p-119_RIC-new-122_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-001_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #1164 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Throne with curved back decorated with three floral ornaments; below, fringed seatcover and strut.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-001
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-24a_p-119_RIC-new-124a_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-003_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #3184 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #3
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Draped throne with triangular back; grain ears atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-003
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
2 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-24a_p-119_RIC-new-124c_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-002_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #2151 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #2
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Draped throne with triangular back; grain ears atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-002
"This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD."
quadrans
Dioclet_var.jpg
023 - Diocletian (284-305 AD), pre-reform Antoninianus - RIC 184 (unlisted var.)30 viewsObv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS AVGG, Hercules standing facing, head to left, holding club and trophy.
Minted in Rome (XX crescent IA in exe), first officina, 291 AD.

The exergual mark XX crescent IA is not listed in RIC for this type, nor have I found it anywhere else. Possibly unknown var.? If anyone knows an other ex I would be delighted to hear of it.
pierre_p77
Diocletian_ant5.jpg
025 - Diocletian (284-305 AD), pre-reform Antoninianus - RIC 28426 viewsObv. IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, radiated, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. CONCORDIA MILITVM, emperor standing right, holding parazonium and receiving Victory on globe from Jupiter, standing left, holding sceptre.
Minted in Heraclea (HA in field, [.XXI. in exe]), first officina, 292 AD

The .XXI. in the exe not visible on this coin. I´m not sure if it ever have bin there. The coin illustrating this type in RIC also missing the exergual mark, but is otherwise very similar to this coin.
pierre_p77
Diocletian_ant6.jpg
026 - Diocletian (284-305 AD), pre-reform Antoninianus - RIC 30634 viewsObv. IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. CONCORDIA MILITVM, emperor standing right, holding parazonium and receiving Victory om globe from Jupiter, standing left, holding sceptre.
Minted in Cyzicus (A in field, XXI in exe), first officina.

There is one die matching obv. to this coin on Coinarchives: http://www.coinarchives.com/a/lotviewer.php?LotID=117756&AucID=137&Lot=917 .
pierre_p77
LitraRoma.jpg
026/3 Litra or 1/8 ounce40 viewsAnonymous. Æ Litra or 1/8 ounce. Rome. 234-231 BC. ( 3.43g, 15mm, 5h) Obv: Laureate head of Apollo right Rev: Horse rearing left, wearing bridle, bit, and reins; ROMA below.

Crawford 26/3; Sydenham 29 (Half-litra); Kestner 56-65; BMCRR Romano-Campanian 70-74 (Half-litra)

This coin is attributed as a Litra by Crawford, others define it as half-litra. However, it could be argued that "1/8 ounce piece" is the better description.

First of all, on litra and half-litra:

"According to Crawford, the weight standard of the series 26 litra and half litra are based on a litra of 3.375 grams . The half litra in Crawford is described as having a dog on the reverse rather than a horse, and the average weight of the half litra of several specimens is described as 1.65 grams. BMCRR does refer to these as half litrae; but keep in mind that Grueber was writing circa 1900 and based on older scholarship. Sydenham was writing in the 1950s. Of the three major works cited, Crawford is the most current and likely based on a greater number of more recent finds."

Andrew Mccabe:

"It's very doubtful to me that the word "litra" is correct. Much more likely, these small bronze coins were simply fractions of the Aes Grave cast coinage system, as they come in weights of 1/4, 1/8 and 1/16 ounce, and the Aes Grave coinage generally had denominations from As down to Semuncia (1/2 ounce). So this coin would be 1/8 ounce coin. That's my view, which differs from their long term designation as "Litra", which presume them to be overvalued token bronze coinage on the Sicilian model, whereby bronze coins had value names that indicate a relationship to the silver coinage.

Litra, the word, is from the same stem as Libra, i.e. pound, would suggest a denomination of a (light) Sicilian pound of bronze, which sometimes equates in value to a small silver coin in Sicily weighing about 1/12 didrachm (about 0.6 grams) so by this definition, a Litra = an Obol. But it hardly stands up to scrutiny that such a tiny bronze coin, weighing 3.375 grams, could have been equivalent to a 0.6 gram silver obol. It would imply a massive overvaluation of bronze that just does not seem credible.

So. throw out the Litras, and call these coins 1/8 ounce pieces, and I think we have a sensible answer."

Paddy
augustus_RIC82a.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AR denarius - struck 19-18 BC54 viewsobv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS (bare head left, banker's mark on face)
rev: SIGNIS RECEPTIS (Mars standing left, head right, with aquila and standard)
ref: RIC I 82a, RSC 259 (4frcs), BMC 414.
mint: Colonia Patricia
3.41gms, 19mm
Rare

History: The Parthians had captured the standards of the legions under the command of Marcus Licinius Crassus (53 BC, at the Battle of Carrhae), Decidius Saxa (40 BC), and Marc Antony (36 BC). It was considered a grave moral defeat and evil omen for the Romans. It required a generation of diplomacy before the Parthians returned them. Their return was considered a great triumph by Augustus, and celebrated like a military victory. He took an ovation entering Rome on horseback and being honoured with a triumphal arch in the year 20 BC. This coin struck in Colonia Patricia (today Cordoba, Spain).
1 commentsberserker
augustus_RIC207.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AR denarius - struck 2 BC-ca. 13 AD85 viewsobv: CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE (laureate head right)
rev: AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, C L CAESARES below (Gaius & Lucius standing front, each with a hand resting on a round shield, a spear, & in field above, a lituus right & simpulum left ["b9"])
ref: RIC I 207, BMC 533, RSC 43
mint: Lugdunum
3.35gms, 18mm

This type was struck to celebrate Gaius and Lucius Caesars, the sons of Marcus Agrippa, as heirs to the imperial throne. Gaius became Princeps Iuventutis in 5 BC and Lucius in 2 BC. They died in 4 AD and 2 AD respectively, thus promoting Tiberius to heir apparent. An obligatory issue for collectors.
berserker
augustus RIC344-RRR.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AR denarius - struck by P. Licinius Stolo, moneyer (17 BC)83 viewsobv: AVGVSTVS TR POT (Augustus, laureate, wearing cloak and short tunic, on horseback riding right, holding patera in right hand - banker's mark)
rev: P STOLO III VIR (Salii or priest of Mars's cap (same than apex flaminis) between two studded oval shields (ancilia)).
ref: RIC I 344 (R3); BMCRE 76; RSC 439 (80frcs)
mint: Rome
3.53gms,18-19mm
Extremely rare

History: The Ludi Saeculares were spread over a period of three days (from May 31 to June 3), and Augustus celebrated them to inaugurate the beginning of a new age. On the reverse of this coin the ancilias (sacred shields) symbolised the music at festivals. The "jumping priests" or Salii marched to the Regia, where was the shrine of Mars, in which the ancilia (the sacred shield, and its 11 copies) of Mars were stored. The Salii wearing apex, taking the bronze Ancilia, and danced through the streets carrying poles with the shields mounted on them in their left hands. With their other hand, they banged the shields with a drumstick.
3 commentsberserker
Nero-Prieur-89.jpg
027. Nero.16 viewsTetradrachm, 63-64 AD, Antioch mint.
Obverse: ΝΕΡΩΝ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΣ / Laureate bust of Nero.
Reverse: ΕΤΟΥΣ ΒΙΡ . Ι / Eagle on thunderbolt, palm branch at right.
14.25 gm., 25 mm.
Prieur #89.

Dating this coin: BIP is the Greek way of writing the numeral 112 (B = 2; I = 10; P = 100) -- which is year 112 of the Caesarean Era of Antioch ( which started numbering from the Battle of Pharsalia, Aug. 9, 48 BC). The second I (after BIP) stands for the 10'th year of Nero's reign, which by today's reckoning is 63 - 64 AD.
Callimachus
didrachm.jpg
028/3 Didrachm/Quadrigatus 37 viewsAnonymous. AR Didrachm-Quadrigatus. Uncertain or Rome Mint c. 225-214 B.C. (6.26g, 20.9m, 9h). Obv: Laureate head of Janus. Rev: Jupiter, hurling Thunderbolt and holding scepter in Quadriga right driven by Victory. Roma in relief in linear frame. Craw. 28/3, Syd. 65, RSC 24. CNG276/320.

One of Rome’s pre-denarius silver coins issued before the Second Punic War, and the introduction of the denarius circa 214-211 B.C.

I wanted to trace the evolution of Roman coinage, so I couldn’t pass this one up when I saw it. More information on the type can be found here: andrewmccabe.ancients.info.

2 commentsLucas H
Karoly-Robert_(1307-1342_AD)_AR-Denar_U-369_C2-013_H-465_K-enthroned_MONETA-RE(G)IS-KARVLI_1327-AD_Q-001_5h_12,9mm_0,46g-s.jpg
029 Károly Róbert., (Charles Robert of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1307-1342 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-369, #01167 views029 Károly Róbert., (Charles Robert of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1307-1342 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-369, #01
avers: King enthroned, facing, holding sceptre and orb, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ MOnЄTA RЄIS KARVLI, Falcon with spread wings standing facing, in circle of dots, head right; border of dots. Without mint-mark.
exergue, mint mark: -/-//--, diameter: 12,9mm, weight: 0,46g, axis:5h,
mint: Hungary, ???, mint mark: No, date: 1327 A.D., ref: Unger-369, CNH-2-013, Huszár-465, Pohl-22,
This emission was referred to in contemporary sources as a denarius cum Aquila.
Q-001
quadrans
Karoly-Robert_(1307-1342_AD)_AR-Denar_U-369_C2-013_H-465_K-enthroned_MONETA-RE(G)IS-KARVLI_1327-AD_Q-002_7h_13,2mm_0,68g-s.jpg
029 Károly Róbert., (Charles Robert of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1307-1342 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-369, #02146 views029 Károly Róbert., (Charles Robert of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1307-1342 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-369, #01
avers: King enthroned, facing, holding sceptre and orb, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ MOnЄTA RЄIS KARVLI, Falcon with spread wings standing facing, in circle of dots, head right; border of dots. Without mint-mark.
exergue, mint mark: -/-//--, diameter: 13,2mm, weight: 0,68g, axis:7h,
mint: Hungary, ???, mint mark: No, date: 1327 A.D., ref: Unger-369, CNH-2-013, Huszár-465, Pohl-22,
This emission was referred to in contemporary sources as a denarius cum Aquila.
Q-002
quadrans
Galba-RIC-95.jpg
029. Galba.17 viewsDenarius, 68-69 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP SER GALBA CAESAR AVG / Laureate bust of Galba.
Reverse: DIVA AVGVSTA / Livia standing, holding patera and sceptre.
3.44 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #4, Sear #2102 var.

The DIVA AVGVSTA on the reverse of this coin is Livia. She was the second wife of Augustus, and the mother of Tiberius. She had a falling out with her son, and became the patroness of the young Galba. When she died, she left him a fortune in her will - certainly a reason to remember her on a coin several decades later.
Callimachus
V633.jpg
02a Domitian as Caesar RIC 79149 viewsAR Quinarius (Broken), 1.04g
Rome mint, 75 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 791 (C). BMC 158. RSC 634. BNC 136.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016

Quinarii were struck under Vespasian for Domitian Caesar from 73 onwards. This common piece dates to 75 when the largest quinarius issue of the reign was produced.

Broken, but enough of the major devices remain to identify it properly. I think I got the better half.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
Tiberius_RIC_I_4.jpg
03 01 Tiberius RIC 454 viewsTiberius 14-37 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum Mint, 15-16 A.D. (3.74g, 17.6mm, 6h). Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right. Rev: [TR POT X]VII. IMP [VII] in exergue, Tiberius, laur. And cloaked, stg. In slow Quadriga r., holding laurel branch and eagle tipped scepter. RIC I 4 (R2), BMC 7, RSC 48.

For an emperor with relatively long reign, Tiberius’ silver coinage was remarkably unvaried with the ubiquitous “tribute penny” making up the bulk of his denarii. This is a decent example of, perhaps, the second most common silver coin. Although the reverse legends are largely off the flan, the obverse has a decent portrait and legend.
2 commentsLucas H
03_Tiberius,_RIC_I_30.jpg
03 02 Tiberius RIC 30150 viewsTiberius. 14-37 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyon) Mint. 3.78 g., 19 mm. Obv: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right. Rev: PONTIF MAXIM, Livia as Pax, seated right, holding scepter and olive branch. Feet on footstool. Ornate chair legs. One line below throne. RIC I 30, RSC 16a.

The well known "tribute penny." When brought a coin as requested, Jesus asked, "Whose is this image and superscription?" When told it was Caesar, He said, ''Render therefore unto Caesar the things which are Caesar's and unto God the things that are God's" (Matthew 22:20-21). Since Tiberius was Caesar at the time, this denarius type is attributed by scholars as the "penny" referred to in the Bible.
8 commentsLucas H
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 920102 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
03-Alex-Babylon-P2619.jpg
03. Alexander the Great.132 viewsTetradrachm, ca 325 - 323 BC, "Babylon" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. M and a bee at left, monogram under throne.
17.12 gm., 26 mm.
P. #3619; M. #696.

Martin J. Price assigns this coin to the mint at "Babylon," but he says (p. 456 -57) it is possible that coins of "group two" may have been minted at Susa or Ecbatana.
3 commentsCallimachus
OTA484-6.png
03. Celtic AE tetradrachm - KAPOSTALER type - c.100-75/50 BC673 viewsobv: Degraded head of Zeus right
rev: Horseman left, with large crest above head; crescent to left
ref: Pink 484-495; Göbl OTA 484-495; LaTour 9807; Kostial 766-797; Dembski 1413-1427;
mint: Szalacska oppidum
8.64gms, 22mm

Description of this type see my East celtic coins topic at the Classical Numismatics
berserker
Philip-II-RIC-224.jpg
03. Philip II as Augustus.12 viewsAntoninianus, 248 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP PHILIPPVS AVG / Radiate bust of Philip II.
Reverse: SAECVLARES AVGG / Goat (or Moose/European Elk) walking; III in exergue.
4.23 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #224; Sear #9275.

The animal on the reverse of this coin is called a goat in most coin catalogues. However, a recent theory suggests that it is a European Elk (same as the American Moose) which is depicted rather than a goat.
Callimachus
RI 030g img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 481 var.73 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– VICTORIA NAVALIS S - C, Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath and palm
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 70-71
References:– Cohen -. RIC II 481 var (Not listed in RIC with this bust and legend combination)

Additional comments coutesy of Curtis Clay:-

“A coin like yours, from the same obv. die, was in M&M's Voirol Sale of 1968, lot 385, ex Hall Sale, 1950, lot 1203. A second spec. from that same die pair is publ. by Giard, Lyon, 42/1a, pl. XLIII, Coll. Gricourt.
BMC 809 pl. 38.7 has obv. CAESAR not CAES and a broader portrait on shorter neck.
Paris doesn't have this type on a COS III dup. of Vesp. at Lugdunum, but their As, Paris 812 pl. LXVII, is from the same rev. die as your dupondius!
Obviously quite a scarce item, and an attractive specimen!”
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Lodovicus-I__U-432-c_C2-89A_H-547_MOnETA-LODOVICI_REGIS-hVnGARIE_Q-001_15mm_0,51g-s.jpg
030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432c, #0178 views030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432c, #01
avers: ✠ mOnЄTA LODOVICI, Saracen's head left, no internal (line) border, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ RЄGIS hVnGARIЄ, Patriarchal cross with dots each corner, amongst emission-marks (--P), border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: -/P//-- This mint mark was struck 1373-1375 by Peter Chimle (by Pohl), diameter: 14,0mm, weight: 0,52g, axis: h,
mint: Hungary, Unknown mint (by Pohl), date: 1373-1382A.D.(by Pohl), ref: Unger-432c, CNH-2-089A, Huszár-547, Pohl-89-08,
Q-001
quadrans
Lodovicus-I__U-432-c_C2-89A_H-547_MOnETA-LODOVICI_REGIS-hVnGARIE_Q-002_14mm_0,54g-s.jpg
030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432c, #0267 views030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432c, #02
avers: ✠ mOnЄTA LODOVICI, Saracen's head left, no internal (line) border, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ RЄGIS hVnGARIЄ, Patriarchal cross with dots each corner, amongst emission-marks (--P), border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: -/P//-- This mint mark was struck 1373-1375 by Peter Chimle (by Pohl), diameter: 14,0mm, weight: 0,54g, axis: h,
mint: Hungary, Unknown mint (by Pohl), date: 1373-1382A.D.(by Pohl), ref: Unger-432c, CNH-2-089A, Huszár-547, Pohl-89-08,
Q-002
quadrans
Lodovicus-I__U-432-c-var_C2-89A_H-547_MOnETA-LODOVICI_REGIS-hVnGARIE_Q-001_13,5mm_0,42g-s.jpg
030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432c.var., #01117 views030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Denarius, U-432-c.-var., #01
avers: ✠ mOnЄTA LODOVICI, Saracen's head left, no internal (line) border, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ RЄGIS hVnGARIЄ, Patriarchal cross with dots each corner, amongst emission-marks (P--), border of dots.
exergue, mint mark: P/-//-- This mint mark was struck by Peter Chimle (by Pohl), diameter: 13,5mm, weight: 0,42g, axis: h,
mint: Hungary, Unknown mint (by Pohl), date: 1373-1375 A.D.(by Pohl), ref: Unger-432-c-var., CNH-2-089A, Huszár-547, Pohl-89-08-var,
Q-001
quadrans
Lodovicus-I_(1342-1382AD)_U-437-c_C2-88_H-546_MONETA-LODOVICI_DEI-GRATIA-R-VGARIE_C_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Obulus, U-437(?)(Not in this Mint mark !!!)., #0199 views030 Lajos I. -Nagy Lajos-, (Lodovicus I. (the great) of Anjou, Angevin)., King of Hungary, (1342-1382 A.D.) AR-Obulus, U-437(?)(Not in this Mint mark !!!)., #01
avers: ✠ MONЄTA LODOVICI, Patriarchal cross with dots each corner, border of dots.
reverse: ✠ DЄI GRACIA R VGARIЄ (AR ligate, Legend variation), Hungarian-Anjou shield, border of dots. "C" above the shield (New mintmark !!!).
exergue, mint mark: -/-//--, diameter: 11,0mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Hungary, , date: 1372 A.D.(by Pohl), ref: Unger-437(?)(Not in)., CNH-2-088, Huszár-546, Pohl-88-(?)(Not in),
Q-001
quadrans
Probus_ant_gr.jpg
031 - Probus (276-282 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 877 (unlisted var.)105 viewsObv. IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust left, wearing imperial mantle and holding eagle tipped sceptre.
Rev. VIRTVS PROBI AVG, emperor galloping right, spearing enemy whose shield lies beneath horse.
Minted in Serdica (KA delta in exe), 4th officina, 4th emission, c 277 AD or 280-81 AD.
22-23 mm in diam, 3,38g
Bust type H.

Not listed with this bust type in RIC.

Ex. Martin Griffiths Probus collection.
5 commentspierre_p77
Maximian_unlist.jpg
032 - Maximian (286-305 AD), Antoninianus - RIC 404, 407 (hybrid unlisted in RIC)44 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMIANUS AVG, radiate bust left in imperial mantle, holding globe.
Rev: PAX AVGG, Minerva standing left, leaning on shield, holding olive branch and spear.
Minted in Lugdunum (C in exe, * in left field) 292-294 AD.

This coin is a hybrid between RIC 404 (as above but without the * and C(?)) and 407 (with * and C) and not listed in RIC. However Bastien lists this coin (vol 7, nr 488) with five examples cited. Not a very pretty coin but somehow interesting anyway as it turned out. Thanks to Jochen and maridvnvm of the FORUM´s classical numismatics discussion board for the info.

[Sold]
2 commentspierre_p77
Hadrian_AR-Den_HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS_COS-III_RIC-II-202_119-122-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5mm_3,31g-s.jpg
032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 202, Rome, COS-III, Crescent moon and seven stars, 336 views032 Hadrianus (117-138 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC II 202, Rome, COS-III, Crescent moon and seven stars,
This coin was used like a pendant,
avers:- HADRIANVS-AVGVSTVS, Bare head right.
revers:- COS-III, Crescent moon and seven stars.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5 mm, weight: 3,31g, axis: 6h,
mint: , date: A.D., ref: RIC-II-202,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Aurelian_389.jpg
033 - Aurelian (270-275 AD), antoninianus - RIC 389 (var.)22 viewsObv: IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate cuirassed bust right.
Rev: RESTITVT ORBIS, woman standing right, presenting wreath to emperor standing left, holding scepter.
Minted in Tripolis (* over . in field, KA in exe.), emission 3-5, 274 AD

Unlisted in RIC with this mintmark.

RIC V:1 nr 389(var.), Estiot 10827-9
pierre_p77
RI_033d_img.jpg
033 - Titus Denarius - RIC II new 728 viewsObv:– IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P VIIII IMP XIIII - COS VII, Capricorn left on globe
Minted in Rome. After 1 July, 79, Group II
Reference:– RIC II new 7

Notes from an example sold by H. J. Berk: "Rare without P P in reverse legend. Titus must have accepted the title Pater Patriae quite soon after the beginning of his ninth tribunician year on 1 July 79 AD. Cohen 280 cites this coin 'with or without P P' as being in the Paris collection, but in fact Paris lacks the denarius of this type without P P, though it possesses the corresponding aureus (Paris-3). Cohen must have seen the denarius without P P in another collection. We had another specimen in our Catalogue 125, 2002, 374; none in Reka Devnia hoard."
maridvnvm
032_Albert_(1437-1439_AD),_AR-Den,_H-592,_C2-135B,_U-461_h_,_P-127-7,_m_ALBERTI_R_VnGARIE,_K-R_over_cross,_1440_AD,_Q-001,_1h,_14-14,5mm,_0,47g-s.jpg
033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.h., P-127-07, #0155 views033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.h., P-127-07, #01
avers: ✠ m•ALBЄRTI•R•VnGARIЄ••, Patriarchal Cross, K-R over +, in a circle, line border.
reverse: Four-part shield (Hungarian stripes in the middle, Czech lion, Austrian band, Moravian eagle around), the border of dots,
exergue, mint mark: K/R over +//-- , diameter: 14,0-14,5mm, weight: 0,47g, axis: 1h,
mint: Hungary, Körmöcbánya (Kremnitz, today Slovakia: Kremnica, Konrad Rudel by Pohl), date:1439 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-592, CNH-2-135B, Unger-461.h., Pohl-127-07,
Q-001
This coin was struck under the Interregnum I. (1439-1440 A.D.) with the name of Abert!
2 commentsquadrans
033_Albert_(1437-1439_AD),_AR-Den,_H-592,_C2-135B,_U-461_q_,_P-127-9,_m_ALBERTI_R_VnGARIE,_C-Lily,_1440_AD,_Q-001,_7h,_13,5-14,5mm,_0,39g-s~0.jpg
033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.q., P-127-09, #0166 views033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.q., P-127-09, #01
avers: ✠ m•ALBЄRTI•R•VnGARIЄ••, Patriarchal Cross, C-⚜, in a circle, line border.
reverse: Four-part shield (Hungarian stripes in the middle, Czech lion, Austrian band, Moravian eagle around), the border of dots,
exergue, mint mark: C/⚜//-- , diameter: 13,5-14,5mm, weight: 0,39g, axis: 7h,
mint: Hungary, Kassa (today Slovakia: Kosice, City coin by Pohl), date:1440 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-592, CNH-2-135B, Unger-461.q., Pohl-127-09,
Q-001
This coin was struck under the Interregnum I. (1439-1440 A.D.) with the name of Abert!
1 commentsquadrans
033_Albert_(1437-1439_AD),_AR-Den,_H-592,_C2-135B,_U-461_s_,_P-127-11,_m_ALBERTI_R_VnGARIE,_K-P,_1440_AD,_Q-001,_4h,_13,5-14,0mm,_0,48g-s.jpg
033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.s., P-127-11, #0167 views033 Albert., King of Hungary, (1437-1439 A.D.) AR Denarius, H-592, C2-135B, U-461.s., P-127-11, #01
avers: ✠ m•ALBЄRTI•R•VnGARIЄ••, Patriarchal Cross, K-P, in a circle, line border.
reverse: Four-part shield (Hungarian stripes in the middle, Czech lion, Austrian band, Moravian eagle around), the border of dots,
exergue, mint mark: K/P//-- , diameter: 13,5-14,0mm, weight: 0,48g, axis: 4h,
mint: Hungary, Körmöcbánya (Kremnitz, today Slovakia: Kremnica, Konrad Polner by Pohl), date:1440 A.D. (by Pohl), ref: Huszár-592, CNH-2-135B, Unger-461.s., Pohl-127-11,
Q-001
This coin was struck under the Interregnum I. (1439-1440 A.D.) with the name of Abert!
1 commentsquadrans
RI_035l_img.jpg
035 - Domitian Ae AS - RIC II 385a79 viewsObv:- IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII CENS PER P P, Laureate head right
Rev:- COS XIIII LVD SAEC FEC - SC, Domitian , togate,standing left, sacrificing from patera over garlanded altar, on the other side of which are two flute players facing the emperor, one of which is partly obscured by the altar, hexastyle temple of Jupiter Capitolinus in background.

This variety, not distinguished in the catalogues, where the second musician's lower body is obscured by the large altar. see BMC pl. 79.3, with obv. portrait left, is from the same rev. die. On other dies, apparently the normal variety, the altar is narrower and you see the second musician's legs descending to the ground.

Celebrates the Secular Games
4 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_035h_img.jpg
035 - Domitian Ae AS - RIC II new 64742 viewsObv:- IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER P P, Laureate head right
Rev:- FIDEI PVBLICAE, Fides standing right with corn ears and plate of fruit
Minted in Rome. A.D. 88-89.
Reference:- BMCRE P. 390 *. RIC II old 370. RIC II new 647 (Rated R). Cohen 115.

This example seems to read FIDES but the lettering is small and likely reads FIDEI.

29.06 mm. 13.72 gms.
maridvnvm
Vespasian-RIC-15.jpg
035. Vespasian.39 viewsDenarius, 69-71 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG / Laureate bust of Vespasian.
Reverse: IVDAEA / Jewish woman captive seated on ground, mourning; trophy behind her.
3.44 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #15; Sear #2296.

When the Jewish Revolt began in 66 AD, Nero appointed Vespasian supreme commander in the East to put down the uprising. In 69 AD Vespasian made his own bid for the throne and left his son Titus to finish up the Jewish War -- which he did in 70 AD by capturing Jerusalem and destroying the Temple. This victory of Vespasian and Titus was the major military event of the reign, and numerous coins were issued to commemorate it.
2 commentsCallimachus
Faustina_sen_Ag-Den_DIVA-AVG-FAVSTINA_DEDICATIO-AEDIS_RIC-III-AP-388_RSC-191_Rome_141-AD_Q-001_7h_19-17mm_3,03g-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0388 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, DEDICATIO AEDIS, Hexastyle temple,88 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0388 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, DEDICATIO AEDIS, Hexastyle temple,
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-AVG-FAVSTINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- DEDICATIO-AEDIS, Frontal view of a hexastyle temple, Victories in corners.
exerg: , diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 3,03g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 141-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-388 (Antoninus Pius)p- , RSC-191, BMCRE-306 (Pius),
Q-001
This coin type records the dedication of the
temple of Divus Antoninus and Diva Faustina. The
dedication ceremonies took place in 142 AD, and
construction was completed in 150 AD. The temple
still stands today, overlooking the Forum.
quadrans
saloninaant.jpg
036. Salonina.81 viewsBI Antoninianus. Eastern mint.

Obv. Draped bust right, on crescent SALONINA AVG

Rev. Ivno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet IVNO REGINA.

RIC13s. aUNC. Simply superb, perfect style, fabric and strike on perfectly round flan with full silvering. Very rare in this condition.

4 commentsLordBest
Marc-Aurelius_AR-Den_IMP-M-ANTONINVS-AVG-TR-P-XXV_COS-III_RIC-233_C-133_Rome-170-71-AD_Q-001_axis-h_19mm_3,45g-s.jpg
037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0233var., Rome, AR-Denarius, COS III, Roma seated left,107 views037b Marcus Aurelius (139-161 A.D. as Caesar, 161-180 A.D. as Augustus), RIC III 0233var., Rome, AR-Denarius, COS III, Roma seated left,
This avers legend variation not mentioned by RIC !!!,
avers:- IMP-M-ANTONINVS-AVG-T-RP-XXV, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS III, Roma seated left on cuirass, holding Victory and spear.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,45g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date:170-171 A.D., ref: RIC-III-233var, p-231, RSC-133var, Sear-4887var,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
dom as caesar pegasus.jpg
03a Domitian as Caesar RIC 921166 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 921 (C2). BMC 193. RSC 47. BNC 169.
Acquired from Nilus Coins, March 2007.

The reverse copies an Augustan one and might possibly allude to Domitian's foray into poetry. (BMCRE xl)

Unlike most of the crude Domitian portraits of the time from the Rome mint, this one has a great beauty and nobility to it that few of his contemporary denarii strive to achieve. Was it a minor slight that most of the better die engravers were used for Vespasian and Titus' coins? Thankfully one slipped through to create a wonderful portrait of the young caesar.

Despite some minor flaws, this is a wonderful coin that I'm happy to add to my collection.
2 commentsVespasian70
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
V932.jpg
03c Domitian as Caesar RIC 93260 viewsÆ As, 10.65g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 932 (C). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2019.

Spes, the goddess of hope, is seen here as an 'heir apparent' type. She is represented on Roman coins as a young girl, reminiscent of earlier Greek statures depicting Elpis. H. Mattingly in BMCRE II says 'the flower held by Spes is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward'. Spes occurs quite commonly throughout the Flavian coinage and is frequently paired up with the young Domitian Caesar, likely expressing a hope or expectation for future dynastic success. It is very Ironic that Spes is often associated with Domitian Caesar on the coinage, considering he would later be the family member most responsible for the dynasty's downfall in 96. Surprisingly, this common Spes type is not in the BM.

The obverse features a quintessential Flavian portrait - unflattering hook nose with full and heavy facial features. Pleasant dark green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
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04 Constantius II71 viewsD N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, A behind/ FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO soldier spearing falling enemy horseman, hair straight up, reaching backwards, LXXII to left, S between AQS in ex.
RIC Aquileia 193


"The reverse mark LXXII refers to the a standard of 72 coins to the pound. The gold solidus and silver light miliarense were both also struck at this c. 4.5 gram standard."
Randygeki(h2)
domitian as caesar rider on horse.jpg
04 Domitian as Caesar RIC 957159 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V; Horseman, helmeted, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, on horse prancing r., with r. hand thrown upwards and back
RIC 957 (C2). BMC 234. RSC 49. BNC 207.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, September 2007.

Issued at a time when Domitian was aspiring to an Eastern command against the Alani, Mattingly attributes this type to that cause: The rider is Mars calling Rome to the field of battle.

Other theories suggest the rider is either Domitian or a soldier. Curtis Clay has also proposed the idea that this type may well be of a commemorative nature, since much of Vespasian's coinage are copies of past popular types.

A lovely coin in hand, the portrait was the reason this one found a home in my collection.
1 commentsVespasian70
gaius_RIC_I_14.jpg
04 Gaius (Caligula) RIC I 014120 viewsGaius (Caligula). 37-41 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint, 37-38 A.D. (3.55g, 19.1m, 5h). Obv: [C CAE]SAR AVG GERM P M TR POT, laureate head right. Rev: AGRIPPINA MAT C CAES AVG GERM, Agrippina, bust, draped right, hair falling in queue down her neck. RIC I 14 (R), RSC 2. Ex personal collection Steve McBride.

Agrippina “the elder” was Gaius’ mother. Falsely accused of wrongdoing by Tiberius, Agrippina was exiled and died of starvation, whether self-imposed or at the orders of Tiberius, is not clear. Upon ascending the throne, Gaius, recovered his mother’s ashes, and restored her name. This coin commemorates the veneration of his mother.
10 commentsLucas H
Caligula_denarius.jpg
04 Gaius (Caligula) RIC I 2222 viewsGaius (Caligula) 37-41 A.D. AR Denarius. Lugdunum (Lyons) Mint 37 AD. (3.3g, 18.5mm, 2h). Obv: C CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR POT COS, bare head right. Rev: anepigraphic, Augustus, radiate head right between two stars. RIC I 2, BMC 4, Sear 1808. Ex personal collection Steve McBride/Incitatus Coins.

Son of Germanicus, Gaius was adopted by Tiberius and was proclaimed Emperor on Tiberius’ death. His reign, marked by cruelty, was ended when he was assassinated by the Praetorian Guard. There is some question when the Imperial Mint was moved from Lugdunum to Rome, but the majority view holds at least Gaius’ early issues were still from Lugdunum.

With more than moderate wear and damage, this coin still has an almost complete obverse legend, and is a decent weight. It was very difficult for me to track down a denarius of Gaius.
2 commentsLucas H
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04-07 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)23 viewsAE 14 mm 3.4 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas con pelo largo viendo a derecha. Monograma en arameo al frente derecha "H" (Het).
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellos monograma en arameo "H" (Het).

Meshore indicates het right on the obverse. Schmitt-Korte, NC 1990, indicates the het right is not present but also identifies a new varitey (Schmitt-Korte 43) with het left on the obverse. The het right on the obverse is clear on this specimen. (Forum Catalog)

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: B.M.C. Vol.28 #30 Pag 9 - SNG ANS 6.1432 - Meshorer #70 - Sear GICTV #5701 Pag.560
mdelvalle
foto6.jpg
04-09 - Aretas IV (9 A.C. - 40 D.C.)26 viewsAE 12 x 13 mm 1.2 gr.

Anv: Cabeza laureada de Aretas con pelo largo viendo a derecha. Sin Monograma al frente derecha.
Rev: Dos cornucopias cruzadas. Entre ellos monograma en arameo "H" (Het).

Meshore indicates het right on the obverse. Schmitt-Korte, NC 1990, indicates the het right is not present and also identifies a new varitey (Schmitt-Korte 43) with het left on the obverse. We have had all three types - het left, het right and none at all. The het right on the obverse is not present on this specimen. (Forum catalog)

Ceca: Petra

Referencias: Sear GICTV #5701 Pag.560 - B.M.C. Vol.28 #30 Pag 9 - Meshorer #70 var.
mdelvalle
valerian1.jpg
040. Valerian, 254-260AD. BI Antoninianus.40 viewsBI Antoninianus. Antioch mint.
Obv. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS AVG

Rev. Emperors sacrificing at altar. PIETAS AVGG

RSC 153, RIC 284.

Extremely nice condition for this emperor. EF.
LordBest
FaustaCONSSalus.JPG
043. Fausta, wife of Constantine I. AE Follis, Constantinople mint.81 viewsAE Follis. Constantinople mint, late 326AD.

Obv.Bust of Fausta right FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG

Rev. Fausta standing holding Constantine II and Constantius II SALVS REIPVBLICAE.

RIC VII 12; LRBC 976. gVF

A very rare and interesting coin. The mint at Constantinople was only in operation for a couple of months when Fausta was executed, coins of her and Crispus from this mint are very hard to come by.
1 commentsLordBest
RI_044e_img.jpg
044 - Hadrian denarius - RIC -37 viewsObv:- IMP CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANVS AVG, Laureate, heroically nude bust right, drapery on left shoulder, baldric strap around back of neck and across chest
Rev:-P M TR P COS II, FORT RED in exergue, Fortuna Redux, veiled, seated left, rudder in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 118
Reference:– RIC - (cf. RIC 41, but unlisted with this bust type)

Ex Harlan Berk. Ex- BeastCoins Hadrian collection.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_044x_img.jpg
044 - Hadrian Denarius - RIC -49 viewsObv:- HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right with slight drapery on far shoulder (Legend reversed as AVGVSTVS HADRIANVS)
Rev:- COS III, Victory standing right holding wreath and palm (Legend reversed as III COS)
Minted in Eastern Mint. A.D. 129-131
Reference:– BMCRE -. Strack -. RIC -. RSC -. Apparently unpublished.

Strack knew just three Eastern denarii with this transposed obv. legend, including one with a Minerva standing rev. type in the Trau coll., Strack's pl. XVIII, *18. Curtis Clay has another example with this obverse with the Minerva type. This would appear to be a fifth specimen from this obverse die but with a new reverse type.

Additional information on this coin from Curtis Clay:-
"Interesting. Apparently a new rev. type on the Eastern denarii, of uncertain origin.

That's admittedly a fairly standard Victory advancing right rev. type, but I find no such type on any denarius of Hadrian from the mint of Rome, nor on his Asian cistophori.

A similar type does occur on Hadrian's silver quinarii, and on a rather scarce denarius of Trajan struck in 112 but these seem unlikely sources for a type on Hadrian's Eastern denarii.

Moreover on the Roman coins Victory grasps the stem of the palm over her shoulder in her left fist, thumb upwards, whereas on the Eastern denarius she palms the stem, holding it with her downwards pointing thumb while apparently keeping her fingers extended. I imagine that this detail may go back to the source copied, since it seems unlikely that the engraver changed it on his own whim."
maridvnvm
Trajan-RIC-147.jpg
045. Trajan.15 viewsDenarius, 103-111 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC PM TR P / Laureate bust of Trajan.
Reverse: COS V PP SPQR OPTIMO PRINC / Trophy of arms: two shield, one round, one oval; at base: two swords, two javelins, and two shields.
3.28 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #147.

The conquest of Dacia, the most important military enterprise of Trajan's reign, occupied two campaigns: 101 - 102 AD, and 105 - 106 AD. This coin commemorates the victories of the second of these campaigns.
Callimachus
RI_048y_img.jpg
048 - Antoninus Pius Denarius - RIC 04030 viewsObv: IMP T AEL CAES HADR ANTONINVS, bare head right
Rev: AVG PIVS P M TR P COS II P P, Modius with corn ears.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 139
Reference:– BMC 79 (4 corn ears and poppy, L. A. Lawrence). RIC III 40 (corn ears and poppy). RSC 103.

This coin doesn't show the poppy as per the BMC/RIC examples.
maridvnvm
RI_048m_img.jpg
048 - Antoninus Pius, Denarius - RIC 01123 viewsObv: IMP T AEL CAES HADRI ANTONINVS, Bare head left
Rev: AVG PIVS P M TR P COS DES II, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus & cornucopia
Minted in Rome. A.D. 138
Reference:– RIC 11. BMC 17 Note. Strack 16. Cohen 76 (citing M. Hamburger - 6F)

RIC rates it as scarce citing the Cohen example. Not present in BMC also citing Cohen. RSC citing Cohen and Strack. This would all seem to confirm that it is quite a scarce coin, depending on what other examples have come to light since.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
049_Septimius_Severus_(193-211_A_D_),_AE-17_AVK_A-CEVHPOC_NIKOPOLITON-PROC-I_Nicopolis_Ad_Istrum_HHJ-08_14_48_---p-138_Crescent_and_star_Q-001_2h_17-18,3mm_3,83g-s~0.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HHJ-8.14.48.10, (2015), AE-17, NIKOΠOΛITΩN-ΠPOC-I, Crescent with star, 112 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HHJ-8.14.48.10, (2015), AE-17, NIKOΠOΛITΩN-ΠPOC-I, Crescent with star,
avers:- AV-K-Λ-CEVHPOC, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. (Not in HHJ 2012, this bust !)
revers:- NIKOΠOΛITΩN-ΠPOC-I, Crescent with star.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,3mm, weight: 3,83g, axes: 2h,
mint: Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: HHJ (2015) 8.14.48.10,
Q-001
quadrans
V958.jpg
04a Domitian as Caesar RIC 958143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V; Horseman, helmeted, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, on horse prancing r., with r. hand thrown upwards and back
RIC 958 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, September 2015.

Second known specimen of this type with left facing portrait. A die match with the unique RIC plate coin. Left facing portraits of Domitian are quite rare and highly prized by collectors.

In fine style with honest wear. The portrait is outstanding!
8 commentsDavid Atherton
Claudius_RIC_I_58.jpg
05 Claudius RIC I 58249 viewsClaudius 41-54 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 50-51 A.D. (3.58g, 18.4mm, 8h). Obv: TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P X PP IMP XVIII, laureate head right. Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE, Pax-Nemesis advancing right, holding winged caduceus pointed at snake. RIC I 58, RSC 66a. Ex CNG 258, Lot: 348.

Claudius was a capable, yet unlikely emperor. Shunned as an idiot by his family due to a limp and embarrassing stutter. After Caligula's murder the Praetorian Guard proclaimed him emperor. He governed well and conquered the troublesome island of Britain. He was poisoned by his second wife, mother of Nero. It was very difficult for me to find a denarius of Claudius, and I love this reverse.
8 commentsLucas H
Claudius_RIC_I_64.jpg
05 Claudius RIC I 6465 viewsClaudius. 41-54 A.D. Rome Mint 51-2 A.D. (3.32g, 18.4m, 0h). Obv: [TI CLA]VD CAESAR AVG PM TR P XI IMP P P C[OS V], laureate head right. Rev: SPQR/PP/OBCS in three lines in oak wreath. RIC I 64. RSC 96.

Claudius was put on the throne by the Praetorian Guard after the murder of Caligula, and was eventually murdered by Nero’s mother. This is a worn coin and common reverse during Claudius’ reign, but I wanted to obtain it as denarii of Claudius seem few and far between, second only to Gaius in the 12 Caesar series it seems.
4 commentsLucas H
ciibh1.jpg
05 Constantius II65 viewsBGN353 - Constantius II (A.D. 337-361), Pre-Magnentian Revolt, AE Centenionalis, 21mm, 5.14g., Arles mint, first officina, A.D. 348-350, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of the Emperor right, A behind head, rev., FEL TEMP REPARATIO, PARL in exergue, helmeted soldier spearing fallen horseman, A in field, (RIC 119/121-22; Bridgnorth Report #79), very fine. RIC Arles 118

Ex Bridgnorth Hoard, Shropshire, England, buried circa A.D. 355, discovered 2007.

"On October 10th, 2007 a metal detectorist discovered a large scattered hoard of late Roman coins that had been disturbed by deep plowing in a potato field near Bridgnorth, Shropshire. His subsequent actions are praised in the UK government 2007 Portable Antiquities and Treasure Annual Report, where local finds officer Peter Reavill states: “The finder is to be congratulated on the careful plotting and speedy reporting of this hoard as it enabled the excavation to take place and vital depositional information recorded. In turn, this minimised the impact to the landowner and his farming activity.” The majority of hoards that come to light are found outside of planned archaeological excavations, the original owner having selected a secluded spot to conceal his or her wealth away from human habitation, leading to loss of information on the archaeological context of the hoard. In this instance, swift action and close cooperation by the finder and the local Finds Liaison Officer led to an excavation of the findspot. The results of which showed that the hoard had been contained in a large pottery vessel (broken by the plow), most probably previously used as a cooking pot as evidenced by burns marks on the outer edges. The pot had been buried in a U-shaped gulley or ditch that formed part of an otherwise unknown late Roman site.

The hoard consisted of 2892 coins, ranging in date from a Reform Antoninianus of Probus to post Magnentian issues of Constantius II up to A.D. 355. The majority of the hoard was issues of Magnentius and Decentius (75%), followed by pre-Magnentian issues of Constantius II and Constans (18%) and closing with post Magnentian issues of Constantius II and Gallus (7%)."
Better Photo
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
domitian as caesar wolf and twins.JPG
05 Domitian as Caesar RIC 961149 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V; She-wolf and twins l. : in ex., boat
RIC 961 (C2). BMC 240. RSC 51. BNC 208.
Ex eBay, February 2007.

The first instance of the she-wolf and twins reverse as a type on Roman Imperial coins. Domitian Caesar, unlike Titus Caesar, used different reverse types than his father Vespasian. The she-wolf and twins is unique to Domitan's coinage. One wonders how much leverage Domitian had for choosing his own reverse designs.

A wonderful coin with good metal and a pleasing portrait. The picture does not reflect this very well however.

2 commentsVespasian70
OTA484-3.png
05. Celtic AE tetradrachm - KAPOSTALER type - c.100-75/50 BC475 viewsobv: Degraded head of Zeus right
rev: Horseman left, with large crest above head; crescent to left
ref: Pink 484-495; Göbl OTA 484-495; LaTour 9807; Kostial 766-797; Dembski 1413-1427;
mint: Szalacska oppidum
8.12gms, 22mm

Description of this type see my East celtic coins topic at the Classical Numismatics
berserker
05-Constantine-Ale-12.jpg
05. Constantine: Alexandria.49 viewsAE 4, 337 - 341, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG / Veiled bust of Constantine.
Reverse: Constantine riding to heaven in quadriga; Hand of God reaches down to him.
Mint mark: ALB
1.05 gm., 15 mm.
RIC #12 var.; LRBC #1454 var.; Sear #17490var.

That this coin is from the mint in Alexandria is beyond doubt. However the mint mark without SM does not seem to be listed in RIC or LRBC.
2 commentsCallimachus
Elagabalus-RIC-27.jpg
05. Elagabalus year III.9 viewsDenarius, 220 AD, Branch mint.
Obverse: IMP ANTONINVS AVG / Laureate bust of Elagabalus.
Reverse: PM TR P III COS III P P / Jupiter seated, holding Victory and sceptre, eagle at his feet.
3.41 gm., 17.5 mm.
RIC #27.

This coin shows signs of being double struck. The obverse legend is doubled on the left side of the coin. On the reverse, the last part of the legend is doubled and way out of alignment.
Callimachus
05-Philip-III.jpg
05. Philip III.83 viewsTetradrachm, 323 - 317 BC, "Babylon" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. M at left, ΛΥ between the rungs of the throne.
16.99 gm., 27 mm.
P. #P181; M. #99; S. #6749.

Martin J. Price assigns this coin to the mint at "Babylon," but he says (p. 455) that coins with the M-ΛΥ monograms may have to be assigned to Susa after further study.
Callimachus
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-BRIT_LIBERAL-AVG-VIIII_RIC-IV-I-302rev-p-258_Rome-213-17-AD_Limes_Q-001_0h_17,5mm_2,40g-s.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 302, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERAL AVG VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, (but base metal, "limes" ?),132 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 302, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERAL AVG VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-BRIT (!!!), Laureate head right. (This legend Not in RIC!!)
revers:- LIBERAL-AVG-VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and cornucopia.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,40g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-302, p-258, (but base metal, "limes" ?), C-139,
Q-001
quadrans
Caracalla_AR-Den_ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-BRIT_LIBERAL-AVG-VIIII_RIC-IV-I-302rev-p-258_Rome-213-17-AD_Limes_Q-001_0h_17,5mm_2,40g-s~0.jpg
051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 302, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERAL AVG VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, (but base metal, "limes" ?),120 views051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), RIC IV-I 302, Rome, AR-Denarius, LIBERAL AVG VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, (but base metal, "limes" ?),
avers:- ANTONINVS-PIVS-AVG-BRIT (!!!), Laureate head right. (This legend Not in RIC!!)
revers:- LIBERAL-AVG-VIIII, Liberalitas standing left, holding coin counter and cornucopia.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,40g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 213-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-302, p-258, (but base metal, "limes" ?), C-139,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_(198_-_217_A_D_)_AE-27_THRACE-ANCHIALUS__-___-_-dot-AV-K-M-AYP-ANT_NINOC_OY__IANON-A_XIA___N_Q-001_0h_27mm_11,66g-s.jpg
051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Thrace, Anchialus, Varbanov II 336-337 but not this bust in Varbanov (Engl), AE-27, OYΛΠIANON AΓXIAΛΕΩN, Eagle standing on thunderbolt, 66 views051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Thrace, Anchialus, Varbanov II 336-337 but not this bust in Varbanov (Engl), AE-27, OYΛΠIANON AΓXIAΛΕΩN, Eagle standing on thunderbolt, head left,
avers:- AV-K-M-AYP-ANTΩNINOC, Laureate head right.
revers:- OYΛΠIANON-AΓXIAΛΕΩN, Eagle standing on thunderbolt, head left, wings spread, and wreath in beak.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 11,66g, axis: 0h,
mint: Trache, Anchialus, date: A.D., ref: Varbanov II 336-337,but not this bust, p-38,
Q-001
quadrans
051p_Caracalla_(196-198_Cae,198-217_A_D__Aug),_Thrace,_Pautalia,_Varbanov_II__5129v_(EEa)_,_AE-29,_Q-001_7h_29-29,5mm_15,67g-s.jpg
051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Thrace, Pautalia, Varbanov II. 5129var., AE-29, OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Hermes standing half left, #190 views051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Thrace, Pautalia, Varbanov II. 5129var., AE-29, OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Hermes standing half left, #1
avers:- AYT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC, Laureate head right (EEa).
revers:- OYΛΠIAC ΠAYTAΛIAC, Hermes standing half left, holding purse and caduceus, with chlamys in left hand.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 29,0-29,5mm, weight: 15,67g, axis:7h,
mint: Thrace, Pautalia, date: A.D., ref: Varbanov(Engl.,2005) II. 5129var., (Not in this legend and bust variation, EEa).
Q-001
quadrans
RI 053a img.jpg
053 - Lucius Verus Denarius - Unlisted with this bust type62 viewsObv:– IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– CONCORD AVG TR P / COS II, Concordia seated left holding patera
Unlisted.
Notes - with many thanks to Curtis Clay for his help with the following information on this coin.
This is a somewhat scarce type for Verus on denarii. The RD hoard lists 9 specimens without TR P in the reverse legend and 6 specimens like this with TR P. Of the 6 RD coins with TR P, 4 showed head bare, 1 head bare with fold of cloak on shoulders, 1 bust draped with head bare. The last two were new variants, the first had been reported in Rivista ital. di num. 1907. New specimens of this coin can easily show new bust variants and this is one of them.
BMC lists ten different right-facing portrait types for Verus on aurei and denarii of 161, plus three left-facing types!
maridvnvm
Bar-Kochba-Hendin-734.jpg
053. 2'nd Jewish (bar Kokhba) Revolt.16 viewsZuz (denarius), attributed to Year 3 (134-35 AD).
Obverse: (Shim'on) / Bunch of Grapes.
Reverse: (For the Freedom of Jerusalem) / Lyre with three strings.
3.19 gm., 18.5 mm.
Mildenberg #205.19 (this coin); Hendin #734.

This coin likely started out as a denarius of one of the Roman emperors between Vespasian and Hadrian. Many coins of the Second Jewish Revolt show traces of the earlier Roman coin. This coin is no exception, and traces of the previous coin can be seen on the obverse in and around the bunch of grapes.

The bunch of grapes on the obverse is an ancient symbol of blessing and fertility. As such it occasionally appears on ancient coins of other areas besides this series. Given the messianic nature of the Bar Kokhba revolt, the bunch of grapes takes on added significance because in Jewish prophetic literature, grapes (and the vine or vineyard) are often symbolic of the restoration of Israel, or even symbolic of Israel itself.

The lyre on the reverse is associated with temple worship, as are trumpets, which are also found on coins of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. King David is mentioned as playing a lyre, and there are numerous Biblical references to praising the Lord with the lyre and trumpets. (The word "kinnor," sometimes translated as "harp," is really a type of lyre.) Even today the lyre is an important Jewish symbol and the state of Israel has chosen to portray it on the half New Israeli Sheqel coin.
Callimachus
054_Macrinus_(217-218_A_D_),AE-27-Pentassarion__AV_K_OPPE_CEV-_Hera_and_Peacock_Markianopolis-Moesia_Inf_HrJ_(2014)-not_in_217-18-AD-Q-001_6h_26,7-27,7mm_12,24ga-s~0.jpg
054p Macrinus (217-218 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova-Jekov 06.24.03.???, AE-27, Pentassarion, Hera and peacock,138 views054p Macrinus (217-218 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova-Jekov 06.24.03.???, AE-27, Pentassarion, Hera and peacock,
avers:- AV K OΠΠ CEVH MAKPEINOC • M OΠEΛ ANTΩNEINOC KAI •, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Macrinus facing bare-headed draped and cuirassed bust of Diadumenian.
revers:- VΠ ΠONTIANOV MAPKIA NOΠOΛEITΩN•, Hera in long garment and mantle, standing left, holding patera in outstretched right hand and
resting with raised left hand on scepter, Peacock at foot in left down, E in right field.
exe: -/-//E, diameter: 26,7-27,7mm, weight:12,24g, axis: 6h,
mint: Moesia, Markianopolis, date: 217-218 A.D., ref: HrJ (2014) Not in this variation, Varbanov (2005) Not in -,
Q-001
quadrans
ImitationBlack.jpg
056/3 Ancient imitation21 viewsAnonymous. Ae Semis imitation. Probably first century BC. Obv: Laureate head of Saturn r.; behind, S. Rev: Prow r.; above, S and below, ROMA.
Crawford 56/3

Style and shape is not the best on this coin. However, as an ancient imitation it does have historical value.
Paddy
56_4_PanoramaBlack1.jpg
056/4 Subgroup 85 & 86A AE Triens60 viewsAnonymous. Ae Triens. Apulia. 212-208 BC. (9.08 g, 23.72 g) Obv: Helmeted head of Minerva right, four pellets above. Rev: ROMA, prow right, four pellets below.

Originally defined as Crawford 56/4, this type of Triens have been assigned to subgroup 85 & 86A. This is a Q or H triens, that is missing the Q or H. Andrew McCabe gives the subgroup the number F1 which has the following characteristics:

"Mint: Apulia. Second Punic war. Related to RRC 85 H, and RRC 86 anchor and Q. Obverses are in high relief. The general style, for examples Janus, or Hercules’ truncation, or the regular reverse prow, is like RRC 86 anchor and Q. Reverses of Sextans and Quadrans have either regular, or Luceria style, prows with a club in an elevated fighting platform. On regular reverses, the top and central keel lines join half way across prow. Flans are thin and broad akin to late issues of Luceria. All denominations As through Sextans are known."

"The regular reverse prow is tall (height/width) with a fighting platform and deck structure elevated more than usual, and there is always a line extending either side of the deck structure. The keel-lines are also distinctive, with the middle of the three lines always converging with the top line half way across the prow... These specific design features – especially the middle keel line converging with the upper line half way across the prow – are identical with and typical of the RRC 86A Q series from Apulia58... The obverses of all denominations are in high relief, and show high quality engraving."

"So a close geographic and timing link between the Anchor Q, H, L, L-T, CA and P coins can be posited. These coins are certainly a second Punic war issue from Apulia. It remains open for discussion which city minted these group F1 coins, presumably alongside the RRC 85 and RRC 86 issues."

This is one out of six specimens: "F1 Triens: 6 coins, mean 9.4 grams, heaviest 10.5 grams".

All quotes are from the work of Andrew McCabe.

Link to thread at Forvm Ancient Coins: http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=90604.0

On this topic at Andrew McCabe's homepage: http://andrewmccabe.ancients.info/RRC056.html

I would strongly recommend anyone who wants to learn more about Roman Republican coins to give Andrew McCabe's homepage a visit.


1 commentsPaddy
Faustina-Sr-RIC-394a.jpg
057. Faustina Senior.16 viewsDenarius, after 141 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: DIVA AVG FAVSTINA / Bust of Faustina.
Reverse: PIETAS AVG / Pietas veiled, standing, dropping incense on altar, and holding a box.
3.59 gm., 18.5 mm.
RIC #394a; Sear #4598.

Faustina died early on in the reign of her husband. Most of her coinage is from the extensive memorial coinage issued in the years after her death. The portrait on this particular coin is exceptionally elegant and dignified.

Visible on the reverse (lower right edge) of this coin is an inclusion of copper that did not get melted and mixed with the silver when the planchet was made. That this coin is probably not a fouree is evidenced by the fact that it weighs a bit more than other denarii of the period.
Callimachus
V976.jpg
05a Domitian as Caesar RIC 97684 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CERES AVGVST; Ceres stg. l., with corn ears and poppy and sceptre
RIC 976 (C). BMC 323. RSC 30. BNC 285.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2014.

Vespasian and Titus normally shared reverse types, but rarely with Domitian. Unusually this Ceres type was struck for all three. It possibly was part of an agrarian themed series Vespasian issued towards the end of his reign. These later issues of Vespasian have neat small portrait heads.

The coin features a pleasant looking Domitian with his trademark protruding upper lip, struck on a large flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
faustina-sr_den_veiled-bust-peacock_2_82gr_feb2012a.JPG
06 - Faustina I - 02 - AR Denarius - Peacock 'CONSECRATIO' - NGC Choice VF56 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Faustina Senior (138 - 141), Wife of Emperor Antoninus Pius (AD 138 - 161).
Silver Denarius, Struck at the Rome Mint by the Emperor Antoninus Pius to consecrate and commemorate his wife after her death.

(All Titles in Latin)
obv: DIVA FAUSTINA - Veiled and Draped bust facing right.
rev: CONSECRATIO - Peacock facing right, head left, standing on scepter with knobs on both ends.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

*Note how the two head feathers on the top of the Peacock's head seperate the 'R' and the 'A' in " CONSECR ATIO ' on the reverse.
***Less common type with Veiled bust obverse rather than her usual bust with hair wrapped on the top of her head, like on my other example of this type with the same reverse design and titles, and the same obverse titles.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Certified "Choice Very Fine" by NGC Ancients.
Strike: 4/5
Surface: 4/5
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
>^..^< CLICK PHOTO FOR FULLSIZE IMAGE >^..^
5 commentsrexesq
IMG_4595.jpg
06 Constantius Gallus13 viewsConstantius Gallus
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
RE-PARATIO
no beard, Phrygian helmet, reaching (headwear not in RIC for this issue)
CONSH / · in centre
Constantinople 122
Randygeki(h2)
Domitian_as_caesar_legionary_standard.jpg
06 Domitian as Caesar RIC-1081113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Clasped hands holding legionary eagle set on prow
RIC 1081 (C2). BMC 269. RSC 393. BNC 240.
Acquired from Beast Coins, April 2007.


The reverse represents 'Concordia Militum', harmony of the troops. Domitian quite possibly was plotting against Titus after Vespasian's death by appealing to the troops with a double donative. This coin might provide numismatic evidence of such. Suetonius states: " On the death of his father he hesitated for some time whether to offer a double largess to the soldiers, and he never had any compunction about saying that he had been left a partner in the imperial power, but that the will had been tampered with."

A nice coin with average wear and an interesting history behind it.


Vespasian70
Nero_RIC_I_15.jpg
06 Nero RIC I 1539 viewsNero. 54-68 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 54 A.D. Oct.-Dec.. (3.43g, 19.1mm, 9h) . Obv: NERO CAESAR AVG IMP, bare head right. Rev: PONTIF MAX TR P IIII PP around oak-wreath enclosing EX SC. RIC I 15 (R2).

A worn but scarce pre-reform denarius from early in Nero’s reign. Despite the wear, the weight of this specimen is quite nice. The EX SC with the oak wreath could allude to the Senate’s awarding of the corona civica to Nero. This specimen also has a very unusual die axis for imperial coinage of the Roman mint from this time.
1 commentsLucas H
06-Alex-Amphipolis-P124.jpg
06. "Amphipolis": Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.35 viewsTetradrachm, ca 320 - 317 BC, "Amphipolis" mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress.
Reverse: Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΟΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Zeus sitting, holding his attendant eagle and sceptre. Branch of laurel at left, Π under throne.
17.33 gm., 25 mm.
P. #124; M. #560.

Alexander appointed Antipater regent in Macedon during his absence. After Alexander's death in 323 BC, Antipater continued ruling as regent until his own death in 319 BC. Most coins issued in Macedon during this time continued to be in the name of Alexander.
Callimachus
OTA484-5.png
06. Celtic AE tetradrachm - KAPOSTALER type - c.100-75/50 BC446 viewsobv: Degraded head of Zeus right
rev: Horseman left, with large crest above head; crescent to left
ref: Pink 484-495; Göbl OTA 484-495; LaTour 9807; Kostial 766-797; Dembski 1413-1427;
mint: Szalacska oppidum
8.35gms, 21mm

Description of this type see my East celtic coins topic at the Classical Numismatics
berserker
06-Constantine-Nic-57.jpg
06. Constantine: Nicomedia.57 viewsAE 4, 347 - 348, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG / Veiled bust of Constantine.
Reverse: VN MR / Constantine standing, veiled.
Mint mark: SMNI .
.96 gm., 14 mm.
RIC #57; LRBC #1155; Sear #17469.

VN MR stands for Venerabilis Memoria (Revered Memory).
RIC dates this coin 347 - 348, which was the 10'th anniversary of Constantine's death. LRBC, however, dates it to 341 - 346.

Callimachus
6-Gordian-III-Caes-RIC-1.jpg
06. Gordian III as Caesar / RIC 1.39 viewsDenarius, April - July 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: M ANT GORDIANVS CAES / Bust of Gordian.
Reverse: PIETAS AVGG / Sacrificial implements: lituus, knife, vase, simpulum, and sprinkler.
2.64 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #1 (Balbinus & Pupienus); Sear #8557.

This denarius was minted near the beginning of the 99 day reign of Balbinus and Pupienus. Denarii of Gordian III as Caesar are quite rare, so it is likely they were minted only to commemorate the occasion of his proclamation as Caesar. When the antoninianus was re-introduced about half way through the reign, none were issued in Gordian's name.

The AVGG in reverse legend refers to Balbinus and Pupienus.
2 commentsCallimachus
L-Verus-RIC-462.jpg
063. Lucius Verus.9 viewsDenarius, Dec. 161 - Dec. 162 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG / Bust of Lucius Verus.
Reverse: PROV DEOR TR P II COS II / Providentia standing, holding globe and cornucopiae.
3.24 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #482.

Providentia Deorum holding a globe and cornucopiae is intended to mark the power and wisdom of the Emperor (see Stevenson, p. 659). This emperor was not noted for these particular traits.
Callimachus
RI_064mg_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus Ae As - RIC 764A43 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG P M TR P XII, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- To left, Bacchus standing right, holding cup and thyrsos, a panther at his feet; to right, Hercules standing left, holding club and lion's skin; on cippus between them, COS / III / LVD / SAEC / FEC , in exergue, S C.
Minted in Rome in A.D. 204 to celebrate the Seacular games with Septimus' hometown gods Liber and Hercules as patrons of his games.
Reference:- RIC IV, Part 1, No. 764A (Rated R2)

A rough example but a rare type.

Curtis Clay's die catalogue includes ten specimens of this coin, all from the same obverse die, nine of them from the same reverse die of this coin, one from a second reverse die.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
GI_064m_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus Ar Drachm - Syd. -61 viewsObv:– AY KAI L CEPT CEOVHPOC, Laureate head right
Rev:– MHTPO KAICAPIACW, Male figure (Argaios(?)), laureate, draped seated left on Mount Argaeus, holding branch
Minted in Caesarea, Cappadocia. Year 17, ETIZ in exe. A.D. 209

Apparently unlisted in Sydenham, cf. Syd. #403, which is a matching didrachm of this type.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 064cz img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus AS - RIC unlisted39 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP II, Laureate head right
Rev:– SAL AV[G TR P II] COS II S--C, Salus sanding left, holding sceptre and patera over alter
Minted in Rome. Early A.D. 194
Reference(s) – Cohen -. RIC - (see below)

The following information provided courtesy of Mr. Curtis Clay.
A specimen of this coin is apparently misreported in RIC, p. 182, note *. It's a rare coin, only two such included in Curtis' unpublished 1972 die study of early Severan bronze coins.
Curtis knows the same rev. type muled with both dupondius and As obv. dies of 193 (IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG). It's not impossible that a sestertius with the same type might turn up someday!
Cohen 640 exactly describes this type, though omitting the IMP II in obverse legend, and calling the coin a sestertius.
maridvnvm
RI_064fh_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus Barbarous Fouree denarius25 viewsObv:- SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:- MINERV SANCT, Minerva standing left holding shield and inverted spear
Fouree with barbarous style using a reverse type not used in Rome for this emperor
maridvnvm
RI_064ng_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - O3 - RIC -44 viewsObv:– IMP CA L SEP SEV - PER AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONI EVENTVS, Fides (Bonus Eventus - RIC) standing left, basket of fruit in right, two heads of grain in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 – A.D. 195
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC - (369 var.). RSC 68 var.

A nice example from this unusual obverse legend variant.

Ex- Forum Ancient Coins
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064uc_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - O3 - RIC -8 viewsObv:– IMP CA L SEP SEV - PER AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONA SPES, Spes standing holding flower and lifting skirt
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 – A.D. 195
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -

A nice example from this unusual obverse legend variant

1.80g, 16.87mm, 0o
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - O4 - RIC -28 viewsObv:–IMP CA L SE SEV PER AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:– MART-I V-ICTORI, Mars advancing right carrying spear and trophy.
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 – A.D. 195
Reference:– cf. BMCRE 378 note. RIC 406b. RSC 324e. (all citing Cohen 324 - Kholl)

Another example of this odd set of obverse legends.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - O9 - RIC -40 viewsObv:– IMP CA L SE SEV PER AG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT REDVC, Fortuna standing left, holding long scepter & cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194
References:– RIC -. BMCRE -. RSC -.

3.17g, 18.54mm, 0o

This is an unusual legend with several spelling errors. It is an obverse die match to a coin in the Doug Smith collection (different reverse type). A reverse die match exists in the British Museum (different obverse die).
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - O9 - RIC -85 viewsObv:– IMP CA L SE SEV PER AG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev– LIBER AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194-195
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC - RSC -.

Another reverse type for this unusual obverse die bringing my total to three different reverses.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -15 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVN R-EDVC, Fortuna (Hilaritas) seated left holding long palm and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, 194 A.D.
References:– RIC - would be in the region of RIC 383 but this reverse type with Hilaritas seated not known
Die axis 0 degrees. Weight 3.18g.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -20 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– CERER FRVG, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears in right hand, torch in left.
Minted in Emesa, Late A.D. 193
References:– RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -.

3.01g, 19.06mm, 0o

This coin is an obverse and reverse die match to a coin on the Barry Murphy Severan site
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -40 viewsObv:– IMP CE L SEP SEV PERT AVG CO, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONI EVENTVC, Fides (sometimes referred to as Bonus Eventus) standing left holding basket of fruit and corn ears.
Minted in Emesa, Late A.D. 193 or Early A.D. 194
References:– RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -.

2.47g, 18.29mm, 0o

This obverse legend variety makes it into RIC and BMCRE as a noted legend mixed in with the COS I series of A.D. 193 in association with a MANET AVG and a MONETAE AVG both cited from RD, where one example of each is listed. The reverse legend BONI EVENTVC is noted in RD as a var. of Cohen 68, which is listed with the COS II obverse legend with a single example listed and is listed in RIC from the RD hoards as a known variant of RIC 369.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 064fi img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -82 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VII-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– ARAB ADIABENIC, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm (R of ARAB corrected over B)
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196-197
Ref:– Cohen -, BMCRE -, RIC -.

The reverse refers to victory over Niger. To hide the fact that this was a civil war, it is phrased as victory over Arabs and Adiabenians, who aided Niger's cause.

RIC IV 466 has the same reverse legend, listed as IMP VII but as Curtis points out this legend is probably a mis-reading of IMP VIII probably cause by the last I being after the bust as on this example. RIC 466 however is Victory with wreath and trophy whereas this type is Victory with wreath and palm. RIC and BMCRE cite Cohen 52 (5 Francs) for this coin.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -50 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P IIII IMP II COS II, Mars standing right, resting on spear and shield
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– BMCRE -, RIC -, RSC -. RIN (Rivista Italiana di Nvmismatica Vol. XCVI (1994/1995)

2.72g. 17.78mm. 0o

Additional information from Curtis Clay:-
"Die match to example in British Museum, found at the site of a Roman villa in Kent, GB, in 1952. The same obv. die also occurs with the types MONETA AVG and LEG III IT AVG TR P COS.
Bickford-Smith recorded three other specimens, of which I also have plaster casts: his own coll. (probably now in BM), Klosterneuburg, and U.S. private collection. On these the rev. legend apparently ends COS rather than COS II.
This type was clearly struck in 194, when Septimius was TR P II and IMP III or IIII, so TR P IIII IMP II in the rev. legend is an error, the origin of which is obvious: the type is a rote copy of the identical type and legend on denarii of Lucius Verus of 164, Cohen 228-9. The titles apply to Lucius in 164, not Septimius in 194!"
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -42 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV P-ERET AVG IMP I-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT REDVC, Fortuna (Pax?) seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 194
References:– RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -

This is the first occurrence of the Fortuna (Pax) type that I have seen for Laodicea.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -21 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I, Laureate head right
Rev:– VICTOR IVST AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 193
References:– RIC Page 139 (-) (this reverse legend not listed for COS I)

2.22g, 18.88mm, 0o
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -26 views064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 386 var
Obv:–IMP CAE L SEP SE . V PERT AVG COS I-I, Laureate head right (Longhead portrait)
Rev:– FORTVNA REDVCI, Fortuna (pax?), with modius on head, seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 195
Reference:- RIC - (cf. RIC 386 which has a different reverse legend for this type FORTVN REDVC)
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -27 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– MINER VICT .., Minerva standing left, holding spear in right hand, left hand on hip
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-5
References:– RIC - (this reverse depiction of Minerva is not listed for Emesa). RSC 327e

Reverse die match to CNG 61 Lot 1915.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -34 viewsObv:- L SEPT SEV PE-RE AVG IMP II, laureate head right
Rev:- SAECVL FELIC, Crescent and seven stars..
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:- BMCRE -. RIC IV -. RSC -.

The PERE is the first time that I have seen this variety of the obverse legend, which is normally seen as PERT, PERTE or PERET.
This reverse type not previously noted from this mint in any of the published references.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -33 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG II C, laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVAE(sic) REDVCI, Moneta/Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

2.99g, 17.53mm, 180o

Additional comments from Curtis Clay - "This combination of the FORTVNAE REDVCI legend with a type of Aequitas is reported on a denarius of Pescennius Niger by Cohen 25 (in a private collection), but does not seem to have been attested before for either Septimius Severus or Julia Domna, at least I can't find any such coin in BMC or RSC."
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- MART VICTOR, Mars, in military attire, standing left, holding Victory and spear
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194 - 195.
References :- BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

This reverse type not listed for Septimius Severus.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -39 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P IIII IMP II COS, Mars standing right, resting on spear and shield
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– BMCRE -, RIC -, RSC -. cf. RIN (Rivista Italiana di Nvmismatica Vol. XCVI (1994/1995)

2.59g. 18.71mm. 0o

Additional information courtesy of Curtis Clay:-

"Bickford-Smith recorded three other specimens, of which I also have plaster casts: his own coll. (probably now in BM), Klosterneuburg, and U.S. private collection. On these the rev. legend apparently ends COS rather than COS II.
This type was clearly struck in 194, when Septimius was TR P II and IMP III or IIII, so TR P IIII IMP II in the rev. legend is an error, the origin of which is obvious: the type is a rote copy of the identical type and legend on denarii of Lucius Verus of 164, Cohen 228-9. The titles apply to Lucius in 164, not Septimius in 194!"
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -28 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– CERER FRVG II COS, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears in right hand, torch in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193
Ref:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

3.67g, 17.37mm, 180o

4 specimens known, Budapest, Barry Murphy (2 spec.) and this example, all from the same die pair. The same reverse die muled with an obverse legend ending II C, BM ex Bickford-Smith
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -31 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERTE AVG IMP II, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT R AVG, Fortuna (Hilaritas), standing front, head left, holding long palm and cornucopiae
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

This reverse legend not listed for Septimius Severus at Laodicea.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -17 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVNE (sic) RDVCI (sic), Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194
References:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

This reverse type not listed in any major references for this issue.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -71 viewsObv:- L - SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP VIII, laureate head right
Rev:- LIERTA (sic.) AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left.
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 195 - 196
Reference:– BMC -. RIC -. RSC -.

This error not noted in the major references.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -31 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P IIII IMP II COS, Mars standing right, resting on spear and shield
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– BMCRE -, RIC -, RSC -. cf. RIN (Rivista Italiana di Nvmismatica Vol. XCVI (1994/1995)

Additional information courtesy of Curtis Clay:-

"Bickford-Smith recorded three other specimens, of which I also have plaster casts: his own coll. (probably now in BM), Klosterneuburg, and U.S. private collection. On these the rev. legend apparently ends COS rather than COS II.
This type was clearly struck in 194, when Septimius was TR P II and IMP III or IIII, so TR P IIII IMP II in the rev. legend is an error, the origin of which is obvious: the type is a rote copy of the identical type and legend on denarii of Lucius Verus of 164, Cohen 228-9. The titles apply to Lucius in 164, not Septimius in 194!"
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -72 viewsObv:- L SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP - II, laureate head right
Rev:- LIB-ER AVG, Liberalitas seated left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left.
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:- BMCRE -. RIC IV -. RSC -.

Liberalitas seated not listed for this issue in any of the major references.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -23 viewsObv:- L - SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP VIII, laureate head right
Rev:- MARTI VICT, Mars advancing right carrying spear and trophy.
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 195 - 196
Reference:– BMC -. RIC -. RSC -.

This type with this reverse legend not listed in any of the major references for this issue.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -31 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG II CO, Laureate head right
Rev:- LEG VIII AVO (sic) ? CR P COS, Legionary eagle between two standards
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194
References:– Cohen -. BMC -. RIC -. RSC -.

This is the only known obverse die with this legend variant.
Possibly the third specimen known. The other examples are Oxford ex Walker, JNG 1978/1979, pl. 9, 4 which are both from the same die pair.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -17 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:- VENER AVG, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm
Eastern COS II mint (RIC - Emesa). A.D. 193 - 195
References:- BMCRE -. RSC - RIC -.

This reverse type should come with VICTOR AVG or VICT AVG. VENER VICT and variations (VICTR, VICTOR etc.) turn up on Venus types of Domna, which we so rarely seen muled with obverses of Septimius Severus but I have never seen this odd mixing.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERET AVG IMP I-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT RDEVC, Fortuna (Hilaritas), standing front, head left, holding long palm and cornucopiae
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 194
References:– RIC -

This brittle coin was broken and being held together by the 2x2 it was held in. I didn't know this until I freed it and dozens of little flakes of coin poured out. They were too small for me to make any attempt at reconstruction.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -14 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SE-V PERT AVG II CO, laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna (pax?), with modius on head, seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194
References:- RIC -. RSC -. BMCRE -.

The first example of this reverse type to turn up with this obverse variety.
maridvnvm
RI_064qj_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -16 viewsObv:- L SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP - II, laureate head right
Rev:- LIB-ER AVG, Liberalitas seated left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left.
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:- BMCRE -. RIC IV -. RSC -.

Liberalitas seated not listed for this issue in any of the major references.
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RI_064fi_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -16 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VII-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– ARAB ADIABENIC, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm (R of ARAB corrected over B)
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196-197
Ref:– Cohen -, BMCRE -, RIC -.

The reverse refers to victory over Niger. To hide the fact that this was a civil war, it is phrased as victory over Arabs and Adiabenians, who aided Niger's cause.

RIC IV 466 has the same reverse legend, listed as IMP VII but as Curtis points out this legend is probably a mis-reading of IMP VIII probably cause by the last I being after the bust as on this example. RIC 466 however is Victory with wreath and trophy whereas this type is Victory with wreath and palm. RIC and BMCRE cite Cohen 52 (5 Francs) for this coin.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064kn_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -4 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, laureate head right
Rev:– FORTV [RE]DVC, Fortuna seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194-195
Reference(s) – BMCRE - (This reverse type not listed for Laodicea, I also have an IMP II example). RIC -. RSC -
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RI_064ec_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -6 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV P-ERET AVG IMP I-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT REDVC, Fortuna (Pax?) seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 194
References:– RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -

This is the first occurrence of the Fortuna (Pax) type that I have seen for Laodicea
maridvnvm
RI_064fj_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -9 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SE - V PEPT(sic) AVG COS - (!!), Laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna (Pax?) seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 193
References:– RIC -
Die axis 180 degrees. Weight 3.00g

Whilst the legend seems to end COS the intention would have been for COS II. This is an earlier bust type typically seen with COS I and with the long legend on the reverse is certainly tied to the earlier types but other examples of this die show two small strokes beneath the bust which could be taken to the II.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -6 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SE - V PEPT(sic) AVG COS - !!, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVNAE REDVCI, Fortuna (Pax?) seated left holding branch and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 193
References:– RIC -
Die axis 180 degrees. Weight 3.60g

Whilst the legend seems to end COS the intention would have been for COS II. This is an earlier bust type typically seen with COS I and with the long legend on the reverse is certainly tied to the earlier types but this example showw two small strokes beneath the bust which could be taken to the II.
maridvnvm
RI 064ft img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (466 corr?)48 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VII-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– ARAB ADIABENIC, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196-197
Ref:– Cohen -, BMCRE -, RIC -.

The reverse refers to victory over Niger. To hide the fact that this was a civil war, it is phrased as victory over Arabs and Adiabenians, who aided Niger's cause.

RIC IV 466 has the same reverse legend, listed as IMP VII but as Curtis points out this legend is probably a mis-reading of IMP VIII probably cause by the last I being after the bust as on this example. RIC 466 however is Victory with wreath and trophy whereas this type is Victory with wreath and palm. RIC and BMCRE cite Cohen 52 (5 Francs) for this coin.
maridvnvm
RI_132ft_img~0.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (466 corr?)9 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VII-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– ARAB ADIABENIC, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196-197
Ref:– Cohen -, BMCRE -, RIC -.

The reverse refers to victory over Niger. To hide the fact that this was a civil war, it is phrased as victory over Arabs and Adiabenians, who aided Niger's cause.

RIC IV 466 has the same reverse legend, listed as IMP VII but as Curtis points out this legend is probably a mis-reading of IMP VIII probably cause by the last I being after the bust as on this example. RIC 466 however is Victory with wreath and trophy whereas this type is Victory with wreath and palm. RIC and BMCRE cite Cohen 52 (5 Francs) for this coin.
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (466 corr?)6 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– ARAB ADIABENIC, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196-197
Reference(s) – C 52 var. BMCRE p 110 var. RIC 466 corr.(RIC 466 (R) is IMP VII but should really be IMP VIII but the reverse type for 466 is incorrectly described as wreath and trophy whereas this type is wreath and palm)
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)29 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064td_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)11 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
maridvnvm
RI_064sv_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - error21 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I - I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FELICITAS TEMPOR, grain ear between crossed cornucopiae / VICTOR SEVER AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left.
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194-195
Reference:– BMCRE 347 note/ BMCRE 399. RIC 347A/RIC 428. RSC 141b/RSC 749

The reverse of this coin has been struck with two diffrerent reverse dies during the strking process. The coin was originally struck, not removed and then struck again with a different reverse die.
maridvnvm
RI_064sv_reva.JPG
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - error - rev 115 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I - I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FELICITAS TEMPOR, grain ear between crossed cornucopiae / VICTOR SEVER AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 194-195
Reference:– BMCRE 347 note/ BMCRE 399. RIC 347A/RIC 428. RSC 141b/RSC 749

The reverse of this coin has been struck with two diffrerent reverse dies during the strking process. The coin was originally struck, not removed and then struck again with a different reverse die.
maridvnvm
RI_064sv_revb.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - error - rev 215 viewsdenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I - I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FELICITAS TEMPOR, grain ear between crossed cornucopiae / VICTOR SEVER AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 194-195
Reference:– BMCRE 347 note/ BMCRE 399. RIC 347A/RIC 428. RSC 141b/RSC 749

The reverse of this coin has been struck with two diffrerent reverse dies during the strking process. The coin was originally struck, not removed and then struck again with a different reverse die
maridvnvm
RI_064ok_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -. cf RIC 411a19 viewsObv:–IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:– MONTE (sic) AVG, Moneta standing left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 – A.D. 195
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -. This error not noted. cf. BMC 380ff. RIC 411a. RSC 330 .

This error not noted in any of the major references.
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RI 064dt img~0.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01344 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XIII GEM / TR P COS, Legionary eagle between two standards.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– Cohen 269. BMCRE 17, RIC 13 (Scarce)

Legion XIII Gemina was stationed at Apulum in Dacia. It is important for collectors to distinguish carefully issues of this scarce legion from the common Legion XIIII Gemina Marti Victrix. Legion XIII coins never have 'MV' following 'LEG XIII GEM' while Legion XIIII coins always have 'MV' following 'LEG XIIII GEM'.
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 01734 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, laureate head right
Rev:– LEG XXX VLP, TR P COS in exergue, legionary eagle between two standards
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– BMCRE 25. RIC 17 (Rated Rare). RSC 278. No examples in RD so this would tend to agree with the scarcity rating given by RIC.

Legio XXX Ulpia Victrix
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RI_064ss_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus Denarius - RIC 01920 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP-T SEV PERT AVG. Laureate head right
Rev:– SAEC FRVGIF COS, Saeculum Frugiferum., radiate, standing left, holding winged caduceus and trident
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC IV 19 (Rated Rare); RSC 622.

About 8 examples from 2 reverse dies known to Curtis Clay. This example from a different reverse die to the British Museum example.
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RI 064do img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 086 var.23 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP VIII, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev:– P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 196
Reference(s) – BMCRE 146 var., RIC IV 86 var. RSC 419 var. (unpublished variety in any of these references with this bust type)
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 086 var. 35 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PE-RT AVG IMP VIII, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev:– P M TR P IIII COS II P P, Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 196
Reference(s) – BMCRE 146 var., RIC IV 86 var. RSC 419 var. (unpublished variety in any of these references with this bust type)
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 114 var. (Barbarous imitation)28 viewsObv:– L SEP SEV PERT AVG IM C P X, Laureate head right
Rev:– MART[I V]IC, Mars standing front, head right, resting right hand on shield set on low base, spear in right hand.
RIC 114 var
This coin looks like it is a barbarous imitation of RIC 114. Whilst the style is quite pleasing the legends are quite severely blundered.

Ex. Forvm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 34425 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– AEQVITAS II, Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– RIC 344 (Rare), BMCRE 319, RSC 18

3.12g. 17.70mm. 0o

I have other examples. This one is off-centre and not all the legends or devices are visible. I can forgive all these because I love this Alexandrian portrait.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 362 var.18 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– VICTOR IVST AVS (sic), Victory walking left, holding wreath in right hand, palm in left .
Minted in Emesa, Late A.D. 193
References:– RIC 362 var, RSC 738 var, BMCRE 388 var. All list VICTOR IVST AVG.

3.26g, 18.83mm, 0o

This coin is an obverse and reverse die match to a coin on the Doug Smith Severan site.
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 36430 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONA SP[ES], Spes standing holding flower and lifting skirt.
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194
References:– RIC 364, RCV88 1748, RCV02 6266, RSC 58
Die axis 0 degrees. Weight 2.61g

We can see in this example where the celator became short of space and had to squeeze in the "II" at the end of the obverse legend
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 37212 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, Laureate head right
Rev:– FELICIT TEMPO, grain ear between crossed cornucopiae.
Minted in eastern COS II mint (Emesa ?). A.D. 194-195
Reference:- Cohen 142. BMCRE 347 note. RIC IV 372 (Rated S). RSC 142.

On the face of it this coin is simply RIC IV 372 though RIC notes that Cohen likely has SEPT in error. RIC and BMCRE cite Cohen 142 for this variant (TEMPO instead of the usual TEMPOR). Cohen 142 reads FELICIT TEMPOR or TEMPO. It would appear that RIC and BMCRE could not find other examples of the TEMPO type other than Cohen when mentioning this variation.
maridvnvm
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064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 377 var17 views064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 377 var
Obv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS I-I, Laureate head right
Rev:– FORTV-N REDVS, Fortuna with modius on head, standing left holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194
References:– RIC 377 var (unlisted with this reverse legend error)
Die axis 0 degrees. Weight 3.32g.
maridvnvm