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Image search results - "Soldiers"
DenTiVeturiobis.jpg
AR Denarius - TI. VETVRIVS - 137 BC. Gens Veturia - Mint of Rome
Obv.: Helmeted bust of Mars right, X and TI. VE (VE in monogram) behind
Rev.: Youth kneeling holding pig, between two soldiers; ROMA above
Gs. 3,6 mm. 18,3
Crawf. 234/1, Sear RCV 111
Some dies of this coin have a crude style.
Maxentius
DenLTiturioSabRatto.jpg
Denarius - 89 BC - Mint of Rome
L. TITVRIVS SABINVS - Gens Tituria
Obv.: Head of Titus Tatius right; SABIN behind, palm before
Rev.: Two Roman soldiers, each carrying a woman; L. TITVRI in exergue.
Gs. 4 mm. 17x18,9
Cr344/1b, Sear RCV 249, Grueber 2325.



Maxentius
10239q00.jpg
Bronze AE 3, RIC 88, VF, 2.24g, 18.4mm, 180o, Antioch mint, 330 - 335 A.D.; obverse FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers, each holding spear and shield on ground, flanking two standards, SMANH in exareich
Twosoldiers.jpg
DN CONSTANTINVS PF AVG

New photo of one of my first coins. From an uncleaned lot.

I never did get around to attributing it!
Jay GT4
bsiszzz.jpg
Siscia
RIC VIII 99, B Constans, AE4. CONSTAN-S PF AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them, chi-rho on banner. Mintmark: BSIS dot in crescent. RIC VIII Siscia 99.
Castvlo
Constantine_I,_soldiers__standards,_Antioch,_330-335_AD~0.JPG
Antonivs Protti
Constans,_soldiers___standard,_Antioch,_346-348_AD.JPG
Antonivs Protti
Constans,_soldiers__standards,_346-348_AD~0.JPG
Antonivs Protti
2014-051-1_ProbusAdventusAvg_Shield.jpg
Shield detail showing Emperor on horseback right surrounded by soldiers carrying shields.gordian_guy
conricx.jpg
Constantine I "The Great" 306-337 CE Constantine I, AE 3, 16 mm, 2.2 g. RIC VII 350
Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette- diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them, dot on banners.
Mintmark R wreath P. Rome mint
NORMAN K
con336s.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII Rome 336Constantine II, AE follis, 18mm, 2.3 g. Rome.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing, heads facing each other with two standards between them and each holds a spear and hand resting on a shield.
Mintmark RBS, Rome. 337-340 CE issue
NORMAN K
constantiusii91e.jpg
Constantius II, RIC 91E sisciaConstantius II AE 3
Obverse: CONSTANTI-VS PF AVG, rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears in one hand and resting the other hand on shield with one standard between them.
episilon SIS crescent, Siscia mint, 16.75 mm., 1.9 g.
NORMAN K
_arles_RIC_VII_347_2.jpg
73 Constantius II, Arles RIC VII 342v (added to wildwinds)Constantius II
AE18, 2.2g, Arles. 330-348 AD.

FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields, standing left and right of two standards with thin poles and small badges. Star between standards. Mintmark SCONST.

RIC VII Arles 347v. Sear (2014) 17676 EF, irregular flan

Note: Coin unique due to star placement. Added to Wildwinds in May 2011
Sosius
constans141.jpg
Constans, RIC VIII 141 HeracleaConstans, AE 3, 333-336 CE.
Obverse: FLI CONSTANS NOB CAES, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust left.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers facing each other holding spears and shields with two standards between them.
SMHE in ex. Heraclea mint, 17.7mm, 2.4 g.
NORMAN K
lfc.jpg
Constans, RIC VIII 27 HeracleaRare left facing Constans as Augustus
Obverse: CONSTANS PF AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust left.
Reverse: GLORIA EXER CITVS, two soldiers standing facing each other and holding a spear in one hand and resting the other hand on shield withone standard between them.
SMHE in ex. Heraclea mint. 16.15 mm., 2.2 g.
NORMAN K
constantine261.jpg
Constantine I AE3, RIC VII 261 Siscia 306-337 CE Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, Rosette diademed bust right, draped and cuirassed.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two Soldiers standing to the front, their heads turned inward at standard, both holding a spear and leaning on shield.
Exe: ASIS (star) Siscia mint: 335-336 = RIC VII, 261 17.1 mm., 1.5 g.
NORMAN K
452s.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 252, SisciaObverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them. O on banner.
mintmark epsilon SIS star. 17.12 mm, 1.6 g. RIC VII Siscia 252, rated R1
NORMAN K
con199s.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII 199 ThessalonicaConstantine II, AE follis, 18.6 mm, 1.8 g. Thessalonica.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing, heads facing each other with two standards between them and each holds a spear and hand resting on a shield.
Mintmark SMTSB Thessalonica. 337-340 CE.
NORMAN K
conii236f.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII Siscia 236Constantine II, AE follis, 18mm, 1.8 g. Siscia.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing, heads facing each other with two standards between them and each holds a spear and hand resting on a shield.
Mintmark dot ESIS dot, 334-335 CE issue
NORMAN K
con41s.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VIII 41 Antioch Constantine II, AE, Antioch 322-323 CE
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers holding spears and shields
Mintmark: SMANB Antioch 14,7mm, 1.4 g.
NORMAN K
conii220.jpg
Constantine II, Siscia RIC VII 220Constantine II, 334-335 C.E., AE3
Obverse : CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C. Laureate bust right, cuirassed
Reverse : GLOR-IA EXERCITVS-ITVS. Two soldiers facing and holding a spear two standards between them.
ESIS in ex. Siscia 18.7 mm., 1.7 g. RIC VII, 220 p. 453
NORMAN K
constantius_II.jpg
Constantius II RIC VII Rome 329
Constantius II
AE 16mm, 2.0g, 330 AD
OBV :: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS; 2 soldiers standing either side of 2 standards
EX :: RFT
REF ::RIC VII Rome 329; Sear 17684
From uncleaned lot 2019
Johnny
aqp.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VII 145, Aquileia, 337-361 CEObverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse:GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.
Mintmark: dot AQP, Aquileia 15.5 mm., 1.6 g.
RIC VII Aquileia 145
NORMAN K
delmat5s.jpg
Delmatius, Cyzicus RIC 132Obverse: FL IVL DELMATIVS NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two helmeted soldiers facing each other, spear in outer hand, inner hand on shield setting on ground, between them a standard.
SMKD in ex. Cyzicus mint15.4 mm,1.8 g. Rated R3
NORMAN K
constantine_i_gloria~0.jpg
(0306) CONSTANTINE I (THE GREAT)(0306) CONSTANTINE I (THE GREAT)
Caesar 306-307; Filius Augustorum 307-309; Augustus 309-337 AD
AE18.5 mm, 2.24 g
O: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG Rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS Two soldiers standing with spears and shields,
two standard between them.
Constantinople mint
laney
constantine_ii_single_std.jpg
(0316) CONSTANTINE II as Caesar316-337 AD
Struck 337
Æ Follis 17 mm, 1.31 g
O:CONSTANTINV-S IVN NOC Laureate and cuirassed bust r.
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS Two soldiers holding spears and shields, standard between them; ESIS-star in exe
Siscia, RIC VII 262.
laney
cst_II_glor_smanb_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Augustus)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 14 mm; 1.60 g
O: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, rosette diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.; SMANB in exe.
Antioch mint
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_scons.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18.5 mm 2.21 g
O: [CONSTANTI]NVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each other with two standards between them; pellet between standards; SCONS in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_unk_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 2.32 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each other with two standards between them; TRP pellet in exe
Trier mint
laney
consstantine_ii_sis_glor_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18.5 mm, 3.11 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each other with two standards between them; pellet SIS pellet in exe.
Siscia mint
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_plg_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15 mm 1.65 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each on either side of a single standard; leaf PLG in exe.
Lyons mint; RIC 286; rare (R4)
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_siscia_res.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18.5 mm 2.21 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers facing each other with two standards between them; pellet between standards
Siscia mint
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_cyzi_single_std.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16.8 mm; 1.33 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them with O on banner.
Mintmark: SMKB.
Cyzicus Mint; Ref: RIC VII Cyzicus 125
laney
constantine_ii_glor_cyz_2_stds.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18.5 mm; 2.06 g
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers with spears and sheilds standing either side of two standards, SMKB in ex.
Cyzicus Mint; RIC Vol VII 83 of Cyzicus, rarity R4.
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_SMKS_one_std.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16 mm; 1.90 g
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two soldiers standing facing each other;
each holding a spear and resting hand on shield, one
standard between them. SMKS in exe.
Cyzicus Mint; RIC VII Cyzicus 123; Sear 17361
laney
constantine_ii_gloria_thessalon.jpg
(0317) CONSTANTINE II (as Caesar)317 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 340 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16.5 mm; 1.83 g
O: CONSTANTIN[VS IVN] NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right
R: GLORI-A EXER-CITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two
standards between them. SMTS_ in exe
Thessalonica mint


laney
c_ii_ge_cae_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 1.46 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C diadamed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers facing single standard
laney
c_ii_ge_hml_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16 mm, 1.09 g
O: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers facing single standard between them; C within standard
laney
c_ii_ge_dot_sm_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 1.58 g
Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev: dot GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, 2 soldiers with 2 standards between them, o on banners.
dot SMHA dot in exe
cf RIC VII Heraclea 133 var, R2
laney
c_ii_ge_conssdotres.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 19 mm, 2.20 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C laureate draped cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers on either side of 2 standards; CONSSdot in exe
Constantinople
RIC VII 75
laney
c_ii_ge_consi_caes_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 1.93 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C bust right
R: 2 soldiers with 2 standards between; CONSIdot in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
csts_ii_ge_bsis_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm 1.55 g
O: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers facing single chi-rho standard; BSIS in exe
Siscia mint
laney
csts_ii_ge_cons_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15.28 mm, 1.21 g
O: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed head right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers facing single standard,"o" on banners;
Constantinople mint
laney
cst_2_glor_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II337 - 361 AD
AE 18 mm; 2.60 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, cuirassed bust right.
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them; O on banners.
Mintmark: dot SMKB (unlisted officina).
Cyzicus mint
laney
consta_II_glor_ex_smhg_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16 mm; 1.31 g
O: CONSTAN-TIVS AVG Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS Two helmeted soldiers standing facing, single standard between; SMHG in exe
Heraclea mint; RIC VIII 19

laney
constantius_ii_ge_smanh_rnd.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II (as Caesar)324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm 2.41 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
LAUR DR CUIR BUST R
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS
2 SOLDIERS STANDING FACING, HOLDING SPEARS AND RESTING HAND ON SHIELD, WITH 2 STANDARDS BETWEEN
SMANH IN EXE
ANTIOCH
RIC VII 88
8 commentslaney
constantius_ii_caes_blk.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II (as Caesar)324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16 mm, 2.44 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them, dot on banners; SMANH in exe
Antioch mint, RIC VII 88.
1 commentslaney
constantius_smanz_blk.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II (as Caesar)324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE Follis 17 mm, 2.54 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing holding spears, shields, and two military standards between them, SMANZ in ex..
Antiochia mint, RIC VII, 88.
laney
constsantius_ii_ge_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II (as Caesar)324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm 2.48 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right.
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them, dot between standards
laney
constantius_ii_ge_smkb_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II (as Caesar)324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm 2.91 g
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right.
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them. O on banners.
dot SMKB in exe.(unlisted officina).
RIC VII Cyzicus 100 var (officina), rare.
laney
constans_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 14.5 mm 1.71 g
O: Diademed dr cuir bust of Constans r.
R: Two soldiers standing with spears and shields, one standard between them.

laney
constans_ge_2_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16.5 mm 1.57 g
CONSTANS P F AVG diademed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers to either side of single chi-rho standard
laney
constans_ge_3_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15 mm, 1.47 g
O: CONSTANS P F AVG Diademed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS Two soldiers facing single standard
laney
constans_ge_smts_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17 mm, 1.75 g
O: CONSTANS P F AVG laureate draped bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS twp soldiers, single standard between
Thessalonica mint
laney
constans_glor_ex_asis_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
struck 337 - 340 A.D.
AE 16 mm; 1.33 g
O: CONSTAN - S P F AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: GLOR - IA EXERC - ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and leaning on shields flanking standard decorated with Chi-Rho, ASIS and dotted crescent in exe
Siscia mint; RIC VIII 99
laney
constans_one_standard.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm, 1.68 g
O: CONSTANS NOB CAES: Bust of Constans, laureate, draped, cuirassed, right
R:GLORI-A EXER-CITVS: Two soldiers, helmeted, draped, cuirassed, standing facing each other, each holding reversed spear in outer hand and resting inner hand on shield; between them, one standard
laney
constans_nobc_gloria.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 17.5 mm, 1.35 g
O: F L IVL CONSTANS NOB C; Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS ; Two soldiers standing facing one another with one standard between them; CONS in exe
laney
gloria_one_std.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 14.5 mm, 1.22 g
O: CONSTANS P F AVG laureate draped bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS twp soldiers, single standard between
SMTS in exe
Thessalonica mint
laney
constans_as_caes_gloria_ex.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15.5 mm, 1.41 g
O: CONSTANS P F AVG Diademed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS Two soldiers facing single standard
laney
constans_gloria_ex_b.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS (as Augustus)333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 13.5 mm, 1.20 g
O: CONST-ANS AVG Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left
R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two helmeted soldiers facing, heads turned
towards each other, each holding an inverted spear and resting on a shield; a single standard between them.
(SCARCE left facing Augustus bust)
laney
constans_ge_consi_res.jpg
(0333) CONSTANS (as Caesar)333 - 337 (as Caesar)
337 - 350 AD (as Augustus)
AE 16.5 mm, 1.31 g
O: VAL CONSTANS NOB CAES Bust left
R:; GLORIA EXERCITVS 2 soldiers facing, single standard between; CONSI in exe.
Constantinople mint
laney
DELMATIUS.jpg
(0335) DELMATIUSCAESAR 18 SEP. 335 - MID 337 AD
AE 16.2 mm 1.312 g
O: FL DELMATIVS NOB C
LAUREATE DRAPED AND CUIRASSED BUST R
R:
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
TWO SOLDIERS HOLDING SPEARS AND SHIELDS ON GROUND FLAKING SINGLE STANDARD
BSIS IN EXE
SISCIA RIC 256
(ex Forum)
laney
delmatius_2_res.jpg
(0335) DELMATIUS335 - 337 AD
AE 16.5 mm 1.64 g
O: FL DELMA TIVS NOB C Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: GLOR-IA - EXERC-ITVS Two soldiers standing facing, heads confronted, each holds a spear in outer hand and rests inner hand on shield, flanking a labarum (Christogram standard)
PCONST in ex
Arles mint
RIC VII 399; very scarce (RIC R3)
laney
delmatius_gloria_res.jpg
(0335) DELMATIUS335 - 337 AD (Caesar)
AE 16.5 mm 1.45 g
O: FL DELMATIVS NOB C laureate cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers, single standard between; BSIS in exe.
Siscia mint
laney
delmatius_res.jpg
(0335) DELMATIUS (Caesar)335 - 337 AD.
AE Follis 16.5 mm 1.72 g
O: FL IVL DELMATIVS NOB C, his laureate and cuirassed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers flanking a single standard, SMKG in ex.
CYZICUS MINT RIC 132
laney
constans_gloria_1_std.jpg
(0337) CONSTANTIUS II(0337) CONSTANTIUS II
324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 15.5 mm, 1.70g
O: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed bust right
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers facing single chi-rho standard
Thessalonica mint
laney
LonginusDenarius.jpg
(504c) Roman Republic, L. Cassius Longinus, 63 B.C.Silver denarius, Crawford 413/1, RSC I Cassia 10, SRCV I 364, aVF, struck with worn dies, Rome mint, weight 3.867g, maximum diameter 20.3mm, die axis 0o, c. 63 B.C. Obverse: veiled bust of Vesta left, kylix behind, L before; Reverse: LONGIN III V, voter standing left, dropping tablet inscribed V into a cista.

The reverse of this Longinus denarius captures a fascinating moment when a Roman citizen casts his ballot. "The abbreviation III V [ir] indentifies Longinus as one of the three annually appointed mintmasters (officially called tres viri aere argento auro flando feriundo). A citizen is seen casting his vote into the urn. On the ballot is the letter 'U', short for uti rogas, a conventional formula indicating assent to a motion. The picture alludes to the law, requested by an ancestor of the mintmaster, which introduced the secret ballot in most proceedings of the popular court" (Meier, Christian. Caesar, a Biography. Berlin: Severin and Siedler, 1982. Plate 6).

The date that this denarius was struck possesses unique significance for another reason. Marcus Tullius Cicero (politician, philosopher, orator, humanist) was elected consul for the year 63 BC -- the first man elected consul who had no consular ancestors in more than 30 years. A "new man," Cicero was not the descendant of a "patrician" family, nor was his family wealthy (although Cicero married "well"). Cicero literally made himself the man he was by the power of the words he spoke and the way in which he spoke them. A witness to and major player during the decline of the Roman Republic, Cicero was murdered in 43 BC by thugs working for Marc Antony. But Cicero proved impossible to efface.

Cicero's words became part of the bed rock of later Roman education. As Peter Heather notes, every educated young man in the late Roman Empire studied "a small number of literary texts under the guidance of an expert in language and literary interpretation, the grammarian. This occupied the individual for seven or more years from about the age of eight, and concentrated on just four authors: Vergil, Cicero, Sallust and Terence" (Heather, Peter. The Fall of the Roman Empire: A New History of Rome and the Barbarians. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. 17).


Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul. And yet amidst these actions he did justice in one thing, by delivering up Philologus to Pomponia, the wife of Quintus; who, having got his body into her power, besides other grievous punishments, made him cut off his own flesh by pieces, and roast and eat it; for so some writers have related. But Tiro, Cicero's emancipated slave, has not so much as mentioned the treachery of Philologus.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Domitian_as_caesar_legionary_standard.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC-1081 [Vespasian]AR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 79 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Clasped hands holding legionary eagle set on prow
RIC 1081 (C2). BMC 269. RSC 393. BNC 240.
Acquired from Beast Coins, April 2007.


The reverse represents 'Concordia Militum', harmony of the troops. Domitian quite possibly was plotting against Titus after Vespasian's death by appealing to the troops with a double donative. This coin might provide numismatic evidence of such. Suetonius states: " On the death of his father he hesitated for some time whether to offer a double largess to the soldiers, and he never had any compunction about saying that he had been left a partner in the imperial power, but that the will had been tampered with."

A nice coin with average wear and an interesting history behind it.


David Atherton
Gaius-Sesterz-RIC48.jpg
003 - Gaius - SestertiusA) C CAESAR DIIVI AVG PRON AVG PM TRP IIII PP
Bare head left
R) ADLOCVT COH SC
Emperor togate standing on a platform left, talking to 5 soldiers, wearing helmets , shields an weapons,
two soldiers holding an aquila

Weight:27,8g; Ø: 37mm; Reference: RIC I/48
Struck: 40-41, Mint: Rome
Gerhard M
Hadrianus-Sest-RICII_746a.jpg
003 - Hadrianus - Sestertius - RIC II 746aA) HADRIANVS AVG COS III PP
Bare, drapeated bust right
R) SC
Exergue.: DISCIPLINA AVG
Emperor walking right, holding scroll, followed by an officer and three soldiers, each of them holding a labarum

Weight: 24,1g; Ø:33mm
Reference: RIC II/ 746a
Struck:134–138; Mint: Rome
3 commentsGerhard M
LucVerus-Sest-RIC_III_1371.jpg
003 - Lucius Verus - Sestertius - RIC III [Marc Aurel] 1371A) L AVREL VERVS AVG ARMENIACVS
Laureated, cuirassed bust seen from the back, right
R) TRP IIII IMP II COS II SC
Exergue: REX ARMEN DAT
Verus seated left on platform, surrounded by soldiers; Parthian king Sohaemus below, standing left, hand to his head

Weight: 20,1g; Ø: 32mm
Reference: RIC III[MarcAurel]/1371
Struck: December 163 - December 164; Mint: Rome
Gerhard M
coin190.JPG
005c. GermanicusGermanicus

After the death of Augustus in 14, the Senate appointed Germanicus commander of the forces in Germania. A short time after, the legions rioted on the news that the succession befell on the unpopular Tiberius. Refusing to accept this, the rebel soldiers cried for Germanicus as emperor. But he chose to honor Augustus' choice and put an end to the mutiny, preferring to continue only as a general. In the next two years, he subdued the Germanic tribes east of the Rhine, and assured their defeat in the Battle of the Weser River in 16.

Germanicus died in Alexandria, Egypt. His death was surrounded with speculations, and several sources refer to claims that he was poisoned by Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, governor of Syria, under orders of the emperor Tiberius.

AS, struck under Caligula. GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large SC. Cohen 1.

Check
ecoli
5514.jpg
005d. Agrippina IILYDIA, Hypaepa. Agrippina Jr., mother of Nero. Augusta, 50-59 AD. Æ 14mm (2.33 gm). Draped bust of Agrippina right / Cult statue of Artemis. RPC I 2541; SNG Copenhagen -.

Julia Vipsania Agrippina Minor or Agrippina Minor (Latin for "the younger") (November 7, AD 15 – March 59), often called "Agrippinilla" to distinguish her from her mother, was the daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina Major. She was sister of Caligula, granddaughter and great-niece to Tiberius, niece and wife of Claudius, and the mother of Nero. She was born at Oppidum Ubiorum on the Rhine, afterwards named in her honour Colonia Agrippinae (modern Cologne, Germany).

Agrippina was first married to (1st century AD) Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. From this marriage she gave birth to Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, who would become Roman Emperor Nero. Her husband died in January, 40. While still married, Agrippina participated openly in her brother Caligula's decadent court, where, according to some sources, at his instigation she prostituted herself in a palace. While it was generally agreed that Agrippinilla, as well as her sisters, had ongoing sexual relationships with their brother Caligula, incest was an oft-used criminal accusation against the aristocracy, because it was impossible to refute successfully. As Agrippina and her sister became more problematic for their brother, Caligula sent them into exile for a time, where it is said she was forced to dive for sponges to make a living. In January, 41, Agrippina had a second marriage to the affluent Gaius Sallustius Crispus Passienus. He died between 44 and 47, leaving his estate to Agrippina.

As a widow, Agrippina was courted by the freedman Pallas as a possible marriage match to her own uncle, Emperor Claudius, and became his favourite councillor, even granted the honor of being called Augusta (a title which no other queen had ever received). They were married on New Year's Day of 49, after the death of Claudius's first wife Messalina. Agrippina then proceeded to persuade Claudius to adopt her son, thereby placing Nero in the line of succession to the Imperial throne over Claudius's own son, Brittanicus. A true Imperial politician, Agrippina did not reject murder as a way to win her battles. Many ancient sources credited her with poisoning Claudius in 54 with a plate of poisened mushrooms, hence enabling Nero to quickly take the throne as emperor.

For some time, Agrippina influenced Nero as he was relatively ill-equipped to rule on his own. But Nero eventually felt that she was taking on too much power relative to her position as a woman of Rome. He deprived her of her honours and exiled her from the palace, but that was not enough. Three times Nero tried to poison Agrippina, but she had been raised in the Imperial family and was accustomed to taking antidotes. Nero had a machine built and attached to the roof of her bedroom. The machine was designed to make the ceiling collapse — the plot failed with the machine. According to the historians Tacitus and Suetonius, Nero then plotted her death by sending for her in a boat constructed to collapse, intending to drown Agrippina. However, only some of the crew were in on the plot; their efforts were hampered by the rest of the crew trying to save the ship. As the ship sank, one of her handmaidens thought to save herself by crying that she was Agrippina, thinking they would take special care of her. Instead the maid was instantly beaten to death with oars and chains. The real Agrippina realised what was happening and in the confusion managed to swim away where a passing fisherman picked her up. Terrified that his cover had been blown, Nero instantly sent men to charge her with treason and summarily execute her. Legend states that when the Emperor's soldiers came to kill her, Agrippina pulled back her clothes and ordered them to stab her in the belly that had housed such a monstrous son.

ecoli
0079.jpg
0079 - Denarius Tituria 89 BCObv/Bearded head of king Tatius r., before TA, behind SABIN.
Rev/Rape of Sabines, two Roman soldiers hurrying l. carrying two Sabines; L TITVRI in ex.

Moneyer: L. Titurius L.f. Sabinus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 344/1a [dies o/r: 294/327 (1a to 1c)] - Syd. 698
ex-Numismática Ramos
dafnis
01-Constantine-II-Sis-95.jpg
01. Constantine II / 2 soldiers and standard.AE 4, 337 - 341, Siscia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG / Diademed bust of Constantine II.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS / Two soldiers, each holding spear and shield, one standard between them. Christogram on standard.
Mint mark: ASIS (crescent and dot)
1.70 gm., 15 mm.
RIC #95; LRBC #770; Sear #17432.

Several mints used the title MAX for all three sons of Constantine the Great for a short time after his death. It's use on coins of Constantius II and Constans was quickly dropped, and P F (Pius Felix) was used instead, reserving MAX for the senior emperor (Constantine II).
Callimachus
1-Maximinus-I-RIC-06.jpg
01. Maximinus I / RIC 6.Denarius, 238 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG GERM / Laureate bust of Maximinus.
Reverse: P M TR P IIII COS P P / The emperor standing between two standards, holding spear and raising right hand.
2.62 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #6; Sear 8314.

This coin dates from January 1 to March 19, 238, at which time Gordian I was proclaimed emperor and the mint at Rome stopped coining for Maximinus. It was not until June 24, however, that he was murdered by his soldiers.
1 commentsCallimachus
Augustus_RIC_I_4(a).jpg
02 03 Augustus RIC I 4(a)Augustus. 27B.C. -14A.D. AR Denarius. Emerita Mint, c. 25-23 A.D. (3.21g, 19.4mm, 0h). Obv: IMP CAESAR AVGVST, bare head right. Rev: P CARISIVS LEG PRO PR, trophy of helmet cuirass, shield, and javelins, on heap of shields and lances. RIC 4(a), RSC 403(a).

Augustus established the colony of Emerita Augusta in Lusitania to settle emeriti- retiring soldiers- as he downsized the Roman army. P. Carisius, legatus pro praetore, effected the foundation on Augustus’s behalf. Emerita served as a strongpoint for the Empire in the west of Spain.
1 commentsLucas H
02-Constantius-II-Sis-086.jpg
02. Constantius II / 2 soldiers and standard.AE 4, 337 - 341, Siscia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Constantius II.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS / Two soldiers, each holding spear and shield, one standard between them. Christogram on standard.
Mint mark: ΓSIS
1.72 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #86; LRBC #780; Sear #17990.
Callimachus
0233_REPROM_RRC423_1.jpg
0233 - Denarius Servilia 57 BCObv/ Head of Flora with flower crown; behind, lituus; around, FLORAL PRIMVS.
Rev/ Soldiers facing each other, holding swords and shields; in ex., C SERVEIL; C F on field.

Ag, 18.8 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: C. Servilius C.f.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 423/1 [dies o/r: 99/110]
ex-DNW, auction Feb 2019, lot 683
1 commentsdafnis
03-Constans-Sis-099.jpg
03. Constans / 2 soldiers and standard.AE 4, 337 - 341, Siscia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Constans.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS / Two soldiers, each holding spear and shield, one standard between them. Christogram on standard.
Mint mark: BSIS (crescent and dot)
1.57 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #99; LRBC #774; Sear #18546.
Callimachus
Tituria1DenSabines.jpg
0a Abduction of the SabinesL Titurius Sabinus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Head of Tativs, right, SABIN behind
Two Roman soldiers bearing women

Seaby, Tituria 1

When the hour for the games had come, and their eyes and minds were alike riveted on the spectacle before them, the preconcerted signal was given and the Roman youth dashed in all directions to carry off the [Sabine] maidens who were present. The larger part were carried off indiscriminately, but some particularly beautiful girls who had been marked out for the leading patricians were carried to their houses by plebeians told off for the task. One, conspicuous amongst them all for grace and beauty, is reported to have been carried off by a group led by a certain Talassius, and to the many inquiries as to whom she was intended for, the invariable answer was given, "For Talassius." Hence the use of this word in the marriage rites. Alarm and consternation broke up the games, and the parents of the maidens fled, distracted with grief, uttering bitter reproaches on the violators of the laws of hospitality and appealing to the god to whose solemn games they had come, only to be the victims of impious perfidy. The abducted maidens were quite as despondent and indignant. Romulus, however, went round in person, and pointed out to them that it was all owing to the pride of their parents in denying right of intermarriage to their neighbours. They would live in honourable wedlock, and share all their property and civil rights, and - dearest of all to human nature - would be the mothers of freemen. He begged them to lay aside their feelings of resentment and give their affections to those whom fortune had made masters of their persons. An injury had often led to reconciliation and love; they would find their husbands all the more affectionate, because each would do his utmost, so far as in him lay, to make up for the loss of parents and country. These arguments were reinforced by the endearments of their husbands, who excused their conduct by pleading the irresistible force of their passion - a plea effective beyond all others in appealing to a woman's nature.

The feelings of the abducted maidens were now pretty completely appeased, but not so those of their parents.

Livy, History of Rome 1.9-1.10
1 commentsBlindado
MariusFundania1Denarius.jpg
0aa Caius MariusC. Fundanius, moneyer
101-91 BC

Denarius

Helmeted head of Roma right, control-mark C behind

"Triumphator" (Marius) in quadriga right, holding laurel-branch and staff; a rider sits on near horse, holding laurel-branch, Q above, C FVNDAN in exergue

The reverse shows Marius as triumphator in the quadriga. He holds sceptre and laurel branch. On one of the horses rides his son. The children of the triumphator were - according to tradition - allowed to share the triumph of their father. The Q above refers to the office as quaestor the mintmaster held while minting these coins. FORVM Ancient Coins says of a similar piece, "The reverse refers to Marius triumph after victories over the Cimbri and Teutones. The rider on the near horse is Marius's son, at that time eight years old." Andrew McCabe comments, "The Triumphator on the Fundania denarius is usually taken to be Marius, with his young son on horseback. This would make it the first Roman coin to explicitly portray a living Roman politician. "

Seaby Fundania 1

Marius rose from common origins to become the First Man in Rome. Plutarch in his Life writes: There is a likeness of Marius in stone at Ravenna, in Gaul, which I myself saw quite corresponding with that roughness of character that is ascribed to him. Being naturally valiant and warlike, and more acquainted also with the discipline of the camp than of the city, he could not moderate his passion when in authority. . . . He was born of parents altogether obscure and indigent, who supported themselves by their daily labour; his father of the same name with himself, his mother called Fulcinia. He had spent a considerable part of his life before he saw and tasted the pleasures of the city; having passed previously in Cirrhaeaton, a village of the territory of Arpinum, a life, compared with city delicacies, rude and unrefined, yet temperate, and conformable to the ancient Roman severity. He first served as a soldier in the war against the Celtiberians, when Scipio Africanus besieged Numantia; where he signalized himself to his general by courage far above his comrades, and particularly by his cheerfully complying with Scipio's reformation of his army, being almost ruined by pleasures and luxury. It is stated, too, that he encountered and vanquished an enemy in single combat, in his general's sight. In consequence of all this he had several honours conferred upon him; and once when at an entertainment a question arose about commanders, and one of the company (whether really desirous to know, or only in complaisance) asked Scipio where the Romans, after him, should obtain such another general, Scipio, gently clapping Marius on the shoulder as he sat next him, replied, "Here, perhaps. . . ."

The consul Caecilius Metellus, being declared general in the war against Jugurtha in Africa took with him Marius for lieutenant; where, eager himself to do great deeds and services that would get him distinction, he did not, like others, consult Metellus's glory and the serving his interest, and attributing his honour of lieutenancy not to Metellus, but to fortune, which had presented him with a proper opportunity and theatre of great actions, he exerted his utmost courage. . . . Marius thus employed, and thus winning the affections of the soldiers, before long filled both Africa and Rome with his fame, and some, too, wrote home from the army that the war with Africa would never be brought to a conclusion unless they chose Caius Marius consul. . . .He was elected triumphantly, and at once proceeded to levy soldiers contrary both to law and custom, enlisting slaves and poor people; whereas former commanders never accepted of such, but bestowed arms, like other favours, as a matter of distinction, on persons who had the proper qualification, a man's property being thus a sort of security for his good behavior. . . .

[In Marius' fourth consulship,] The enemy dividing themselves into two parts, the Cimbri arranged to go against Catulus higher up through the country of the Norici, and to force that passage; the Teutones and Ambrones to march against Marius by the seaside through Liguria. . . . The Romans, pursuing them, slew and took prisoners above one hundred thousand, and possessing themselves of their spoil, tents, and carriages, voted all that was not purloined to Marius's share, which, though so magnificent a present, yet was generally thought less than his conduct deserved in so great a danger. . . . After the battle, Marius chose out from amongst the barbarians' spoils and arms those that were whole and handsome, and that would make the greatest show in his triumph; the rest he heaped upon a large pile, and offered a very splendid sacrifice. Whilst the army stood round about with their arms and garlands, himself attired (as the fashion is on such occasions) in the purple-bordered robe, and taking a lighted torch, and with both hands lifting it up towards heaven, he was then going to put it to the pile, when some friends were espied with all haste coming towards him on horseback. Upon which every one remained in silence and expectation. They, upon their coming up, leapt off and saluted Marius, bringing him the news of his fifth consulship, and delivered him letters to that effect. This gave the addition of no small joy to the solemnity; and while the soldiers clashed their arms and shouted, the officers again crowned Marius with a laurel wreath, and he thus set fire to the pile, and finished his sacrifice.
Blindado
Cornelia51QuinVict.jpg
0aa Defeat of Hannibal on Sicily, 222 BCCn. Lentulus, moneyer
90-85 BC

Quinarius

Laureled head of Jupiter, right
Victory crowning trophy, CN LENT in ex

Seaby, Cornelia 51

Possibly a reference to this event: [Q. Fabius Maximus, afterwards called Cunctator] broke up his camp at Suessula and decided to begin by an attack on Arpi. . . . Now at last the enemy was roused; there was a lull in the storm and daylight was approaching. Hannibal's garrison in the city amounted to about 5000 men, and the citizens themselves had raised a force of 3000. These the Carthaginians put in front to meet the enemy, that there might be no attempt at treachery in their rear. The fighting began in the dark in the narrow streets, the Romans having occupied not only the streets near the gate but the houses also, that they might not be assailed from the roofs. Gradually as it grew light some of the citizen troops and some of the Romans recognised one another, and entered into conversation. The Roman soldiers asked what it was that the Arpinians wanted, what wrong had Rome done them, what good service had Carthage rendered them that they, Italians-bred and born, should fight against their old friends the Romans on behalf of foreigners and barbarians, and wish to make Italy a tributary province of Africa. The people of Arpi urged in their excuse that they knew nothing of what was going on, they had in fact been sold by their leaders to the Carthaginians, they had been victimised and enslaved by a small oligarchy. When a beginning had been once made the conversations became more and more general; at last the praetor of Arpi was conducted by his friends to the consul, and after they had given each other mutual assurances, surrounded by the troops under their standards, the citizens suddenly turned against the Carthaginians and fought for the Romans. A body of Spaniards also, numbering something less than a thousand, transferred their services to the consul upon the sole condition that the Carthaginian garrison should be allowed to depart uninjured. The gates were opened for them and they were dismissed, according to the stipulation, in perfect safety, and went to Hannibal at Salapia. Thus Arpi was restored to the Romans without the loss of a single life, except in the case of one man who had long ago been a traitor and had recently deserted. The Spaniards were ordered to receive double rations, and the republic availed itself on very many occasions of their courage and fidelity.

Livy, History of Rome, 24.46-47
Blindado
Aemilia10.jpg
0ac Conquest of MacedoniaPaullus Aemilius Lepidus, moneyer
109-100 BC

Denarius

Veiled head of Concord, right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA
TER above trophy, L. Aemelius Lepidus on right, Perseus and his two sons as prisoners on left, PAVLLVS in ex.

Seaby, Aemelia 10

L. Aemelius Paullus defeated the Macedonians in 168 BC and brought Perseus and his sons to Rome to adorn his triumph.

Three days after the battle Perseus arrived at Amphipolis, and from that city he sent heralds with a caduceus to Paulus. In the meanwhile Hippias, Midon, and Pantauchus, the principal men among the king's friends who had fled from the field of battle to Beroea, went and made their surrender to the Roman consul. In the case of others also, their fears prompted them, one after another, to do the same. The consul sent his son Q. Fabius, together with L. Lentulus and Q. Metellus, with despatches to Rome announcing his victory. He gave the spoils taken from the enemy's army lying on the field of battle to the foot soldiers and the plunder from the surrounding country to the cavalry on condition that they were not absent from the camp more than two nights. The camp at Pydna was shifted to a site nearer the sea. First of all Beroea, then Thessalonica and Pella, and almost the whole of Macedonia, city by city, surrendered within two days.

Livy, History of Rome, 44.45
Blindado
1000-16-149.jpg
107. PertinaxPertinax

Only a mediocre public speaker, Pertinax was first and foremost a gritty old soldier. He was heavily built, had a pot belly, although it was said, even by his critics, that he possessed the proud air of an emperor.
He possessed some charm, but was generally understood to be a rather sly character. He also acquired a reputation for being mean and greedy. He apparently even went as far as serving half portions of lettuce and artichoke before he became emperor. It was a characteristic which would not serve him well as an emperor.

When he took office, Pertinax quickly realized that the imperial treasury was in trouble. Commodus had wasted vast sums on games and luxuries. If the new emperor thought that changes would need to be made to bring the finances back in order he was no doubt right. But he sought to do too much too quickly. In the process he made himself enemies.

The gravest error, made at the very beginning of his reign, was to decide to cut some of the praetorian's privileges and that he was going to pay them only half the bonus he had promised.
Already on 3 January AD 193 the praetorians tried to set up another emperor who would pay up. But that senator, wise enough to stay out of trouble, merely reported the incident to Pertinax and then left Rome.

The ordinary citizens of Rome however also quickly had enough of their new emperor. Had Commodus spoilt them with lavish games and festivals, then now Pertinax gave them very little.
And a truly powerful enemy should be the praetorian prefect Laetus. The man who had after all put Pertinax on the throne, was to play an important role in the emperor's fate. It isn't absolutely clear if he sought to be an honest advisor of the emperor, but saw his advise ignored, or if he sought to manipulate Pertinax as his puppet emperor. In either case, he was disappointed.

And so as Pertinax grew ever more unpopular, the praetorians once more began to look for a new emperor. In early March, When Pertinax was away in Ostia overseeing the arrangements for the grain shipments to Rome, they struck again. This time they tried to set up one of the consuls, Quintus Sosius Falco.

When Pertinax returned to Rome he pardoned Falco who'd been condemned by the senate, but several praetorians were executed. A slave had given them away as being part of the conspiracy.
These executions were the final straw. On 28 March AD 193 the praetorians revolts.
300 hundred of them forced the gates to the palace. None of the guards sought to help their emperor.
Everyone, so it seemed, wanted rid of this emperor. So, too, Laetus would not listen as Pertinax ordered him to do something. The praetorian prefect simply went home, leaving the emperor to his fate.

Pertinax did not seek to flee. He stood his ground and waited, together with his chamberlain Eclectus. As the praetorians found him, they did not discover an emperor quivering with fear, but a man determined on convincing them to put down their weapons. Clearly the soldiers were over-awed by this brave man, for he spoke to them for some time. But eventually their leader found enough courage to step forwards and hurl his spear at the emperor. Pertinax fell with the spear in his chest. Eclectus fought bravely for his life, stabbing two, before he two was slain by the soldiers.
The soldiers then cut off Pertinax' head, stuck it on a spear and paraded through the streets of Rome.

Pertinax had ruled for only 87 days. He was later deified by Septimius Severus.

RI1. Pertinax. A.D. 193. AR denarius (18.0 mm, 2.74 g, 7 h). Rome mint. Rare. IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG, laureate head right / OPI DIVIN TR P COS II, Ops seated left, holding two stalks of grain, resting hand on seat of throne. RIC 8a; RSC 33; BMCRE 19. aVF, flan crack.
ecoli
Probus_AE-Ant_V-IRTVS-PROBI-AVG-(Gvar)_VIRTVS-AVG_P-XXT_RIC-430_p-64_4th-emiss_Ticinum_278-AD_Q-001_5h_23-23,5mm_4,34g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 430, Ticinum, VIRTVS AVG, Bust-Gvar, -/-//QXXT, Mars walking right, Scarce!!112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 430, Ticinum, VIRTVS AVG, Bust-Gvar, -/-//QXXT, Mars walking right, Scarce!!
avers:- V-IRTVS-PROBI-AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left., pointing spear and shield (shield are decorated with soldiers), seen from back. (9,Gvar)
revers:-VIRT-VS-AVG, Mars walking right, holding spear and trophy.
exerg: -/-//QXXT, diameter: 23-23,5mm, weight: 4,34g, axis: 5h,
mint: Ticinium, 4th emission, date: 278 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-430var, p-64, C-808, Scarce!!,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_904_112_Probus_AE-Ant_VIRTVS-PR-OB-I-AVG_ADVENT-VSPROBI-AVG_Delta_RIC-904_C-_Cyzicus-2nd-em_276-277_Q-001_6h_22,5-23mm_4,07g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 904, Cyzicus, ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Bust E1-G, -/-//Δ, Emperor riding left,112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 904, Cyzicus, ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Bust E1-G, -/-//Δ, Emperor riding left,
avers: VIRTVSP ROBI AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield. Shield decorated with soldiers with shield walking left, (E1-G).
reverse: ADVENT VS PROBI AVG, Emperor riding left, right hand raised, left holding sceptre; at foot, captive.
exergue: -/-//Δ, diameter: 22,5-23mm, weight: 4,07g, axis: 6h,
mint: Cyzicus, 2nd emission, date: 276-277 A.D., ref: RIC-904, Scarce!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Probus_AE-Ant_VIRTVS-PROB-I-A-VG-(G)_ADVENTVS-PROBI-AVG_XXI-S_RIC-634-p-85_Alf-9-No-33_Siscia_3rd-em-277-AD_Rare_Q-001_axis-h_mm_g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0009.0033, -/-//XXIϛ, Bust E1/G, RIC V-II 634, AE-Antoninianus, ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Emperor riding left, Rare!!!112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0009.0033, -/-//XXIϛ, Bust E1/G, RIC V-II 634, AE-Antoninianus, ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Emperor riding left, Rare!!!
avers: VIRTVS PR OB I AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield. Shield decorated with a scene of the emperor on horse riding right in front of soldiers carrying shields. (E1/G).
reverse: ADVENTVS PROBI AVG, Emperor riding left, right hand raised, left holding the sceptre, at foot, captive.
exergue: -/-//XXIϛ, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, 3rd. emission, date: 277 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 634, p-85, Alföldi 0009.0033, Rare!!!
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_818_A_098_No_049_112_Probus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-AVR-PROBVS-P-F-AVG_VIRTVS-PROBI-AVG_XXIV_p-106_Alf-98_no-49_277-AD_Q-001_6h_21,0-21,5mm_3,77g-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0098.0049, RIC V-II 818, AE-Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Bust E1/G, -/-//XXIT, Emperor galloping left, Scarce! #1112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0098.0049, RIC V-II 818, AE-Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Bust E1/G, -/-//XXIT, Emperor galloping left, Scarce! #1
avers: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P F AVG, Bust Type E1/G, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield. Shield decorated with rider right, soldiers carrying shields in the foreground. (E1/G)
reverse: VIRTVS PR OBI AVG, Emperor galloping left, spearing enemy.
exergue: -/-//XXIV, diameter: 21,0-21,5mm, weight: 3,77g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, 4th. em. 3rd. off., date: 277 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 818, p-106, Alföldi 0098.0049, Scarce!
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Trajse06-2.jpg
115 AD: Trajan's eighth proclaimation as imperator after his conquest of MesopotamiaSestertius (25.5g, 33mm, 6h) Rome mint. Struck 115-117.
IMP CAES NER TRAIAno OPTIMO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P laureate draped bust of Trajan right
IMPERATOR VIII / S C [in ex.] Trajan seated right on platform with two officers, a commander, six soldiers and a horse before the platform.
RIC 656 [R]; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 105/72
Charles S
1411 files on 16 page(s) 1

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