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Search results - "Postumus"
cc50283b.jpg
118 viewsPOSTUMUS: Double sestertius,
21.62g.

MINT: COLOGNE

IMP. C. M. CASS. LAT. POSTVMVS P. F. AVG. radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC DEVSONIE[NSI] Hercules standing l. holding club and lionskin, within four-columned temple with three pellets in pediment.

Bastien-231 (7 spec.), C-99 (30 Fr.), RIC-134 (R2).
1 commentspostumus
cc50283a.jpg
113 viewsPOSTUMUS: Double sestertius,
21.62g.

MINT: COLOGNE

IMP. C. M. CASS. LAT. POSTVMVS P. F. AVG. radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC DEVSONIE[NSI] Hercules standing l. holding club and lionskin, within four-columned temple with three pellets in pediment.

Bastien-231 (7 spec.), C-99 (30 Fr.), RIC-134 (R2).
postumus
POSTUMUS-1.jpg
35 viewsPOSTUMUS - 260/268 AD -Billon Antonianius - Lugdunum mint
Obv:IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REv: VIRTVS AVG, Mars standing right, holding spear and leaning on shield
Gms 3,1, mm. 23,3
RIC 93, Cohen 419
1 commentsMaxentius
POSTUMUS-2.jpg
36 viewsPOSTUMUS - 260/268 - Billon Antoninianus - Lugdunum mint
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Rdiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing left, holding olive branch and club
Gms 2,27 mm 23,2
RIC 67 Cohen 101
Maxentius
ABM_Postumus.jpg
81 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, sestertius, 260

IMP C M CASS LAT POST[...],Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in arms
Weight 15.49g

A very rare early issue with Postumus' full name given on the obverse - normally this only occurs on radiate double-sestertii. This is struck from the same obverse die as a gold medallion in Paris with a SALVS PROVINCIARVM reverse.
Adrianus
Postumus_sestertius_helmeted_bust.jpg
49 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, double sestertius
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, helmeted and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, spurning captive
Weight 20.07g

A very rare obverse type - this coin from the same obverse die as the examples illustrated in Bastien
2 commentsAdrianus
Postumus_VIRTVS_AVG.jpg
30 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, sestertius

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing right
Weight 17.35g
Adrianus
AE_Postumus_france.JPG
16 viewsAntonivs Protti
110561LG.jpg
6 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, A.D. 260-269. BI antoninianus (21 mm, 2.30 g, 1 h). Treveri, A.D. 261. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / P M TR P CO-S II P P, emperor standing facing, head left, holding globe and spear. RIC 54; Mairat 27-31; AGK 60; RSC 243aQuant.Geek
110353LG.jpg
10 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, A.D. 260-269. BI antoninianus (20 mm, 3.04 g, 7 h). Treveri, A.D. 266. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / FIDES [E]XERCITVS, four military standards. RIC 303; Mairat 120; AGK 20; RSC 65. Quant.Geek
rjb_cast1_07_05.jpg
673 viewsPostumus
260-269
AE 42 mm
Trier Mint (?)
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_p3_03_09.jpg
6322 viewsAE double sestertius
Trier Mint?
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP COS II PP SC
Emperor standing left holding globe and spear
Bastien 63?
mauseus
rjb_p8_03_09.jpg
6821 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM SC
Fides standing left with two standards
Bastien 68
mauseus
rjb_post_sest11~2.jpg
7232 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM
Fides standing left with two standards
Bastien 72
mauseus
rjb_p4_03_09.jpg
7521 viewsAE double sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM
Fides standing left with two standards
Bastien 75 (obv. die duplicate)
mauseus
rjb_p7_03_09.jpg
9217 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG SC
Victory walking left, captive at feet
Bastien 92
mauseus
rjb_p2_03_09.jpg
9927 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG
Victory walking left, captive at feet
Bastien 99c (obv. die duplicate)
1 commentsmauseus
Postumus_RIC_Lyons_67.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus22 viewsPOSTUMUS
AR Antoninianus, Lyons Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, RDC bust r. / HERC PACIFERO, Hercules st. l., holding olive branch, club and lion's skin
RIC V-II Lyons 67; Sear 10946
Sosius
Postumus_Sear_10940.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus11 viewsSosius
Postumus_Double_Sest_RIC_207.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus30 viewsPOSTUMUS
Double Sestertius, 15.89g
Radiate Bust r. / LAETITIA AVG, Galley
A Contemporary imitation, as indicated by the style and the fact that the E in the reverse legend is retrograde
Bastien 373; RIC 207
ex Harlan J. Berk
1 commentsSosius
Postumus_RIC_Cologne_315.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus20 viewsPOSTUMUS
AR Antoninianus, Cologne
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate bust r. / MONETA AVG, Moneta standing l., holding scales and cornucopiae
RIC V-II Cologne 315
Sosius
Postumus_RIC_Lyon_75.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus11 viewsPOSTUMUS
AR Antoninianus, Lyons Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, RDC bust right / MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae
RIC V-II Lyons 75; Sear (1988) 3116

Sosius
Postumus_RIC_Lyon_77.jpg
Gallic 1 Postumus12 viewsPOSTUMUS
AR Antoninianus, Lyons Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate draped and cuirassed bust r. / ORIENS AVG, Sol walking l., holding whip, r. hand raised
RIC V-II Lyons 77; Sear (1988) 3118


Sosius
Aureolus_RIC_Milan_388.jpg
Gallic 1.5 Aureolus11 viewsAUREOLUS
Rebel general, in name of Postumus
AE Antoninianus, Milan Mint
IMP POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust r. / VIRTVS EQVIT, Virtus walking right, carrying spear and shield, T in exergue
RIC V-II Milan 388,;de Witte 363; Sear (1988) 3135
Sosius
Aureolus_RIC_Milan_377.jpg
Gallic 1.5 Aureolus15 viewsAUREOLUS
Rebel general, in name of Postumus
AE Antoninianus, Milan Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate bust r. / FIDES EQVIT, Fides seated left, holding patera and standard
RIC V-II Milan 377
Sosius
post1s.jpg
Postumus RIC IV 199 Lugdunum26 viewsSilver Antoninianus
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate and draped bust right.
Reverse: MONET AVG, Monet standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left.
Lugdunum (lyon) mint 21 mm diam., 3.9 g
sold 1-2018
NORMAN K
postume-dsesterce-herc-pacifero.JPG
Bastien 277 Postumus: double sestertius (Herc Pacifero)14 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Herc Pacifero (264-265/6, mint II)

Bronze, 15.52 g, diameter 26 mm, die axis 11h

A/ IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC-PACIFERO; Hercules, standing left, holding olive branch, club and lion’s skin
Droger
postume-salvs-provinciarvm-1ere-emission.JPG
RIC.abs Postumus: antoninianus (Salvs Provinciarvm)10 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Salvs Provinciarvm (1st emission, 1st phase, 260, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 2.19 g, diameter 23 mm, die axis 6h

A/ IMP C M CASS LAT POSTIMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SALVS PROVINCIARVM; the Rhine god recumbent left, right hand on vessel and left hand holding a scepter or a reed

EG.1
Droger
postume-salvs-prov.JPG
RIC.87 Postumus: antoninianus (Salvs Provinciarvm)10 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Salvs Provinciarvm (1st emission, 2ond phase, 260-261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.23 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 1h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SALVS PROVINCIARVM; the horned Rhine god recumbent left, right hand on vessel and left hand holding a scepter or a reed

EG.9
Droger
postume-herc-devsoniensi~0.JPG
RIC.64 Postumus: antoninianus (Herc Devsoniensi)9 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Herc Devsoniensi (1st emission, 3rd phase, 261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 2.40 g, diameter 23 mm, die axis 1h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC DEVSONIENSI; Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding bow and lion's skin

EG.15
Droger
postume-laetitia.JPG
RIC.73 Postumus: antoninianus (Laetitia Avg)21 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Laetitia Avg (1st emission, 3rd phase, 261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.63 g, diameter 23 mm, die axis 1h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ LAETITIA / AVG in exergue; galley left with 4 rowers and pilot

EG.19
Droger
postume-pmtrpcosiipp.JPG
RIC.54 Postumus: antoninianus (PM TR P COS II PP)7 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: PM TR P COIS II PP (1st emission, 3rd phase, 261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.13 g, diameter 23 mm, die axis 6h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ PM TR P CO-S II PP; Emperor in military attire, standing left, holding spear and tropy

EG.19
Droger
postume-victoria.JPG
RIC.89 Postumus: antoninianus (Victoria Avg)23 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Victoria Avg (1st emission, 3rd phase, 261, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.25 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 1h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ VICT-OR-IA AVG; Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm; seated captive to left

EG.22
1 commentsDroger
postume-herc-pacifero.JPG
RIC.67 Postumus: antoninianus (Herc Pacifero)44 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Herc Pacifero (2ond emission, 2ond phase, 262, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.37 g, diameter 20 mm, die axis 7h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC-PA-CIFERO; Hercules, standing left, holding olive branch, club and lion’s skin

Curious Postumus' big nose.

EG.27
2 commentsDroger
postume-neptvno.JPG
RIC.76 Postumus: antoninianus (Neptvno Redvci)16 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Neptvno Redvci (2ond emission, 2ond phase, 262, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.40 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 7h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ NEPTVNO - REDVCI; Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident

EG.32
Droger
postume-virtvs.JPG
RIC.93 Postumus: antoninianus (Virtvs Avg)9 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Virtvs Avg (2ond emission, 2ond phase, 262, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.39 g, diameter 22 mm, die axis 2h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ VIRT-VS AVG; Mars standing right, holding spear and leaning on shield

EG.35
Droger
postume-mars.JPG
RIC.57 Postumus: antoninianus (P M TR P IIII COS III P P)18 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antonianus: P M TR P IIII COS III P P (3rd émission, 1st phase, 263-265, Trèves)

Billon (150 ‰), 4.27 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 1 h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ PP M TR P-IIII-COS III PP; Mars walking right with spear and trophy.

EG.36
Droger
postume-herc-devsoniensi.JPG
RIC.66 Postumus: antoninianus (Herc Devsoniensi)10 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Felicitas Avg (3rd emission, 1st phase, 263-265, Trèves)

Billon (150 ‰), 4.09 g, diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 7 h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC DEV-SONIENSI; Hercules standing left in temple of four columns, leaning on club and holding lion's skin


EG.40
Droger
postume-felicitas.JPG
RIC.58 Postumus: antoninianus (Felicitas Avg)19 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Felicitas Avg (3rd emission, 2ond phase, 263-265, Trèves)

Billon (100 ‰), 2.91 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 7 h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ FELICI-T-AS AVG; Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus in right, cornucopia in left

EG.44
Droger
postume-saecvli-felicitas.JPG
RIC.325 Postumus: antoninianus (Saecvli Felicitas)8 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Saecvli Felicitas (4th emission, 1st phase, 266, Trèves)

Billon (100 ‰), 3.86 g, diameter 22 mm, die axis 6h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SAECVLI FELICITAS; emperor standing right, holding globe and spear

EG.67
Droger
postume-salvs.JPG
RIC.86 Postumus: antoninianus (Salvs Avg)7 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Salvs Avg (4th emission, 1st phase, 266, Trèves)

Billon (100 ‰), 3.46 g, diameter 18-21 mm, die axis 7h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ SALV-S AVG; Esculape standing, facing, looking left, leaning on a staff on which a snake is wrapped. At foot, a globe on the right

EG.70
Droger
postume-ubertas.JPG
RIC.330 Postumus: antoninianus (Vbertas Avg)16 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Vbertas Avg (4th emission, 2ond phase, 267, Trèves)

Billon (100 ‰), 3.08 g, diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 12 h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ VBERTAS AVG; Ubertas standing left, holding ear in right and cornucopia in left

EG.83
Droger
postume-pax.JPG
RIC.318 Postumus: antoninianus (Pax Avg P)14 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Pax Avg (6th emission, 268, Trèves)

Billon (20 ‰), 2.79 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 12 h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ PA-X AVG/ P|-; Pax standing left, holding an olive-branch and a sceptre

EG.110
Droger
postumus.jpg
(0259) POSTUMUS50 views259 - 268 AD
BILLON ANT. 23 mm 5.43 g
O:IMP C POSTVUVS PF AVG
RAD DR CUIR BUST RIGHT
R: MONETA AVG
MONETA STANDING L HOLDING SCALES AND CORNUCOPIA
laney
Augustus_AE-Postumus-Dup-Under-Tiberius_DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-dot-PATER-Radiate-head-left_PROVIDENT-Altar-large-S-C-on-either-side__RIC-81_C-228_Rome_22-23-AD-_Q-001_27-28mm_10,55g-s.jpg
002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #1278 views002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #1
avers:- DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-•-PATER, Radiate head left.
revers:- PROVIDENT, Altar large S-C on either side.
exe: S/C//PROVIDENT, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 10,55g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 22-23 A.D., ref: RIC-I-81, C-228,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Augustus_AE-Postum-Dup-Under-Tiberius_DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-two-dot-PATER-Radiate-head-left_PROVIDENT-Altar-large-S-C_RIC-81_C-228_Rome_22-3-AD-_Q-002_axis-5h_26-27,5mm_10,47g-s.jpg
002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #2338 views002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #2
avers:- DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-:-PATER, Radiate head left.
revers:- PROVIDENT, Altar large S-C on either side.
exe: S/C//PROVIDENT, diameter: 26-27,5mm, weight: 10,47g, axis:- 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 22-23 A.D., ref: RIC-I-81, C-228,
Q-002
4 commentsquadrans
Augustus_AE-AS_C-CAESAR-AVG-GERMANICVS-PON-M-TR-POT_PROVIDEx_S-C_RIC-xx_BMC-xx_C-xx_Rome-40-41-AD_Q-001_h_29mm_9,88gx-s.jpg
002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #385 views002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #3
avers:- DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-:-PATER, Radiate head left.
revers:- PROVIDENT, Altar large S-C on either side.
exe: S/C//PROVIDENT, diameter: 28-29mm, weight: 9,85g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 22-23 A.D., ref: RIC-I-81, C-228,
Q-003
quadrans
Augustus_AE-Post-Dup-Under-Tiberius_DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-P-dot-ATER-Radiate-head-left_PROVIDENT-Altar-large-S-C__RIC-81_C-228_Rome_22-23-AD-_Q-004_5h_27,5-28,5mm_10,19g-s.jpg
002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #4105 views002a Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), RIC I 081, Rome, AE-As, PROVIDENT, Postumus, Under Tiberius, #4
avers: DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-P•ATER, Radiate head left.
revers: PROVIDENT, Altar large S-C on either side.
exe: S/C//PROVIDENT, diameter: 27,5-28,5mm, weight: 10,19g, axis:5h,
mint: Rome, date: 22-23 A.D., ref: RIC-I-81, C-228,
Q-004
1 commentsquadrans
046.jpg
044 POSTUMUS7 viewsEMPEROR: Postumus
DENOMINATION: Antoninianus
OBVERSE: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from front
REVERSE: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left with scales & cornucopiae.
DATE: 260-268 AD
MINT: Cologne
WEIGHT: 3.55 g
RIC: V.II.75
Barnaba6
Personajes_Imperiales_7.jpg
07 - Personalities of the Empire50 viewsVolusian, Corn. Supera, Valerian I, Mariniana, Gallienus, Salonina, Valerian II, Saloninus, Regalianus, Dryantilla, Macrianus, Quietus, Postumus and Laelianus.mdelvalle
88a.jpg
088a Postumus. AR-bill. anoninianus15 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG rad. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: PAX AVG Pax std. l. holding olive branch ad sceptre
hill132
88b.jpg
088b Postumus. AR-bill. antoninianus21 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG rad. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: PAX AVG Pax std. l. holding olive branch and sceptre
1 commentshill132
88c.jpg
088c Postumus. AR-bill. antoninanus16 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG rad. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: NEPTVNO REDVCI Neptune std. l. holding dolpin and trident,to l. forpart of vessel
hill132
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_LAETITIA-AVG_RIC-73-p-_C-167_Lugdunum_260-69-AD___Q-001_7h_22mm_3,02ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne (???), RIC V-II 073, AE-Antoninianus, LAETITIA AVG, Galley right, #1324 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne (???), RIC V-II 073, AE-Antoninianus, LAETITIA AVG, Galley right, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: LAETITIA AVG, Galley right.
exergue: -/-//AVG, diameter: 22mm, weight: 3,02g, axis: 7h,
mint: Cologne? or Trier?, (Lugdunum? are an error in RIC V-II), date: 260-69 AD.,
ref: RIC V-II 73, RSC 167, Sear 10958,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_MONETA-AVG_RIC-V-II-75a-p-343_C-199_260-69-AD_Q-001_6h_21,5mm_4,11ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne (???), RIC V-II 75v., AE-Antoninianus, MONETA AVG, Moneta left, #1204 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne (???), RIC V-II 75v., AE-Antoninianus, MONETA AVG, Moneta left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS•P•F•AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
reverse: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left,
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 4,11g, axes: 6h,
mint: ???, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 75v., RSC 199a, Sear 3116, (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_PAX-AVG_P-left-field_RIC-V-II-318-p-363_Cologne_260-69_AD_Q-001_0h_20mm_3,05ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne, RIC V-II 318, AE-Antoninianus, P/-//--, AVG, Pax left, #1210 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Cologne, RIC V-II 318, AE-Antoninianus, P/-//--, AVG, Pax left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing left with branch and scepter, P in left field.
exergue: P/-//--, diameter: 20,0mm, weight: 3,05g, axes: 0h,
mint: Cologne, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 318, RSC 215, Elmer 333, Sear 10966,
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-P-F-AVG_P_M_TR_P_COS_II_P_P_RIC-V-II-54_p-_C-243_260-69_AD_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 054v., AE-Antoninianus, P M TR P COS II P P, Postumus standing left, #1128 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 054v., AE-Antoninianus, P M TR P COS II P P, Postumus standing left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS•P•F•AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
reverse: P M TR P COS II P P, Postumus standing left with globe and spear.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 054v., Cohen 243, Sear 10971. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-P-F-AVG_P_M_TR_P_COS_III_P_P_RIC-V-II-55_p-_RSC-261var_,_Lugd,_261-2-AD_Q-001_0h_19,5-22,5mm_3,58g-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 055, AE-Antoninianus, P M TR P COS III P P, Postumus standing left, #1126 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 055, AE-Antoninianus, P M TR P COS III P P, Postumus standing left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: P M TR P COS III P P, Postumus standing left with globe and spear.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-22,5mm, weight: 3,58g, axes: 0h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 261-262 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 055, RSC 261var., Sear 10972,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_FIDES-MILITVM_RIC-V-II-p-_C-x__260-69_AD_Q-001_1h_21,5mm_4,04ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 059v., AE-Antoninianus, FIDES MILITVM, Fides left with two standards, #1174 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 059v., AE-Antoninianus, FIDES MILITVM, Fides left with two standards, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS•P•F•AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides left with two standards,
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5mm, weight: 4,04g, axes: 1h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 59v., Cohen 67, Sear 10940, (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-dotPdotFdot-AVG_HERC-DEVS-ONIENSI_RIC-VII-64v-p-342-C-91v_(dots_in_legend_not_in_RIC)_AD_Scarce_Q-001_axis-5h_22-23mm_3,26g-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 064v., AE-Antoninianus, HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing right, #166 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 064v., AE-Antoninianus, HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing right, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS•P•F•AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
reverse: HERC DEVS ONIENSI, Hercules standing right, leaning on the club, holding lion's skin and bow.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0-23,0mm, weight: 3,26g, axes:5h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 64v., Elmer 187, Cohen 91v., (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_HERC-PACIFERO_RIC-VII-67-p-342-3C_Lugdunum_AD_Q-001_2h_21-22mm_3,37ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 067, AE-Antoninianus, HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, #1173 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 067, AE-Antoninianus, HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, holding olive branch and club.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-22,0mm, weight: 3,37g, axes: 2h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 67, RSC 101, Sear 10946,
Q-001
quadrans
098_Postumus_(260-269_A_D_),_Lugdunum,_RIC_V-II_74,_AE-Ant,_IMP_C_POSTVMVS_P_F_AVG,_MINER_FAVTR,_Cohen_195,_Sear_10961,_Q-001,_0h,_21,5-22,5mm,_3,54g-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 074v., AE-Antoninianus, MINER FAVTR, Minerva advancing left carrying olive branch, #169 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 074v., AE-Antoninianus, MINER FAVTR, Minerva advancing left carrying olive branch, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS•P•F•AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
reverse: MINER FAVTR, Minerva advancing left carrying olive branch, spear, and shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22,5mm, weight: 3,54g, axes: 0h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 074v., Cohen 195, Sear 10961, (dots in legend not in RIC !!!)
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_PROVIDENT-IA-AVG_RIC-V-II-221-p-355-3C_Lugdunum_AD_Q-001_1h_19-22mm_2,45ga-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 080, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1175 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 080, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: PROVIDENT IA AVG, Providentia standing left,
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0-22,0mm, weight: 2,45g, axes: 1h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 265-268 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 080, Sear 10979, Cunetio 2415, RSC 295a,
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-V-II-234-p-355_C-386_Lugdunum-AD_Q-001_5h_21-24mm_2,62gax-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 089, AE-Antoninianus, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, #1204 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC V-II 089, AE-Antoninianus, VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm; seated captive to left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-24,0mm, weight: 2,62g, axes: 5h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260-269 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 089, RSC 377, Sear 10996,
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_PROVIDENTIA-AVG_RIC-V-II-323-p-_Trier_263-265-AD_Q-001_1h_21,5-22,5mm_3,78g-s.jpg
098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Trier, RIC V-II 323, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #174 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), Trier, RIC V-II 323, AE-Antoninianus, PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, #1
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers: PROVIDENT IA AVG, Providentia standing left,
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22,5 mm, weight: 2,45g, axes: 1h,
mint: Trier, date: 263-265 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 323, RSC 295a, Sear 10979,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Aureolus_AE-Ant_IMP-POSTVMV-AVG_CONCORDIA-EQVIT_S_RIC-_p-_AD-Q-001_11h_18,5-19,5mm_2,20ga-s.jpg
098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//S, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, #1179 views098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//S, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, #1
avers: (IMP C )POSTVMVS AVG, In the name of Postumus. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right. Attributed by Alföldi to Aureolus.
reverse: CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, foot on prow, holding patera and rudder.
exergue: -/-//S, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,20g, axes:11h,
mint: Mediolanum, date: 267-268 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), RSC-20a (Postumus),
Q-001
quadrans
Aureolus_AE-Ant_IMP-POSTVMV-AVG_CONCORDIA-EQVIT_S_RIC-_p-_AD-Q-002_0h_18,5-21,5mm_2,42g-s.jpg
098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//S, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, #2119 views098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//S, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, #2
avers: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, In the name of Postumus. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right. Attributed by Alföldi to Aureolus.
reverse: CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, foot on prow, holding patera and rudder.
exergue: -/-//S, diameter: 18,5-21,5mm, weight: 2,42g, axes:0h,
mint: Mediolanum, date: 267-268 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 372 (Postumus), RSC-20a (Postumus),
Q-002
4 commentsquadrans
098a_Aureolus_(267-8AD),_AE-Ant,_IMP_POSTVMVS_AVG,_VIRTVS_EQVIT,_T,_RIC_V_388(Postumus)_Mediolanum,_p-_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18-19mm,_2,57g-s.jpg
098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 388 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//T, VIRTVS EQVIT, Virtus advancing right, #178 views098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), Mediolanum, RIC V-II 388 (Postumus), AE-Antoninianus, -/-//T, VIRTVS EQVIT, Virtus advancing right, #1
avers: IMP POSTVMVS AVG, In the name of Postumus. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right. Attributed by Alföldi to Aureolus.
reverse: VIRTVS EQVIT, Virtus advancing right, holding spear and shield.
exergue: -/-//T, diameter: 18,0-19,0 mm, weight: 2,57g, axes:11h,
mint: Mediolanum, date: 267-268 A.D.,
ref: RIC V-II 388(Postumus), RSC 441 (Postumus),
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
rjb_p6_03_09.jpg
11351 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
VIRTVS POSTVMI AVG
Helmeted bust left with spear and shield
HERC DEVSONIENSI
Hercules standing right leaning on club
Bastien 113a (obv. and rev. die duplicate)
1 commentsmauseus
RI_115n_img.jpg
115 - Aureolus, rebel under Postumus - RIC Postumus 37217 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONCORD EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, foot on prow, holding patera and rudder, S in exergue
Minted in Mediolanum (Milan). A.D. 268
Reference– RIC Postumus 372. Cohen.20 -. Cunetio-. E.616. AGK.6 a
maridvnvm
RI_115p_img.jpg
115 - Postumus - Antoninianus - RIC 0724 viewsObv:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– IOVI PROPVGNATORI, Jupiter walking left, head turned right, hurling thunderbolt.
Reference– RIC 72. RSC 155a

3.49 gms, 23.07mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
RI_115o_img~0.jpg
115 - Postumus - Antoninianus - RIC 33118 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VIRTVS AVG, Emperor (sometimes referred to as Mars) advancing right, holding spear and shield, small captive to right.
Minted in Cologne. A.D. 266
Reference– RIC 331; Elmer 291; AGK (corr.) 103; Cunetio 2427.

A scarcer reverse type

All examples I have been able to find come from the same die pair
maridvnvm
RI_115o_img.jpg
115 - Postumus - Imitative AE As?35 viewsObv:- IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:- AMV above Galley, with rowers right, AMV below. Retrograde P to left?
cf. Bastien 310a-h (plate L = 50)

Atelier II

9.47 g. 25.42 mm
maridvnvm
RI 115b img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 05856 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left with long caduceus & cornucopiae
Reference(s) – Van Meter 10, RIC 58, RSC 39
maridvnvm
RI 115i img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 060 C14 viewsObv:- IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev:- FORTV-NA AVG, Fortuna, standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
Ref:- RIC 60 Bust Type C, attributed to Lugdunum
maridvnvm
RI 115h img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 064 C27 viewsObv:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules, standing right, leaning on club, holding bow and lion’s skin
Ref:- RIC 64 Bust Type C, attributed to Lugdunum
maridvnvm
RI 115g img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 067 A17 viewsObv:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped bust right
Rev:– HERC PACIFERO, Hercules, standing left, holding olive branch, club and lion’s skin
Ref:- RIC 67 Bust Type A, attributed to Lugdunum
maridvnvm
RI 115m img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 076 A35 viewsObv:- IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.
Rev:- NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing left with dolphin and trident.
Ref:- RIC 76 Bust Type A, attributed to Lugdunum

Nice strong portrait and reasonable reverse strike even though the legends are a bit weak.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 115l img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 089 C47 viewsObv:- IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev:- VICTORIA AVG, Victory, walking left, holding wreath and palm, at foot captive.
Ref:- RIC 89 Bust Type C, attributed to Lugdunum

Very strong portrait and somewhat weak reverse strike as it typical of the type.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 115j img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 093 C55 viewsObv:- IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev:- VIRT-VS AVG, Mars, standing right, holding spear and resting on shield.
Ref:- RIC 93 Bust Type C, attributed to Lugdunum
2 commentsmaridvnvm
rjb_p10_03_09.jpg
11949 viewsAE sestertius
Trier Mint
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left with hand raised
LAETITIA AVG SC
Galley left
Bastien 119
1 commentsmauseus
IMG_3691~0.jpg
125. Postumus (260-269 A.D.)20 viewsAv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Rv.: SAECVLI FELICITAS

Billon Antoninian Ø21 / 5,1g
RIC 83=325 Cologne , Cohen 331
Juancho
IMG_4807.JPG
126. Aureolus (Rebel under Postumus)16 viewsAv.: IMP POSTVMVS AVG
Rv.: FIDES EQUIT
Ex.: P

Billon Antoninian Ø20 / 2,9g
Elmer 612, Schulzki 18c, Cunetio 2479
Juancho
rjb_p5_03_09.jpg
146cf25 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
LAETITA AVG (sic)
Galley left
Bastien - (cf 146)
mauseus
TiberiusAsSC.jpg
1al Tiberius26 views14-37

As
Laureate head, left, TI CAESAR AVGVST F IMPERAT V
PONTIF MAXIM TRIBVN POTEST XXIII SC

This is one of a series of 12 Caesars pieces that were local finds in Serbia. There are better coins out there, but I'll hang onto these because they really got me into the hobby.

RIC 469

Per Suetonius: Within three years, however, both Lucius Caesar and Gaius Caesar were dead [in AD2 and 4 respectively], and Augustus now adopted both their brother Agrippa Postumus, and Tiberius, who was first required to adopt his nephew Germanicus [in 4 AD]. . . .

From that moment onwards, Augustus did all he could to enhance Tiberius’ prestige, especially after the disowning and banishment of Postumus [ca 6 AD] made it obvious that Tiberius was the sole heir to the succession. . . .

Tiberius acted like a traditional citizen, more modestly almost than the average individual. He accepted only a few of the least distinguished honours offered him; it was only with great reluctance that he consented to his birthday being recognised, falling as it did on the day of the Plebeian Games in the Circus, by the addition of a two-horse chariot to the proceedings; and he refused to have temples, and priests dedicated to him, or even the erection of statues and busts, without his permission; which he only gave if they were part of the temple adornments and not among the divine images. . . .

Moreover, in the face of abuse, libels or slanders against himself and his family, he remained unperturbed and tolerant, often maintaining that a free country required free thought and speech. . . . He even introduced a species of liberty, by maintaining the traditional dignities and powers of the Senate and magistrates. He laid all public and private matters, small or great, before the Senate consulting them over State revenues, monopolies, and the construction and maintenance of public buildings, over the levying and disbanding of troops, the assignment of legions and auxiliaries, the scope of military appointments, and the allocation of campaigns, and even the form and content of his replies to letters from foreign powers. . . .

Returning to Capreae, he abandoned all affairs of state, neither filling vacancies in the Equestrian Order’s jury lists, nor appointing military tribunes, prefects, or even provincial governors. Spain and Syria lacked governors of Consular rank for several years, while he allowed the Parthians to overrun Armenia, Moesia to be ravaged by the Dacians and Sarmatians, and Gaul by the Germans, threatening the Empire’s honour no less than its security. Furthermore, with the freedom afforded by privacy, hidden as it were from public view, he gave free rein to the vices he had concealed for so long. . . .
Blindado
PostumusAntVirtus.jpg
1de Postumus31 views259-268

Antoninianus

Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust, right, IMP C POTVMVS PF AVG
Virtus standing right, holding spear & shield, VIRTVS AVG

RIC 93

Postumus rebelled against Gallienus and ruled Gaul, Spain, and Britain. Eutropius wrote: When affairs were in this desperate condition, and the Roman empire almost ruined, POSTUMUS, a man of very obscure birth, assumed the purple in Gaul, and held the government with such ability for ten years, that he recruited the provinces, which had been almost ruined, by his great energy and judgment; but he was killed in a mutiny of the army, because he would not deliver up Moguntiacum, which had rebelled against him, to be plundered by the soldiers, at the time when Lucius Aelianus was endeavouring to effect a change of government.

According to the Historia Augusta: This man, most valiant in war and most steadfast in peace, was so highly respected for his whole manner of life that he was even entrusted by Gallienus with the care of his son Saloninus (whom he had placed in command of Gaul), as the guardian of his life and conduct and his instructor in the duties of a ruler.- Nevertheless, as some writers assert though it does not accord with his character he afterwards broke faith and after slaying Saloninus seized the imperial power. As others, however, have related with greater truth, the Gauls themselves, hating Gallienus most bitterly and being unwilling to endure a boy as their emperor, hailed as their ruler the man who was holding the rule in trust for another, and despatching soldiers they slew the boy. When he was slain, Postumus was gladly accepted by the entire army and by all the Gauls, and for seven years he performed such exploits that he completely restored the provinces of Gaul. . . . Great, indeed, was the love felt for Postumus in the hearts of all the people of Gaul because he had thrust back all the German tribes and had restored the Roman Empire to its former security. But when he began to conduct himself with the greatest sternness, the Gauls, following their custom of always desiring a change of government, at the instigation of Lollianus put him to death.

Zonaras adds: Galienus, when he had learned of [his son's death], proceeded against Postumus, and, when he had engaged him, was initially beaten and then prevailed, with the result that Postumus fled. Then Auriolus was sent to chase him down. Though able to capture him, he was unwilling to pursue him for long, but, coming back, he said that he was unable to capture him. Thus Postumus, having escaped, next organized an army. Galienus again marched upon him and, after he had penned him in a certain city of Gaul, besieged the usurper. In the siege, the sovereign was struck in the back by an arrow and, having become ill as a result, broke off the siege.
Blindado
VictorinusAntPax.jpg
1df Victorinus20 views268-270

AE Antoninianus

Radiate, cuirassed bust, right, IMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG
Pax walking left, holding olive-branch and sceptre, PAX AVG

RIC 55

According to the Historia Augusta: When the elder Postumus saw that Gallienus was marching against him with great forces, and that he needed the aid not only of soldiers but also of a second prince, he called Victorinus, a man of soldierly energy, to a share in the imperial power, and in company
with him he fought against Gallienus. Having summoned to their aid huge forces of Germans, they protracted the war for a long time, but at last they were conquered. Then, when Lollianus, too, had been slain, Victorinus alone remained in command. He also, because he devoted his time to seducing the wives of his soldiers and officers, was slain at Agrippina l through a conspiracy formed by a certain clerk, whose wife he had debauched ; his mother Vitruvia, or rather Victoria, who was later called Mother of the Camp, had given his son Victorinus the title of Caesar, but the boy, too, was immediately killed after his father was slain at Agrippina. [Scholars doubt that Postumus raised Victorianus to the purple, they he was one of his generals, and suggest a held power later during the time of Claudius.]
Blindado
rjb_2010_01_03~0.jpg
236742 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTIMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS PROVINCIARVM
Rhine reclining left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2367
mauseus
rjb_post_24_01_05.jpg
237232 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS PROVINCIARVM
Rhine reclining left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2372
mauseus
rjb_post9_11_05.jpg
237525 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG
Victory walking left, captive at feet
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2375
mauseus
rjb_post10_11_05.jpg
237725 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS AVG
Hercules standing right holding bow
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2377
mauseus
rjb_p1_03_09.jpg
237cf23 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS AG (sic)
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
LETITIA AVG (sic)
Galley left
Bastien: 353 (obverse die duplicate), cf 237 (rev)

Although Bastien lists 237 as reading LAETITIA AVG close examination of the plate coin shows it to read LETITIA AVG. It is not a die duplicate of this reverse.
mauseus
rjb_post1_11_05.jpg
238325 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
HERC DEVSONIENSI
Hercules standing right leaning on club
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2383
mauseus
rjb_post_25_01_05.jpg
238532 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
LAETITIA AVG
Galley left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2385
mauseus
rjb_post2_11_05.jpg
238621 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM
Fides standing left holding two standards
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2386
mauseus
rjb_post11_11_05.jpg
238729 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP COS II PP
Emperor standing left holding globe and vertical spear
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 1
Cunetio 2387
mauseus
rjb_post_05_08.jpg
239122 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP COS III PP
Emperor standing left holding globe and vertical spear
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2391
mauseus
rjb_post4_11_05.jpg
2394-520 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
HERC PACIFERO
Hercules standing left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2394-5
mauseus
rjb_post_7_01_05.jpg
2396-740 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
MINER FAVTR
Minerva walking left holding shield and branch
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2396-7
mauseus
rjb_post3_11_05.jpg
239835 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
NEPTVNO REDVCI
Neptune standing left, prow at feet
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2398
mauseus
rjb_post_10_01_05.jpg
240022 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS AVG
Virtus standing right holding spear and leaning on shield
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2400
mauseus
rjb_post_6_01_05.jpg
240130 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI PROPVGNATORI
Jupiter standing right throwing thunderbolt
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2401
mauseus
rjb_post1_09_06.jpg
240219 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI PROPVGNAT
Jupiter standing right throwing thunderbolt
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2402
mauseus
rjb_post5_11_05.jpg
240516 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG
Pax walking left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2405
mauseus
rjb_post_11_01_05.jpg
240627 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP IIII COS III PP
Virtus standing right holding spear and leaning on shield
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2406
mauseus
rjb_2009_10_14.jpg
240917 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
HERC PACIFERO
Hercules standing left in tetrastyle temple
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2409
mauseus
rjb_post_15_01_05.jpg
241337 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
MONETA AVG
Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2413
mauseus
rjb_post12_11_05.jpg
241420 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FELICITAS AVG
Felicitas standing left holding caduceus and cornucopia
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2414
mauseus
rjb_post_23_01_05.jpg
241521 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PROVIDENTIA AVG
Providentia standing left holding globe and transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 3
Cunetio 2415
mauseus
rjb_post6_11_05.jpg
241916 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
MERCVRIO FELICI
Mercury standing left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2419
mauseus
rjb_post_2_01_05.jpg
242144 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SERAPI COMITI AVG
Serapis standing left holding transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2421
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post7_11_05.jpg
242223 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
MARS VICTOR
Mars standing left leaning on shield and holding spear
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2422
mauseus
rjb_post_1_01_05.jpg
242526 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FORTVNA AVG
Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopia
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2425
mauseus
rjb_post1_11_07.jpg
242619 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SAECVLO FRVGIFERO
Winged caduceus
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2426
mauseus
rjb_post_08_07.jpg
242817 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PIETAS AVG
Pietas standing left holding two children with two children at feet
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2428
mauseus
rjb_post_8_01_05.jpg
243029 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
DIANAE LVCIFERAE
Diana standing right holding torch
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2430
mauseus
rjb_post17_11_05.jpg
243224 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES EXERCITVS
Four standards
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2432
mauseus
rjb_post2_11_07.jpg
243415 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS EXERCITI
Aesculapius standing left holding staff entwined by a snake
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2434
mauseus
rjb_post_12_01_05.jpg
243523 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVG
Aesculapius standing left holding staff entwined by a snake
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2435
mauseus
rjb_post14_11_05.jpg
243919 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VBERITAS AVG
Uberitas standing left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2439
mauseus
rjb_post13_11_05.jpg
244016 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VBERTAS AVG
Uberitas standing left
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2440
mauseus
rjb_post_16_01_05.jpg
244426 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SAECVLI FELLICITAS
Emperor standing right holding spear and globe
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 4
Cunetio 2444
mauseus
rjb_post_3_01_05.jpg
244783 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP VIII COS IIII PP
Bow, club and quiver
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio 2447
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_13_01_05.jpg
244923 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI STATORI
Jupiter standing left, head right, holding thunderbolt and sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio 2449
mauseus
rjb_post1_01_05.jpg
245038 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG
Providentia standing left holding branch and transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio 2450
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post8_11_05.jpg
245016 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG
Providentia standing left holding branch and transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio 2450
mauseus
rjb_post_4_01_05.jpg
2450 cf112 viewsPOSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, nude bust left, lion's scalp on shoulder and holding club
PAX AVG
Pax standing left holding transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio - (cf 2450)
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_9_01_05.jpg
245122 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
ORIENS AVG
Sol walking left, hand raised and holding whip
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 5
Cunetio 2451
mauseus
rjb_post_5_01_05.jpg
245323 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG P/-//-
Pax standing left holding transverse sceptre
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 6
Cunetio 2453
mauseus
rjb_post_14_01_05.jpg
245426 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
ORIENS AVG P/-//-
Sol walking left, hand raised and holding whip
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 6
Cunetio 2454
mauseus
rjb_post_22_01_05.jpg
245723 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
COS IIII
Nemesis standing right holding branch
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 6
Cunetio 2457
mauseus
rjb_post15_11_05.jpg
245923 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
COS .V.
"Nemesis" standing right holding branch
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 7
Cunetio 2459
mauseus
rjb_post16_11_05.jpg
2462-424 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IMP X COS V
"Nemesis" standing right
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 7
Cunetio 2462-4
mauseus
rjb_post2_09_06.jpg
246554 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PACATOR ORBIS
Radiate, draped bust of Sol right
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 7
Cunetio 2465
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_21_01_05.jpg
246822 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI VICTORI
Jupiter standing right throwing thunderbolt
Mint 2 (Cologne), Issue 1
Cunetio 2468
mauseus
rjb_post_vic_11_05.jpg
246951 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP X COS PP
Victory standing right inscribing shield VO XX
Mint 2 (Cologne), Issue 2
Cunetio 2469
"Suffolk" hoard
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_milan2_02_06.jpg
2473 bis35 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS AEQVIT -/-//-
Virtus walking right holding spear and trophy
Milan Mint, Issue 1
Cunetio -; Normanby 1355
mauseus
rjb_post_17_01_05.jpg
2479-8169 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES EQVIT -/-//P
Fides seated left holding patera and standard
Milan Mint, Issue 3
Cunetio 2479-81
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_18_01_05.jpg
248380 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
CONCORD EQVIT -/-//S
Concordia left holding rudder
Milan Mint, Issue 3
Cunetio 2483
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_19_01_05.jpg
2485-770 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VIRTVS EQVIT -/-//T
Virtus walking right holding spear and shield
Milan Mint, Issue 3
Cunetio 2485-7
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_post_20_01_05.jpg
249650 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVG -/-//P
Aesculapius standing left holding staff with snake entwined
Milan Mint, Issue 5
Cunetio 2496
mauseus
Posthumus-victory.jpg
260 AD - POSTUMUS - 260-268 AD - RIC 089136 viewsIMPCPOSTVMVSPFAVG - Postumus Radiate draped and curaissed right
VICTORIA AVG Victory advancing left, captive seated at her feet.

AR Antoninianus Rome Mint, 260-1 AD, 4.02g. Cunetio-2381 (770 sg. Cunetio-23pec), RIC-89.

Nice portrait !!!!
jimwho523
10513v.jpg
267-268 AD., Postumus, Colonia mint, Antoninianus, Zschucke 178.70 viewsPostumus, Colonia mint, 20th emission,
Antoninianus (20-21 mm / 2.83 g), 267-268 AD.,
Obv.: IMP POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: SAECVLI FELICITAS , Postumus standing right, holding globe and spear.
Zschucke 178 ; Cunetio 2444 ; RIC 83 ; C 331 .

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
rjb_02_07_09.jpg
282cf13 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II or irregular
IMP C POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PM TRP IIII COS III PP
Mars walking right with spear and trophy
Bastien cf 282 (rev)
mauseus
Z2157LG.jpg
308b. Saloninus (AD 258-260)149 viewsSon of Gallienus

Publius Licinius Cornelius Saloninus (242 - 260) was Roman Emperor in 260. His full title was IMP CAESAR CORNELIUS LICINIUS SALONINUS VALERIANUS PF INVICTUS AUG.

Saloninus was born around the year 242. His father was the later emperor Gallienus. In 258 Saloninus was appointed Caesar by his father (just like his older brother Valerian II, who had then just died, two years earlier was) and sent to Gaul, to make sure his father's authority was respected there. Saloninus lived in Cologne during that time of his life.

In 260 (probably in july) Saloninus and his protector, the praetorian prefect Silvanus, had an argument with the usurper Postumus about the distribution of some booty. Both fled to Cologne with some loyal troops and were besieged by Postumus. The troops elevated Saloninus to the rank of Augustus but the city was soon captured by Postumus, and both Saloninus and Silvanus were murdered. Gallienus, being on the other side of the empire could do nothing to stop him. Saloninus was probably emperor for about one month only.

AE Antoninianus (as Caesar)
OB: Radiate, draped bust, right
SALON. VALERIANVS NOB. CAES.
REV: Spes presenting flower to Saloninus
SPES PVBLICA
RIC, Vol. V, Part 1, #36
Antioch mint
1 commentsecoli73
coin247.JPG
309. Gallienus33 viewsOne of the key characteristics of the Crisis of the Third Century was the inability of the Emperors to maintain their hold on the Imperium for any marked length of time. An exception to this rule was the reign of the Emperor Gallienus. The fact that Gallienus served as junior Emperor with his father, Valerian, from 253 to 260 may have had something to do with his successes. Father and son each wielded his authority over a smaller area, thus allowing for more flexible control and imperial presence. Another, more probable reason, lay in Gallienus's success in convincing Rome that he was the best man for the job. However, Gallienus had to handle many rebellions of the so-called "Gallienus usurpers".

In 260, Valerian was taken prisoner by Sapor, King of Persia while trying to negotiate a peace settlement. Although aware that his father had been taken alive (the only Emperor to have suffered this fate), Gallienus did not make public Valerian's death until a year later. His decision hinged on the fact that Romans believed that their fate rose and fell with the fate of the Emperor, which in turn depended upon his demonstrating the proper amount of piety (Latin pietas) to the gods and maintaining their favor. A defeated Emperor would surely have meant that the gods had forsaken Valerian and, by extension, Gallienus.

Gallienus's chief method of reinforcing his position is seen in the coinage produced during his reign (see Roman currency). The coinage provides clear evidence of a successful propaganda campaign. Gallienus took pains to make sure that he was regularly represented as victorious, merciful, and pious. The people who used these coins on a daily basis saw these messages and, with little evidence to the contrary, remained supportive of their Emperor.

There were, however, those who knew better. During Gallienus' reign, there was constant fighting on the western fringes of the Empire. As early as 258, Gallienus had lost control over a large part of Gaul, where another general, Postumus, had declared his own realm (typically known today as the Gallic Empire). As Gallienus' influence waned, another general came to the fore. In time-honored tradition, Claudius II Gothicus gained the loyalty of the army and succeeded Gallienus to the Imperium.

In the months leading up to his mysterious death in September of 268, Gallienus was ironically orchestrating the greatest achievements of his reign. An invasion of Goths into the province of Pannonia was leading to disaster and even threatening Rome, while at the same time, the Alamanni were raising havoc in the northern part of Italy. Gallienus halted the Allamanic progress by defeating them in battle in April of 268, then turned north and won several victories over the Goths. That fall, he turned on the Goths once again, and in September, either he or Claudius, his leading general, led the Roman army to victory (although the cavalry commander Aurelian was the real victor) at the Battle of Naissus.

At some time following this battle, Gallienus was murdered during the siege of usurper Aureolus in Mediolanum; many theories abound that Claudius and Aurelian conspired to have the emperor killed. Be that as it may, Claudius spared the lives of Gallienus' family — Gallienus' wife, Iulia Cornelia Salonina, had given him three sons: Valerianus (who died in 258), Saloninus (died in 260 after becoming co-emperor), and Egnatius Marinianus — and had the emperor deified.

Gallienus Antoninianus - Minerva
OBVERSE: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate, cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: MINERVA AVG, Minerva standing right with spear and shield.
23mm - 3.7 grams
ecoli
rjb_p9_03_09.jpg
310cf38 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG?
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
LAETITIA AVG
Galley left
Bastien - (cf 310)
1 commentsmauseus
coin250.JPG
311. Postumus28 viewsPostumus was recognized as emperor in Gaul, Spain, Germany, and Britain. He set up the capital of his renegade empire at Cologne, complete with its own senate, consuls and praetorian guard. He represented himself as the restorer of Gaul on some of his coins, a title he earned after successfully defending Gaul against the Germans. The coins issued by Postumus were of better workmanship and higher precious metal content than coins issued by Gallienus.

In 263, Gallienus launched a campaign to defeat Postumus. After initial success against Postumus, Gallienus was seriously wounded and needed to return home. After his failed attempt at defeating Postumus, Gallienus was occupied with crises in the rest of his empire and never challenged Postumus again.

Aureolus, a general of Gallienus who was in command of Milan, openly changed sides and allied himself with Postumus. The city of Milan would have been critical to Postumus if he planned to march on Rome. For whatever reason, Postumus failed to support Aureolus, who was besieged by Gallienus.

Postumus, one of Gallienus usurpers, was himself challenged by a usurper in 268. Laelianus, one of Postumus' top military leaders, was declared emperor in Mainz by the local garrison and surrounding troops (Legio XXII Primigenia). Although Postumus was able to quickly capture Mainz and kill Laelianus, he was unable to control his own troops and they turned on him and killed him, since they were dissatisfied with him for not allowing them to sack the city of Mainz (Aur. Vict. 33.8; Eutrop. 9.9.1).

Following the death of Postumus, his empire lost control of Britain and Spain, and the shrunken remains of the Gallic Empire were inherited by Marius.

Postumus AR Antoninianus. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left with scales & cornucopiae. RIC 75. RSC 199.
ecoli
IMG_9258.JPG
311a. Aureolus7 viewsAureolus. Romano-Gallic Usurper, AD 267-268. Antoninianus (19mm, 2.17 g, 7h). Struck in the name of Postumus. Mediolanum (Milan) mint, 2nd officina. 3rd emission, mid AD 268. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Postumus right / Concordia standing left, holding patera and rudder; prow of galley to left; S. RIC V (Postumus) 373; Mairat 215-21; AGK (Postumus) 6b; RSC (Postumus) 19. Near VF, dark brown patina.

Aureolus was an extraordinarily capable general who served under Valerian and Gallienus. Around AD 258, Gallienus stationed a new cavalry unit at Mediolanum that was to serve as a quick reaction force against any new invasions along the frontier of the central empire. Aureolus was given command of this unit. In AD 260-261 his forces defeated the armies of the usurpers Ingenuus and Macrianus, and recovered the province of Raetia. Following these victories, Gallienus and Aureolus led a Roman army against the breakaway Gallic provinces under Postumus. Gallienus was forced to leave the field after being injured in battle, and left the campaign in the hands of Aureolus. Aureolus ended the campaign shortly thereafter, and while the reason is uncertain, the historical record suggests it was due to either his incompetence or else treachery (he had come to a secret agreement with Postumus). While the former seems unlikely, given Aureolus’ record, the latter is possible, as there are indications that he had been preparing for a revolt as early as AD 262. Regardless, at some point in AD 267, Aureolus revolted and established his base at Mediolanum, where Gallienus besieged him in AD 268. The details of the revolt are unclear, but it appears that Aureolus first appealed to Postumus for aid, and, failing to gain the Gallic Emperor’s support, declared himself emperor. About the same time, Gallienus was murdered, and was succeeded by Claudius II Gothicus, who continued to beseige Mediolanum. Soon, though, it appeared that an agreement was reached, and Aureolus emerged from the city to meet Claudius. Any such concord, however, was simply a ruse, as Aureolus was taken into custody and executed.
ecoli
coin251.JPG
312. Victorinus27 viewsMarcus Piav(v)onius Victorinus was emperor of the successionist Gallic Empire from 268 to 270 or 271, following the brief reign of Marius.

Victorinus, born to a family of great wealth, was a soldier under Postumus, the first of the so-called Gallic emperors. Victorinus held the title of tribunus praetorianorum in 266/267, and was co-consul with Postumus in 267 or 268. Following the death of Marius, Victorinus was declared emperor by the troops located at Augusta Treverorum (Trier, Germany), and he was recognized by the provinces of Gaul and Britain, but not Spain, which reunited with the Roman Empire.

During his reign, Victorinus successfully prevented the city of Augustodunum Haeduorum (Autun, France) from rejoining the Roman Empire. The city was besieged for seven months, before it was stormed and plundered.

Victorinus was murdered in 270 or early 271 by Attitianus, one of his officers, whose wife Victorinus had supposedly seduced. Victorinus' mother, Victoria (or Vitruvia), continued to hold power after the death of Victorinus and she arranged for his deification and, after considerable payment to the troops, the appointment of Tetricus I as his successor.

Victorinus is listed among the Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta. The (dubius) Historia Augusta equally has a short description of Victorinus the Younger, allegedly the son of Victorinus that was appointed Emperor by his family the day his father was murdered, and would have been killed immediately afterwards by the troops.

Victorinus antoninianus. IMP C VICTORINVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / PAX AVG, Pax standing left. RIC 118, Cohen 79.
ecoli
coin252.JPG
312a. Marius28 viewsMarius. AD 269. AE antoninianus.

Marcus Aurelius Marius was emperor of the Gallic Empire in 268.

According to later tradition, he was a blacksmith by trade who rose through the ranks of the Roman army to become an officer. After the death of Postumus he seized power, reportedly for two or three days, before being killed by a sword of his own manufacture.

This tradition is probably partially or entirely incorrect. Based upon the number of coins he issued, a more accurate length for his reign would be at least two or three months. Marius is listed among the Thirty Tyrants in the Historia Augusta.

Denomination : Bronze Antoninianus. Mint : Cologne.

Reference : RIC 5, part 2, page 377 #9. Sear-3155

Size : 16.9 x 18.0 mm Weight : 3.12 grams.

Grade : VF slightly off-centre.

Obverse : Radiate bust of Marius right, with IMP C M AVR MARIVS P F AVG around (the first half of the inscription is off the flan, but IVS P F AVG is clear.

Reverse : Felicitas standing left holding a caduceus and cornucopiae, with SAEC FELICITAS around.

At a glance one could confuse this coin with Postumus, as both Postumus and Marius have similar portraits and the part of the obverse inscription visible could be MVS P F AVG with the first part of the M off the flan. However, Postumus never issued this reverse type, so the coin can only be a Marius. (Description/Coin - Ex- Calgary Coins)
ecoli
Rjb_post_sest_04_05.jpg
37230 viewsAE double sestertius
Uncertain mint (cast)
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
HERC PACIFERO
Hercules standing left, club over shoulder
Bastien 372
mauseus
Postumus-RIC-318.jpg
62. Posthumus.11 viewsAntoninianus, 258 - 269 AD, Cologne mint.
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG / Radiate bust of Postumus.
Reverse: PAX AVG / Pax standing, holding olive branch and sceptre.
3.42 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #318; Sear #10967.

This is one of the last coins issued in the white metal alloy. Posthumus abandoned it later than most, and later coins of the Cologne mint are just bronze with a silver colored plating on them. See RIC vol. V, part 2, p. 328 - 330.
Callimachus
770Hadrian_RIC706~0.jpg
706 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 132-34 AD Galley left58 viewsReference
RIC 706; Strack 837; C. 657; Banti 337

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate head right.

Rev. FELICITATI AVG COS III P P S-C in field
Galley moving left with stearman and five rowers; vexillum on prow.

23.61 gr
31 mm
12h

Ex.
Stack's Bowers Galleries January 2013 N.Y.I.N.C. lot 5210

Note.
An acrostolium is an ornamental extension of the stem post on the prow of an ancient warship. Often used as a symbol of victory or of power at sea. (numiswiki)
1st-4th Century AD:
The Ship in Imperial Rome

Realizing its importance, Augustus established the Roman navy along lines similar to that of the legions. In addition to a number of key harbors, from which ships could be deployed, he stationed several fleets (Latin classes) in key areas throughout the empire. Among these, the classis Britannica patrolled the channel between Gaul and Britannia, protecting the shipping lanes. Its strategic regional importance is commemorated in the coinage of several of the period usurpers from the area. M. Aurelius Postumus was the first to do so (lots 676-679). His bronze ship issues carry the legend LAETITIA AVG, emphasizing the source of imperial well-being resides in a strong navy. The usurper M. Aurelius Carausius, commander of the classis Britannica under Diocletian, struck coins commemorating, in part, his control of that fleet and its abilities in keeping the sea lanes open (lot 680). His short-lived successor, Allectus, continued the type (lots 681-684).

One important function of the navy was the transportation of the imperial family on state visits. From the time of Augustus, vessels were dispatched to carry the emperor between the capital and the provinces. One such instance is commemorated in a rare bronze as, struck at Patrae in AD 66/7 (lot 609). The reverse depicts the quinquereme used to carry Nero on his infamous tour of Greece. Hadrian’s extensive travels were recorded with a wide variety of ship types struck at Rome (lots 610-622), and in the East (lot 623). An inscription from Ephesus (Syll. III 3241), records that a local captain, L. Erastus, used his ship to transport the emperor while he was in that area. A coin struck at Alexandria (lot 624) is of particular importance for, in the same year as the coin was struck Antinoüs drowned as the imperial party was sailing up the Nile. Hadrian’s successors continued to travel, now to shore up border conflicts or prepare for one of the periodic wars with Persia (lots 625-627; 631-675). By the middle of the third century AD local issues, rather than those minted at the imperial capital, recorded these events, a sign that the center of power was drifting away from Rome itself.

Warships were not the exclusive vessel of the Roman navy. Providing the empire with an uninterrupted supply of grain, as well as other necessary supplies, necessitated the construction of ship for such a purpose. Unlike the warship, which required speed and strength for ramming, the merchantman (Greek nau~ stroggulh; Latin navis oneraria) was of broader beam. Many of these vessels, like the ponto or more common actuaria resembled the shape of a trireme and could be powered by both oars and sails. Since ships of this type were used to transport vital commodities such as wine and grain, they, like the large ponto, are often those shown on coins from the Black Sea (lots 655 and 664-666). The great Roman merchantman, or corbita, often seen in part on imperial issues commemorating the annona, is more familiar (lots 607-608). Powered by two large sails, it featured a rear cabin in the shape of a swan and was the true workhorse of Roman merchant vessels; its type continued well into the Byzantine period.
3 commentsokidoki
Antoniniano Postumo RIC 59.jpg
88-02 - POSTUMO (260 - 269 D.C.)39 viewsAR Antoniniano 23 x 21 mm 4.1 gr.

Anv: "IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDES MILITVM" - Fides (La Fidelidad) de pié a izquierda, portando un estandarte militar en cada mano de sus brazos extendidos.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 260 - 261 D.C.
Ceca: Treveri (Off.A) Hoy Trier - Alemania
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #59 Pag.342 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10940 Pag.359 (Cologne) - Sear RCTV (1988) #3109 - Cohen Vol.VI #67 Pag.23 - RSC Vol. IV #67a Pag.128 - DVM #13 Pag.267 - Cunieto #2386 - Elmer #133 - AGK #21 - Hunter #9
mdelvalle
RIC_59_Antoniniano_Postumo1.jpg
88-02 - POSTUMO (260 - 269 D.C.)7 viewsAR Antoniniano 23 x 21 mm 4.1 gr.

Anv: "IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado, vestido y acorazado, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FIDES MILITVM" - Fides (La Fidelidad) de pié a izquierda, portando un estandarte militar en cada mano de sus brazos extendidos.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 3ra.Fase 261 D.C.
Ceca: Treveri (Off.A) Hoy Trier - Alemania
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #59 Pag.342 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10940 Pag.359 (Cologne) - Sear RCTV (1988) #3109 - Cohen Vol.VI #67 Pag.23 - RSC Vol. IV #67a Pag.128 - DVM #13 Pag.267 - Cunetio #2386 - Elmer #133 - AGK #21 - Hunter #9 - L.E.G.PPS #16 P.XXIV
mdelvalle
Antoniniano Postumo RIC 320.jpg
88-04 - POSTUMO (260 - 269 D.C.)41 viewsAR Antoniniano 23 x 22 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y vestido, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETAS AVG" - Pietas (La Piedad) de pié a izquierda, sosteniendo un niño en cada uno de sus brazos. A sus piés dos niños mas uno a cada lado.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión 266 D.C.
Ceca: Treveri (Off.B) Hoy Trier - Alemania
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #320 Pag.363 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10969 pag.362 (Cologne) - Cohen Vol.VI #230 Pag.39/40 - RSC Vol. IV #230 Pag.132- DVM #40 Pag.268 - Cunieto #2428 - Elmer #395 - AGK #58 - Hunter #730
mdelvalle
RIC_320_Antoniniano_Postumo.jpg
88-04 - POSTUMO (260 - 269 D.C.)11 viewsAR Antoniniano 23 x 22 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG" - Busto radiado y vestido, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PIETAS AVG" - Pietas (La Piedad) de pié a izquierda, sosteniendo un niño en cada uno de sus brazos. A sus piés dos niños mas uno a cada lado.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión 266 D.C.
Ceca: Treveri (Off.B) Hoy Trier - Alemania
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.V Parte II #320 Pag.363 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10969 pag.362 (Cologne) - Cohen Vol.VI #230 Pag.39/40 - RSC Vol. IV #230 Pag.132- DVM #40 Pag.268 - Cunetio #2428 - Elmer #395 - AGK #58 - Hunter #730 - L.E.G.PPS #65 P.XXVII

mdelvalle
R662_Postumus_portrait.jpg
AD 260-269 - POSTVMVS6 viewsPostumus

Marcus Cassianius Latinius Postumus was a Roman commander of Batavian origin who ruled as emperor in the west "founding" the "Gallic Empire".

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa55 viewsAgrippa, as (struck under Caligula).
Son-in-law of Augustus.
RIC 58.
11,37 g, 28-29 mm.
Rome, 37-41 A.D.
Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown.
Rev. S C either side of Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a renowned Roman general and close friend of Octavian (Augustus). As general, Agrippa defeated the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. In 21 B.C., Augustus married his own daughter Julia to Agrippa. By Julia, Agrippa had two daughters, Vipsania Julia Agrippina and Vipsania Agrippina maior, and three sons, Gaius, Lucius and Agrippa Postumus.
1 commentsMarsman
Postumus3.jpg
Antoninianus of Postumus34 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus. 259-268 AD

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right / HERC DEVSONIENSI ("Hercules of Deuson"). Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding lion's skin and bow. Mint: ? (possibly Lyon)

RIC 64, Elmer 187, Cohen 91
Belisarius
postumus.jpg
Antoninianus of Postumus15 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus, minted between 266-267 AD

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right

Reverse: SAECVLI FELICTAS, Postumus standing right with spear & globe.

Attribution: RIC 83
chuy1530
augustus_RIC_207.jpg
Augustus135 viewsAugustus, denarius.
RIC I 207, RSC 43.
Lugdunum mint.
19.5 mm, 3.8 g
Obv. CAESAR AVGVSTVS DIVI F PATER PATRIAE, laureate head right.
Rev. AVGVSTI F COS DESIG PRINC IVVENT, C L CAESARES below, Gaius and Lucius standing front, each with a hand resting on a round shield, a spear, and in field above, a lituus right and simpulum left.

Gaius and Lucius were adopted in 17 BC by their maternal grandfather Augustus, who named the two boys his heirs. They were raised and educated by their grandparents. Lucius died in Gaul of an illness in 2 A.D and Gaius died two years later in Lycia, after being wounded during a campaign in Artagira. The death of both Gaius and Lucius, the Emperor's two most favored heirs, compelled Augustus to adopt his stepson, Tiberius, and his sole remaining grandson, Postumus Agrippa as his new respective heirs.

I love this Augustus portrait!
3 commentsMarsman
PostumusMilanEquit.jpg
Aureolus for Postumus118 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/[VIRTV]S EQVIT / / T
Mars walking right, holding spear end shield

Antoninianus struck in Mediolanum , third officina
C.442 - RIC.387 - Elmer 617 - AGK.111a

magnificient portrait
3 commentsgb29400
Aureolus FIDES EQVIT RIC 378.jpg
Aureolus for Postumus FIDES EQVIT RIC V/2 378138 viewsAnt, 19mm, 2.76g.

Obverse: IMP POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: FIDES EQVIT, Fides seated L with patera & Standard.

Exe: P

RIC V/2 378, 268, Common.

Milan. Struck by Aureolus in Postumus' name.
Robert_Brenchley
Aureolus VIRTVS EQVIT RIC 387 var.jpg
Aureolus for Postumus VIRTVS EQVIT RIC V/2 387 var53 viewsAnt, 17x20mm, 1.51g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VIRTVS EQVIT, Mars walking R with spear and shield.

Exe: T

Milan. Struck by Aurolus in Postumus' name.

RIC V/2 387 var, 268, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Baktria_Hermaios_SNG-ANS1416ff_1_53.jpg
Baktria, Hermaios10 viewsBaktria, Hermaios. 105-90 BC. AR Drachm (1.53 gm) postumus, struck 55-45 BC. Diademed bust of king r. with old portrait. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ EPMAIOY / Zeus enthroned, 3/4 l., hand extended, holding scepter. Karosthi legend Maharajasa tratarasa Heramayasa (of Great King Hermaios the Savior). VF. SNG ANS 9 #1416ff; Boperachchi Série 17A; HGC 12 #305; Sear Greek 7740.
Christian T
MISC_Bohemia_pragergroschen_Wladislaus.JPG
Bohemia. Wladislaus II (1471-1516)68 viewsBohemia. Wladislaus II (1471-1516)

Castelin __, Fiala/Donebauer 947, cf. Saurma 407/182

AR pragergroschen, 32 mm., Kutná Hora mint.

Obv: + DEI x/x GRATIA + REX x/x BOEmIE / + WLADISLAUS SECVnDVS, crown in center.

Rev: + * GROSSI * PRAGENSIS, crown double-tailed lion facing left.

The groschen of Prague (pragergroschen) were first minted in July 1300 during the reign of Wenceslas II (1278-1305), following the discovery of exceptionally rich silver deposits at Kutná Hora in 1298. It was struck, with the design essentials unchanged for roughly 250 years. The pragergroschen played the same role in central Europe that was played by the denier tournois further west. Its preeminence in Germany postponed the appearance of native groschen over much of the region for over 150 years.

The coinage was debased under Wencelsas IV (1378-1419), and none were minted during the reigns of Sigismund (1420-37), Albert (1437-39) and Ladislas Postumus (1453-57). When minting was revived toward the end of the reign of George Podĕbrad (1458-71), they were struck to a much lower standard, having a fineness of only 10 lot (625/1000) and a silver content of 1.69 gr., which was barely half that of the original pragergoschen of Wenceslas II. It was then reckoned 24 instead of 12 to the ducat, and fell further when it was debased (to a weight of around 1.25 gr.) toward the end of the reign of Wladislaus II.
Stkp
carus.jpg
Carus, early Sep 282 - c. Jul/Aug 283 A.D., Postumus Consecration Issue41 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC -, S -, ANS -, choice aEF, 3.06g, 22.7mm, 180o, Tripolis mint, obverse DIVO CARO, radiate bust right; reverse CONSECRATIO •, flaming altar, T - R across fields, XXI in exergue; dark toning
salem
agrippa.jpg
Corinth AE, Unknown Imperator.27 viewsCORINTHI, Bare headed bust right.

C MUSSIO PRISCO IIVIR C HEIO POLLIONE ITER, in a wreath of parsley.

The identity of the obverse bust remains a mystery. I submitted it for identifcation on the boards with both archivium and Curtis Clay responding. They also were unable to attribute the bust to either Augustus, Tiberius, Agrippa Postumus or Drusus!

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=55882.0

On Curtis's advice I contacted Dr. Michael Amandry, who completed a significant work on the subject of Romano-Corinthian coinage titled "LE MONNAYAGE DES DUOVIRS CORINTHIENS."

Dr. Amandry's reply stated that the die on my coin was similar to other dies of Augustus or Drusus, but was unable to differentiate further. The identity of the bust must therefore remain partly solved until I can collect further examples of this coin for comparison.
Will Hooton
MAntDeL14.jpg
Crawford 544/29, Marc Antony, for Legio XIV, Denarius, 32-31 BC.84 viewsMarc Antony, for Legio XIV (Gemina Martia Victrix), Patras mint (?), 32-31 BC.,
Denarius (16-17 mm / 3,63 g),
Obv.: above: [AN]T AVG , below: [III VI]R R P C , under oar right, filleted scepter or mast with fluttering banners on prow.
Rev.: LEG - XIV , Aquila (legionary eagle) between two military standards.
Crawf. 544/29 ; Bab. (Antonia) 123 ; BMC 208 ; Sear 369 ; Syd. 1234 .

Die Legio XIV wurde 41 v. Chr. von Augustus aufgestellt. Sie war seit 9 n. Chr. in Moguntiacum (Mainz) stationiert und kämpfte später unter Claudius in Britannien, wo sie 60 oder 61 n. Chr. half, Boudicca niederzuwerfen. Später war die Legion u. a. in Vindobona (Wien) und Carnuntum stationiert. Sie war an den Usurpationen des Saturninus und Regalianus beteiligt.

Legio XIV Gemina Martia Victrix was a legion of the Roman Empire, levied by Octavian after 41 BC. The cognomen Gemina (twin in Latin) suggests that the legion resulted from fusion of two previous ones, one of them possibly being the Fourteenth legion that fought in the Battle of Alesia. Martia Victrix (martial victory) were cognomens added by Nero following the victory over Boudica. The emblem of the legion was the Capricorn, as with many of the legions levied by Augustus.
Invasion of Britain
Stationed in Moguntiacum, Germania Superior, since AD 9, XIIII Gemina Martia Victrix was one of four legions used by Aulus Plautius and Claudius in the Roman invasion of Britain in 43, and took part in the defeat of Boudicca in 60 or 61. In 68 it was stationed in Gallia Narbonensis.
Rebellion on the Rhine
In 89 the governor of Germania Superior, Lucius Antonius Saturninus, rebelled against Domitian, with the support of the XIVth and of the XXI Rapax, but the revolt was suppressed.
Pannonian defense
When the XXIst legion was lost, in 92, XIIII Gemina was sent in Pannonia to substitute it, camping in Vindobona (Vienna). After a war with the Sarmatians and Trajan's Dacian Wars (101-106), the legion was moved to Carnuntum, where it stayed for three centuries. Some subunits of Fourteenth fought in the wars against the Mauri, under Antoninus Pius, and the legion participated to the Parthian campaign of Emperor Lucius Verus. During his war against the Marcomanni, Emperor Marcus Aurelius based his headquarters in Carnuntum.
In support of Septimius Severus
In 193, after the death of Pertinax, the commander of the Fourteenth, Septimius Severus, was acclaimed emperor by the Pannonian legions, and above all by his own. XIIII Gemina fought for its emperor in his march to Rome to attack usurper Didius Julianus (193), contributed to the defeat of the usurper Pescennius Niger (194), and probably fought in the Parthian campaign that ended with the sack of the capital of the empire, Ctesiphon (198).
In support of imperial candidates
In the turmoil following the defeat of Valerian, tXIIII Gemina supported usurper Regalianus against Emperor Gallienus (260), then Gallienus against Postumus of the Gallic empire (earning the title VI Pia VI Fidelis — "six times faithful, six times loyal"), and, after Gallienus death, Gallic Emperor Victorinus (269-271).
5th century
At the beginning of the 5th century, XIIII Gemina still stayed at Carnuntum. It probably dissolved with the collapse of the Danube frontier in 430s. The Notitia Dignitatum lists a Quartodecimani comitatensis unit under the Magister Militum per Thracias; it is possible that this unit is XIV Gemina.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
R662_Postumus_Diana.jpg
Diana - Antoninian - AD 260-269 (Postumus)16 viewsAR-Antoninian
Rev.: DIANAE LVCIFERAE Diana walking right, holding a long-handled torch in both hands; quiver on her back.
Ag, 3.66g, 20mm


for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
EB0846_scaled.JPG
EB0846 Postumus / Sol8 viewsPostumus 259-268, AE Antoninianus, Cologne.
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: ORIENS AVG, Sol advancing left, holding whip, right hand raised, P in left field.
References: RIC 316; Sear 10964.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.529g.
EB
EB0847_scaled.JPG
EB0847 Postumus / Victory9 viewsPostumus 259-268, Antoninianus, Cologne mint?
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P P AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: COS [IIII?], Victory standing right, with wreath & palm.
References: Cf. RIC 287, Cohen 31.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.197g.
EB
EB0848_scaled.JPG
EB0848 Postumus / Victory10 viewsPostumus 259-268, AE Double Sestertius.
Obverse: IMP CM CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICT-OR-IA AVG, Victory running left, holding wreath and palm, bound captive left; S C in exergue.
References: RIC 169.
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 16.714g.
EB
EB0849_scaled.JPG
EB0849 Postumus / PM TRP COS II PP14 viewsPostumus 259-268, Antoninianus, Lyons mint, 260 AD.
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: PM TRP COS II PP, Emperor standing left holding globe and spear.
References: RIC 54, Cohen 243; Sear 10971.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 3.471g.
EB
FIDES MILITVM-18~0.jpg
FIDES MILITVM163 viewsPostumus AE sestertius. Radiate bust right IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG / FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing between two standards. RIC 127, C. 73. 4 commentspostumus
postumus.jpg
Gallic Empire, Postumus, AD 260-26910 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 1.5g, 20mm, 7h; Uncertain Gallic mint.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG; Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: PROVIDENTIA AVG; Providentia standing left, holding globe and scepter.
Reference.: RIC V(b) Postumus 80, p. 343.
Notes: Baltimore Expo, rt.
John Anthony
aaposthumus.jpg
GALLIC EMPIRE/ROME - POSTUMUS87 viewsPOSTUMUS - 260-269 AD. Bronze antoninianus, RIC 77, VM 35, C 213, S 3118, VF, Cologne, 2.962g, 19.6mm, 0o, obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ORIENS AVG, Sol advancing left, right extended, holding whip, P leftdpaul7
22-post_3_sony.jpg
GALLIC EMPIRE/ROME - POSTUMUS26 viewsGALLIC EMPIRE/ROME - POSTUMUS (260-269AD) Billon Antoninianus. Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right. Rev.: IOVI VICTORI, Jupiter, nude, stands facing, head right, hurling thunderbolt with right. RSC 161a; Sear5 -. RIC V, Part II, #311. dpaul7
HERC DEVSONIENSI-03.jpg
HERC DEVSONIENSI185 viewsPostumus AE double sestertius. IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right / HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing in temple with club & lion skin. 4 commentspostumus
P MTR P COS II PP - 16.jpg
P M TR P COS II P P157 viewsPostumus Æ Double Sestertius. , 260 AD. IMP M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right / P M TR P COS II P P, Virtus standing facing, head left, holding globe & reversed spear. C. 248 - R.I.C. 106 Mint Cologne 1 commentspostumus
Postumus.png
Postmus Antoninian12 viewsPurchased in Bremen.
I suppose this may have a higher silver content than the traditional (billon) antoninians of the time since Postumus controlled for a time the silver mines in Spain (unless I am mistaken).
Alex F
40- Postumus.JPG
Postumus32 viewsBillion Antoninianus, Ludunum Mint. 260-269 AD
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate , draped , and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG: Victory advancing left with wreath and palm , treading on captive.
RIC 89
22mm , 2.8 gm.

jdholds
PostumusAntPAx.jpg
Postumus46 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/ PAX - AVG
Pax walking left

Antoninianus struck 263 -265 in TRIER, 3° emission
C.220 - RIC.78 - Elmer 333 - Cunetio 2405 - AGK.51
gb29400
013_50.jpg
Postumus21 views260 - 269 A.D.
Silver antoninianus, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right
5.14 gm, 22 mm
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Rev.: P M TR P COS II P P
Postumus in military attire standing left holding globe and spear
RIC V-II 54; Sear'88 3121
Lugdunum mint, 260 A.D.
Jaimelai
rjb_i10.jpg
Postumus10 viewsmauseus
rjb_i9.jpg
Postumus19 viewsmauseus
rjb_i8.jpg
Postumus12 viewsmauseus
rjb_i11.jpg
Postumus17 viewsmauseus
00265-Postumus.JPG
Postumus21 viewsPostumus Antoninians
21 mm 3.5 gm
O: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate Draped Cuir Right
R: PAX AVG
Pax standing left holding olive branch + sceptre
1 commentsJohn Campbell
coin95.JPG
Postumus7 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
PAX AVG
RIC V-II Cologne 318
ecoli
coin121.JPG
Postumus3 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus. 259-268 AD.

IMP C POSTVMVS dot P dot F dot AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right / HERC DEVSONIENSI, / HERC DEVSONIENSI,
Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding lion's skin and bow. Elmer 187, Cohen 91v.
ecoli
100_0642.JPG
Postumus19 viewsSilver Antoninianus 260 - 269

OB: IMPCPOSTVMVSPFAVG
REV: MONETAAVG

Lugdunum RIC V75
simmurray
100_0653.JPG
Postumus11 viewsObverse:IMPCPOSTVMVSPFAVG
Reverse: LAETITIA AVG

Galley left with 4 rowers and pilot

Exe: AVG - RIC43
simmurray
00postumus.jpg
POSTUMUS20 viewsAR antoninianus. Treveri . 268 AD. 5th emission. 3.28 grs.12h. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right . IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. / Jupiter standing front, head right, holding scepter and thunderbolt. IOVI STATORI.
RIC V 309. RSC 159a.
1 commentsbenito
100_6155.JPG
Postumus76 viewsBetter photo

Postumus Antoninianus. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / VBERTAS AVG, Uberitas standing left, holding purse & caduceus. RIC V-II Cologne 330


Treveri (Trier) mint. 4th emission, 2nd phase, group 2. Struck AD 267. RIC V 330; Mairat 136.
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
00postumus~0.jpg
POSTUMUS28 viewsAR antoninianus. Treveri . 268 AD. 5th emission. 3.28 grs.12h. Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right . IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. / Jupiter standing front, head right, holding scepter and thunderbolt. IOVI STATORI.
RIC V 309. RSC 159a.
benito
Postumus_Trier_RIC_V_329.jpg
Postumus42 viewsAntoninianus (2,94g - 20mm)
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
rev.SERAPI C OMITI AVG
Serapis standing left, raising hand and holding sceptre
Trier mint 267 AD
RIC V 329
1 commentsHolger G
Postumus_Sol.jpg
Postumus11 viewsAR Antoninianus
Trèves mint
struck in 267 AD
RIC 77, Cohen 213.
3.67g 21mm
Samson L2
coin9.jpg
Postumus13 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, holding olive branch & club. RIC 67, RSC 101, Sear5 10946.simmurray
postumuspax.jpg
POSTUMUS23 viewsAR antoninianus. Treveri, 268 A.D. 3,84 grs. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG / Pax standing left holding olive branch and scepter. PAX AVG.
RIC V 318. Cohen 215. RSC 215b.
benito
postumuspax~0.jpg
POSTUMUS19 viewsAR antoninianus. Treveri, 268 A.D. 3,84 grs. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG / Pax standing left holding olive branch and scepter. PAX AVG.
RIC V 318. Cohen 215. RSC 215b.
benito
558527_548147718555477_1648710427_n.jpg
Postumus 76 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus, Lyons. 259 AD. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PM TRP COS I PP, Postumus standing left, holding globe and spear. RIC V-II Lyons 537 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_1937_(1).JPG
Postumus35 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus. Cologne Mint ? 262-268 AD. Obv.IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate draped cuirassed bust r. Rev. MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
RIC 75.
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2456081_(1).JPG
Postumus21 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus, Lyons. 259 AD. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right / PM TRP COS I PP, Postumus standing left, holding globe and spear. RIC V-II Lyons 53

Better Photo
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
2.jpg
Postumus28 viewsSuperb bust left, with features of Hercules1 commentsSTEPHANE R
Postumus30_11g_S_11040.jpeg
Postumus13 viewsPostumus AE Double Sestertius (30.11g). IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing facing, head left, holding two standards. RIC 123, Cohen 74, Sear 11040.Molinari
Postumus.jpeg
Postumus11 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, AD 260-269. Æ Sestertius (11.87g). Treveri (Trier) mint. 1st bronze emission, 2nd phase, mid AD 260. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, IMP POSTVMVS P F AVG / Galley left, LAETITIA AVG. RIC V 144; Mairat –; Bastien 7; Banti 23.Molinari
cRy82mWxC5Ra7k7TB3boWz6E4ZAjLn.jpg
POSTUMUS2 viewsPOSTUMUS, ROMANO-GALLIC EMPEROR, 261 AD, 21MM, 3.85GM GALLEY LEFT. RIC 73.Ancient Aussie
PostumusBusteHerculePax2.jpg
Postumus bust with club and lion's skin PAX AVG83 viewsPOSTVMVS AV - G
Radiate bust left with club and lion's skin
R/ PA - X AVG
Pax standing left.

Antoninianus struck 268 in Trier
5° emission
C.218 - RIC.319 - Elmer 564 - Cunetio 2446 (7 ex) - AGK. 52b

large flan , 4,24 g
rare bust
1 commentsgb29400
PostumusPietas.jpg
Postumus PIETAS AVG71 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/ PIETA -S AVG
Pietas standing left, holding two children, two children at her feets.

Antoninianus struck 266 in TRIER, second group 4° emission
C.230 - RIC.320 - Elmer 395 - Cunetio 2428 - AGK.58
2 commentsgb29400
POSTUMUS-1.jpg
Postumus RIC V-II 7827 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
radiate and draped bust right
Rev: PAX AVG
Pax running left, holding olive branch and sceptre.
22mm 3.6gm
1 commentsOWL365
post.jpg
Postumus (260 - 269 A.D.)32 viewsAR Antoninianus
O: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
R: FIDES EXERCITVS Four military standards, hand on top of second, eagle on third.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck 266 A.D.
3.8g
20mm
RIC V 303; Cunetio 2432; Elmer 417; RSC 65

Scarce
1 commentsMat
Postumus_(260-269)_antoninianus_(AR).png
Postumus (260-269) antoninianus (AR)27 viewsObv.: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG (Draped bust of emperor wearing radiate crown) Rev.: VICTORIA AVG (Victoria walking left, holding wreath and palm, captive sitting at feet) Diameter: 23 mm Weight: 3,0 g RIC 89

According to the notoriously inaccurate Historia Augusta, Postumus was generally well loved by his people, 'while Gallienus spent his time in debauchery and taverns and grew weak in loving a barbarian woman.'
Nick.vdw
postumus-ant-felicitus-reshoot.jpg
Postumus (263-265 AD) AR Antoninianus, Treveri mint12 viewsRoman Imperial, Postumus (263-265 AD) AR Antoninianus, Treveri mint, 3.46g, 22.3mm, 1h

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: FELICI-TAS AVG, Felicitas standing left with long caduceus & cornucopiae.

Reference: RIC 58, RSC 39 A, Sear 10936

EX: Tom Mullally
Gil-galad
1b.jpg
Postumus (Aureolus), Milan mint, R/ FIDES EQVIT (Braithwell hoard)40 viewsPostumo, antoniniano battuto in suo nome da Aureolus (Aureolo).Impero romano-gallico (267?-268 d.C.). Zecca di Milano, I officina
AE, 3.43 gr., 17,0 x 19,0 mm; qBB (aVF)
D/: IMP POSTVMVS AVG, busto radiato e drappeggiato di Postumo,
R/: FIDES EQVIT, Fides seduta a sin, che tiene la patera e stendardo, officina in ex.
RIC 376; Braithwell Report #151 (questa moneta)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (21 aprile 2008, numero catalogo 27), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2007), ex CNG auctions (asta 176/2007, nel lotto 338), ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
DSC01696.JPG
Postumus (Gallic Empire) 260-269 A.D.41 viewsSilver Antoninianus, 24mm
Obverse: IMP POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: SALV-S AVG, Salus standing left feeding snake around alter, holding rudder in left on globe.
1 commentsDk0311USMC
00731.jpg
Postumus (RIC 124, Coin #731)6 viewsRIC 124 (C), AE Sestertius, Lugdunum, 261 AD.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: FIDES MILITVM; Fides standing left holding a signum in each hand.
SIZE: 31.8mm, 19.58g
MaynardGee
00351.jpg
Postumus (RIC 325, Coin #351)11 viewsRIC 325 (C), AR Antoninianus, Cologne, 265 - 268 AD.
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SAECVLI FELICITAS Postumus standing right holding globe and spear.
Size: 21.7mm 3.08gm
MaynardGee
00305.jpg
Postumus (RIC 58, Coin #305)8 viewsRIC 58 (C), AR Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 263-265 AD.
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Rev: FELICITAS AVG Felicitas standing left holding caduceus and cornucopiae.
Size: 21.3mm 3.88gm
MaynardGee
00778.jpg
Postumus (RIC V-2 58, Coin #778)9 viewsRIC V-2 58, Billon Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 265 - 268 AD
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
REV: FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing half left, long grounded caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand.
SIZE: 22.2mm, 3.62g
MaynardGee
234_Postumus_75.jpg
Postumus - AE antoninianus28 viewsTrier
263-265 AD
Issue 3
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia
M_ONET_A AVG
RIC V-II Lyons 75, C 199
3,24g 21,5-20,5mm
Johny SYSEL
Postumus Antoninien.jpg
Postumus - antoninianus37 viewsIMP. C. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG
PIETAS AVG , Pietas standing left holding two children, two more at her feet.

I love Postumus' portrait on this one, he looks like Santa Claus. Maybe it's because of the children on the reverse. The reverse die style is typically gallic.

RIC 320
1 commentsGinolerhino
Postumus 2.jpg
Postumus - antoninianus12 viewsIMP. C. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG
MONETA AVG. , Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopiae
RIC 315
Ginolerhino
Postumus 1.jpg
Postumus - antoninianus11 viewsIMP. C. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG.
COS. IIII , Victory standing right holding wreath and palm.

Minted in Cologne.
RIC 287
Ginolerhino
247_Postumus_67.jpg
Postumus - BI antoninianus24 viewsTrier
262 AD
Issue 2
radiate draped cuirassed bust right
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Hercules standing left, holding branch and club with lion's skin
HERC_PACIFERO
RIC V-II Lyons 67; RSC 101; Sear'88 #3112
3,97g 23-22mm
Johny SYSEL
Postumus double HS.jpg
Postumus - double sestertius31 viewsIMP. C. M. CASS. LAT. POSTVMVS P.F. AVG. , radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM , Fides standing left holding double-standards.
Ginolerhino
coin2a.jpg
Postumus - Double Sestertius - RIC 1439 viewsObv: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: LAETITIA AVG, Galley right with three rowers
Size: 28 mm
Weight: 20.6g
Ref: RIC 143, Cohen 179, Sear5 11049
vs1969
postumus-hercules.jpg
Postumus - Hercules26 viewsRoman Imperial, Postumus (260-269 AD) BI Antoninianus, Lugdunum mint, 2.4g, 22.0mm

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, holding olive branch & club. "Herculean Pacification"

Reference: RIC V-II Lyons 67, RSC 101, Sear5 10946.

Ex: Holding History Coins +photo
Gil-galad
PMTRPIIICOSIIIPP.jpg
Postumus - Mars111 viewsObv; IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate Draped Cuir Right. Rev; PM TR P IIII COS III PP; MARS advancing right holding spear and trophy. MINT of LUGDUNUM1 commentspostumus
MERCVRIOFELICI.jpg
Postumus - Mercurio118 viewsObv; IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate Draped Cuir Right. Rev; MERCVRIO FELICI; Mercury, half-naked stg. facing, lookin rigth, holding purse and caduceus. MINT of COLOGNE1 commentspostumus
6-post.jpg
Postumus - RIC 30925 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus.
Cologne mint.
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bist right
IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing facing, head right, with sceptre & thunderbolt.
RSC 159; Sear5 10954.
xokleng
postumo-1.jpg
Postumus - RIC 5417 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus.
Lyons mint, 260 AD.
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
P M TR P COS II P P, Postumus standing left with globe and spear.
RIC 54, Cohen 243; Sear 10971.
xokleng
postumo-2.jpg
Postumus - RIC 5713 viewsRIC 57 Postumus AR Antoninianus.
Lyons mint, 262 AD.
C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars walking right with trophy & transverse spear.
RSC 273a; Sear5 10974.
xokleng
3-post.jpg
Postumus - RIC 5924 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus.
Lyons mint. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left holding two standards.
Cohen 67, Sear5 10940
xokleng
5-post.jpg
Postumus - RIC 6020 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus.
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
FORTVNA AVG, Fortuna standing, head left, holding rudder & cornucopia.
Sear5 10941.
xokleng
2-post.jpg
Postumus - RIC 6421 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus.
Cologne mint.
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing right leaning on club.
Cohen 91, Sear5 10944.
xokleng
1post-ric89.jpg
Postumus - RIC 8923 viewsPostumus Billon Antoninianus.
Lyons mint.
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm,
captive at foot.
RSC 377; Sear5 10996.
xokleng
52af.jpg
Postumus - Rine124 viewsObv; IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate Draped Right. Rev; SALVS PROVINCIARVM; Rine reclining left, resting on urn, rigth hand on forepartof boat, l. holding anchor. MINT of LUGDUNUM postumus
postumus.jpg
Postumus A.D. 259- 26812 viewsPostumus A.D. 259- 268 Ӕ Antoninianus

21x22mm 2.8gm

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.


VICTORIA AVG; Victory walking l., holding wreath and palm, treading on captive.RIC V Lugdunum 89

Though attributed to Lyons in RIC, the mint is not certain.

Ex Victor Clark - 10.06.2018








Britanikus
postumus-providentia-reshoot~0.jpg
Postumus AE Antoninianus, 260 - 269 AD, Lugdunum mint25 viewsRoman Imperial, Postumus AE Antoninianus, (260 - 269 AD), Lugdunum mint, 2.9g, 23.3mm

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right.

Reverse: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding globe and transverse scepter.

Reference: Sear5 10979; RIC 80
Gil-galad
postumus_01.jpg
Postumus AE Double Sestertius48 viewsObv: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG - Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: LAETITIA AVG - Galley with four rowers on waves to right.
Date: 261 AD
Ref: RIC 143
oa
postumus110.jpg
Postumus AE reduced Double Sestertius - VICTORIA AVG53 viewsOBV: IMP C M CASS LATT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rx: - VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, captive at feet.
RCV 11065. 28mm, 10.5g.
Grade: VF by wear, but some flaking
recycled photo
cliff_marsland
postumus_ant.jpg
Postumus Ant.9 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC V 89, Van Meter 71, Cohen 377, aEF, reverse a bit flat, 3.785g, 24.3mm, 180o, Lugdunum mint;

OB: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
RE: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm frond, captive at feet; nice portrait, full circle centering;
grattius
Postumus_Antoninian_Köln_Kaiser_Globus_Lanze_Colonia_Agrippina.jpg
Postumus Antoninian Köln Kaiser Globus Lanze Colonia Agrippina 21 viewsRömisches Kaiserreich

Postumus, 259-268 AD

Münzstätte: Colonia Agrippina (Köln) 261

Antoninian

Vs: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Büste mit Strahlenkrone, Drapierung und Kürass nach rechts.

Rs: PM TR P COS II PP, Kaiser nach links mit Globus und Lanze.

Erhaltung: sehr schön

3,197 g. 22 mm.

RIC 54 (Lyon); Elmer, 129 (Cologne). _1279
Antonivs Protti
Postumus_2b.jpg
Postumus antoninianus53 viewsMONETA AVGTibsi
Postumus_1b.jpg
Postumus antoninianus52 viewsVIRTVS AVGTibsi
Postumus_Galley.jpg
Postumus Antoninianus20 viewsAR Antoninianus
RIC73, RSC167
24mm, 3.61g

It has been speculated that it may refer to an expedition of Postumus to Britain early in his reign, other say refer this to the activity that Postvmvs made ​​to secure the coasts of Gaul, who at the time were much infested by pirates.
2 commentsSamson L2
AADZb_small.png
Postumus Antoninianus6 viewsPostumus, emperor of the Gallic Empire, 260-269 AD.

Lugdunum. 260-269 AD.

21 mm., 2.52g.

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Bust of Postumus, radiate, draped, right, or bust of Postumus, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right.

FELICITAS AVG. Felicitas, draped, standing left, holding caduceus in right hand and cornucopiae in left hand.

References: RIC V Postumus 58

AADZ
RL
AADYb_small.png
Postumus Antoninianus10 viewsPostumus, emperor of the Gallic Empire, 260-269 AD.

Cologne. 260-269 AD.

21 mm., 2.80g.

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Bust of Postumus, radiate, draped, right, or bust of Postumus, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right.

IOVI STATORI. Jupiter, standing right, holding sceptre in right hand and thunderbolt in left hand.

References: RIC V Postumus 309

AADY
RL
Postumus.png
Postumus Antoninianus20 viewsPostumus Antoninianus

Obverse:
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Reverse:
MONETA AVG
Moneta standing left, holding scale and cornucopia
1 commentsHarry G
Clipboard~50.jpg
Postumus Antoninianus - Felicitas standing left13 viewsPostumus Antoninianus, struck 263-265 AD at Cologne mint.
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopiae.
RIC 58; Elmer 335,
Weight - 2,7g
Diameter - 20mm
lorry66
Postumus.jpg
Postumus antoninianus - RIC V 7526 viewsYou can see every last hair on his head. This coin is stunning in hand, the strike on the back is a bit off flan, but this is a seriously beautiful coin. My boyfriend picked it up, took a good look at it, and told me he thought Postumus looks a bit like Santa Claus. Tis the season, eh?EvaJupiterSkies
Postumus_RIC_83.jpg
Postumus Antoninianus A.D. 266/7 RIC 83, RSC 331, AGK 77, Sear5 1098345 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust bust right / SAECVLI FELICTAS, emperor, wearing military attire, standing right, holding spear transversely and globe. Treveri mint.
Maximum Diameter: 20.0 mm
Weight: 3.63 g
5 commentsTheEmpireNeverEnded
PostumusCASSLATRhin.jpg
Postumus Antoninianus CASS LAT r/ SALVS PROVINCIARVM102 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTIMVS P F AVG
Draped, cuirassed and radiated bust right
R/SALVS PROVONCIARVM
Rhine reclining left, resting on urn, right hand on forepart of a boat, left holding anchor, horns on his head

Antoninianus stuck summer 260 in Trier
1 st emission
C. - RIC. - Elmer - AGK.88a

rare issue
probably on of the first Postumus coin struck after his accession to power.
1 commentsgb29400
Postumus4.jpg
POSTUMUS Antoninianus RIC 75, Moneta13 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopiae

3.7g. 21mm

Struck at Cologne, 262-5 AD
Legatus
FullSizeRender~0.jpg
Postumus Antoninianus Victoria 22 viewsAR Antoninianus
Postumus, 260 - 268 CE
Diameter: 24 mm, Weight: 3.71 grams, Die axis: 11h

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS . P . F . AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust to right.

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG
Victory advancing left, holding wreath in outstretched right hand, palm frond resting over left shoulder. Captive seated to left at Victory's feet.

Mint: Probably Colonia Agrippinensis (Cologne)

Notes:
- A fine and unusual portrait struck early in Postumus' usurpation, mid to late 260 CE as part of Postumus' 2nd coinage issue.
-Silver content was still decent during this period, at around 20%.

Ex Poinsignon Numismatique, 2018
Pharsalos
Postumus double denarius, 259-263 AD.JPG
Postumus antoninianus, 259-268 AD47 viewsPostumus, AD 260-268
AR - antoninianus, 15mm
Treveri mint; 3rd emission, 1st phase; AD 263-265
radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Moneta standing left with scales & cornucopia
MONETA AVG
RIC V 75; Mairat 65
Ardatirion
Postumus1_opt.jpg
POSTUMUS Antoninianus, RIC 318, Pax21 viewsOBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: PAX AVG, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre
2.3g, 21mm

Minted at Cologne, 268 AD
Legatus
Postumus3_opt.jpg
POSTUMUS Antoninianus, RIC 323, Providence16 viewsOBV: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding globe & sceptre
2.90g, 21mm

Minted at Cologne/Trier, 263-265 AD
Legatus
Postumus2_opt.jpg
POSTUMUS Antoninianus, RIC 78, Pax27 viewsOBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate and draped bust right
REV: PAX AVG, Pax running left, holding olive branch and sceptre
3.8g, 22mm

Minted at Lugdunum, 259-68 AD
1 commentsLegatus
0005.jpg
Postumus AR Antoninianus102 viewsMint city I=Trier, 263-265 AD.
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing left, leaning on club and holding lion's skin; all within tetrastyle temple. RIC V 66, RSC 98a.
1 commentsPostumus
postumus.jpg
Postumus AR Antoninianus15 viewsOBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: MONETA AVG
Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia
RIC V 75, Van Meter 32, aEF
3.486g, 21.7mm, Lugdunum mint
1 commentsgoldenancients
pos_moneta.jpg
Postumus Ar antoninianus Moneta Avg Cologne12 views Obv. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev. MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left with scales & cornucopiae
Skyler
postumus32.jpg
Postumus Colonia Agrippinensis, 259-268 AD.13 views
Postumus Colonia Agrippinensis, 259-268 AD. AR antoninianus, 3.4 g.

Obv; IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev; VIRTUS AUG Mars standing right, with spear and shield.

22 mm
RIC 93.

Ex Steven Geer 10.07.2018
Britanikus
Postumus COS IIII RIC 287.jpg
Postumus COS IIII RIC V/2 28755 viewsAnt, 20 mm, 3.09g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate and draped bust R.

Reverse: COS IIII, Victory standing R, holding palm and wreath.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 6. 267 AD.

RIC 287, Common.

The obverse on this is extremely badly struck, with traces of the original rough surface of the planchet visible.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus DIANAE LVCIFERAE RIC 299.jpg
Postumus DIANAE LVCIFERAE RIC V/2 29963 viewsAnt, 20mm, 4.11g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: DIANAE LVCIFERAE, Diana walking R with torch and quiver.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 4.

RIC v/2 299, Common.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
PostumeDbleSesterce.JPG
POSTUMUS double sestertius66 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiated and cuirassed bust right
FIDES MI - LITVM
Fides holding 2 standards

gb29400
053A.jpg
Postumus Double Sestertius52 viewsRIC Vb 106 Lyons; Bastien 63; Elmer 213; C 248; Sear5 11052
15.40 g, 32 mm
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
P M TR P COS II P P S-C, Emperor standing left, holding globe and sceptre.
1 commentsMark Z2
PostumusSesterceArcTriomphe.jpg
Postumus Double sestertius FELICITAS Triumphal arch146 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTIMVS P F AVG
Draped, cuirassed and radiated bust right
R/ FELICITAS on entablature of elaborate triumphal arch. AVG in ex. , two captives seated either side of trophy on roof of arch.

Double Sestertius uncertain mint

C.47 - RIC.118 - Bastien 142,156

rare reverse
4 commentsgb29400
PostumeDbleSest_Laet.jpg
Postumus double sestertius Galley with mast83 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
radiated bust right

R/ LA[ETITI]A / AVG
Galley with four rowers and pilot travelling right on wawes. Galley with mast

Cohen.183
2 commentsgb29400
la_postumus_13.jpg
Postumus Double Sestertius HERC DEVSONENSI42 viewsPostumus "double Sestertius", 260-269 AD, Cologne.
Obv: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: HERC DEVSONIENSI, naked Hercules standing right, holding lion skin and bow left and leaning on club right.
29-30 mm, 13.35 g
Bastien 104
grade: by wear: aVF/F, bit rough.
1 commentscliff_marsland
10982.jpg
Postumus Double Sestertius RIC V 16634 viewsAttribution: RIC 166 Lugdunum
Date: 259-268 AD
Obverse: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS…., Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VICT….Two Victories attaching shield to palm tree, with two captives seated below, S C in exergue
Size: 34.02 mm
Weight: 25.3 grams
cliff_marsland
Postumus_sestertius,_259-263_AD,_Cologne.JPG
Postumus double sestertius, 259-263 AD, Cologne34 viewsPostumus
AE double sestertius
Cologne, 259-268 AD
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG
laureate, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
LAETITA, AVG in ex.
galley right
RIC V 144 var. (legend and bust type)

Ex Classical Numismatics Group E52, lot 119
Ardatirion
Postumus FELICITAS AVG RIC 58.jpg
Postumus FELICITAS AVG RIC V/2 5874 viewsAnt, 23mm, 4.19g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing L with caduceus and cornucopia.

Trier, Officina B.

RIC 58, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Felicitas_RIC_5b_325.JPG
Postumus Felicitas RIC 5b 32519 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, 21mm, 3.26g, 266 - 267 AD, Sear 10983, RIC 5b 325, Cunetio 2444
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, radiate draped bust right
REV: SAEVVLI FELICITAS, emperor standing right holding spear and globe
SRukke
Postumus_Felicitas_RIC_5b_58.jpg
Postumus Felicitas RIC 5b 585 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 263 - 268 AD, 3.81g, 21mm, RIC 5b 58,
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left with long caduceus and cornucopiae
SRukke
PostumusAntFides.jpg
Postumus FIDES MI - LITVM22 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS . P. F .AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/ FIDES MI - LITVM
Fides standing left, holding two ensigns

Antoninianus struck 260 - 261 in TRIER, 1° emission
C.67 - RIC.59 - Elmer 133 - Cunetio 2386 - AGK.21
gb29400
Postumus FIDES MILITVM RIC 59.jpg
Postumus FIDES MILITVM RIC V/2 5943 viewsAnt, 20mm, 4.57g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PP AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing L with two standards.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 1.

RIC 59, Common.

Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Fides_RIC_5b_380.JPG
Postumus Fides RIC 5b 3808 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, 22mm, 3.0g, 259 - 258 AD, RIC 5b 380, Sear 10940, Cohen 67
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, holding two standards.
SRukke
Postumus FORTVNA AVG RIC 60.jpg
Postumus FORTVNA AVG RIC V/2 6039 viewsAnt, 20x22mm, 4.28g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: FORTVNA AVG, Fortuna standing L with anchor & cornucopia.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 4.

RIC v/2 60 Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Posthumus_Galley~0.JPG
Postumus Galley18 viewsPostumus Billon Antoninianus, struck 260/261 AD at Cologne mint. 21mm, 3.71g
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: LAETITIA / AVG (in exergue), Galley going left.
RIC 73, Elmer 130, 186, AKG (corr.) 41, Cunetio 2385
474 specimens in the Cunetio hoard.
Romanorvm
Postumus_Galley_RIC_Vb.jpg
Postumus Galley21 viewsPostumus AE Sestertius. Cologne mint, 261 AD, 22.3g, 30mm
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
REV: LAETITIA AVG, galley right with four rowers, SC in exergue

Unknown reference, not found, possibly unpublished?
1 commentsSRukke
Postumus_Galley_RIC_73.JPG
Postumus Galley RIC 7317 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Cologne, 260 - 261 AD, 21.4mm, 3.5g, RIC 73, Elmer 130, 186, AKG (corr.) 41, Cunetio 2385, RSC 167, SEAR 5 10958
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: LAETITIA AVG, galley left with four rowers & pilot
Romanorvm
Postumus HERC DEUSONENSI RIC 66.jpg
Postumus HERC DEVSONENSI RIC V/2 6648 viewsAnt, 23mm, 3.82g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: HERC DEVSONENSI, Hercules standing R leaning on club and holding bow and lion's skin.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 1.

RIC 66, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Herc_Pacifero_RIC_5b_67.jpg
Postumus Herc Pacifero RIC 5b 674 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, 262 AD, Lugdunum, 3.47g, 22mm, RIC 5b 67
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
REV: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing left, olive branch in right hand,
club and lions skin in left
SRukke
Postumus HERC PACIFERO RIC 67.jpg
Postumus HERC PACIFERO RIC V/2 67148 viewsAnt, 21mm, 3.65g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing L with club, branch and lion skin.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 2.

RIC 67, Common.

Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Hercules_RIC_5b_67.jpg
Postumus Hercules RIC 5b 674 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 260 - 265 AD, Sear 10946, RSC 101, RIC 5b 67
OBVERSE: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing right, holding olive branch and club
lion skin in left
SRukke
Postumus_Hercules_RIC_64.jpg
Postumus Hercules RIC 6418 viewsPOSTUMUS, Silver Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 260 - 269 AD, 23mm, 4.32g, RCV 10944, RIC Vb pg., 342 64
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
REV: HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing right, resting on club, with bow and lion skin
Romanorvm
Postumus IMP X COS V RIC 289.jpg
Postumus IMP X COS V RIC V/2 28970 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.81g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: IMP X COS V, Victory standing R with wreath & palm.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 7. AD 269.

RIC V/2 289, Scarce.

Struck at the end of Postumus' reign, and silvered not billon.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus IOVI PROPVGNATORI RIC 72.jpg
Postumus IOVI PROPVGNATORI RIC V/2 7245 viewsAnt, 23mm, 4.03g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate and draped bust R.

Flan crack running across the lower part of the bust.


Reverse: IOVI PROPVGNATORI, Jupiter walking L with thunderbolt and eagle.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 2.

RIC 72, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus IOVI STATORI RIC 309.jpg
Postumus IOVI STATORI RIC V/2 30968 viewsAnt, 18x20mm, 3.98g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing R with sceptre & thunderbolt.

Trier, Issue 5, Officina B.

RIC V/2 309, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Jupitor_RIC_5b_311~0.JPG
Postumus Jupitor RIC 5b 31129 viewsPostumus, Lugdunum, 260 - 261 AD, 2.77g, 19mm, RIC 5b 311, RSC 161a
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: IOVI VICTORI, Jupitor standing right, hurling thunderbolt
1 commentsSRukke
PostumusLaetitia.jpg
Postumus LAETITIA AVG Galley97 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/LAETITIA aroung AVG in exergue
Galley to left with four rowers and a pilot.

Antoninianus struck 260 -261 in TRIER, 1st emission
C.167 - RIC.73 - Elmer 130 - Cunetio 2385 - AGK.41

nice portrait
3 commentsgb29400
Postumus LAETITIA AVG RIC 73.jpg
Postumus LAETITIA AVG RIC V/2 73123 viewsAnt, 22mm, 3.67g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate and draped bust R.

Reverse: LAETITA AVG, galley L with steersman and four rowers.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 1.

RIC 73, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Double_Sestertius.jpg
Postumus Laetitia Double Sestertius33 viewsPostumus
Gallic Emperor AD 260-268
AE Double Sestertius

O: ...S LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right

R: LAETITIA, AVG in exergue, galley with steersman and four rowers facing left
1 commentsGao
Postumus_Laetitia_RIC_5b_73.JPG
Postumus Laetitia RIC 5b 73 28 viewsPostumus 261 - 262 AD, Cologne, 21.44mm, RIC Vb 73, RSC 167, Sear 10958
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: LAETITIA AVG, Galley left with 5 rowers and pilot
2 commentsSRukke
Postumus MINER FAVTR RIC 74.jpg
Postumus MINER FAVTR RIC V/2 7469 viewsAnt, 22mm, 3.58g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: MINER FAVTR, Minerva running L with olive branch and spear and shield.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 2.

RIC 74, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_Moneta~0.JPG
Postumus Moneta18 views259-268AD Roman/Gallic Empire Marcus Postumus SILVER XF
Roman Empire / Gallic Empire (Gaul, Spain, Britain) 259/260 to 268/269 AD, Marcus Cassianius Latinus Postumus. Silver 2.89 grams, Sear 3116, RIC 75, RSC 199A
OBV: IMP. C. POSTVMVS P. F. AVG., radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right.
REV: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, holding cornucopia and scales.

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Postumus MONETA AVG RIC 75.jpg
Postumus MONETA AVG RIC V/2 75103 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.67g.

Obverse: IMPC POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing L holding scales and cornucopia.

Trier, Officina C, Issue 3.

Ric 75, Common. RIC also gives #315 with an identical description; #75 is atrributed as being from Lugdunum mint and #315 Cologne. As RIC's mint attributions for Postumus don't hold up, I've assumed the two to be identical.

1 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus_Moneta_RIC_5b_75~0.JPG
Postumus Moneta RIC 5b 754 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Cologne, 262 - 265 AD, 4.29g, 22mm, RIC 5b 75, RSC 199, Sear 10962.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, dra;ped and cuirassed bust right
REV: Monets standing left, holding cornucopia and scales
SRukke
Postumus_Moneta_RIC_75.JPG
Postumus Moneta RIC 7520 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Lugdunum, 259 - 268 AD, 3.2g, 22.69mm, RIC 75, RSC 199, Sear5 10962,
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left with scales and cornucopiae
Romanorvm
Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI RIC 76.jpg
Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI RIC V/2 7657 viewsAnt, 23mm, 4.28g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing L with dolphin and trident.

Trier, Officina 2, Issue 2. RIC 76, C.

A seriously worn reverse die, but this is typical of Postumus.

Robert_Brenchley
Postumus ORIENS AVG RIC 77v.jpg
Postumus ORIENS AVG RIC V/2 77v79 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.03g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: ORIENS AVG, Sol walking L, hand raised, holding whip.
P in L field.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 6.

RIC 77v

Some silvering remaining.
1 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus PACATOR ORBIS RIC  317.jpg
Postumus PACATOR ORBIS RIC V/2 31788 viewsAnt, 19mm, 1.97g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, Draped and Cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: PACATOR ORBIS, Radiate and Draped bust of Sol R.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 7.

RIC 317, Scarce.

Broken unfortunately, but in the right place, and it's still quite a pleasant coin. It's not common and it was a case of getting what I could afford!
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus PAX AVG RIC 318.jpg
Postumus PAX AVG RIC V/2 318 var51 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.79g

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed but R.

Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing L with branch and sceptre. P in L field.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 6.

RIC 318 var, Common.

I'm not sure there's much justification in identifying this with RIC 318; it's clearly a different type. But it's the closest I can get.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus PAX AVG RIC 78.jpg
Postumus PAX AVG RIC V/2 7868 viewsAnt, 23x19 mm, 3.41g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate. draped and cuirassed R.

Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax walking L with branch and sceptre.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 3.

RIC 78. Common.

I think I see a trace of a cuirass on this one, but I admit I'm not 100% certain.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus PAX AVGVSTI RIC 79.jpg
Postumus PAX AVGVSTI RIC V/2 79109 viewsAnt, 19mm, 2.30g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed buxst R.


Reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing L with branch and sceptre.

Trier, Officina A, issue 5.

RIC 79, Common.
3 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus PM TRPCOS II PP RIC 54.jpg
Postumus PM TRP COS II PP RIC V/2 5448 viewsAnt, 19x23mm, 2.84g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: PM TRP COS II PP, Emperor standing L in military dress, holding globe and spear.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 1, 260 AD.

RIC 54, Common.

Robert_Brenchley
Postumus PM TRP COS III PP RIC 55_2.jpg
Postumus PM TRP COS III PP RIC V/2 5572 viewsAnt, 22mm, 2.43g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: PM TRP COS III PP, Emperor standing L with spear & globe.

Trier, Issue 2, Officina B. 260-1 AD.

RIC V/2 55, Common.

This is evidently an engraver's error, as Postumus was COS II in 260-1, when he was TRP I, and this is as stated on the common dated coin of this year. I have two of these, from different dies, so evidently the mistake was repeated.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus PM TRP IIII COS III PP RIC 57~0.jpg
Postumus PM TRP IIII COS III PP RIC V/2 5796 viewsAnt, 23mm, 2.46g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: PM TRP IIII COS III PP, Mars walking R with spear and trophy.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 3.

AD 262. RIC 57, Common.

The flan is very thin, hence the low weight.

2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus PROVIDENTIA AVG RIC 80.jpg
Postumus PROVDENTIA AVG RIC V/2 8079 viewsAnt, 21mm, 3.33g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing L holding globe and sceptre.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 3.

RIC 80, Common.
1 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus RESTITOR GALLIAR RIC 223 var.jpg
Postumus RESTITOR GALLIAR RIC V/2 223 var42 viewsCast large bronze, 23mm, 6.19g.

Obv: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS AG, Radiate & cuirassed bust R.

Rev: RESTITOR GALLIAR, Emperor holding spear and raising helmeted woman.

Atelier II

RIC V/2 223 var, Scarce.
Robert_Brenchley
postumus_ric_325.jpg
Postumus RIC 32511 viewsAR Antoninianus.
(Colonia ? ) 266-7 AD.
IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, radiate draped bust right
SAECVLI FELICITAS, emperor standing right holding spear & globe.
xokleng
postumus com.JPG
Postumus RIC V Lugdunum 7527 viewsAR 19-23 mm 2.9 grams 260-269 AD
OBV :: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: M-ONET-A AVG. Moneta standing left holding cornucopia and scales
EX :: none
RIC V-2 Lugdunum 75
purchased 04/2008
Johnny
POSTUMUS-1-ROMAN~0.jpg
Postumus RIC V(2)-54 Cologne16 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Cologne mint, 261 A.D.
22mm, 2.87g
RIC V(2)-54, RSCv.4-243a, RCVv.3-10971

Obverse:
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
P M TR P COS II P P
Emperor in military attire, standing left, holding globe and spear.
rubadub
postumus_289.jpg
Postumus RIC V, 28747 viewsPostumus, AD 260-269
AR - Antoninianus, 22mm, 2.75g
Cologne AD 269
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. Victory, nude to hips, stg. r., holding wreath in raised r. hand and long palm in
l. hand
RIC V/2, 287; C.31
EF, lustrous

Sorry, I can't see the wreath which is mentioned in the description!

1 commentsJochen
postumus_Elmer413.jpg
Postumus RIC V, 31322 viewsPostumus, AD 259-268
AR - Antoninianus, 3.27g, 22mm
Cologne, 13th emission, AD 265
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Bust, draped (and cuirassed?), radiate, r.
rev. MERCVRIO FELICI
Mercurius, nude except chlamys, stg. l., looking r., holding short caduceus in l. arm and purse in r. hand.
ref.: RIC V/2, 313; C.192; Elmer 413; Cunetio 2419
Scarce, VF

This seems to be the only type with a connection between Mercurius and commerce!

Jochen
postumus_315(c).jpg
Postumus RIC V, 315(c)90 viewsPostumus 259 - 268, Gallic Empire
AR - Antoninianus, 3.66g, 19.9mm
Cologne 262/268
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
draped, cuirassed bust, radiate head r.
rev. M - ONET - A - AVG
Moneta standing l., holding scales and cornucopiae
RIC V/2, 315(c); C.199
nearly MS, superb portrait
from Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Remarkable is that the die originally has an AVGG on the rev. This second G then was removed. His son Postumus jun. for some time was his co-ruler (from Alex, but see the comment of Pscipio!)
2 commentsJochen
postumus_373.jpg
Postumus RIC V, 37382 viewsAureolus in the name of Postumus
AE - Antoninian, 3.05g, 19mm
Mediolanum, 2nd officin, Aug./Sept. 268
obv. IMP POSTVMVS AVG
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev. CONCORD EQVIT
Concordia standing left, foot on prow, holding pater and rudder.
S in ex.
RIC V/2, 373; Schulzki 6b
about VF, super coin for type!
2 commentsJochen
Postumus_Saecvli_Felicitas~0.JPG
Postumus Saecvli Felicitas12 viewsPOSTUMUS. 260-269 AD. Antoninianus, Struck 266 - 267 AD, Trier
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: SAECVLI FELICITAS, Postumus standing right, holding spear and globe
RIC 83 and 325, Schulzki 77, RSC 331a
Romanorvm
Postumus SAECVLI FELICITAS RIC 83.jpg
Postumus SAECVLI FELICITAS RIC V/2 8376 viewsAnt, 22mm, 4.30g.

Obverse: IMP C POTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: SAECVLI FELICITAS, Emperor standing R with globe & spear, in military dress.

Trier, Officina C, Issue 4.

RIC V/2 83, Common.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
PostumusAntSalusAesculape.jpg
Postumus SALVS AVG54 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/ SALVS AVG
Aesculapius standing facing, head left, leaning on his serpent-entwined staff

Antoninianus struck 266 in TRIER, second group 4° emission
C.336 - RIC.86 - Elmer 415 - Cunetio 2435 - AGK.80
1 commentsgb29400
Postumus SALVS AVG RIC 85.jpg
Postumus SALVS AVG RIC V/2 85170 viewsAnt, 23mm, 3.49g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: SALVS AVG, Salus standing L feeding snake over altar with flame, & leaning on anchor.

RIC V/2 85, Common.
3 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus SALVS AVG RIC 86.jpg
Postumus SALVS AVG RIC V/2 8656 viewsAnt, 21nn, 3.29g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: SALVS AVG, Aesculapius standing head L, leaning on serpent staff, globe at foot.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 4.

RIC V/2 86, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus SALVS POSTVMI AVG RIC 328.jpg
Postumus SALVS POSTVMI AVG RIC V/2 32865 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.19g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate and draped bust R.

Reverse: SALVS POSTVMI AVG, Salus standing L with snake.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 4.

RIC 328, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus SALVS PROVINCIARVM RIC 87.jpg
Postumus SALVS PROVINCIARVM RIC V/2 8744 viewsAnt, 22mm, 3.58g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: SALVS PROVINCIARVM, Rhine reclining L, one hand on urn, the other on river boat prow.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 1.

RIC V/2 87, Common.

Postumus' first type, this seems to commemorate some sort of victory along the Rhine, which allegedly restored 'the safety of the province'.
Robert_Brenchley
PostumusPaxEquitumT.jpg
POSTUMUS scare Milan mint Pax Equitum96 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiated, draped and cuirassed bust right

PAX EQ - VITVM // T
Pax standing left holding branch and sceptre

Antoninianus, 268 , Milan struck
Issue : 5e
Officina : 3e

21 mm, 3,58 g, axis 180°

C.228 - RIC.381 - E.620 - Cunetio2498 - AGK.57

good portrait
2 commentsgb29400
Postumus SERAPI COMITI AVG RIC 329.jpg
Postumus SERAPI COMITI AVG RIC V/2 32954 viewsAnt, 19mm, 3.73g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: SERAPI COMII AVG, Serapis standing L, raising R hand and holding sceptre.

Trier, Officina A, Issue 4.

RIC V/2 329, Common.
Robert_Brenchley
postumus76.jpg
Postumus Sestertius, overstruck upon Postumus radiate73 viewsPOSTUMUS AE laureate sestertius. 261 AD.

OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, laureate bust right.
Rx: VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm; captive before

Appears to have been overstruck upon a Postumus radiate.

CONDITION: F-VF, probably VF by wear, overstruck.
SIZE: 28mm.
WEIGHT: 10.5g.
RCV 11099
recycled photo.
cliff_marsland
post1salus.JPG
Postumus Silvered Antoninianus struck AD 266 AD at Cologne33 viewsOBV: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust Right.
REV: SALVS AVG Aesculapius standing right, head left, with right hand leaning on staff round which is entwined a snake, to right globe at feet.
wt 3.6 gm


RIC 86, 326, Elmer 415, AGK (corr.)80, Cunetio 2435
(Ref. Sebastian Sonderman personal comm.)


The artists at the Gallic Mints, especially Cologne, rendered hair in an original way, more naturalisticaly than the best Greek coins and superior to anything from contemporary Roman Imperial mints.
1 commentsdaverino
Postumus_Sol_RIC_5b_77.jpg
Postumus Sol RIC 5b 777 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, Cologne, 268 AD, RIC 5b 77, 21mm, 3.40g, Elmer 569, AGK (Corr.) 48, Cunetio 2451, Cohen 213
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: ORIENS AVG, Sol running left, with right hand raised
and holding whip in left hand, cloak flies behind
SRukke
Postumus VBERTAS AVG RIC 330.jpg
Postumus VBERTAS AVG RIC V/2 33082 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.18g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VBERTAS AVG, Uberitas standing L holding purse and cornucopia.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 4.

RIC 330 Common.
1 commentsRobert_Brenchley
PostumusAntVictoria.jpg
Postumus VICTORIA AVG57 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/VICT - OR - IA AVG
Victoria walking left , captive at her feet

Antoninianus struck 260 -261 in TRIER, 1st emission
C.377 - RIC.89 - Elmer 125 - Cunetio 2375 - AGK.97c
gb29400
Postumus VICTORIA AVG RIC 89.jpg
Postumus VICTORIA AVG RIC V/2 89102 viewsAnt, 21mm 3.23g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking L with wreath and palm, treading captive L.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 1.

RIC 89, Common.
1 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus VICTORIA AVG short beard RIC 89.jpg
Postumus VICTORIA AVG RIC V/2 8998 viewsAnt, 20mm, 3.37g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking L with palm, trampling captive.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 1

RIC V/2 89, Common.

This is an early example with the very short beard (Phase B Style 1) characteristic of these.
2 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Postumus_Victoria_RIC_5b_89.JPG
Postumus Victoria RIC 5b 895 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, 3.8g, 22mm, 259 - 268 AD, RIC 5b 89, RSC 377, Sear 10996
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm, captive at foot
SRukke
Postumus_Virtus_RIC_5b_93.JPG
Postumus Virtus RIC 5b 937 viewsPostumus, Trier, 262 AD, **mm, 4.02g, RIC 5b 93, RSC 419, Sear 10998
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing right, holding spear and shield
SRukke
PostumusVirtusMars.jpg
Postumus VIRTVS AVG124 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/VIRTV - S AVG
Postumus, bare-headed, in military dress, walking right, holding spear and shield, at his feet a captive.

Antoninianus struck 266 in TRIER, 4° emission
C.427 - RIC.331 - Elmer 291 - AGK.103
1 commentsgb29400
Postumus VIRTVS AVG RIC 93.jpg
Postumus VIRTVS AVG RIC V/2 93124 viewsAnt, 22mm, 4.59g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, reapsed and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VIRTVS AVG, Mars standing R holding spear and leaning on shield.

Trier, Officina B, Issue 2.

RIC 93, Common.

This example is on a thicker flan than normal, thus the unusally heave weight.
Robert_Brenchley
Postumus_RIC_329.JPG
Postumus, 260 - 268 AD23 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.

Rev: SERAPI COMITI AVG, Serapis standing left, raising right hand and holding a scepter in his left, a ship at his feet.

Billon Antoninianus, Cologne mint, 267 AD

3.5 grams, 20 mm, 45°

RIC Vii 329, RSC 358a, S10992, VM 66
SPQR Matt
Postumus_RIC_83~0.JPG
Postumus, 260 - 269 AD16 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.

Rev: SAECVLI FELICITAS, Postumus standing, in military attire, holding globe and spear.

Billon Antoninianus, Lugdumum mint, 265 - 268 AD

4 grams, 22 mm, 0°

RIC Vii 83, RSC 331a, S10983, VM 58
Matt Inglima
Postumus_RIC_309~0.JPG
Postumus, 260 - 269 AD22 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.

Rev: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing holding a scepter and a thunderbolt.

Billon Antoninianus, Cologne mint, 265 - 268 AD

3.4 grams, 21.1 mm, 0°

RIC Vii 309, RSC 159, S10954, VM 26
Matt Inglima
Postumus_RIC_67.JPG
Postumus, 260 - 269 AD30 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.

Rev: HERC PACIFERO, Hercules, standing left, holding an olive branch, club and lion's skin.

Billon Antoninianus, Cologne mint, 260 - 265 AD

3.9 grams, 21.8 mm, 45°

RIC Vii 67, RSC 101, S10946
SPQR Matt
Postumus_AR_Antoninianus.jpg
Postumus, 260 - 269 AD, Silver Antoninianus, Pax43 viewsCologne Mint, 21mm, 2.7 grams
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus right.
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax standing left holding branch and sceptre.
Sear10966 // RIC78 _4802
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
postum_monet.jpg
Postumus, 260-268, Antoninian, MONETA AVG29 viewsPostumus, AR-Antoninian, 4,06 g;  20 mm.
Av.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate and draped bust right.
Rv.: MONETA AVG; Moneta standing left, scales in right, cornucopiae in left hand.
RIC 315; Sear 3116; Cohen 200
good very fine/fine, weakly struck.

Nothing special, but I like the portrait!
1 commentshelcaraxe
post_double_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 259-268 21 viewsÆ Double Sestertius, 23g, 35mm, 6h; Struck 261 AD.
Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right /
Rev.: P M TR P COS II P P, Emperor standing left, holding globe and sceptre.
Reference: RIC V pt. 2, 106; CNG Coin Shop 732120, sold Theo.
1 commentsJohn Anthony
post_pax_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2692 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 20mm, 2.8g, 12h; Colonia Agrippina Mint, 268 AD.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: PAX AVG Pax standing front, her head turned to left, holding an olive branch in her right hand and a transverse scepter in her left.
Reference: RIC Vb 318, p. 363. 16-191-45
From the YOC Collection, Mossy Bottom Barn Hoard
John Anthony
post_virtus2_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2694 viewsӔ “Double" Sestertius, 35mm, 29.7g, 6h; Lugdunum mint, AD 261
Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG; Radiate, draped bust right.
Rev.: VIRTVS AVG, Mars standing right holding spear and leaning on shield / S-C
Reference: RIC Vb 179, p. 352.
From the YOC Collection
John Anthony
postumus_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2694 viewsAE “Double" Sestertius, 33mm, 24.9g, 12h; Colonia Agrippinensis or Treveri
Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: LAETITIA AVG (AVG in exergue); Galley left, four rowers and steersman
Reference: RIC Vb 143 (Lugdunum)
From the YOC Collection, 16-257-200
John Anthony
postumus_k~0.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2694 viewsÆ Sestertius, 31mm, 18.2g, 6h; Lugdunum mint, AD 260
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG; Radiate, draped bust right.
Rev.: PM TRP COS II PP; Emperor in military attire standing left, holding globe and spear / S-C
Reference: RIC Vb 109, p. 346
From the YOC Collection
John Anthony
Post_Military_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2699 viewsBillon antoninianus, 22mm, 2.9g, 12h; Colonia Agrippinensis mint, AD 260.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: P M TR P COS II P P, Postumus standing slightly left, wearing helmet and military attire, globe in right hand, spear vertical in left hand.
Reference: RIC Vb 54 (Lugdunum), p. 341 / 16-391-50
1 commentsJohn Anthony
postumus_moneta_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2696 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 21mm, 3.5g, 6h; Lugdunum or Cologne mint.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: MONETA AVG; Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
Reference: RIC Vb 75, p. 343 (Lugdunum) or 315, p. 362 (Cologne)
John Anthony
postumus_pax_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2694 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 20mm, 2.6g, 1h; Cologne, 268.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus to right.
Rev.: PAX AVG; Pax standing front, her head turned to left, holding an olive branch in her right hand and a transverse scepter in her left.
Reference: RIC Vb 318, p. 363
From the YOC Collection
John Anthony
postlaeses_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2695 viewsӔ Sestertius, 32mm, 16.8g, 6h; Lugdunum mint, AD 261.
Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped bust right.
Rev.: LAETITIA AVG; Galley right with four rowers and steersman.
Reference: RIC Vb 143, p. 349
From the YOC Collection, 17-002-250
John Anthony
Postumus_Mars_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2695 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 22mm, 2.5g, 6h; Lugdunum mint, AD 262.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: P M TR P IIII COS III P P; Mars walking right with trophy and transverse spear.
Reference: RIC Vb 57, p. 341
From the YOC Collection, Mossy Bottom Barn Hoard
17-003-45
John Anthony
Postumus_Victory_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-26913 viewsAR Antoninianus, 22mm, 3.0g, 6h; Trier mint, AD 260-261.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: VICT-ORIA AVG; Victory advancing left, holding palm in left hand and wreath in right hand; captive at feet.
Reference: RIC Vb 89, p. 344
From the YOC Collection, Mossy Bottom Barn Hoard
17-09-55
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Post_moneta_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-2695 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 20mm, 4.1g, 8h; Cologne mint.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev.: MONETA AVG; Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
Reference: RIC Vb 75, p. 343
From the YOC Collection, Mossy Bottom Barn Hoard
John Anthony
post_virtus_k.jpg
Postumus, AD 260-26911 viewsBillon Antoninianus, 22x19mm, 3.3g, 6h; Cologne mint.
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. VIRTVS AVG; Virtus, helmeted, standing right, holding spear with his right hand and resting his left on a shield set on ground.
Reference: RIC Vb 93, p. 344
From the YOC Collection, Mossy Bottom Barn Hoard
1 commentsJohn Anthony
0450-210np_noir.jpg
Postumus, Antoninianus76 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate and draped bust right
VICTORIA AVG, Victoria advancing left, captive at her feet
3.65 gr
Ref : Cohen # 377,
2 commentsPotator II
0450-220.jpg
Postumus, Antoninianus41 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate and draped bust right
SERAPI COMITI AVG, Serapis standing left, raising right hand and holding spear
4.3 gr
Ref : RCV # 10992, Cohen # 360
Potator II
postume.jpg
Postumus, Antoninianus17 viewsMint of Trier
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG - Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right
MONETA AVG - Moneta to left holding scales and cornucopia

263 265AD

Ref: RIC 75
byzancia
1postumo_completa.jpg
Postumus, antoninianus (Boyd collection)31 viewsPostumus (260-269 d.C.), antoniniano (266-267), zecca di Treviri
AR, 22 mm, 4.0 gr, 360° , BB
D/ IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG; busto radiato, drappeggiato e corazzato a dx.
R/ PROVIDENTIA AVG; Providentia stante a sx, regge uno scettro di traverso e un globo
RSC 295, RIC 80
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (8 agosto 2009, numero catalogo 15), ex Breitsprecher collection (Imperator coins-vcoins), Grand Marais MN, Usa, ex Baldwin's auction 42 2005, ex W.C. Boyd (1842-1906) collection, London Uk (gennaio 1890), ex rev. dr. Simpson collection, London Uk (1889).
paolo
postumus2.jpg
Postumus, Antoninianus,10 viewsPostumus, Antoninianus, 260-269, Trier, , Billon 21MM
Obverse- Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Reverse- Serapis standing left, raising hand & holding sceptre; prow at his feet to left SERAPI COMITI AVG
RIC-329 Trier mint (AD 267)
Paul R3
__.png
POSTUMUS, Antoninianus, 26914 viewsObv. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Rev. COS V
Victory half naked, standing right, right hand raised to head, holding long vertical palm-branch in left hand

RIC 288.
Hugo L
5008_5009.jpg
Postumus, Antoninianus, ORIENS AVG4 viewsAR Antoninianus
Postumus
Augustus: 260 - 269AD
21.0 x 19.0mm
O: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG; Radiate, draped bust, right.
R: ORIENS AVG; Sol advancing left, raising right hand and holding whip in left hand.
Exergue: P, left field.
Cologne Mint
Aorta: 228(?): B32, O19, R99, T139.
RSC 213
del550 201368022537
6/15/15 2/3/17
Nicholas Z
PostMoneta~0.JPG
Postumus, AR antoninianus34 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Bust radiate, draped, cuirassed, right
MONETA AVG
Moneta standing left, holding scale and cornucopeia
RIC 75 & 316 (same description), RSC 199a
Cunetio Hoard 2404 (straight hair on temple)
Uncertain mint (Lugdunum, Cologne, Milan, Trier?)
whitetd49
Postumo.JPG
Postumus, BI Antoninianus, Fides Militvm10 viewsPostumus (260 – 268 AD)
Roman-Gallic Empire

Billon Antoninianus, Trier

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left holding two standards

RIC V-II, 59

Weight: 2,1g
Diameter: 21mm
Jose Polanco
IMG_0514.jpg
Postumus, cast double sestertius, uncertain mint, reverse HERC PACIFERO 13 views[...] LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing left holding branch, club and lionskin

Casting seams evident on the edge.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_iovi_victori.jpg
Postumus, Cologne, Normanby 1352.13 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
IOVI VICTORI, Jupiter standing.
Normanby 1352.
Adrianus
0450-310np_noir.jpg
Postumus, Double sestertius - *112 viewsDouble sestertius struck in Cologne, AD 261
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate bust of Postumus right
LAETITIA AVG, Galley travelling left
18.12 gr
Ref : Cohen #177, RCV #11049
1 commentsPotator II
IMG_0510.jpg
Postumus, double sestertius, Atelier II, reverse emperor standing with globe12 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
P M TR P C[...], Emperor standing left with globe and spear or sceptre

This double sestertius has been overstruck on an earlier sestertius, possibly of Hadrian. The ghostly outline of a head is visible on the reverse of the coin.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_arch_as.jpg
Postumus, double sestertius, Atelier II, reverse Triumphal arch20 views[...], Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
[...], Triumphal arch, FELICITAS across lintel
Adrianus
abm_postumus_cast_1.jpg
Postumus, irregular cast double sestertius, reverse LAETITIA AVG29 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
LAETITIA AVG, Galley.
A cast double sestertius. The obverse is cast in a mould produced using a coin that is die-identical to the coin used to produce the obverse mould of another coin in this gallery with a VICTORIA AVG reverse. The casting seams are very apparent on the edge of this example.
Diameter 27.5mm, weight 10.38g.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_cast_2.jpg
Postumus, irregular cast double sestertius, reverse VICTORIA AVG20 viewsIMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left.
A cast double sestertius. The obverse is cast in a mould produced using a coin that is die-identical to the coin used to produce the obverse mould of another coin in this gallery.
Diameter 24.5mm, weight 7.69g.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_irreg_pax.jpg
Postumus, irregular radiate, reverse PAX AVG.15 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
PAX AVG, Pax standing left with transverse sceptre.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_irreg_hercules.jpg
Postumus, irregular radiate, silvered, reverse VIRTVS AVG with Hercules standing.12 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
VIRTVS AVG, Hercules standing.
A silvered copy with the surfaces breaking through to the copper alloy core in places.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_milan_corcord_equit.jpg
Postumus, Milan12 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
CONCORD EQVIT, Concordia standing left.
Another Milan issue, struck during the period when Aureolus held the city in Postumus' name, c.268-9.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_milan_fides_equit.jpg
Postumus, Milan, Normanby 1369 (Issue III)33 viewsIMP POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
FIDES EQVIT, Fides seated left, -/-//P.
Normanby 1369.
Cottenham hoard.
Weight
1 commentsAdrianus
abm_postumus_left_facer.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby -16 viewsPOSTVMVS AVG, Radiate bust left, club over right shoulder, lionskin over left shoulder.
PAX AVG, Pax standing left.
Normanby -
A very rare issue with Postumus bedecked in the attributes of Hercules.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_caduceus.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby -7 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
SAECVLO FRVGIFERO, Winged caduceus.
Normanby -
A rare issue with the winged caduceus reverse.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_minerva.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby 1327 (Series II, phase 2)8 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
MINER FAVTR, Minerva advancing left.
Normanby 1327
Weight
Adrianus
abm_postumus_moneta.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby 1331, Cunetio 2413, RSC 199a (Series III)7 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left.
Normanby 1331, Cunetio 2413, RSC 199a.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_felicitas_olivers_orchard.jpg
Postumus, Principal Mint, Normanby 1332 (Series III, Phase 2) 13 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
FELICITAS AVG, Felicitas standing left.
Normanby 1332.
Oliver's Orchard hoard.
Weight
Adrianus
abm_postumus_oriens_aug.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby 1339, Cunetio 2451.9 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
ORIENS AVG, Sol advancing left.
Normanby 1339, Cunetio 2451.
Weight
Adrianus
abm_postumus_cos_iiii.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, Normanby 1342, Cunetio 2455, RSC 31a (Series VI).9 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
COS IIII, Nemesis standing right.
Normanby 1342, Cunetio 2455, RSC 31a.
Ex-Chalfont St. Peter hoard (no. 969).
Adrianus
abm_postumus_trp_iiii_cos_iii.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, radiate, reverse P M TR P IIII COS III P P13 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
P M TR P IIII COS III P P, Mars advancing right with spear and trophy
Adrianus
abm_postumus_providentia.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, radiate, reverse PROVIDENTIA AVG19 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left
Adrianus
IMG_0512.jpg
Postumus, Principal Mint, sestertius25 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS.P.F.AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing right.
Adrianus
abm_postumus_sestertius_fides_victoria.jpg
Postumus, Principal mint, sestertius, reverse VICTORIA AVG over FIDES MILITVM.44 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PIVS F AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
[VICT]ORIA AVG, Victory advancing left, over FID[ES MILITVM].
An example with a second reverse type overstruck on another. Both are of Postumus and we have here a workshop blunder where a coin was successively struck with two reverse dies.
1 commentsAdrianus
abm_postumus_serapis.jpg
Postumus, radiate, Principal mint, reverse SERAPI COMITI AVG59 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SERAPI COMITI AVG, Serapis standing left
Adrianus
abm_postumus_irreg_dup.jpg
Postumus, reduced irregular double sestertius49 views[IMP C POSTV]MVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right.
VICTORIA AVG, Victory advancing left.
A very small reduced bronze. Too thick to be a copy of an antoninianus and very small for an irregular double sestertius (?or dupondius).
21mm.
Adrianus
PostSe02-2.jpg
Postumus, RIC 143, double sestertius of AD 259-268 25 viewsÆ Double sestertius (11.3g, Ø28mm, 8h), Rome mint, Struck AD 259-268
Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P P AVG, radiate, draped bust of Postumus facing right.
Rev.: LETITIA AVG (around) S C (in ex.), Galley travelling.
RIC 143; Cohen 177 var.
Charles S
PostumusRIC329.JPG
Postumus, RIC 32915 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
SERAPI C-OMITI AVG
Serapis standing left, raising hand and holding sceptre.
AR antoninianus, 21 mm

RIC V 329 Trier mint, Struck 267 AD.
novacystis
postumus_74.jpg
Postumus, RIC V, 7431 viewsPostumus, AD 260-269
Billon-Antoninian, 3.67g, 22.50mm, 180°
Trier, AD 262
obv. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. MINE - R - FAVTR
Minerva Fautrix, helmeted, advancing l., holding in l. hand spear and shield and
in raised r. hand olive-branch
ref. RIC V/2, 74; C. 195; RSC 195a; Mairat 45-50; AGK 44
VF, attractive
Pedigree:
ex CNG 11/2007
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

The rev. seems to honour the Legio I Minerva. The interesting reverse legend MINER FAVTR stands for Minerva Fautrix, the favouring (partisan) Minerva. Perhaps the message is that Minerva offered Postumus wisdom, military power (note the spear and shield), and peace (note the branch) (FAC)
2 commentsJochen
Postimus.jpg
Postumus, RIC, 7515 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
MONETA AVG
AR Antoninianus, 21mm, 3.56g
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Moneta standing left holding scales and cornucopia
Lyons mint
E in ex.
Cyzicus mint
novacystis
Postumus.jpg
Postumus, Silver antoninianus.58 viewsPostumus, Summer 260 - Spring 269 A.D.
Silver antoninianus, RIC V 67, Cohen 101, EF/VF, 3.673g, 22.9mm, 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse HERC PACIFERO, Hercules standing left, olive branch in right, club and lion skin in left;

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins Auction.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation . Photo and Description , courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From the Sam Mansourati collection.
3 commentsSam
abm_postumus_sest_hercules_temple.jpg
Postumus, so-called 'Atelier II', double sestertius, Bastien nos. 167-8, 217 & 231.59 views[...], Radiate bust right.
HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules in temple.
A large radiate sestertius-sized coin from Postumus' 'Atelier II'. Struck using the same obverse die as his nos. 168a-c.
Adrianus
1braithwell_Postumo_Usa.jpg
Postumus, Treveri mint (268 d.C.), R/ ORIENS AVG, (Braithwell hoard)16 viewsPostumus. Romano-Gallic Emperor, AD 260-269.
Antoniniano argentato, zecca di Treveri (Trier) 6° emissione, 268 d.C.
AR, 20 mm, 2.89 gr, VF
D/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, busto radiato, drappeggiato e corazzato a dx
R/ ORIENS AVG, P nel campo a sin, Oriens andante a sx, alza la mano dx e tiene una frusta con la sx.
RIC V 316; Mairat 166; AGK 49; RSC 213a; Braithwell 147 (1 esemplare nell'hoard).
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (12 aprile 2011, numero catalogo 137); ex Wayne collection (Minneapolis MN Usa, via ebay, 2010); ex CNG auction 176 (London, lot 800689, 2007); ex Braithwell hoard (Braithwell, South Yorkshire Uk, 2002).
paolo
Aureolusblack1.png
Postumus. Struck under Aureolus.20 viewsPostumus, Usurper in Gaul AD 260-269. Struck under Aureolus, circa AD 267-268.

Mediolanum Antoninianus Æ silvered

18mm., 2,53g.

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus to right

SALVS AVG, P in exergue, Aesculapius standing front, head to left, leaning right on serpent-entwined staff.

Vendors refernces: AGK (corr.) 83a; Cunetio 2496; Elmer 618; RIC 382.

RLACAAHW
RL
rjb_i30.jpg
Postumus?12 viewsmauseus
Postumus_aureolus.jpg
Postumus_Antoninian_VIRTVS_EQVIT7 viewsNumis-Student
Probus_-_Restitutor_Orbis.jpg
Restitutor Orbis131 viewsObv. IMP C M AVR PROBVS PF AVG, radiate and draped bust right;
Rev. RESTITVT ORBIS, Female figure standing right presenting wreath to emperor standing left, holding globe; {Delta} between, XXI in ex
Antoninanus, 21mm, 4,32 gr.
Refs: RIC 851

Historia Augusta 14, "His gestis cum ingenti exercitu Gallias petiit, quae omnes occiso Postumo turbatae fuerant, interfecto Aureliano a Germanis possessae. tanta autem illic proelia et tam feliciter gessit, ut a barbaris sexaginta per Gallias nobilissimas reciperet civitates, praedam deinde omnem, qua illi praeter divitias etiam efferebantur ad gloriam. et cum iam in nostra ripa, immo per omnes Gallias, securi vagarentur, caesis prope quadringentis milibus, qui Romanum occupaverant solum, reliquos ultra Nicrum fluvium et Albam removit."

"This done, he set out with a huge army for the provinces of Gaul which since the death of Postumus had all been in turmoil, and after the murder of Aurelian had been seized by the Germans.There, moreover, he fought battles so great and successful that he took back from the barbarians sixty most famous communes of Gaul, besides all the booty, by which the Germans, even apart from the actual wealth, were puffed up with glory. And whereas they were wandering at large on our bank, or rather through all the country of Gaul, Probus, after slaying about four hundred thousand who had seized upon Roman soil, drove all the rest back beyond the river Neckar and the district of Alba."
Syltorian
R662_Postumus_fac.jpg
RIC 5B, p.361, 299 - Postumus, Diana18 viewsPostumus
AR-Antoninian
Obv.: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus to right.
Rev.: DIANAE LVCIFERAE Diana walking right, holding a long-handled torch in both hands; quiver on her back.
Ag, 3.66g, 20mm
Ref.. RIC 299, Cunetio 2430
Ex Roma Numismatics 2009
Ex moremoth 2019
1 commentsshanxi
14815.jpg
RIC V 14334 viewsAttribution: RIC Vii 143
Date: 259-268 AD
Obverse: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: LAETITIA AVG SC , galley right
Size: 33.14 mm
Weight: 19.6 grams
cliff_marsland
04816q00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58451 viewsAgrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero

Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58, SRCV I 556, superb EF, weight 10.34 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields; bold high relief strike on a large flan with no wear, beautiful green patina, extraordinary portrait, spectacular!

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.

7 commentsJoe Sermarini
Aureolus_RIC-372_11h_18,5-19,5mm_2,20g-s.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 372, Mediolanum, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left,237 views098a Aureolus (267-268 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 372, Mediolanum, CONCORDIA EQVIT, Fortuna standing left,
avers:- (IMP-C-)POSTVMVS-AVG, In the name of Postumus. Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right. Attributed by Alföldi to Aureolus.
revers:- CONCORDIA-EQVIT, Fortuna standing left, foot on prow, holding patera and rudder.
exerg: -/-//S, diameter: 18,5-19,5 mm, weight: 2,20g, axes:11h,
mint: Mediolanum, date: 267-268 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-372-p-, RSC-20a,
Q-001
quadrans
t1-29G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Barbarous Tetricus - COS IIII (Postumus)47 views15mm – 2,50g
Avers Tetricus
Atelier local : type COS IIII
AGK N2c (R5)
gascogne
t1-20G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Barbarous, Tetricus - FORTVNA AVG (Postumus)50 views17mm – 1,79g
Avers Tetricus
Atelier local : type FORTVNA AVG
AGK N8c (R1)
gascogne
t1-19G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Barbarous, Tetricus - MONETA AVG (Postumus)44 views20mm – 3,36g
Avers Tetricus
Atelier local : type MONETA AVG
AGK N22c (R1)
gascogne
t1-41G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Barbarous, Tetricus - SALVS AVG (Postumus)61 views18mm - 1,90g
Avers Tetricus
atelier local : Type SALVS AVG
AGK **
gascogne
08800p00.jpe
Roman Empire, Carus, early Sep 282 - c. Jul/Aug 283 A.D., Postumus Consecration Issue777 viewsThe consecratio altar type is not listed for Tripolis mint in references held by FORVM. A similar type is listed for Antioch.
1 commentssalem
08800p00~0.jpe
ROMAN EMPIRE, Carus, early Sep 282 - c. Jul/Aug 283 A.D., Postumus Consecration Issue577 viewschoice aEF, 3.06g, 22.7mm, 180o, Tripolis mint, obverse DIVO CARO, radiate bust right; reverse CONSECRATIO •, flaming altar, T - R across fields, XXI in exergue; dark toning2 commentssalem
bpS1O5Gallienus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, Antoninianus44 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head right.
Rev: DIANAE CONS AVG
Stag walking right.
Antoninianus, 3.6 gm, 20.6 mm, Rome RIC 179
History (As sole Augustus, 266-268, Part II): In the East, the rampages of Shapur I were largey repelled and kept in check by the Palmyran King, Odaenathus who was rewarded with titles including "Ruler of the Romans" and "Governor of the East". In 266 he extended his influence by advancing into Dacia to check another of the Gothic invasions. An extremely important and powerful ally of Rome who never contended for Imperial power, he was murdered in 267 in a domestic quarrel and succeeded by his wife, Queen Zenobia. Gallienus was in almost continuous defense of Gothic intrusions over the Danube in 266-267. In 268, however, the Goths joined by the Heruli staged a massive invasion through the Balkans and into Greece. Leaving Aureolus at Milan to deflect any incursion by Postumus into the homeland, Gallienus won a great victory at Naissus. At this point, Aureolus staged his second rebellion by defecting to Postumus and shortly after declaring himself Emperor. This forced Gallienus to immediately return to Italy to face the expected invasion. He quickly managed a victory over Aureolus at Pontirolo and then laid siege to him at Milan. Before he could bring this to its expected conclusion, Gallienus was betrayed by his military staff who murdered the emperor in front of his own tent after luring away his guards.
Massanutten
bpS1O4Gallienus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gallienus, Antoninianus40 viewsObv: GALLIENVS AVG
Radiate head, right.
Rev: APOLLINI CONS AVG
Centaur drawing bow, right.
Antoninianus, 2 gm, 19.4 mm, Rome RIC 163
History (As sole Augustus, 260-265, Part I): The loss of Valerian led many to believe that the Empire was ripe for their grab of a portion of the imperial power. The first to revolt in the East was Ingenuus, the Governor of Pannonia and Moesia. Proclaimed Emperor by his Legions, he was defeated soon after by Aureolus, one of Gallienus' field generals. Next to rise was Regalianus who quickly realized a similar fate. Also in 260 the family Macriani revolted, taking with them Syria, Egypt and Asia Minor. Again, Aureolus came through by defeating Macrianus in 261 while his younger brother, Quitus, was removed by Odaenathus, the ruler of Palmyra and ally of Rome. Gallienus could do little about the flood of barbarous incursions in the West, short of sending his young and inexperienced son, Saloninus, to establish the Imperial Presence. Postumus, the Governor of Lower Germany, filled the power vacuum by allowing his Legions to declare him Emperor in 260. thus establishing the seed for a breakaway empire that would last for the next fourteen years. Meanwhile back in the East, the next to revolt was the trusted field commander, Aureolus in 262, but he reneged on the gambit through the intercessions of Gallienus. In the following year or perhaps 264, Gallienus and Aureolus, now put in Command of the newly established mobile cavalry, initiated a campaign in the West to depose Postumus. Greatly successful, the campaign came to a sudden halt in 265 when Gallienus was seriously wounded and Aureolus failed to prevent Postumus from escaping. No further action would be taken against Postumus for the remainder of the reign of Gallienus.
Massanutten
IMG_0929.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus24 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus, 3.6 gm, 19 mm
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right / SAECVLI FELICTAS, Postumus standing right with spear & globe.
RIC 83, RSC 331
Ilya_VK
Postumus1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus14 viewsCologne mint, 261

IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
VICTORIA AVG
Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm frond, captive at feet

RIC V 89
Michael V
Postumus2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus15 viewsCologne mint, 262

IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG,
radiated, draped and cuirassed bust r.
HERC PACIFERO
Hercules standing l., holding olive-branch, club and lion’s skin

RIC V 67
Michael V
Postumus3.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus16 views261

IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust r.
[LAETITIA AVG]
Galley to l. with rowers

RIC 148
Michael V
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_LAETITIA-AVG_RIC-V-II-73-p-343_C-167_Lugdunum_260-69-AD___Q-001_axis-7h_22mm_3,02g-s.jpg
Roman Empire, Postumus (260-269 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 073, Cologne? or Trier?, LAETITIA AVG, 371 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 073, Cologne? or Trier?, LAETITIA AVG,
avers:- IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- LAETITIA, Galley right.
exergo: AVG, diameter: 22mm, weight: 3,02g, axis: 7h,
mint: Cologne? or Trier?, (Lugdunum? are error in RIC -V), date: 260-69 AD., ref: RIC-V-II-73, p-343, C-167,
Q-001
quadrans
Postumus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIA-AVG_RIC-V-II-234-p-355_C-386_Lugdunum-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_21-24mm_2,62g-s.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus (260-269 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 234, Lugdunum, VICTORIA-AVG, Victory advancing left,360 views098 Postumus (260-269 A.D.), AE-Antoninianus, RIC V-II 234, Lugdunum, VICTORIA-AVG, Victory advancing left,
avers:- IMP-C-POSTVMVS-PF-AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- VICTORIA-AVG, Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm; seated captive to left.
exerg: , diameter: 21-24mm, weight: 2,62g, axes: 5h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 260-269 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-234, p-355, C-386,
Q-001
quadrans
bpS1R5Postumus2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus (Gallic Empire)50 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: LAETITIA AVG
Manned galley left, waves below.
Reduced Double Sestertius, 7.9 gm, 24 mm, Bastien 310.
Comment: Likely struck at the semi-official mint of Atelier 2. The branching lines beneath the waves are thought to be the celator's attempt to show the swirl pools caused by the action of the oars. Attribution thanks to Mauseus.
Massanutten
bpS1R2Postumus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus (Gallic Empire)42 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG
Radiate and draped bust, right.
Rev: FELICITAS AVG
Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
Antoninianus, 4.1 gm, 21.8 mm, Trier, RIC 58
Massanutten
po-01G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - COS IIII11 views18mm - 3,06g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
COS IIII
AGK 9 (C2) ; EG 112
gascogne
po-02G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - DIANAE LVCIFERE14 views22mm - 3.16g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
DIANAE LVCIFERE
AGK - ; EG 57
gascogne
po-03G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - FELICITAS AVG19 views22mm - 3,45g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
FELICITAS AVG
AGK 14 (C4) ; EG 48
gascogne
po-04G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - FIDES EXERCITVS14 views21mm - 4,20g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
FIDES EXERCITVS
AGK 20 (S) ; EG 59
gascogne
FIDES MILITVM-18.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - FIDES MILITVM550 viewsDouble sestertius. Obv.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG - Radiated and cuirassed bust right. Rev.: FIDES MILITVM, Fides standing left, holding two ensigns. Mint LVGDVNVM C. 74 - R.I.C. 1236 commentspostumus
po-05G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - FIDES MILITVM13 views22mm - 2,93g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
FIDES MILITVM
AGK 21 (C4) ; EG 16
gascogne
po-06G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - FORTVNA AVG12 views21mm - 3,67g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
FORTVNA AVG
AGK 23 (C2) ; EG 61
gascogne
posthumousweb.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - HERC DEVSONIENSI92 viewsATTRIBUTION-RIC 64--Cohen 91--Sear 3111
OBV. IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG-Radiate bust right draped and cuirassed
REV. HERC DEVSONIENSI-Hercules Standing right leaning on club
EX. N.A
black-prophet
po-08G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - HERC DEVSONIENSI12 views22mm - 3,93g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
HERC DEVSONIENSI
AGK 25 (C4) ; EG 6
gascogne
po-09G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - HERC PACIFERO10 views21mm - 2,96g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
HERC PACIFERO
AGK 27 (C4) ; EG 26
gascogne
po-10G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - IMP X COS V15 views20mm - 3,11g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
IMP X COS V
AGK 32 (C3) ; EG 117
gascogne
po-11G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - IOVI PROPVGNATORI17 views21mm - 3,67g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
IOVI PROPVGNATORI
AGK 37 (C1) ; EG 29
gascogne
po-12G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - IOVI STATORI14 views19mm - 3.39g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
IOVI STATORI
AGK 38a (C3) ; EG 96
gascogne
po-47G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - IOVI VICTORI18 views20mm - 2,93g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
IOVI VICTORI
AGK 39 (C2) ; EG 123
gascogne
po-48G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - IOVIT S ATORI9 views19mm - 2,77g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
IOVIT S ATORI
AGK **
gascogne
po-14G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - LAETITIA AVG12 views22mm - 3,65g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
LAETITIA AVG
AGK 41 (C3) ; EG 18
gascogne
po-15G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - MERCVRIO FELICI17 views20mm - 2,87g
Avers Postumus
atelier local : type MERCVRIO FELICI
AGK N20 (R4)
gascogne
po-16G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - MINER FAVTR15 views23mm - 3,71g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
MINER FAVTR
AGK 44 (C2) ; EG 30
gascogne
po-17G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - MONETA AVG14 views22mm - 4,74g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
MONETA AVG
AGK 45 (C5) ; EG 45
gascogne
po-44G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - MONETA AVG / PROVIDENTIA11 views18mm – 3,66g
Avers Postumus
Atelier local : type MONETA AVG/ PRVIDETI[A AVG]
AGK **
gascogne
po-18G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - NEPTVNO REDVCI14 views22mm - 3,58g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
NEPTVNO REDVCI
AGK 47 (R2) ; EG 32
gascogne
po-43G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - ORIENS AVG15 views19mm - 3.41g
Avers Postumus
Atelier local : type ORIENS AVG
AGK N24a (R1)
gascogne
po-41G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - ORIENS AVG / P16 views21mm - 3,16g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
ORIENS AVG / P
AGK 49 (C2) ; EG 111
gascogne
po-49G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - P M TR P COS I P P15 views19mm - 2.52g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
P M TR P COS I P P
(Mêmes coins que de witte 198)
AGK 59 (R4) ; dW 198 ; EG -
gascogne
po-26G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - P M TR P COS II P P15 views23mm - 3,42g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
P M TR P COS II P P
AGK 60 (C5) ; EG 21
gascogne
po-27G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - P M TR P COS III P P17 views22mm - 3,81g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
P M TR P COS III P P
AGK 61 (C1) ; EG 23
gascogne
po-28G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - P M TR P IIII COS III P P12 views23mm - 2,70g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
P M TR P IIII COS III P P
AGK 64 (C2) ; EG 36
gascogne
po-20G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PACATOR ORBIS16 views21mm - 2.11g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PACATOR ORBIS
AGK 50 (S) ; EG 119
gascogne
po-21G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PAX AVG13 views22mm - 3,91g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PAX AVG
AGK 51 (C3) ; EG 41
gascogne
po-22G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PAX AVG13 views22mm - 2,87g
Avers Postumus
Atelier local : type PAX AVG
AGK N25a (C1)
gascogne
po-23G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PAX AVG16 views20mm - 3.45g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PAX AVG
AGK 52a (C3) ; EG 99
gascogne
po-24G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PAX AVG / P12 views20mm - 3,26g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PAX AVG / P
AGK 53 (C4) ; EG 110
gascogne
po-25G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PIETAS AVG11 views20mm - 4,01g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PIETAS AVG
AGK 58 (C1) ; EG 65
gascogne
po-29G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - PROVIDENTIA AVG19 views20mm - 3.29g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
PROVIDENTIA AVG
AGK 69 (C4) ; EG 46
gascogne
po-30G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SAECVLI FELICITAS11 views22mm - 4.85g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SAECVLI FELICITAS
AGK 77 (C4) ; EG 67
gascogne
po-31G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SAECVLO FRVGIFERO13 views21mm - 2.66g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SAECVLO FRVGIFERO
AGK 78 (S) ; EG 68
gascogne
po-32G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SALVS AVG16 views21mm - 3,58g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SALVS AVG
AGK 80 (C2) ; EG 70
gascogne
po-33G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SALVS AVG16 views20mm - 3,26g
Avers Postumus
Atelier local : type SALVS AVG
AGK N36 (R1)
gascogne
po-46G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SALVS AVG12 views20mm - 3,14g (Globe à gauche)
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SALVS AVG
AGK ** ; EG 71
gascogne
po-34G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SALVS POSTVMI AVG11 views22mm - 3,87g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SALVS POSTVMI AVG
AGK 86 (C1) ; EG 74
gascogne
po-35G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SALVS PROVINCIARVM13 views23mm - 3,84g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SALVS PROVINCIARVM
AGK 88c (C2) ; EG 9
gascogne
po-36G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - SERAPI COMITI AVG11 views20mm - 3,08g
Avers Postumus
Atelier local : type SERAPI COMITI AVG
AGK N40a (R2)
gascogne
po-37G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - VBERTAS AVG13 views21mm - 4.17g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
VBERTAS AVG
AGK 95 (C2) ; EG 83
gascogne
po-38G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - VICTORIA AVG16 views22mm - 3,77g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
VICTORIA AVG
AGK 97c (C4) ; EG 10
gascogne
po-40G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - VIRTVS AVG12 views22mm - 4,29g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
VIRTVS AVG
AGK 102 (C3) ; EG 35
gascogne
po-42G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus - VIRTVTI AVGVSTI16 views19mm - 3.55g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
VIRTVTI AVGVSTI
AGK 114 (S) ; EG 85
gascogne
4254LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus / Oriens / Cologne52 viewsAttribution: RIC 316 (RIC V, Part II), Schulzki 49

Mint: Cologne, P

Date: 259-268 AD

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right

Reverse: ORIENS AVG/ P in left field, Sol advancing left holding whip

Size: 20mm

Weight: 2.26 grams
AnemicOak
postumus-moeda1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus 260-269 AD.18 viewsAE Antoninian of Postumus 260-269 AD.

Weight: 4.1g
Ø: 21mm

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG - Postumus right.

Rev: VBERTAS AVG - Uberitas standing left.

EF/EF

Sear ?? - RIC ?? - VM 69 - Cohen 365.
Jorge C
Postumus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus AR Antoninianus381 viewsPostumus AR Antoninianus

Attribution: Cunetio 2453,
Zschucke 135, Cologne
Date: AD 268
Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS
PF AVG, radiate, draped, &
cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax stg.
l. holding branch and scepter
Size: 20 mm
Weight: 2.4 grams
4 commentsNoah
053B.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus Double Sestertius53 viewsRIC Vb 106 Lyons; Bastien 63; Elmer 213; C 248; Sear5 11052
15.40 g, 32 mm
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
P M TR P COS II P P S-C, Emperor standing left, holding globe and sceptre.
Mark Z
9811 n.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus Double Sestertius RIC 173 - ONLY 2 KNOWN OF TYPE201 viewsDouble sestertius, Colonia AD 260 (?), about 32 gr., 32-36 mm diameter.
Av.: IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG , drap. cuir. bust with crown right
Rv.: [VICTO]R[I]A AVG , Victoria walking with palm-branch and wreath right (no captive at feet)
Cohen 392 (Vente de Marquis de Moustier, Hoffmann, Paris, 1872) ; RIC 5B, p. 351 no. 173 ; Bastien - ; Zschucke -
probably the second known coin of this type (Curtis Clay)
Arminius
Photo_2006_8_7_19_0_47_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus HERC DEVSONIENSI33 viewsPostumus, 260-269 A.D., Trier mint.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules, standing right, leaning on club and holding bow.
ancientcoins
Photo_2006_8_7_19_8_26_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus MONETA AVG28 viewsPostumus, 259-270 A.D., Trier mint.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: MONETA AVG, Moneta standing facing with scales and cornucopiae.
ancientcoins
Photo_2006_7_18_14_9_10_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI32 viewsPostumus, 262 A.D., Trier.
OBV: IMP POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing left, holding trident and dolphin, prow at feet.
ancientcoins
Photo_2006_8_18_15_22_47_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus PROVIDENTIA AVG24 viewsPostumus, 260-269 A.D., Lyons.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: PROVIDENTIA AVG, Providentia standing left, holding globe and transverse scepter.
ancientcoins
coins1 221.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus SAECVLI FELICITAS82 viewspostumus, 260-269 A.D., trier mint.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped bust right.
REV: SAECVLI FELICITAS, postumus standing right with globe and spear.
2 commentsancientcoins
Photo_2006_12_20_3_18_20_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus SERAPI COMITI AVG45 viewsPostumus, 267 A.D., Trier.
OBV: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
REV: SERAPI COMITI AVG, Serapis standing left, raising right hand and holding sceptre. Prow at feet left.
ancientcoins
4db9_1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Antoninianus75 viewsObv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Radiate bust right.
Rev: MONETA AVG. Moneta standing facing left holding scales and cornucopiae.
NervousRex
Postumus ant FIDES MILITVM.jpg
Roman Empire, Postumus, Antoninianus14 viewsRIC 59
Rev: FIDES MILITVM, Fides holding two standards.
Base silver.
E Pinniger
POSTUMUS.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Antoninianus15 viewsPOSTUMUS
PROVIDENTIA AVG
Franz-Josef M
POSTUME.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, POSTUMUS, Antoninianus11 viewsCologne Mint, 268 AD
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG, Pax standing left with branch & sceptre
RIC 318
Nicolas B
POSTUME.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Base silver Antoninianus23 viewsAntoninien de Postume. AGK 52a
Avers: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Buste radié, drapé et cuirassé de Postume à droite
Revers: PAX AVG. Pax drapée, debout de face regardant à gauche, brandissant une branche d'olivier de la main droite et tenant un sceptre transversal de la main gauche
Kenobi O
Postumus_-_Bust_left.jpg
Roman Empire, Postumus, Cologne mint, struck 266 AD, Billon Antoninianus81 viewsPOSTVMVS AVG radiate bust left, holding club over right shoulder, lion's head on left shoulder, strap across bare chest
PAX AVG Pax standing left, holding branch and scepter
RIC 319, Elmer 564, Zschucke 161.
dupondius
Postumus_-_Restitutor_Orbis.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, POSTUMUS, Cologne mint, struck 267-268 AD, Billon Antoninianus83 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REST ORBIS emperor standing right, holding spear and raising kneeling female, holding cornucopiae.
RIC 324, Elmer 592, Zschucke 177
2 commentsdupondius
8MG_0965_Postumus_Avers_640_320.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Lugdunum mint, struck 282 AD, AE Antoninianus40 viewsPostumus Billon Antoninianus. IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate draped bust right / IOVI VICTORI, Jupiter standing right, hurling thunderbolt. Cohen 161a. RIC 311

http://www.numishop.com/fiche-brm_164046-mo_rom-1-POSTUMUS_Antoninien_268.html
dupondius
1~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Postumus, previously unrecorded cuirassed bust90 viewsAn unique and previously unrecorded type for an antoninianus of Postumus.
The cuirassed bust devoid of any drapery is what makes this coin so unique.
Struck in january 268 for the Emperor's fourth consulate.
Wonderful portrait, of the finest style of the period.
1 commentsSTEPHANE R
Picture_3~6.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, POSTUMUS, RIC 2127 viewsPostumus RIC 212jessvc1
Postumus Ant obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, RIC 28950 viewsPostumus
AE Antoninianus
Cologne Mint. 268 A.D.
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG - Radiate and draped bust right.
Rev: IMP X COS V - Victory standing right.
Ref: RIC 289.
seraphic
Picture_4~8.png
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Silvered Antoninianus33 viewsGallic Empire1 commentsjessvc1
au-03G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - CONCORD EQVIT14 views18mm - 2,50g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
CONCORD EQVIT
AGK 5 (S) ; EG 133
gascogne
au-04G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - CONCORD EQVIT / S10 views18mm - 2,64g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
CONCORD EQVIT / S
AGK 6b (C1) ; EG 139
gascogne
au-09G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - FIDES EQVIT12 views20mm - 2,80g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
FIDES EQVIT
AGK 17 (R4) ; EG 134
gascogne
au-05G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - FIDES EQVIT / P10 views20mm - 3,90g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
FIDES EQVIT / P
AGK 18c (C1) ; EG 137
gascogne
au-08G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - SALVS AVG / P13 views19mm - 2,97g
IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
SALVS AVG / P
AGK 83a (S) ; EG 158
gascogne
au-01G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - VIRTVS AEQVIT14 views21mm - 3,33g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
VIRTVS AEQVIT
AGK 106 (R3) ; EG 130
gascogne
au-02G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - VIRTVS AEQVIT13 views20mm - 4,00g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
VIRTVS AEQVIT
AGK 108 (R4) ; EG 132
gascogne
au-06G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - VIRTVS EQVIT / P13 views20mm - 4,62g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
VIRTVS EQVIT / P
AGK 110 (R4) ; EG 142
gascogne
au-07G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, struck by Auréolus - VIRTVS EQVIT / T15 views20mm - 2,77g
IMP POSTVMVS AVG
VIRTVS EQVIT / T
AGK 111b (C2) ; EG 143
gascogne
Postumus_Galley.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus, Trier mint, struck 260-261 AD, AE Sestertius143 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG laureate-headed draped, and cuirassed bust right
LAETITIA AVG galley with four oarsmen left
RIC 144, Cohen 169
2 commentsdupondius
POSTUMUS_IOVI_STATORI.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, POSTUMUS. AR ANTONINIANUS of Treveri. Struck A.D.265 - 268.74 viewsObverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.
Reverse: IOVI STATORI. Jupiter standing facing left, head turned to right, holding thunderbolt in his left hand and sceptre in his right.
RIC V : 309 | RSC IV : 159a.

M. Cassianius Latinius Postumus was appointed commander of the Rhine legion by Valerian I. In AD 259 he rebelled against Gallienus and ruled Gaul, Spain and Britain for almost a decade. He was assassinated by his own troops in AD 268 for refusing to allow them to sack Moguntiacum which had supported Laelianus.
1 comments*Alex
t2-21G.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Tetricus I - FORTVNA AVG (Postumus)10 views15mm - 2,30g
Avers Tetricus I
Atelier local : type FORTVNA AVG
AGK N8d (R2)
gascogne
Screenshot_2017-06-07_13_49_08.png
Roman Imperial, Postumus (Gallic Emperor), AR Antoninianus.16 viewsCologne 260-269 A.D. 2.95g - 22.8mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG - Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.

Rev: MONETA AVG - Moneta standing left with scales and cornucopiae.

RIC V 75, RSC 199, Sear 10962.
scarli
Screenshot_2017-11-20_15_07_51.png
Roman Imperial, Postumus (Gallic Emperor), AR Antoninianus.12 viewsLyons 260-269 A.D 4.54g - 22.8mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG - Radiate, draped bust right.

Rev: PAX AVG - Pax running left, holding olive branch and sceptre.

RIC V-II 78.
1 commentsChristian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2017-11-20_14_14_13.png
Roman Imperial, Postumus (Gallic Emperor), AR Antoninianus.11 viewsLugdunum 261 A.D. 3.50g - 22mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG - Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Rev: FIDES MILITVM - Fides standing left holding two standards.

RIC V-II 59; Cohen 67.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-06-02_19_31_57.png
Roman Imperial, Postumus as Augustus, Æ Double Sestertius.10 viewsLugdunum or Auxiliary Mint 259-268 A.D. 13.15g - 32.6mm, Axis 11h.

Obv: IMP CM CASS LAT POSTVMVS P AVG - Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: F(D?)EIS MILITVM - clogged die or error. - Fides standing facing, head left, holding two standards.

RIC V-II 123, var (obverse legend)
scarli
PostMoneta.JPG
Roman, Postumus451 viewsThe only reason that I bought this coin was for the portrait, otherwise it is fairly ordinary.1 commentswhitetd49
VICTORIA AVG.jpg
Roman, Postumus333 viewsSUPERBE silvered AE ant, Postumus (259 - 268 A.D.), IMP C POSTVMVS P. F. AVG, Radiate head right / VICTORIA AVG, Victoria walking left, with captive at her feet. C. 377 - R.I.C. 891 commentspostumus
RI 115l obv.jpg
Roman, Postumus329 viewsThe quality of the engraving on this bust made me want to pick it up and look at it through my loupe again and again. It is paired with a slightly weak reverse which I have not included since it would detract from the portrait.1 commentsmaridvnvm
Postumus Ant1.jpg
Roman, Postumus281 viewsPostumus Antoninian, struck 260-261 AD at Lugdunum mint.
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: HERC DEVSONIENSI, Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding bow and lion's skin.
Ø 20-21.5 mm, 4.44 g.
RIC 64
1 commentsPscipio
Ant12-porträt.JPG
Roman, Postumus Antoninian324 viewsPostumus AR-Antoninian, struck 267 AD at Cologne mint (?).
Obv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
(Rev: IOVI VICTORI, Iupiter walking left, looking right, holding sceptre and thunderbolt.)
Ø 21 mm, 3.16 g.
Cunetio 2468, Elmer 571, Zschucke 170, RIC 311
4 commentsPscipio
postumeMilanbuste.jpg
Roman, Postumus struck under Aureolus538 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
Cuirassed, draped and radiated bust right
R/[VIRTV]S EQVIT / / T
Mars walking right, holding spear end shield

Antoninianus struck in Mediolanum , third officina
C.442 - RIC.387 - Elmer 617 - AGK.111a

magnificient portrait

the coin is also in my gallery with reverse
2 commentsgb29400
2~0.jpg
Roman, Postumus, herculean bust110 viewsA nice example of the famous herculean bust3 commentsSTEPHANE R
abm_postumus_milan_fides_equit~0.jpg
Roman, Postumus, mint of Milan, FIDES EQVIT, c.268-9169 viewsI thought this one probably the worthiest of my Postumus portraits - an issue from Milan during the period when Aureolus held the city and struck issues in Postumus' name, c.268-9
IMP POSTVMVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
FIDES EQVIT, Fides seated left, -/-//P.
Normanby 1369.
Ex-Cottenham hoard.
2 commentsAdrianus
1.jpg
Roman, Postumus, Wonderful portrait, of the finest style of the period.60 viewsAn unique and previously unrecorded type for an antoninianus of Postumus.
The cuirassed bust devoid of any drapery is what makes this coin so unique.
Struck in january 268 for the Emperor's fourth consulate.
Wonderful portrait, of the finest style of the period.
STEPHANE R
Postumus_RIC_V-378.jpg
Romano-Gallic Empire: Aureolus, Usurper (268-269 CE) Antoninianus, Mediolanum (RIC V 378; Toffanin 280; Mairat 209-11; AGK 18c; RSC 60)20 viewsObv: IMP POSTVMVS AVG; Radiate and draped bust right
Rev: FIDES EQVIT; Fides seated left, holding patera and signum
1 commentsQuant.Geek
Postumus SAECVLO FRUGIFERO RIC 84.jpg
SAECVLO FRVGIFERO RIC V/2 84131 viewsAnt, 22mm, 3.13g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate & draped bust R.

Reverse: SAECVLO FRVGIFERO, Winged caduceus.

Reiwe, Officina A, Issue 4.

RIC V/2 84, Scarce.
Robert_Brenchley
saloninus_RIC36.jpg
SALONINUS AR antoninianus - 256 AD24 viewsobv: SALON VALERIANVS NOB CAES (draped, cuirassed, radiare bust right)
rev: SPES PVBLICA (Spes presenting flower to prince, wreath above)
ref: RIC Vi 36 (C), Cohen 95 (3frcs)
mint: Asia (Antioch), billon
3.20gms, 21mm
Scarce

P.Licinius Cornelius Saloninus Valerianus was the second son of Gallienus and Salonina. He received the title of Caesar on the death of his elder brother in A.D.255. He was raised to the rank of Augustus by Gallienus in A.D.259 but was killed a short time later by Postumus, the commander of the Rhine legions.
berserker
Postumus_Oriens.JPG
Struck A.D.260 - 268. POSTUMUS. AE ANTONINIANUS of Treveri (Issue 6)8 viewsObverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Radiate and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.
Reverse: ORIENS AVG. Sol advancing left, raising right hand and holding whip in left; in left field, P.
Diameter: 21mm | Weight: 2.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RSC : 213a
*Alex
Postumus_moneta.JPG
Struck A.D.260 - 268. POSTUMUS. AR ANTONINIANUS of Lugdunum8 viewsObverse: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Postumus facing right.
Reverse: MONETA AVG. Moneta standing facing left, holding scales in her right hand and cornucopiae in her left.
Diameter: 22mm | Weight: 3.6gms | Die Axis: 5
RIC V : 75 | RSC : 199
*Alex
postumus.JPG
Struck Imitation of Postumus19 viewsStruck Imitation of Postumus
Galley type sestertius
c. 265 AD
[?]CASS POS[??]
Radiate head right
LA[??]
Galley right
Ardatirion
postumus-oval.jpg
Tetricus -RIC 5626 viewsTetricus I AE Antoninianus.
IMP C TETRICVS P F AVG, radiate bust right /
COMES AVG, Victory standing left holding wreath & palm.
xokleng
Tetricus II- SPES AVGG.jpg
Tetricus II- SPES AVGG42 viewsTetricus II, Caesar mid 271 - spring 274 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right

C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES

C: Caius
PIV: Pius
ESV: Esuvius
TETRICVS: Tetricus
CAES: Ceasar

Reverse:
SPES AVGG

SPES: Hope
AVGG: More than one emperor

Spes advancing left holding flower and raising drapery

Domination: Antoninianus, Bronze, size 18 mm

Mint: Treveri (Trier), RIC 270.

Comment:
Gallic, if the bust is radiate, draped and cuirassed then the mint is probably Trier. If the bust is radiate and cuirassed only then the mint is probably Cologne.

Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus II was the son of the Governor of Aquitaine, in the breakaway Gallo-Roman Empire (Gaul, Spain, and Britain) established by Postumus. After Victorinus, the successor to Postumus, was murdered, Tetricus' father was acclaimed Tetricus I, Augustus. His father later elevated the young Caius to Caesar, but their reign was cut short, peacefully, when Tetricus deserted his own troops to surrender to Aurelian. In gratitude, Aurelian later restored Tetricus I as a Senator, and even installed him as Governor of Lucania, and Tetricus II returned to normal life, as a private citizen.

John Schou
Tetricus II-  Spes Publica.jpg
Tetricus II- Spes Publica46 viewsTetricus II, Caesar mid 271 - spring 274 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right

The words CVS CAES being visible in front of the radiate bust of the youthful, unbearded male.


C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES IMP
C: Caius
PIV: Pius
ESV: Esuvius
TETRICVS: Tetricus
Caes: Caes
IMP: Imperator

Reverse:
SPES PVBLICA

SPES: Hope
PVBLICA: Republic

Showing: Spes advancing left, holding flower in right and raising skirt with left.


Domination: Antoninianus, Bronze, size 18 mm
Mint: Trier mint, struck 251-253 AD. RIC 272, Cohen 97.

Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus II was the son of the Governor of Aquitaine, in the breakaway Gallo-Roman Empire (Gaul, Spain, and Britain) established by Postumus. After Victorinus, the successor to Postumus, was murdered, Tetricus' father was acclaimed Tetricus I, Augustus. His father later elevated the young Caius to Caesar, but their reign was cut short, peacefully, when Tetricus deserted his own troops to surrender to Aurelian. In gratitude, Aurelian later restored Tetricus I as a Senator, and even installed him as Governor of Lucania, and Tetricus II returned to normal life, as a private citizen.
John Schou
Tetricus II- SPES PVBLICA.jpg
Tetricus II- SPES PVBLICA55 viewsTetricus II, Caesar mid 271 - spring 274 A.D.

Obverse:Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right



The words CVS CAES being visible in front of the radiate bust of the youthful, unbearded male.

CVS CAES

CVS: C. Pivs Esuvius
CAES: Caes

C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES IMP
C: Caius
PIV: Pius
ESV: Esuvius
TETRICVS: Tetricus
Caes: Caes
IMP: Imperator

Reverse:
SPES PVBLICA

SPES: Hope
PVBLICA: Repulic

Showing: Spes advancing left, holding flower in right and raising skirt with left.


Domination: Antoninianus, Bronze, size 18 mm
Mint: Gallic???

Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus II was the son of the Governor of Aquitaine, in the breakaway Gallo-Roman Empire (Gaul, Spain, and Britain) established by Postumus. After Victorinus, the successor to Postumus, was murdered, Tetricus' father was acclaimed Tetricus I, Augustus. His father later elevated the young Caius to Caesar, but their reign was cut short, peacefully, when Tetricus deserted his own troops to surrender to Aurelian. In gratitude, Aurelian later restored Tetricus I as a Senator, and even installed him as Governor of Lucania, and Tetricus II returned to normal life, as a private citizen.
John Schou
Tetricus II- SPES PVBLICA 1.jpg
Tetricus II- SPES REBVPLICA44 viewsTetricus II, Caesar mid 271 - spring 274 A.D.

Obverse:
Radiate draped and cuirassed bust right

The words CVS CAES being visible in front of the radiate bust of the youthful, unbearded male.


C PIV ESV TETRICVS CAES IMP
C: Caius
PIV: Pius
ESV: Esuvius
TETRICVS: Tetricus
Caes: Caes
IMP: Imperator

Reverse:
SPES PVBLICA

SPES: Hope
PVBLICA: Republic

Showing: Spes advancing left, holding flower in right and raising skirt with left.


Domination: Antoninianus, Bronze, size 18 mm
Mint: Gallic???

Caius Pius Esuvius Tetricus II was the son of the Governor of Aquitaine, in the breakaway Gallo-Roman Empire (Gaul, Spain, and Britain) established by Postumus. After Victorinus, the successor to Postumus, was murdered, Tetricus' father was acclaimed Tetricus I, Augustus. His father later elevated the young Caius to Caesar, but their reign was cut short, peacefully, when Tetricus deserted his own troops to surrender to Aurelian. In gratitude, Aurelian later restored Tetricus I as a Senator, and even installed him as Governor of Lucania, and Tetricus II returned to normal life, as a private citizen.
John Schou
postumus ant.jpg
The Gallic Empire - 260-269AD POSTUMUS AR antoninianus15 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG (radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: PAX AVG (Pax walking left, branch in right hand, scepter in left)
ref: RIC Vii 78, C.220
mint: Lugdunum, struck 260-269 AD
3.67gms, 22mm
berserker
postumus ant~0.jpg
The Gallic Empire - 260-269AD POSTUMUS AR antoninianus16 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG (radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: SALVS PROVINCIARVM (Rhine reclining left resting on urn, right hand on forepart of a boat; horns on head.)
ref: RIC Vii 87, RSC 355, Cunetio 2372; Elmer 123
mint: Lugdunum, struck 260-261 AD
3.6gms, 21mm
Scarce

There are a number of coins that refer to Salus in the legend, meaning health or welfare as usual, but do not have an image of the goddess and use a different type entirely. On the far right is an antoninianus of Postumus from 260 CE that shows the reclining figure of a river-god, in this case representing The Rhine, with the outline of a Rhine river-boat to one side. Command of the Rhine was critical to the welfare of Postumus' breakaway Gaulish version of the Roman empire, and the legend, SALVS PROVINCIARVM, reflects that. Postumus was making clear that he had safeguarded the border of his empire along the Rhine. As usual with this issue, the coin is with a weak reverse
berserker
rjb_post_sest8.jpg
Uncertain38 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
MONETA AVG
Moneta standing left with scales and cornucopia
Bastien -
mauseus
rjb_post_sest10.jpg
Uncertain44 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II
IMP C M CASS LAT POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG
Pax walking left
Bastien -
At 4.4 grammes this is barely above the weight of an antoninanus
mauseus
rjb_pos_sest_04_06.jpg
Uncertain33 viewsAE double sestertius
Atelier II?
[IMP C M CASS LAT] POSTVMVS PT [AVG] (sic)
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
[LAETITIA AVG] SC
Galley facing right
Bastien -

Note, no type in Bastien, regular or irregular with the galley right. Also, clear signs of overstriking on an earlier sestertius (standing figure on the reverse at 85 degrees).
mauseus
rjb_postsest_08_05.jpg
Uncertain24 viewsAE double sestertius
Uncertain mint (cast)
IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
PAX AVG
Pax walking left
Bastien -
24mm diameter
mauseus
Postumus VBERITAS AVG RIC 330-2.jpg
VBERITAS AVG RIC V/2 330190 viewsAnt, 21mm, 3.76g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: VBERITAS AVG, Uberitas standing L with purse and cornucopia.

Trier, Issue 4, Officina B.

RIC V/2 330, Common.

The scarcer variant with VBERITAS spelt correctly.
6 commentsRobert_Brenchley
Probus_-_Victoria_Germ.jpg
Victoria Germanica65 viewsVictoria Germanica
Obv. PROBVS PF AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right,
Rev. VICTORIA GERM, trophy with weapons and two prisoners, RAA in exergue
Rome Mint
22 mm, 4,06 gr.
Refs: RIC 222

Historia Augusta, 13-14: "his gestis cum ingenti exercitu Gallias petiit, quae omnes occiso Postumo turbatae fuerant, interfecto Aureliano a Germanis possessae. tanta autem illic proelia et tam feliciter gessit, ut a barbaris sexaginta per Gallias nobilissimas reciperet civitates, praedam deinde omnem, qua illi praeter divitias etiam efferebantur ad gloriam. et cum iam in nostra ripa, immo per omnes Gallias, securi vagarentur, caesis prope quadringentis milibus, qui Romanum occupaverant solum, reliquos ultra Nicrum fluvium et Albam removit. tantum his praedae barbaricae tulit quantum ipsi Romanis abstulerant. (...) nec cessatum est umquam pugnari, cum cottidie ad eum barbarorum capita deferrentur, iam ad singulos aureos singula, quamdiu reguli novem ex diversis gentibus venirent atque ad pedes Probi iacerent. quibus ille primum obsides imperavit, qui statim dati sunt, deinde frumentum, postremo etiam vaccas atque oves."

"This done, he set out with a huge army for the provinces of Gaul, which since the death of Postumus had all been in turmoil, and after the murder of Aurelian had been seized by the Germans. There, moreover, he fought battles so great and successful that he took back from the barbarians sixty most famous communes of Gaul, besides all the booty, by which the Germans, even apart from the actual wealth, were puffed up with glory. And whereas they were wandering at large on our bank, or rather through all the country of Gaul, Probus, after slaying about four hundred thousand who had seized upon Roman soil, drove all the rest back beyond the river Neckar and the district of Alba, getting from them as much barbarian booty as they themselves had seized from the Romans. (...) All the while the heads of barbarians were brought in to him daily, now at the price of an aureus apiece, and he never ceased fighting until nine princes of different tribes came before him and prostrated themselves at his feet. From these he demanded, first hostages, which they gave him at once, then grain, and last of all their cows and their sheep."
Syltorian
ABM_barb_rad_base_silver.jpg
Victorinus, irregular radiate (apparently base silver), c.269-7568 views[...], Radiate bust right
[...], Emperor standing right with spear and globe (type of Postumus)
Die axis 12, diameter 15mm, weight 1.92g.
Adrianus
postumus_ar-ants_o_4x_DSC02475.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianii - 4x coins - Moneta, Hercules, Pax, Providentia21 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Four (4x) Silver Antoninianii.

Right to Left:
Top Row: PROVIDENTIA AUG, PAX AUG
Bottom Row: MONETA AUG, HERC DEVSONIENSI

All have the same Obverse Titles:
obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
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rexesq
postumus_ar-ants_o_4x_25c_DSC02476.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianii - 4x coins - Moneta, Hercules, Pax, Providentia - US 25c10 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Four (4x) Silver Antoninianii with US Quarter (25 cents) for size comparison.

Right to Left:
Top Row: PROVIDENTIA AUG, PAX AUG
Bottom Row: MONETA AUG, HERC DEVSONIENSI

All have the same Obverse Titles:
obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
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rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_hercules_DSC02452_DSC02468.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Hercules - HERC DEVSONIENSI19 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS P F AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from the front.
rev: HERC DEVSONIENSI - Hercules standing right, leaning on club, holding lion's skin and bow.

Size: 24 mm
Weight: 3.6 Grams
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*Very nice coin of Postumus!
rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_MONETA-AUG_02_o_25c_DSC02438.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta #02 - w/ 25c19 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus (260 - 269 AD), Ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' .
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

Size: 25 mm x 23 mm
Weight: 2.7 Grams
rexesq
postumus_ant_moneta_5_0grams_obv_07_rev_06.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta - 5.0 Grams - Heavy!21 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus, struck 262 - 265 at the Cologne Mint.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

5.0 Grams - HEAVY!! for the type.

RIC 315
2 commentsrexesq
Copy_of_postumus_ant_moneta_5_0grams_obv_06.jpg
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta - 5.0 Grams - Heavy!14 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus, struck 262 - 265 at the Cologne Mint.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

5.0 Grams - HEAVY!! for the type.

RIC 315
rexesq
postumus_ant_moneta_5_0grams_obv_03_rev_01.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta - 5.0 Grams - Heavy!19 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus, struck 262 - 265 at the Cologne Mint.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

5.0 Grams - HEAVY!! for the type.

RIC 315
2 commentsrexesq
postumus_ant_moneta_5_0grams_00.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta - 5.0 Grams - Heavy!.14 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus, struck 262 - 265 at the Cologne Mint.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

5.0 Grams - HEAVY!! for the type.

RIC 315
rexesq
postumus_ant_moneta_5_0grams_03.jpg
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - Moneta - 5.0 Grams - Heavy!..17 viewsAncient Rome
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus, struck 262 - 265 at the Cologne Mint.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS PF AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MONETA AUG - Moneta standing facing left, holding scales and cornucopia.

5.0 Grams - HEAVY!! for the type.

RIC 315
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*NOTE: You can see just how large the flan on this particular coin is by comparison to the crappy certification company's slab! I will likely end up removing this coin from it's prison so the coin can breathe and I can hold it.
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*update: coin removed safely, no injuries or accidents, all well and coin safely transferred to a proper coin holding device and now rests amongst my other Roman coins.
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rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_PAX-AUG_r_DSC02424.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - PAX AUG31 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS P F AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from the front.
rev: PAX AUG - Pax standing holding an olive branch up in the air and holding a sceptre.

Size: 23 mm x 22 mm
Weight: 3.2 Grams
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*High quality detail on reverse, very nice for the type!
rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_PAX-AUG_r_DSC02422.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - PAX AUG83 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS P F AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from the front.
rev: PAX AUG - Pax standing holding an olive branch up in the air and holding a sceptre.

Size: 23 mm x 22 mm
Weight: 3.2 Grams
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-
*High quality detail on reverse, very nice for the type!
rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_PROVIDENTIA-AUG_o_25c_DSC02426.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - PROVIDENTIA AUG - w/ 25c82 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS P F AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from the front.
rev: PROVIDENTIA AUG - Providence standing facing left holding globe and sceptre.

Size: 25 mm x 24 mm
Weight: 3.8 Grams
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*Coin shown next to US Quarter-Dollar (25 Cents) for size comparison.
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rexesq
postumus_ar-ant_PROVIDENTIA-AUG_o_25c_DSC02425.JPG
X - Postumus AR Antoninianus - PROVIDENTIA AUG - w/ 25c84 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Postumus, ruler of the 'Gallic Empire' AD 260 - 269
Silver Antoninianus.

obv: IMP C POSTUMUS P F AUG - Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from the front.
rev: PROVIDENTIA AUG - Providence standing facing left holding globe and sceptre.

Size: 25 mm x 24 mm
Weight: 3.8 Grams
-----

*Coin shown next to US Quarter-Dollar (25 Cents) for size comparison.
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-
rexesq
Valerian1RIC232.jpg
[1112a] Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.70 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 232, RSC 10, VF, worn die reverse, Mediolanum mint, 3.909g, 22.2mm, 180o, 257 A.D.; Obverse: IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AETERNITATI AVGG, Sol standing left, raising right, globe in left; nice portrait, good silver for the reign. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.
Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright Richard D. Weigel, 2007. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian I was proclaimed emperor after the death of Trajan Decius. He successfully repulsed many barbarian incursions but the standard of living declined and would never recover. In 260 A.D., after four years of war during which Roman forces suffered great losses in battle and to plague, he arranged for peace talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sassinian emperor Sapor and was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown, but in Rome it was rumored that he had been murdered and that Sapor was using his stuffed body as a footstool. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.72 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV197unlistedvar.jpg
[1114a] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.58 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 197 var (pellet in exergue), aEF, 3.880g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, • in exergue; full silvering, bold strike, excellent centering and eastern style, rare this nice; rare variety. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV214.jpg
[1114b] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.53 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC V 214, VF, 2.930g, 20.3mm, 180o, Antioch mint; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right; Reverse: NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident in left hand, • in exergue; excellent centering. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ClaudiusIIGothicusRIC34.jpg
[1114c] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.51 viewsAntoninianus. RIC 34. Weight, Size. F. Rome mint. Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right; Reverse: FIDES EXERCI, Fides standing left, holding two standards. Ex Maridvnvm


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Z1546TN.jpeg
[1119a] Probus, Antoninianus, 276-282 A.D.84 viewsProbus (AD 276-282) AE Antoninianus; Obverse: Radiate bust, left, wearing imperial mantel and holding scepter surmounted by eagle IMP. PROBVS P. F. AVG. Reverse: Cult image of Roma seated within six column temple ROMAE AETER. R thunderbolt A in exergue; Rome mint 21mm x 22mm, 3.59g; VF; RIC, Vol. 5. Part 2, #183.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Probus (276-282 A.D.) and Rival Claimants (Proculus, Bonosus, and Saturninus)of the 280s

Robin Mc Mahon
New York University

Probus's Background
M. Aurelius Probus was most likely born in Sirmium in 232 A.D. It is difficult to reconstruct Probus' career before he became emperor because of the unreliable nature of the account in the Historia Augusta, but it is certainly possible that he was a tribune under Valerian. Perhaps all that can be said with any reliability is that he served in the military and was on Aurelian's staff during his Eastern campaigns. There is a certain amount of confusion in the sources about him because of the fact that he has often been confused with a certain Tenagino Probus, who served as prefect in Egypt under Claudius II Gothicus.

Accession to Power
After the murder of Aurelian, the Senate chose as his successor the septuagenarian senator, Tacitus, who took up the burdens of state and headed with the army to the East. The Eruli had overrun Pontus, Galatia, Cappadocia and finally Cilicia, where Tacitus, with help from his half-brother Florianus, defeated them. Tacitus, however, either died of an illness or was killed by his own troops; he was succeeded by Florianus. In the meantime, Probus had been declared Emperor by his own troops in mid-276, and prepared to meet Florianus, who was marching from the Bosporus, having broken off his victorious engagement against the Eruli. Florianus was acknowledged in Rome and was supported by Gaul, Spain, Britain, and Italy; Probus was supported by Syria, Phoenicia, Palestine and Egypt. The two fought a desultory campaign near Tarsus. With a much smaller force, Probus decided his best strategy would be to avoid a pitched battle and let the heat overcome the troops of Florianus. The latter, having reigned barely two months, was murdered by his own troops. Probus became sole Emperor, possibly by August 276.
Probus in the West: 276-279
His first order of business was to punish the murderers of Aurelian, who may have also had a hand in the murder of Tacitus. On the basis of numismatic evidence, Probus appears to have traveled from the east across the Propontis, and then through the provinces of Thrace, Moesia and Pannonia. It is at this time that he must have defeated the Goths because he already had the title Gothicus by 277 A.D. Shortly after he arrived at the Rhine River he made a trip to Rome to have his powers ratified by the Senate.

Following the death of Postumus in 258, the situation in Gaul had rapidly deteriorated and numerous bands of invaders had swept across the Rhine. In the south, the Longiones, together with the Alamanni, had advanced through the Neckar valley into Gaul. The Franks had crossed the Rhine further north. In order to meet this simultaneous threat, Probus divided his forces having his generals campaign against the Franks, while he himself fought against the Longiones and Alamanni. Both Probus and his generals were victorious; in fact, Probus even captured Semnon, the leader of the Longiones, with his son. Both groups of invaders agreed to terms and booty and prisoners were returned; in the end, Probus allowed Semnon and his son their freedom.

Probus is next reported to have fought victoriously against the Burgundians and to have secured his victory with some ingenuity. Because his forces were smaller than those of the invaders, he wanted to engage the enemy on terms as favorable as possible; the Romans were on one side of the river and the barbarians were on the other. Probus was able to induce them to cross the river by having his soldiers hurl insults at them, and being enraged, they began crossing the river. Before the barbarians were able to organize themselves, the Roman army soundly routed them. Smarting from their defeat, the enemy did not live up to their end of the treaty, with the result that, in a second battle, they were again worsted by Probus. The barbarians who were taken prisoner were enrolled in the Roman Army and sent to Britain.

Not content with merely defeating the barbarians along the Rhine, Probus took important steps to secure the boundary for the future. He planned and constructed a series of forts and depots on the German side of the Rhine at various crossing points, which he garrisoned with troops. Further, Probus apparently took measures to restore economic stability to Gaul by encouraging the planting of vineyards. Probus' titles Gothicus Maximus and Germanicus Maximus suggest claims to the success of his operations in the area.

Events in the East 279-280
The sources do not give many details of Probus's activities in Raetia and Illyricum, but Zosimus does say he repulsed an invasion of Vandals from Illyricum in a battle along a river generally identified as the Lech. In 279, theatre of operations was Lycia. Zosimus records the curious story of the adventures and death of a robber chieftain name Lydius who may be the same individual called Palfuerius in the Historia Augusta. In order to prevent further troubles, Probus constructed fortresses, and settled large groups of veterans in this area, giving them land in exchange for the promise that their sons would also serve in the legions when they were old enough.

Probus's Military and Economic Activities In Egypt
Meanwhile, Probus had sent his generals to Egypt, where the Blemmyes were stirring up trouble in 280; they had broken through the border, advanced up the Nile, and, in league with the city of Ptolemais, captured the city of Koptus. They were eventually expelled and order was restored by Probus' generals. Once Probus had restored order, he set about the task of a large-scale reconstruction of the dikes, canals, and bridges along the Nile, something which not been done since it had been undertaken by Augustus in the years 27-25 B.C. More specifically, the Vita Probi notes, "On the Nile, moreover, he did so much that his sole efforts added greatly to the tithes of grain. He constructed bridges and temples porticos and basilicas, all by the labour of the soldiers, he opened up many river-mouths, and drained many marshes, and put in their place grain-fields and farms"(9.3-4). The importance of this type of work cannot be underestimated since a large percentage of the food supply for Rome came from Egypt and the African provinces.

The Revolts of Proculus, Bonosus, and Saturninus
According to the Historia Augusta, although the Persian King, Vahram II, had made peaceful overtures, Probus had rejected these and was planning to push the war forward when he was faced with a series of revolts both in the West and East. It is difficult to place them in their exact time-frame since the sources do not agree. Nevertheless, the situation was serious enough for Probus to cancel his plans for war with Persia and hurry back to the West. On his return Probus settled large numbers of barbarians in the Empire. Perhaps this was done to repopulate areas which had been left abandoned by the effects of invasions and plague. This policy, which Probus did not begin, and which was continued by his successors was, however, destined to bring trouble to Rome in the future.

The writer of the Vita Probi in the Historia Augusta indicates that in 280 A.D. Proculus revolted in the vicinity of the city of Lugdunum, which had been severely dealt with by Aurelian and, for reasons not given, spurred on by this fear, had adopted a hostile attitude towards Probus. Proculus apparently had some connections to the Franks and he had hoped to rally them to his cause. They appear, however, to have handed him over to Probus when he arrived on the scene. Probably at the same time, Bonosus revolted. His rebellion seems to have been serious as it appears to have required considerable force to be suppressed. Bonosus, an officer in charge of the Rhine fleet, had somehow let the Germans slip over the border and burn the fleet. Fearful of retribution, he apparently took shelter in proclaiming himself emperor. He was, in spite of his lapse with the fleet, an excellent soldier. The fighting was only stopped when Bonosus, despairing of his position, hanged himself. Probus spared the lives of his sons as well as that of his wife.

Julius Saturninus, one of Probus 's commanders in Syria, probably seized power in the year 281. A close friend and associate of Probus, he may have been compelled to adopt the purple by his unruly troops. Although he initially rejected a request of the people of Alexandria to put on the purple, he later changed his mind and proclaimed himself Augustus. In any case, Probus planned to put down the rebellion. However, Saturninus was killed by his own troops before Probus had a chance to act.

The sources do not provide much in the way of material to analyze the extent of these revolts and how widespread the feeling was against Probus in the West. There are indications that the revolts were more than local affairs because inscriptions from as far away as Spain have been found where Probus's name has been erased.

In 281 Probus was in Rome to celebrate his victories. Although the Historia Augusta goes into great detail to describe the events of Probus’s triumph and celebrations of his victories in respect to the number of animals and prisoners involved, there may be some truth to its description because Zosimus states there was a uprising which at this time required a force of soldiers to suppress. On a more substantial note, Probus completed the wall around Rome which had been begun by Aurelian.

Probus' Assassination
Probus was too anxious to push ahead with his plans for an invasion of Persia, which had been postponed due to the revolts and unrest in the West, and, to this end, he left Rome in 282 and proceeded first to his native town of Sirmium when news came that M. Aurelius Carus, Perfect of the Guard, had been proclaimed emperor. When troops sent by Probus to quell the rebellion went over to Carus, Probus' remaining troops killed the emperor. His death occurred sometime between September or October 282.
Copyright (C) 1999, Robin Mc Mahon. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of the Roman Emperors and their Families; http://www.roman-emperors.org/probus.htm. Used by permission.

Probus started as a simple soldier but advanced to general and was declared emperor after the death of Tacitus. Florian's murder left him as undisputed ruler. His leadership brought peace and prosperity but he was murdered by mutinous soldiers, enraged at being employed on public building projects. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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PostumusRIC93.jpg
[1200] Postumus, Summer 260--Spring 269 A.D.43 viewsBillon Antoninianus, RIC 93 Bust Type A. RSC 419. Weight, Size; VF; Obverse:– IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped bust right; Reverse:– VIRTVS AVG, Mars/Virtus, standing right, holding spear and resting on shield. Ex maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Postumus (A.D. 260-269)

Michel Polfer
Centre Universitaire de Luxembourg

Postumus is the first emperor of the so-called "Gallic Empire", which lasted from his rebellion against Gallienus in 260 AD to the surrender of Tetricus I to the central emperor Aurelian in 274 AD.

In 260 AD, the general situation of the Empire was favorable to usurpations: Valerian I, father of and co-emperor with Gallienus, had been made prisoner by the Persian king Shapur I. The news shook the Empire and in the following months, the position of his heir Gallienus became very difficult, as he had to face rebellions in several parts of the Empire. While the inner situation was thus more than unstable, the barbarians, sensing the opportunity, poured across the northern frontier. The Franks entered into Gaul, devastating Germania Inferior and Belgica. Some Frankish warrior groups pressed on as far as Spain, where they destroyed Tarragona. The Alamanni broke through the lines in Germania superior and Raetia, overran the Agri Decumates, sacked the city of Aventicum and begun to extend their destructions to the interior of Gaul. Italy itself was exposed to them, as Gallienus had withdrawn most of the troops to fight the usurper Ingenuus on the Danube. After his victory over Ingenuus, Gallienus returned to Italy and was able to defeat the Germanic invaders at Milan in midsummer 260 AD. The resulting peace was short-lived, as a new rebellion on the Danube, led by Regalianus, and the great Sarmatic invasions of 260 exposed the northern frontier. Moreover, Gallienus had to face the revolt of Macrianus and Quietus in Egypt, which removed this important province from his control.

Thus, it is not surprising that Gallienus was unable to take swift and effective military actions, when - probably in the summer of 260 AD- an other usurper, M. Cassianius Latinius Postumus, rebelled on the Rhine frontier. The exact position of Postumus on the moment of the revolt is not known, but the context makes it clear that he was commanding troops on the Rhine frontier. The direct reason for his rebellion seems to have been a quarrel about booty taken from a barbarian raiding-party destroyed on its way home by Postumus and his soldiers. While Postumus had distributed the booty to his men, the praetorian prefect Silvanus ordered him to surrender the booty to himself and the Caesar Saloninus, the son of Gallienus, whom his father had left behind as his representative in the town of Cologne, under the guardianship of Silvanus. Postumus troops rebelled and proclaimed their commander imperator. They marched against and laid siege to Cologne. The garrison in the town was compelled to hand over Saloninus and Silvanus, both were put to death.

The area controlled by Postumus after his rebellion in 260 AD consisted of Germania Inferior and Germania Superior as well as of Raetia and the whole of Gaul (except for the southern parts of Lugdunensis and perhaps also Narbonensis). From 261 AD on, it also included Britain and the Spain. Neither he nor his successors made any attempt to extend the Gallic Empire further to the south or the east.

According to the literary sources at our disposal, the first "Gallic" emperor Postumus reigned well. They praise him for his military success against the Germanic invaders, thus crediting him with the restoration of the western provinces which had been on the verge of collapse. That Postumus undertook heavy fighting against Germanic tribes is also confirmed by his coinage and by the fact that he assumed -before the 10th of December 261 AD - the title of Germanicus maximus.

In 265 AD, the central emperor Gallienus tempted to crush the usurper, but twice failed to do so. On the first occasion, the fugitive Postumus owed his life only to the carelessness of Gallienus' cavalry commander Aureolus, on the second occasion, the emperor, besieging the usurper in a Gallic town, was wounded by an arrow and had to break of the assault. It seems that thereafter Gallienus made no other serious attempt to overcome this usurpation, devoting his attention to the political and military problems in the eastern part of the Roman empire.

He could do so, because Postumus took no actions at all to march on Rome. Right from the beginning of his usurpation, Postumus thus had made it clear that he had no intentions to make a bid for Rome, that his thoughts were only for Gaul. Even when in 268 AD Aureolus, the cavalry commander of Gallienus stationed in Milan - who had succeeded to recover Raetia for the central empire- entered into rebellion and declared himself for Postumus. Postumus did not take up the implied invitation to invade Italy, finally abandoning Aureolus to his fate.

But on the other hand there is no evidence at all to support the theory that he had the intention to create a separate "Galliarum Imperium." On the contrary: Postumus - ass well as his successors - avoided in his propaganda every hint to the limited extension of his reign. He put himself clearly in the tradition of the central Roman emperors, clearly underlining the universal claim of his rule, taking all the traditional titles of the Roman emperors, including those of pontifex maximus and pater patriae, proclaiming senators and nominating his own consuls. His coins show the same universal claims, giving preference to types like Roma aeterna or pacator orbis, to salus and fides.

By the end of 265 AD, Postumus' coins joyfully proclaimed his victory, the festivities celebrating his quinquennalia continued into the following year. But while the coinage of Postumus of the years 267-268 underlined the peace and prosperity brought to his reign by the guiding hand of the emperor, the sudden deterioration of his billon coinage in 268 AD shows that Postumus was facing more and more difficulties. It is very likely that his repeated refusal to march on Rome had disturbed many of his soldiers, since only his recognition of sole ruler of the Empire might have legitimized their rebellion of 260 AD and provided them with adequate reward for their support. So the debasement of 268 was probably occasioned by Postumus' need to buy the loyalty of his men, thus forcing him to mint beyond the silver supplies which the area under his control could provide. Nevertheless, he was able to celebrate in late 268 AD the commencement of his tenth year in power as well as his entry into his fifth consulship on 1st of January 269.

These festivities were cut short early in 269 AD by the rebellion of Ulpius Cornelius Laelianus at Moguntiacum (Mainz). There is no direct written or epigraphic evidence for the office Laelianus held at the time of his revolt against Postumus, but it seems most likely that he held an office in Germania Superior, either as legatus legionis XXII Primigenie or as governor of Germania Superior. His rebellion can be explained only on the grounds of a growing dissatisfaction of the troops of the Rhine-army with their commander in chief and emperor Postumus. How deep these tensions had become became apparent after the successful action against the usurper: no sooner had Postumus taken Moguntiacum and thus ended the ephemerous rebellion of Laelianus than he was murdered by his own troops for refusing them to sack the city. In his place, the troops raised to the purple a simple soldier, Marcus Arelius Marius, shortly afterwards killed and replaced by Marcus Piavonius Victorinus.

Copyright (C) 2000, Michel Polfer. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/postumus.htm


Postumus was an incredibly skilled general and administrator. Rebelling against Gallienus, Postumus succeeded in uniting Gaul, Spain and Britain into what was essentially an empire within an empire. Enjoying tremendous military success against the Germans, he kept his Gallic Empire secure and prosperous. In 268 A.D. he quickly destroyed the forces of the usurper Laelianus, but his refusal to allow his forces to sack Moguntiacum (Mainz, Germany) led to his assassination by disgruntled troops (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

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