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26531q00.jpg
100 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Prieur 720 (1 example), SNG Paris 2331, Weber -, VF, 13.043g, 26.9mm, 180o, Aegeae mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse AUTOKR KAIS TRAIA ADRIANO SEB P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ETOUS •QOR• AIGEAIWN, eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in ex; rare;

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

ex FORVM
dealer's picture
1 commentsareich
ABM_Postumus.jpg
81 viewsPostumus, Principal Mint, sestertius, 260

IMP C M CASS LAT POST[...],Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
SALVS AVG, Salus standing right, feeding snake held in arms
Weight 15.49g

A very rare early issue with Postumus' full name given on the obverse - normally this only occurs on radiate double-sestertii. This is struck from the same obverse die as a gold medallion in Paris with a SALVS PROVINCIARVM reverse.
Adrianus
Frankreich_Medaille_1878_Exposition_Universelle_Paris_Barre.jpg
11 viewsFrankreich

Medaille 1878 (Bronze)

von Barre

auf die Exposition Universelle zu Paris

Vs.: Kopf nach links

Rs.: Schrift

Gewicht: 15,4g

Durchmesser: 30mm

Erhaltung:min.Rdf., zaponiert, vorzüglich _897
Antonivs Protti
Schweiz_Helvetia_Suisse_2_Rappen_1851_A_Paris_Hut_Wappen_Kranz_Bronze.jpg
15 views
Schweiz

2 Rappen

1851 A

Münzstätte: Paris

Vs.: HELVETIA. Schweizerwappen auf gekreuzten Lorbeer- und Eichenzweigen, darüber ein Federhut. Unten die Jahrzahl.

Rs.: Wertangabe 2 in einem Kranz, bestehend aus zwei Lorbeerzweigen. Unten Münzzeichen A.

Rand glatt

Zitat: Divo / Tobler 323

Erhaltung: Sehr schön

Bronze

20 mm, 2,40 g _491
Antonivs Protti
Kölner_Münzkabinett_Tyll_Kroha_-_5_December_2014_-_lot_406.jpg
32 viewsROME
PB Tessera (17mm, 3.56 g, 12 h)
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Silvanus standing left, holding scythe and branch
Rostovtsev 2977; München 368; BM 397; Paris 390; Kircheriano 922-4

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett Tyll Kroha 102 (5 December 2014), lot 406
1 commentsArdatirion
charles2-denier-paris.JPG
D.761 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1a, Paris)10 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
Denier (Paris, class 1a, 840-864)

Silver, 1.69 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 7h

O/ +CΛR•LVS RE•X FR ; cross pattée
R/ PΛRI / • / S◂II



Droger
charles2-denier-temple-paris.JPG
D.762 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 1e, Paris)28 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
"Temple" denier (Paris, class 1e, 840-864)

Silver, 1.70 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 4h

O/ +CΛRLVS REX FR; cross pattée
R/ +PΛRISII CIVITΛS; temple

The mint's name (Paris) stands in for the usual legend XPISTIANA RELIGIO. The royal authority may have been quite weak in the beginning of Charles' reign, and each mint may have been tempted to make a clear legend to characterize its own coinage.
Droger
charles2-gdr-curtisasonien.JPG
D.375 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 2, Courcessin?)35 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877)
GDR denier (Courcessin?, class 2, 864-875)

Silver, 1.43 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +GRΛTIΛ D-I REX; carolingian monogram
R/ +I.CVRTISΛSONIEH; cross pattée

In 864, Charles the Bald promulgated the edict of Pîtres, huge reform whose aim was to protect the kingdom from Viking raids. It also reinforced royal authority on minting, and created a new type of deniers . The new coins could be only struck at 10 mints (Palace, Chalon sur Saône, Melle, Narbonne, Orléans, Paris, Quentovic, Reims, Rouen and Sens). This limitation had never been applied, more than 110 mints struck the new coinage. This can be understood as a lack of control of the central autority. However it seems that several mints shared dies... Grierson and Blackburn proposed that only 10 main mints produced dies and partially outsourced coinage production ?
On the obverse is written GRATIA D-I REX (GDR) around a carolingian monogram. The alliance with Roman Church goes on... The reverse already existed for Class 1, with the mint name around a cross pattée.
Class 2 of Charles' coinage is made of these GDR deniers.

The precise localization of the mint in Normandie (north of France) is still not clear. According to Grierson and Blackburn, Courti(s) Sasonien(sis) may come from some groups of Saxons settled in northern part of Gaul.
Droger
charles2-denier-bourges-emp.JPG
D.198 Charles II the Bald (denier, class 3, Bourges)27 viewsCharles the Bald, king of the Franks (840-877) and Holy Roman Emperor (875-877)
Denier (Bourges, class 2, 876-877)

Silver, 1.47 g, 19 mm diameter, die axis 12h

O/ +CΛRLVS IMP ΛVG; cross pattée
R/ +BITVRICES CIVIT; carolingian monogram

In 875, after the death of his nephew, the Emperor Louis II, Charles received the imperial crown.
The related coinage clearly shows the imperial title in a roman way, IMP AVG. This coinage may be undistinguishable from the one of Charles the Fat (885-887), when he assumed West Francia kingship (before being chased by Eudes, count of Paris and next king of the Franks).
Droger
henri-ier-denier-paris.JPG
Dy.016 Henry I: denier (Paris, 1st type)7 viewsHenry I, king of the Franks (1031-1060)
Denier (Paris, 1st type)

Silver, 1.23 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 10h
O/ HΛNIRICVS REX ; Alpha et Omega hung in the field
R/ PΛISIVS CIVTAS around a cross pattée
Droger
louis7-denier-parisis-2eme.JPG
Dy.145 Louis VII (the Young): denier parisis (Paris), 2nd type13 viewsLouis VII, king of the Franks (1137-1180)
Denier parisis (Paris), 2nd type

Billon, 0.81 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 9h
O: +LVDOVICVSoREX; FRA/NCO
R: PARISII CIVIS, cross pattée


Droger
louis7-denier-parisis-3eme.JPG
Dy.146 Louis VII (the Young): denier parisis (Paris), 3rd type12 viewsLouis VII, king of the Franks (1137-1180)
Denier parisis (Paris), 3rd type

Billon, 0.83 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 3h
O: LVDOVICVS REX; FRA/OCN
R: PA[R]ISII CIVIS, cross pattée

The second line on the field of the obverse must be read form right to left, so that one can read : Lvdovicvs rex franco(rum).
Droger
louis7-denier-parisis-4t.JPG
Dy.148 Louis VII (the Young): denier parisis (Paris), 4th type23 viewsLouis VII, king of the Franks (1137-1180)
Denier parisis (Paris), 4th type

Billon, 0.90 g, diameter 18-20 mm, die axis 3h
O: +LVDOVICVS RE; FRA/OCN
R: PA[R]ISII CIVIS, cross pattée

The second line on the field of the obverse must be read form right to left, so that one can read : Lvdovicvs rex franco(rum).
Droger
philippe2-denier-parisis.JPG
Dy.164 Philip II (Augustus): denier parisis (Paris)21 viewsPhilip II, king of France (1180-1223)
Denier parisis (Paris)

Billon, 1.04 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 9h
O: PHILIPVS REX; FRA/OCN
R: PARISII CIVIS, cross pattée

Philip II's denier parisis is very similar to his father's.
Droger
philippe2-denier-arras.JPG
Dy.168 Philip II (Augustus): denier parisis (Arras)15 viewsPhilip II, king of France (1180-1223)
Denier parisis, 2ond emission (1191-1199, Arras)

Billon, 1.08 g, diameter 20 mm, die axis 2h
O: PHI.LIPVS REX; FRA/OCN
R: +ARRAS CIVIS, cross pattée with 2 lily flowers
Droger
philippe2-denier-saintmartin.JPG
Dy.176 Philip II (Augustus): denier tournois (Saint Martin de Tours)24 viewsPhilip II, king of France (1180-1223)
Denier tournois (Saint Martin de Tours)

Billon, 0.96 g, diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 7h
O: PHILIPVS REX; croix pattée
R: +SCS MARTINVS; châtel tournois

The livre parisis was a standard for minting coins (and for unit of accounts) inherited from the Carolingians.
In 1203, John (Lackland) lost Anjou to Philip II. The deniers minted at the Saint Martin abbey in Touraine were considered as very stable. So Philip II decided to adopt the livre tournois (tournois means "of Tours", Tours is a French city in Anjou close to Saint Martin abbey) as a new standard denier and unit of account. Livre parisis and livre tournois coexisted for some time but the livre tournois quickly outstripped the livre parisis as a unit of account. Deniers parisis ceased to be struck a little more than a century later, but livre parisis existed till 17th century.
SCS MARTINVS means Sanctus Martinus (Saint Martin). The name of the abbey was temporarily kept on the deniers tournois, but was soon replaced by the name of the city of Tours.
Droger
philippe4-denier-parisis-orond.JPG
Dy.221 Philip IV (the Fair): denier parisis with a round O 9 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Denier tournois with round O (1280-1290)

Billon (359 ‰), 0.94 g, diameter 19 mm, die axis 7h
O: PhILIPPVS REX; FRA/OCN
R: +PARISIVS CIVIS; croix pattée

This type was struck during 1280-1285 (end of Philipp III's reign) and 1285-1290 (beginning of Philip IV's reign).
Droger
philippe4-double-parisis~0.JPG
Dy.227 Philip IV (the Fair): double parisis, 1st emission15 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Double parisis, 1st emission (1295-1303)

Billon (480 ‰), 1.28 g, diameter 20 mm, die axis 11h
O: +PhILIPPVS REX; leafy cross
R: +mOnETA DVPLEX: REGA/LIS under a fleur-de-lis

Philip had to face with extensive financial liabilities. He found money expelling Jews, Lombard bankers, arresting Templars and confiscating their properties. He also debased the French coinage and minted quite a large number of successive types and emissions of coins, with varying silver proportions.
Droger
philippe4-double-parisis.JPG
Dy.229 Philip IV (the Fair): double tournois, 1st emission22 viewsPhilip IV, king of France (1285-1314)
Double tournois, 1st emission (1295-1303)

Billon (399 ‰), 1.21 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 12h
O: +PhILIPPVS REX; cross pattée with one fleur-de-lis
R: +mOn DVPLEX REGAL: chatel tournois' pediment with 2 lis
Droger
charles4-double-parisis.JPG
Dy.244C Charles IV (the Fair): double Parisis, 3rd emission44 viewsCharles IV, king of France (1322-1328)
Double parisis, 3rd emission (07/24/1326)

Billon (319 ‰), 1.10 g, diameter 20 mm, die axis 3h
O: +kAROLVS REX(clover); crown with fleur-de-lis and a small ring below
R: +mOnETA DVPLEX; cross with fleur-de-lis

2 commentsDroger
eudes-denier-blois.JPG
D.163 Eudes (denier, Blois)15 viewsEudes, king of the Franks (888-898)
Denier (Blois)

Silver, 1.59 g, 20 mm diameter, die axis 3h

O/ +MISERICORDIΛ DE-I; monogram
R/ +BIESIΛNIS CΛSTR◊; cross pattée

Eudes was not a Carolingian. As count of Paris, he obtained successful results against the Viking attacks. He was then chosen by frankish noblemen to be the king. The legitimate heir Charles III the Simple was then too young to rule.

This type of coinage is a very Carolingian one.
Eudes made his own monograms. This one is quite elaborate, with ◊DO above and RX below. Still on the obverse, the inscription is Misericordia Dei instead of the traditional Gratia Dei Rex. These two features (monogram and legend) make this coin very similar to Louis III's coins of Touraine (Blois and Tours mainly).

Droger
raoul-denier-paris.JPG
D.774 Rudolph (denier, Paris)9 viewsRudolph (or Raoul, Radulf), king of the Franks (923-936)
Denier (Paris)

Silver, 1.13 g, 18 mm diameter, die axis 11h

O/ +CRATIA DI REX; monogram
R/ + / PΛRISI / CIVITΛ / +

Rudolph was elected king of Franks by noblemen in 923, after his father-in-law (Robert I)'s death.

Although Rudolph wasn't a carolingian, his coinage used a monogram.This monogram is clearly inspired by the habitual KRLS monogram. The letters seem to be R(?)DFS. Anyway, the F on the bottom can be cleary distinguished, and this coin can be attributed to Rudolph.

Droger
commodus_kybele_hadri_rev.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS--HADRIANOPOLIS46 views177 - 192 AD
(under governor of Thrace Julius Castus)
AE 28 mm; 16.62 g
O: AY KAI Λ AYPH KOMOΔOC draped bust right
R: Cybele riding lion running right
Thrace, Hadrianopolis
Jurukova, Hadrianopolis 124 (V 75/R 124), citing specimens in Munich and Paris
d.s.

laney
commodus_nike_nikop.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS--NIKIPOLIS AD ISTRUM29 views177-192 AD
AE 17 X 21 mm, 2.53 g
O: AVT [KAI MAR AVRH] KOMODOC, laureate head right
R: [NEIKOPOLEITWN] PROC ICC TRON Tyce standing left with kalathos, rudder, and cornucopia
Nikopolis ad Istrum, AMNG I/1, 1239
(interesting error on rev., with extra C)
Pick knows 3 ex., Berlin, Paris, Sophia. Usually these coins are from a rude style.

laney
septim_nik_herak_patera_club_skin.jpg
(0193) SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS15 views193-211 AD
AE 19 mm, 3.19 g
O: AVK - [CEVHROC] Laureate head right
R:NIKOPOL - I PROC ICT Herakles, standing facing with head left holding club and lion-skin in left arm and patera in outstretched right hand
Moesia Inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum; ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1388 (1 ex., Paris); Varbanov (engl.) 2297; Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2015) No. 8.14.14.23
Rare type with Herakles holding patera
laney
radiate.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS32 views218 - 222 AD
AE 25 mm 9.62 g
O: AV(T?) KM AVR - ANTWNINOC, cuirassed, radiate bust r.
R: VP NOBIOV ROVFOV NIKOPOLITWN PRO (PR ligate) in l. field one below the other C ITRO / N (sic!), Athena stg. l., holding spear in raised l. hand and shield set on ground in r. hand
Nikopolis ad Istrum
AMNG I/1, 1920 (1 ex., Paris); Hristova/Jekov No. 8.26.4.5 corr.
laney
elagab_markianop_lion.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS24 views218 - 222 AD
AE 17.5 mm; 2.14 g
O: AVT KM AVP ANTWNEINOC Laureate head right
R: MARKIANOPOLI/ TWN Lion standing left
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis mint
Ref: (all apparently from the same dies as this coin)
Pfeiffer, Münzen aus Markianopolis, 2nd ed., Kaarst 2013, 443.
AMNG 915: Paris, rev. ill. pl. XX.1; Hristova-Jekov, Marcianopolis, 2006, p. 149, ill. 6; Lanz 82, 1997, lot 546
d.s.

laney
Balbinus.jpg
*SOLD*45 viewsBalbinus AE 36

Attribution: SNG Paris 1627 (same dies), Tarsus, rare
Date: AD 238
Obverse: AVT KAIC KAI BALBEINON CEB, laureate and draped bust r.,
Ω / Π in l. and r. fields
Reverse: TA PCOY M HTPO Π O Λ C Ω C, Perseus stg. l. holding head of Gorgon Medusa in r. hand and a harpa in l. hand, A/K in l. field, M/B/ Γ in r. field
Size: 35 mm
Weight: 20.4 grams
Noah
DSC07230.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria Tetradrachm #3 .7 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Caracalla (198 - 217 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. - #3

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right.
rev: Eagle standing on leg and thigh of sacrificial animal. Head right, tail right, wings spread, holding wreath in beak.

Weight: 13.48 Grams
Size: 30 mm x 28 mm
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Emperor Caracalla (212 - 217) Antioch, Syria Silver Tetradrachm #3 with USA Quarter Dollar (25 cent piece) for size comparison
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rexesq
DSC07227.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria Tetradrachm #3 .7 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Caracalla (198 - 217 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. - #3

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right.
rev: Eagle standing on leg and thigh of sacrificial animal. Head right, tail right, wings spread, holding wreath in beak.

Weight: 13.48 Grams
Size: 30 mm x 28 mm
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Emperor Caracalla (212 - 217) Antioch, Syria Silver Tetradrachm #3 with USA Quarter Dollar (25 cent piece) for size comparison
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rexesq
DSC07228.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria Tetradrachm #3 .13 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Emperor Caracalla (198 - 217 AD)
Silver Tetradrachm of Antioch, Syria. - #3

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust right.
rev: Eagle standing on leg and thigh of sacrificial animal. Head right, tail right, wings spread, holding wreath in beak.

Weight: 13.48 Grams
Size: 30 mm x 28 mm
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Emperor Caracalla (212 - 217) Antioch, Syria Silver Tetradrachm #3 with USA Quarter Dollar (25 cent piece) for size comparison
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rexesq
caracalla_tets_syro-phoenician_obv_DSC07297_75%.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria. Tetradrachmai, Syro - Phoenician.7 views4x Caracalla Tets, the one on the bottom row is from Tyre, Phoenicia, and has an interesting Frontal, cuirassed bust, that I have never seen before on a Tyre tet.
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With a USA Quarter (25 cent piece) on the bottom right, for size comparison.
rexesq
caracalla_tets_syro-phoenician_rev_DSC0790_65%.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria. Tetradrachmai, Syro - Phoenician.8 views4x Caracalla Tets, the one on the bottom row is from Tyre, Phoenicia, and has an interesting Frontal, cuirassed bust, that I have never seen before on a Tyre tet.
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With a USA Quarter (25 cent piece) in the center for size comparison.
rexesq
caracalla_tets_syro-phoenician_obv_DSC0783_60%.JPG
0 - Caracalla - Antioch, Syria. Tetradrachmai, Syro - Phoenician.10 views4x Caracalla Tets, the one on the bottom row is from Tyre, Phoenicia, and has an interesting Frontal, cuirassed bust, that I have never seen before on a Tyre tet.
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With a USA Quarter (25 cent piece) in the center for size comparison.
rexesq
002_Augustus,__RPC__AD,_Q-001,_6h,_16,2-17,0mm,_3,44g-s.jpg
002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Mysia, Lampsakos, RPC I 2278, Bust of Senate right, Rare! #1127 views002p Augustus (63 B.C.-14 A.D.), Mysia, Lampsakos, RPC I 2278, Bust of Senate right, Rare! #1
avers: CЄBACTOY ΛAMΨAKH (retrograde), Laureate head of Augustus right.
reverse: CYNKΛHTOC IЄPA(retrograde), Bare-headed, draped bust of the Senate right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,2-17,0mm, weight: 3,44g, axes: 6h,
mint: Mysia, Lampsakos, date: c.17 B.C., ref: RPC I 2278; McClean 7640; Paris 799-801., Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
996Hadrian_Strack3_eastern.jpg
004 Hadrian Denarius 117 AD Trajan and Hadrian standing vis-à-vis eastern mint34 viewsReference.
Strack *3; Paris 4616

Obv. IMP CAES TRAIAN HADRIANO AVG DIVI TRA
Laureate, cuirassed bust right, baldric strap over shoulder and across chest, seen from front.

Rev. PARTHIC DIVI TRAIAN AVG F P M TR P COS P P ADOPTIO in exergue
Trajan holding with both hands, Hadrian's right hand; left hand on hip

2.73 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
This early series celebrates the adoption of Hadrian by Trajan, therefore legitimizing Hadrian's succession to the people.
on Rome Mint Trajan or both would hold a volumen/rolls
2 commentsokidoki
RI 007a img.jpg
007 - Tiberius As (as Ceasar under Augustus) - RIC 245 44 viewsÆ As.
Obv:- TI CAESAR AVGVST F IMPERAT VII, laureate head right
Rev:- ROM ET AVG, front elevation of the Altar of Lugdunum, decorated with the corona civica between laurels, nude figures, & Victories.
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 12-14
Ref:- RIC 245 [Augustus], Cohen 37, BMC 585, Paris 1769
27 mm, 10.04gm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RPC_I_2364_Plautius_Silvanus_y_Augusto_MYSIA_PERGAMON.jpg
01-75 - Pergamo - Misia - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)13 viewsAE19 19 mm 5.7 gr.
M. Plautius Silvanus procónsul y Magistrado de Demophon.

Anv: "ΣΙΛΒΑΝΟΝ ΠΕΡΓΑΜΗΝΟΙ" - el Proconsul M. Plautius Silvanus vistiendo toga estante de frente, portando pátera y siendo coronado por una figura masculina vestida con coraza.
Rev: "ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΝ ΔΗΜΟΦΩΝ" - Templo con cuatro columnas con una estatua de Augusto.

Acuñada 04 - 06 D.C.
Ceca: Pergamo - Misia

Referencias: RPC I #2364 Pag.403 - SNG BN Paris #2016 - Voegtli, FvP #337 Pag.30 - BMC #242-5 Pag.139
mdelvalle
102155.jpg
012a. Domitia101 viewsDomitia, wife of Domitian. Augusta, 82-96 AD.

In 70, Domitia was married to Lucius Aelius Lamia, but she attracted the attention of Domitian, son of emperor Vespasian. Shortly afterwards she was taken from her husband and remarried with the future emperor. They had a son in the next year and a daughter in 74, both died young. Domitian was very fond of his wife and carried her in all his travels. In 83, Domitia Longina's affair with the actor Paris was disclosed. Paris was executed and Domitia received her letter of divorce from Domitian. She was exiled, but remained close to Roman politics and to Domitian.

CILICIA, Epiphanea. Æ 21mm (7.18 gm). Dated year 151 (83/84 AD). Draped bust right / Athena standing left, righ hand extended, left resting on shield; ANP (date) left. RPC I 1786; SNG Levante 1813; SNG France -; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, dark green patina, some smoothing. Very rare, only 1 specimen (the Levante specimen), recorded in RPC. Ex-CNG
ecoli73
DSC07494_philip-II_as-caesar_01.JPG
02 - 01 - Philip II as Caesar (244 - 247 AD) AR Tetradrachm - Bare head, draped and cuirassed, seen from the Front.14 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Philip II as Caesar (Prince) - Large Silver Tetradrachm
Struck in Antioch, Syria between 244 and 247 AD.

(titles in Greek)
obv: Bare head of Philip II facing right. Draped and cuirassed. Bust seen from the front.

rev: Eagle standing on Palm branch facing, wings open holding wreath in beak, head and tail facing left.
'S C' Below.

Weight: 13.03 Grams
Size: 26.3 mm* - *(at the narrowest part)
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ex Amphora Coins

with Photo Certificate of Authenticity signed by Author of "Guide to Biblical Coins" David Hendin.
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*Shown next to a US 25 cent piece (quarter-dollar) for size comparison.*
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rexesq
DSC08187_DSC08191_china_10-cash_ND_o-r.JPG
02 - China, Republic - 10 Cash coin26 views-
--
The Republic of China
1920 (ND) - Ten Cash

(Titles in Chinese, some in English)

obv: Crossed Flags.

Weight: 6.5 Grams
Size: 31 mm

ex Old Pueblo Coin Exchange, Tucson, Arizona. USA.
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*NOTE: Coin next to a modern USA State Quarter-Dollar (25 cents) in this photo for size comparison.
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rexesq
DSC08183_china_10cash_ND_w-US-25c_obv.JPG
02 - China, Republic - 10 Cash coin.19 views-
--
The Republic of China
1920 (ND) - Ten Cash

(Titles in Chinese, some in English)

obv: Crossed Flags.

Weight: 6.5 Grams
Size: 31 mm

ex Old Pueblo Coin Exchange, Tucson, Arizona. USA.
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*NOTE: Coin next to a modern USA State Quarter-Dollar (25 cents) in this photo for size comparison.
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rexesq
antioch_gordian-III_tetradrachm_ram-crescent-moon_w-US-cent_obv_03.JPG
02 - Gordian III Tetradrachm #2 w/ cent.17 viewsRoman Empire
Tetradrachm of Emperor Gordian III (238 - 244 AD)

obv: Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Seen from behind.

rev: Eagle standing facing, head left, holding wreath in beak.
Beneath: Crescent Moon above the head of a ram leaping left, it's head reverted.

10.9 Grams
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Ancient Roman Tetradrachm of emperor Gordian III next to a 2010 D USA One Cent for size comparison.
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rexesq
LarryW8010.jpg
020 W. Asia Minor, Ioniia, c. 650 to 600 BC54 viewsElectrum hekte, 10mm, 2.75g very early Phokaic standard, VF
Raised square with cross pattern / Rough quadripartite incuse square. Very grainy surfaces. Sear COA
cf. Rosen 314 & 319; Traite pl. IV, 1 (Paris and London)
Lawrence Woolslayer
Vespasian,_RIC_357,_RIC(1962)_63__(Titus),_AR-Denar,_DIVVS_AVGVSTVS_VESPASIANVS,_two-Capricorn,_Large_shield,_RSC_497,_BMC_129,_Rome_80-81_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,5-18,5mm,_3,33g-s.jpg
020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Large shield version!, SC, #1183 views020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Large shield version!, SC, #1
avers: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
reverse: No legend, Shield reading SC held by two capricornii, globe below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,33g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC² (Titus) 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063 p-123, RSC 497, BMC 129, BM-129, Paris 101,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-VESPASIANVS_two-Capricorn_RIC-II-063_RIC-new-357_C-497_Rome_80-81-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5mm_2,98g-s.jpg
020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Small shield version!, SC, #1250 views020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Small shield version!, SC, #1
avers: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
reverse: No legend, Shield reading SC held by two capricornii, globe below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5 mm, weight: 2,98g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC² (Titus) 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063 p-123, RSC 497, BMC 129, BM-129, Paris 101,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 030g img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 481 var.73 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– VICTORIA NAVALIS S - C, Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath and palm
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 70-71
References:– Cohen -. RIC II 481 var (Not listed in RIC with this bust and legend combination)

Additional comments coutesy of Curtis Clay:-

“A coin like yours, from the same obv. die, was in M&M's Voirol Sale of 1968, lot 385, ex Hall Sale, 1950, lot 1203. A second spec. from that same die pair is publ. by Giard, Lyon, 42/1a, pl. XLIII, Coll. Gricourt.
BMC 809 pl. 38.7 has obv. CAESAR not CAES and a broader portrait on shorter neck.
Paris doesn't have this type on a COS III dup. of Vesp. at Lugdunum, but their As, Paris 812 pl. LXVII, is from the same rev. die as your dupondius!
Obviously quite a scarce item, and an attractive specimen!”
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_033d_img.jpg
033 - Titus Denarius - RIC II new 728 viewsObv:– IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P VIIII IMP XIIII - COS VII, Capricorn left on globe
Minted in Rome. After 1 July, 79, Group II
Reference:– RIC II new 7

Notes from an example sold by H. J. Berk: "Rare without P P in reverse legend. Titus must have accepted the title Pater Patriae quite soon after the beginning of his ninth tribunician year on 1 July 79 AD. Cohen 280 cites this coin 'with or without P P' as being in the Paris collection, but in fact Paris lacks the denarius of this type without P P, though it possesses the corresponding aureus (Paris-3). Cohen must have seen the denarius without P P in another collection. We had another specimen in our Catalogue 125, 2002, 374; none in Reka Devnia hoard."
maridvnvm
035_Antoninus_Pius_(138-161_A_D_),_AE-23,_AYTO_KAI_TIT_AIL_ADRI_ANTWNEINOC_CEB,_QEAC_CYR-IAC_IEROPO,_Delta,_Syria,Hieropolis,_BMC-19_Q-001_0h_22mm_ga-s~0.jpg
035p Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), Syria, Hieropolis, BMC 19, AE-22, ΘEAC CYR/IAC IEROΠO and Δ in three lines within wreath,130 views035p Antoninus Pius (138-161 A.D.), Syria, Hieropolis, BMC 19, AE-22, ΘEAC CYR/IAC IEROΠO and Δ in three lines within wreath,
avers:- AYTO KAI TIT AIΛ AΔRI ANTωNEINOC CEB, Laureate head right.
revers:- ΘEAC CYR/IAC IEROΠO and Δ in three lines within wreath.
exe: -/-//Δ, diameter: 22mm, weight: 9,52g, axis: 0h,
mint: Syria, Hieropolis, date: 138-161 A.D., ref: BMC 19, Paris F986, Butcher 17,
Q-001
quadrans
054_Macrinus_(217-218_A_D_),AE-27-Pentassarion__AV_K_OPPE_CEV-_Markianopolis-Moesia_Inf_Mus-532_Var1214v__217-18-AD-Q-001_axis-6h_26,5-27,5mm_10,41g-s.jpg
054p Macrinus (217-218 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Mushmov-532., Varbanov-, AE-27, Pentassarion, 62 views054p Macrinus (217-218 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Mushmov-532., Varbanov-, AE-27, Pentassarion,
avers:- AY-K-OΠEL-CEV-MAKREINOC-K-M-OΠEL-AN-TΩNEINOC•, Laureate head of Macrinus facing bare-headed bust of Diadumenian.
revers:- VΠ-ΠONTIANOV-MAΡKIANO-ΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis advancing right, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver on her back, hound running right at foot, retrograde E in left field.
exe: Ǝ/-//ΠOΛIT, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 12,38g, axis: 6h,
mint: Moesia, Markianopolis, date: 217-218 A.D., ref: Mushmov-532., Varbanov-.,
a) AMNG I/1, 730 (like ex. 3, 4, 5, Paris, St.Petersburg, Wien)
b) Hristova/Jekov (2013) 6.24.13.3 (same dies)
c) not in Pfeiffer (2013)
Q-001
quadrans
RI_064ry_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -27 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG II CO, laureate head right
Rev:– INVICTO IMP TROPAEA, Trophy with captured arms below
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

One other example known in Paris
maridvnvm
RI_064ge_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 467 corr.21 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– BON EVENT, Fides standing left holding basket of fruits in right hand, grain ears in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 197
Reference:– BMCRE 437 Note corr. (VIII not VII). RIC 467 corr. (S) (467 is IMP VII). Cohen 63 (citing Paris).

Evidently no examples of this reverse legend variety were seen by the authors of RIC or BMCRE as they both note the coin but cite Cohen 63 which evidently cites a misread obverse legend of VII likely being VII-I from Paris.
maridvnvm
RI_064mo_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 467 corr.26 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– BON EVENT, Fides standing left holding basket of fruits in right hand, grain ears in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 197
Reference:– BMCRE 437 Note corr. (VIII not VII). RIC 467 corr. (S) (467 is IMP VII). Cohen 63 (citing Paris).

Evidently no examples of this reverse legend variety were seen by the authors of RIC or BMCRE as they both note the coin but cite Cohen 63 which evidently cites a misread obverse legend of VII likely being VII-I from Paris.
maridvnvm
RI_064sa_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 467 corr.13 viewsObv:– L SEPT SEV PERT AVG IMP VIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– BON EVENT, Fides standing left holding basket of fruits in right hand, grain ears in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 197
Reference:– BMCRE 437 Note corr. (VIII not VII). RIC 467 corr. (S) (467 is IMP VII). Cohen 63 (citing Paris).

Evidently no examples of this reverse legend variety were seen by the authors of RIC or BMCRE as they both note the coin but cite Cohen 63 which evidently cites a misread obverse legend of VII likely being VII-I from Paris.
maridvnvm
RI 064ia img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 47725 viewsObv:– L S[EP S]EV PERT AVG IMP VI-[II], Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT R-EDVC, Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopiae
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:– RIC 477 (Scarce, citing Cohen 164 (Paris)). BMCRE page 111 also citing C. 164.
maridvnvm
RI_064ia_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 4778 viewsObv:– L S[EP S]EV PERT AVG IMP VI-[II], Laureate head right
Rev:– FORT R-EDVC, Fortuna standing left holding rudder and cornucopiae
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 194
Reference:– RIC 477 (Scarce, citing Cohen 164 (Paris)). BMCRE page 111 also citing C. 164.
maridvnvm
064_Julia_Mamaea_(190-235_A_D_),_Lydia,_Tabala,_AE-19,_IOY_MAMAIA_CE,,_TABA_#923;E_#937;N,_E_#929;MOC,_Waddington_5305,_222-235_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_19mm,3,72g-s.jpg
064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Lydia, Tabala, Waddington 5305, AE-19, TABAΛEΩN/EPMOC, River-god Hermos reclining left, #190 views064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Lydia, Tabala, Waddington 5305, AE-19, TABAΛEΩN/EPMOC, River-god Hermos reclining left, #1
avers: IOY MAMAIA CE, Draped bust right, wearing Stephane.
reverse: TABAΛEΩN around, EΡMOC below, River-god Hermos reclining left, holding reed and cornucopiae, resting left arm on overturned urn from which waters flow.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0mm, weight: 3,72g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Tabala, date: 222-235 A.D., ref: Waddington 5305, Paris 1384.
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RI_065ak_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -31 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– MONETAE AVG II COS, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194
Reference(s) – RIC -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

One of the rare dated reverse series. The third known example, others in Paris and Vienna. Die match to the Paris example.
Martin Griffiths
Copy_of_faustina-jr_AR-denarius_CERES_3_4gr_w-quarter_obv_01.JPG
07 - Faustina Jr. - AR Denarius - CERES - with US 25 Cent coin.8 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Faustina Jr. (161 - 175 AD)
also known as 'Faustina the Younger', daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius (138 - 161 AD) and Roman Empress Faustina Sr. (138 - 141 AD) also known as 'Faustina the Elder'.
Faustina Jr. was wife of the Roman Emperor, who also happened to be her maternal cousin, Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161 - 180 AD).
She was also mother to the future Emperor 'Commodus' (180 - 192 AD, sole reign ).

obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust of Empress Faustina facing right.
rev: CERES - Ceres seated left, holding corn ears and long torch.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 3.4 Grams
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Imperial Lifetime Issue Minted During the Reign of Marcus Aurelius.

References: RIC 669, RSC 35, BMC 79
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*US Quarter Dollar (25 cents) to right, for size comparison.
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rexesq
Copy_of_faustina-jr_AR-denarius_CERES_3_4gr_w-quarter_obv_05.JPG
07 - Faustina Jr. - AR Denarius - CERES - with US 25 Cent coin.12 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Faustina Jr. (161 - 175 AD)
also known as 'Faustina the Younger', daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius (138 - 161 AD) and Roman Empress Faustina Sr. (138 - 141 AD) also known as 'Faustina the Elder'.
Faustina Jr. was wife of the Roman Emperor, who also happened to be her maternal cousin, Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius (161 - 180 AD).
She was also mother to the future Emperor 'Commodus' (180 - 192 AD, sole reign ).

obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust of Empress Faustina facing right.
rev: CERES - Ceres seated left, holding corn ears and long torch.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 3.4 Grams
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Imperial Lifetime Issue Minted During the Reign of Marcus Aurelius.

References: RIC 669, RSC 35, BMC 79
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*US Quarter Dollar (25 cents) to right, for size comparison.
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rexesq
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
080_Herennia_Etruscilla,_Lydia,_Magnesia_ad_Sipylum,_AE-27,_Leypold_I,_1049,_BMC_91,_Paris_715,_249-51AD,_Q-001,_6h,_27mm,_7,95g-s~0.jpg
080p Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum, Leypold I 1049, AE-27, Tetrastyle temple, #01113 views080p Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum, Leypold I 1049, AE-27, Tetrastyle temple, #01
avers: ЄΡЄN ЄTΡOYCKIΛΛA, Draped bust right.
reverse: ЄΠ AΡTЄMA MAΓNHTΩN CIΠYΛOY CTΡ, Tetrastyle temple with open pediment, Tyche standing left within, holding rudder and cornucopiae. Magistrate Artema.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 26,5-27,5mm, weight: 7,95g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum, date: 249-251 A.D., ref: Leypold I 1049, BMC 91, Paris 715
Q-001
quadrans
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
1152_P_Sabina_RPC1024~0.jpg
1024 BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia Sabina Ae 32 Octastyle temple16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1024; Rec 53; Paris 815; von Aulock 290; BMC 30; C/M Howgego 64 ( Hadrian Laureate head right)

Obv. СΑΒΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑΣΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, r., with hair coiled and piled on top of head above double stephane

Rev. ΚΟΙ-ΝΟΝ ΒΕΙΘΥΝΙΑС
Octastyle temple on podium of two steps; pellet between middle columns; in pediment, sacrificing Genius in pediment; below, prow

25.17 gr
32 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
1152_P_Sabina_RPC1024.jpg
1024 BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia Sabina, Octastyle temple51 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1024; Rec 53; Paris 815; von Aulock 290; BMC 30; C/M Howgego 64 ( Hadrian Laureate head right)

Obv. СΑΒΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑΣΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, r., with hair coiled and piled on top of head above double stephane

Rev. ΚΟΙ-ΝΟΝ ΒΕΙΘΥΝΙΑС
Octastyle temple on podium of two steps; pellet between middle columns; in pediment, sacrificing Genius in pediment; below, prow

25.17 gr
32 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
Probus_AE-Ant_IMP-C-M-AVR-PROBVS-P-AVG_VIRTVS-PROBI-AVG_XXI-V_RIC-816var-p-106_Alf-96-No-170_Siscia_282-AD_Bust-and-Offic-NotinRIC_Q-001_axis-0h_22mm_4,00ga-s.jpg
112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0096.0170, -/-//XXIP, Bust E2/Gvar., RIC V-II 816, (Bust and officina not in RIC!!!), AE-Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Mars walking right, Rare!!!155 views112 Probus (276-282 A.D.), Siscia, Alföldi 0096.0170, -/-//XXIP, Bust E2/Gvar., RIC V-II 816, (Bust and officina not in RIC!!!), AE-Antoninianus, VIRTVS PROBI AVG, Mars walking right, Rare!!!
avers: IMP C M AVR PROBVS P AVG, Radiate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield, seen from back, shield in front and a spear pointing forward. (E2/Gvar.)
reverse: VIRTVS PR OBI AVG, Mars walking right, holding spear and trophy.
exergue: -/-//XXIV, diameter: 22mm, weight: 4,00g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 282 A.D., ref: RIC V-II 816 var, p-106 Bust and officina not in RIC, Alföldi 0096.0170, Rare!!!
Q-001
"- Quadrans' coin (titulature P AVG) is known to me by 2 other examples, both in Paris: one is the coin quoted by Alföldi 96, 170, the other belonged to the collection of the famous epigraphist H.-G. Pflaum, whose collection has been (partly) bought by the Bibliothèque nationale de France. These 3 coins have been struck from the same obverse die." by S. Estiot.
2 commentsquadrans
Maximianus-Herculeus_AE-_IMP-MAXIMIANVS-P-AVG_IOVI-CONSERVATORI_RIC-V-II--p_C-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_16mm_1,42g-s.jpg
120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II Not in, AE-Quinarius, -/-//--, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Extremly Rare!97 views120 Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Siscia, RIC V-II Not in, AE-Quinarius, -/-//--, IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, Extremly Rare!
avers:- IMP MAXIMIANVS P AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- IOVI CONS ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16mm, weight: 1,42g, axes: 6h,
mint: Siscia , date: 285-286 A.D., ref: RIC-V-II-Not in, C-Not in,
Q-001

"The quinar of maximianus you last showed is also of Siscia mint.
Your coin is the 2nd known.
Paris has another coin in outstanding condition with the same set of dies.
Companions coins for Diocletian also exist. One of them is published and illustrated in Cathy King's publication on Roman Quinarii > Siscia 2 a ( Zagreb collection ) with the same reverse die as your coin !
All these quinarii from Siscia with larger busts ( in my opinion datation around 288-9 AD ) are very rare." by Helveticus, Thank you Helveticus
quadrans
Henry_III_short_cross_penny.JPG
1216 – 1272, Henry III, AR Penny, Struck 1217 - 1242 at London, England (Short cross type)2 viewsObverse: HENRICVS REX around central circle enclosing a crowned, draped and bearded facing bust of Henry III holding a sceptre tipped with a cross pommee in his right hand.
Reverse: + GIFFREI ON LVND. Voided short cross dividing legend into quarters, crosslets in each quarter of inner circle. Cross pattée in legend. Moneyer: Giffrei, cognate with the modern English name of Geoffrey.
Issue type 7c, distinguished by the degraded portrait and large lettering.
Diameter: 19mm | Weight: 1.1gms | Die Axis: 4
SPINK: 1356C

Henry III was the eldest son of King John and came to the throne at the age of nine. He was king of England from 1216 until his death in 1272, ruling longer than any other English monarch until the reign of George III.
Henry expressed a lifelong interest in architecture and much of what constitutes the Tower of London today is a result of Henry’s work, he added several towers and a curtain wall to expand the White Tower beginning in 1238. Westminster Abbey however, is considered to be Henry's greatest building work. The project began in 1245, when Henry sent his architect Henry de Reynes to visit the French cities of Rheims, Chartres, Bourges and Amiens and Paris’s royal chapel Sainte-Chapelle to learn the Gothic technique that he much admired.
The Westminster Abbey that stood previously on the site had been erected by Edward the Confessor in 1042. Edward the Confessor was a hero of Henry’s, and he probably named his son (the future Edward I) after him. The foundations and crypt are still those of Edward the Confessor’s Abbey, but everything above ground today is the building begun by Henry III. The tomb of Edward the Confessor was moved to a new position of honour in 1269 at the very centre of the new abbey, and when Henry III died in 1272 he was buried beside Edward’s shrine in the exact position the bones of his hero had lain for 200 years.
*Alex
RI_125ab_img.jpg
125 - Aurelian, Antoninianus- RIC 06312 viewsObv:– IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed  bust right
Rev:– ORIENS AVG, Sol standing left, raising right hand, holding globe in left hand and palm, resting right foot on bound captive in front, with another bound captive seated behind.
Minted in Rome, (_ | VI //XXI*).
Reference:– Paris-144, LV 849-856. RIC 63.
maridvnvm
RI_125ac_img.jpg
125 - Aurelian, Antoninianus- RIC 15113 viewsObv:– IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– ORIENS AVG, Sol standing left, raising right hand, holding globe in left hand and palm, resting right foot on bound captive in front, with another bound captive seated behind.
Minted in Ticinum, (* | _ //TXXT). Emission 2, Officina 3. June - September A.D. 274 (Estiot)
Reference:– Paris-592-594, LV 5005-5064, RIC 151
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_125aa_img.jpg
125 - Aurelian, denarius - RIC 07149 viewsObv:– IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, Laureate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VICTORIA AVG, Victory walking left, holding wreath and palm.
Minted in Rome, (B _ //VSV). Allocated by Estiot to Emission 10 dating to end A.D. 274.
Reference:– Paris-185, Gobl-135f2 (9 spec.), RIC-71, C-250 (Elberling, 6 Fr.).
Virtually fully silvered , a good strike, well centred and not showing much evidence of wear.
5 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 130s img.jpg
130 - Tacitus Antoninianus - Cyzicus mint unlisted46 viewsObv:– IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– CONSERVATOR MILITVM, Mars standing right, presenting globe to Tacitus, who stands left
Minted in Cyzicus (E in centre field / KA in exe) Emission 1, Officina 5
References:– Unlisted in Cohen, unlisted in RIC. Venera Hoard 2405 pl. 20 (apparently same rev. die as this specimen), further specimens in Vienna (ill. pl. 32, no. 46) and Paris cited on p. 33.
maridvnvm
RI_130bf_img.jpg
130 - Tacitus Antoninianus - RIC -23 viewsObv:– IMP C M CLA TACITVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PAX AVG, Pax standing left holding branch and transverse sceptre.
Minted in Siscia (Q in exe)
Reference:– RIC -. Estiot 2204, La Venera 1798. Paris P. 368
maridvnvm
RI 130ai img.jpg
130 - Tacitus Antoninianus - RIC 127 corr. var34 viewsObv:– IMP C M CL TACITVS AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right (seen from rear)
Rev:– CLEMENTIA TEMP, Emperor, standing right, receiving globe from soldier standing left, holding spear
Minted in Cyzicus (//Q) Emission 3 Officina 4. A.D.
Reference:– Cohen -. RIC 127 corr. var Bust type F (Unlisted with this bust type in RIC. RIC attributes to Ticinum but corrected to Cyzicus by Estiot). Not in LaVenera. Estiot Paris Catalog p. 427: two spec. in Vienna.
maridvnvm
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
RI_141br_img.jpg
141 - Diocletian - Follis - RIC VI Trier 677a (corr. Cyzicus)70 viewsObv:– D N DIOCLETIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right in imperial mantle, olive branch in right hand, mappa in left
Rev:– PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies standing left, branch upward in right hand, vertical sceptre in left
Minted in Cyzicus (not Trier) ( S | F / KS //PTR)
Reference:– RIC VI Trier 677a (R) (see notes)
Notes:- This is perhaps one of the most unusual issues in the entire follis series. It is nearly always attributed to Trier (Treveri), but a comparison of portrait styles and an examination of follis hoards reveals that this issue was not struck in Trier but in Cyzicus. Two officinae struck this issue, and the KS in the field between the two figures is actually the mintmark, not the PTR. A look at the coins of Cyzicus (RIC 22-23) shows that the same two officinae struck this issue without the PTR also. The Senior Augustus issues of Diocletian and Maximianus were struck at every mint currently in operation. Apparently, the first coins of this type were prepared at Trier and examples were sent to the various mints for the individual mints to copy. At Cyzicus, the die engravers copied everything, including the Trier mintmark and put their own mintmark in the field. Eventually someone soon realized the mistake and new dies were prepared with the mintmark in its proper location.

Nicely silvered with little / no visible wear.
maridvnvm
jovian.jpg
1410a, Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.78 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 179, aVF, Constantinople, 3.126g, 21.6mm, 180o. Obverse: D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: VOT V MVLT X within wreath, CONSPG in exergue; scarce.

Flavius Jovianuswas born in 331 at Singidunum, modern Belgrade. His distinguished father, Varronianus, had been a tribune of the legion Ioviani and a comes domesticorum, perhaps under Constantius II, who had retired to private life shortly before Jovian's elevation to the purple. Jovian married a daughter of Lucillianus, perhaps named Charito, and by her produced at least two children.

Jovian himself was a protector domesticus under Constantius II and Julian and, under Julian, primicerius domesticorum. Various Christian sources maintain that Jovian's Christianity led to his deposition by Julian, though most modern scholars dismiss this as ex post facto Christian apologetic. Jovian, recalled to the ranks if he had ever been dismissed, marched with Julian against Sapor in 363, and on 27 June, the day after that emperor's death, was acclaimed Augustus.

Ammianus and Zosimus, among others, detail the difficult straits of the Roman army during its withdrawal from Persian territory, Ammianus from the perspective of a proud soldier confident even in defeat of the superiority of Roman arms, Zosimus, in a much shorter and confused version, concentrating on the predicament of Jovian's troops and on the dire effects to the empire of the peace terms agreed to with Sapor. These terms entailed the cessation to Persia of Roman territory beyond the Tigris -- the cities of Singara and Nisibis, however, to be surrendered on the condition of the safe passage of their inhabitants -- and the guarantee of the neutrality of Rome's ally Arsaces, King of Armenia, in the event of future hostilities between Roman and Persia. Ammianus asserts that in agreeing to these terms Jovian misjudged his tactical strength and wasted an opportunity presented by negotiations with Sapor to move his forces closer to supplies at Corduena, and that Jovian acted on the advise of flatterers to preserve the fighting strength of his forces in the event of an attempt by Julian's relative Procopius to seize the throne. Others present the treaty terms as unavoidable given the Roman predicament.

Jovian appears to have treaded cautiously with regard to religious matters during the early months of his reign. Eunapius says that Jovian continued to honor Maximus and Priscus, the Neoplatonist advisors of Julian, and, upon reaching Tarsus, Jovian performed funeral rites for Julian. Nonetheless, various Christians, most notably Athanasius, took the initiative in an effort to gain Jovian's favor and support. An adherent of the Nicaean creed, Jovian did eventually recall various bishops of homoousian disposition and restore to their followers churches lost under earlier emperors. But in spite of such measures, unity among various Christian sects seems to have been the foremost concern of Jovian, whose ipsissima verba Socrates Scholasticus purports to give: "I abhor contentiousness, but love and honor those hurrying towards unanimity" (Hist. Eccl. 3.25).

Jovian died at the age of thirty-two on 17 February 364 at Dadastana on the boundary of Bithynia and Galatia. The cause of his death was most probably natural and is variously attributed to overeating, the consumption of poisonous mushrooms, or suffocation from fumes of charcoal or of the fresh paint on the room in which he was sleeping. Ammianus' comparison of the circumstances of Jovian's death to those of Scipio Aemilianus suggest the possibility of foul play, as does John of Antioch's reference to a poisoned rather than a poisonous mushroom, while John Chrysostom -- in a highly suspect literary context of consolatio-- asserts outright that the emperor was murdered. Eutropius records that he was enrolled among the gods, inter Divos relatus est. Zonaras says he was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles and that his wife, Charito, was eventually laid to rest beside him.

Ancient authors agree that Jovian was of modest intellect but imposing physique and disposed to excessive eating and drinking.

By Thomas Banchich, Canisius College
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited By J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
678_P_Hadrian_RPC1663.jpg
1663 TROAS, Pionia Hadrian AE 14 Heracles standing10 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1663; BMC 4; SNG BN Paris 2335

Magistrate Neikomachos (strategos)

Obv. [ ]ΝΟΝ [ΑΔ]ΡΙΑΝΟ[ ]
Laureate head of Hadrian, r.

Rev. ΕΠΙ ΝΙΚΟ ΠΙΟΝΙΤΩΝ
Heracles standing facing, resting on club with his r. hand, holding lion skin in l.

2.20 gr
14 mm
6h
okidoki
617_Eastern_RSC335d.jpg
167 Hadrian Denarius 134-38 AD Genius standing Eastern mint32 viewsReference.
RIC -; Strack-; BMCRE pg. 379, 22, pl. 69, 20 (same dies) Paris.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P,
Laureate head right

Rev. COS III
Genius standing left, sacrificing from patera over lighted altar, holding cornucopia in left arm.

2.57 gr
17 mm
7h
1 commentsokidoki
Louis XIV 1672 Prise de douze villes en Hollande.JPG
1672, Prise de douze villes en Hollande777 viewsObv. Draped and cuirassed bust right LVD MAG FRA ET NAV REX PP, CHERON on bust truncation.
Rev. The King in the guise of Sol, radiating light, seated right in a heavenly chariot pulled by three horses, surrounded by clouds. Around are aerlia views of twelve towns and forts captured in Holland SOLIS QVE LABORES on scroll above central design, the names of all twelve towns/forts around.

AE63. Engraved by Charles Jean Francois Cheron. ORIGINAL STRIKE, very rare.

Charles Jean Francois Cheron (1635-1698), one of the most distinguished artists of the school of Jean Warin, was born at Nancy and was trained by his father, Jean-Charles Cheron, engraver to Charles IV, Duke of Lorraine. Cheron went to Rome and became engraver of medals for Clement IX and Innocent X. Cheron's style in his Roman medals is of remarkable boldness, and his medals of Pope Clement IX and of Bernini are grandiloquent and among the finest Italian medals of the period. He returned to France in 1675 and was employed by Louis XIV at the Medal Mint at Paris for about twelve years, where he contributed several medals to the medallic series of the monarch, the Histoire Metallique. His medals are considered to be in an international baroque style.
11 commentsLordBest
1713_ANNE_FARTHING.JPG
1713 Anne AE Pattern Farthing5 viewsObverse: ANNA DEI GRATIA. Draped bust of Anne facing left.
Reverse: BRITANNIA • 1713 •. Britannia seated facing left, left arm holding spear and resting on shield, raised right hand holding olive-branch; exergue blank.
Diameter: 22mm on thick flan. | Weight: 5.1gms. | Die axis: 6h
PATTERN - EXTREMELY RARE

All of Anne's farthings are patterns, no farthings were issued for general circulation during her reign. The portrait of Anne on this example was designed by John Coker (1670 - 1741). Coker joined the Royal Mint in 1697 and became chief engraver there in 1705.

Although Anne farthings are generally very rare, there are at least six distinct pattern varieties known to exist and there is one variety, dated 1714, of which, according to Peck, between 300 and 500 coins may have been produced. The fact that such a large number of these farthings were released in the last year of Anne's reign may be because the type was about to be produced for general circulation at the time of Anne's death on the 1st of August. Sir Isaac Newton was Master of the Mint, and he had high ideals about the quality of the coinage, and the Anne farthing is certainly vastly superior in striking and design to the pieces of William III. The old figure of Britannia used since Charles II's time was discarded in favour of a sharper high relief design in which the bare leg on the former figure of Britannia is covered up, reportedly on the orders of the Queen.
All the other farthing varieties are certainly patterns, and were never struck as currency for circulation.

This particular coin is of good weight and metal and it appears to be a die match for another Anne pattern farthing, in this instance struck in silver, which was sold at the 12th September 2011 Heritage Long Beach Signature World & Ancient Coins Auction. It was Lot 27289 and, for comparison purposes, I have illustrated it below.
*Alex
1223_P_hadrian_RPC1780.jpg
1780 LYDIA, Stratonicaea. Hadrian 128-30 AD, Zeus seated16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1780; Paris 591;

Magistrate Candidus (strategos)

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΤΙСΤΗС
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΠ(Ο) СΤΡ ΚΑ
Zeus seated l., holding patera in extended r. hand, his l. resting on sceptre

5.02 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
The obverse legend identifies Hadrian as the ktistes (“founder”) of the city.
1 commentsokidoki
LouisXVIMarieAntoinetteBirthofDauphin1781.JPG
1781. Louis XVI & Marie Antoinette, Birth of the Dauphin.161 viewsObv. Conjoined busts of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette LUDOVICO XVI ET M ANT AUSTR FR ET NAV REGI ET REGINAE LUTETIA signed DUVIVIER.
Rev. King and Queen between a kneeling Paris, holding a shield, and Trade (Abundance), holding a cornucopia and Hermes’ staff. SOLEMNIA DELPHINI NATALITIA REGE ET REGINA URBEM INVISENTIBUS XXI. JANU. MDCCLXXXII signed DV.

Commemorates the birth of Louis-Joseph Xavier Francois, Dauphin of France from 1781 to his death in 1789.
1 commentsLordBest
LouisXVIMarieAntoinette18781.JPG
1781. Louis XVI & Marie Antoinette, Congratulations of the Merchants of Paris on the Birth of the Dauphin.145 viewsObv: Busts of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette vis a vis. LVD XVI FR ET NAV REX MAR ANT AVSTR REG
Rev: Six Corps of Merchants led by the Governor of Paris the Duke de Cosse ASSERENDI NOVA SPES COMERCII / REGI DE ORTU SS DELHINI SEX MERCATOR PARIS ORDINES GRATULANTOR AUSP DUCIS DE COSSE URBIS CUB DIE IV NOV MDCCLXXXI
AE60. Engraved by Duvivier.

This medal commemorates the birth of Louis-Joseph Xavier Francois, Dauphin of France from 1781 to his death in 1789. The reverse expresses the hopes of the merchants of Paris of continuing prosperity under a stable monarchy.
LordBest
LouisXVIArrivalInParis1789.JPG
1789. Louis XVI Medal. French Revolution, The Arrival of the King in Paris.124 viewsObv. Draped bust right. LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANCAIS VILLE DE PARIS
Rev. The King, Queen and Dauphin being welcomed by the personification of Paris, building and crowds in background JY FERAI DESORMAIS MA DEMESRE HABITUELLE ARIVEE DU ROI A PARIS LA 6 OCT 1789

Commemorates the arrival in Paris of the King.
1 commentsLordBest
LouisXVIMayorOfParis1789.JPG
1789. Louis XVI Medal. French Revolution, The First Mayor of Paris.116 viewsObv. Draped bust right LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANCAIS
Rev. Personification of Paris facing holding rudder and sceptre surmounted by liberty cap, leaning on colum decorated with fasces, ships prow to left, various emblems of trade and wealth on right ESTABLISSEMENT DE LA MAIRIE DE PARIS J SILVAIN BAILLY PREMIER MAIRE ELU L 15 JULLIET 1789

Commemorates the cration of Jean Silvain Bailly as the first mayor of Paris. Bailly was later guillotined during The Terror.
LordBest
1791_Rochdale_Halfpenny.JPG
1791 AE Halfpenny Token. Rochdale, Lancashire.27 viewsObverse: ROCHDALE / 1791. Sheep facing left, being weighed suspended in a sling round it's waist.
Reverse: HALFPENNY. Detailed view from behind of a weaver, sitting half-right, working at a loom.
Edge: PAYABLE AT THE WAREHOUSE OF IOHN KERSHAW • X •.
Diameter 30mm | Die Axis 6
Dalton & Hamer: 140

This token was engraved and manufactured by J.G.Hancock in Birmingham.
It was issued by John Kershaw who appears to have been a mercer and draper with a business in Rochdale, and who is also thought to have been connected with a woollen mill in the town.

Rochdale's recorded history begins with an entry in the Domesday Book of 1086 under Recedham Manor. The ancient parish of Rochdale was a division of the hundred of Salford and one of the largest ecclesiastical parishes in England comprising several townships. By 1251, Rochdale had become important enough to have been granted a Royal charter. Subsequently, the town flourished into a centre of northern England's woollen trade, and by the early 18th century was described as being "remarkable for many wealthy merchants".
During the 19th century, Rochdale rose to prominence as a major mill town and centre for textile manufacture. It was amongst the first ever industrialised towns during the Industrial Revolution and the Rochdale Canal was a highway of commerce during this time, being used for the haulage of cotton, wool and coal.
*Alex
Charles_IIII_1795_Mexico_Spanish_Colonial_8_Reales.jpg
1795- MoFM Mexico Spanish Colonial 8 Reales of Charles IIII - [KM-109 -- Charles IIII]63 viewsChopmarked, 0.7797 ounce silver 8 Reales (also known as the pillar dollar), 26.65g, 39.62mm, 0 degree, Mexico City, Mexico Mint [Mo -- small 'o' set over a large 'M'], 179[5]

Obv. - • CAROLUS IIII • DEI • GR[ATIA] •, laureate bust of Charles IIII right

Rev. - • HISPAN • ET IND • REX • Mo • 8R • F • M •, coat of arms of Spain

This coin was sold as a 1794 chopmarked 8 Reale. Upon inspection in hand under high magnification and different lighting conditions, as well as inspection of large, quality pictures on the computer allowing for color/contrast/levels manipulation, and I have determined this coin to actually be from 1795. The '5', although extremely worn is visible under the correct conditions and comparisons of the worn number morphology to other 179x coins lends credence to this finding.

The reverse is just as interesting and challenging. Although the mintmark is almost completely worn off, the assayer of FM ensures that the coin is of Mexico City, Mexico mintmark.

The coat of arms of Spain, a crown crown flanked by columns and a middle shield includes the national motto PLVS VLTRA spread across the two columns. PLVS VLTRA (PLUS ULTRA) translates to "further beyond." It is adopted from the personal motto of Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (and King of Spain as Charles I) and is a Latin translation from Plus Oultre, his original motto in Old French.

A great website for helping to attribute these coins and a breakdown of the legend components can be found here: http://coinquest.com/cgi-bin/cq/coins?main_coin=2334

Reading on different chopmarks can be found here: http://www.1messydesk.com/chopmarks/chopmarks.html

Although this coin is quite worn in certain areas, it has a lovely tone and great character. The numerous different chopmarks just add to the appeal. This coins was bought as a conversation piece as I have always found them interesting, albeit with knowing next to nothing concerning them. However, after doing some research, I have come to appreciate it much more and may follow suite with further additions. In any case, I plan on further reading into the subject area.
___________

Purchased from Regal Coin Exchange in Savannah, GA
1 commentsrenegade3220
NapoleonIII1855Exposition.JPG
1855. Napoleon III, Exposition Universalle A.179 viewsObv. Head of Napoleon III NAPOLEON III EMPEREUR
Rev. French Imperial crest encircled by wreath naming the exposition in full, itself surrounded by the coats of arms of all the French regions (I believe) EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE AGRICULTURE INDUSTRIE BEAUX ARTS/ PARIS 1855. Chalon et Estienne engraved on open scroll in ex.

A medal struck in 1855 to commemorate the 'Exposition Universelle des produits de l'Agriculture, de l'Industrie et des Beaux-Arts de Paris 1855', France's first world fair, following four years on from London's Great Exhibition.
LordBest
NapoleonIII1855Exposition1855gilt.JPG
1855. Napoleon III. Exposition Universalle B.258 viewsObv. Conjoined heads of Napoleon III and Eugenie left, signed CAQUE F
Rev. Wreath, outside wreath MSON DE LA BELLE JARDINIERE QUAI AUX FLEURS PARIS P PARISSOT, within wreath EXPOSITION UNIVERSELLE 1855 MEDAILLE D'HONNEUR MASSONNET EDITEUR
Gilt AE38.
1 commentsLordBest
england_1870_1d_maundy_dr-martin_inside-flip_obv_05_lincoln-cent.JPG
1870 One Pence - Maundy w/ US Lincoln Cent for Comparison28 viewsGreat Britain 1870 Maundy One Pence w/ US Lincoln Cent for size comparison.

mintage: 7,920
rexesq
193_Pertinax_Dupondius_RIC_31_or_30note_1.jpg
193_Pertinax_Dupondius_RIC_31_or_30note_112 viewsPertinax (January 1st – March 28th 193 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, January 1st – March 28th 193 AD
IMP CAES P HELV PERTIN AVG;
Radiate head right
PROVIDENTIAE DEORVM COS II, S-C(?);
Providentia standing left, holding up both hands to large star
12,17 gr, 25 mm
RIC IVa, 31 (C. 51); BMC V, 32 var. (no S-C); C. 51 (Paris); CMB I, 15
or
RIC IVa, 30 note (BMC); BMC V, 32; C. 51 var. (S-C); CMB I, 20
ga77
1342_P_Sabina_RPC1943.jpg
1943 IONIA, Phocaea Sabina, Prow2 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1943; BMC 136; Paris 2014

Obv. ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ΦΩΚΑΕΩΝ
Prow, r.; above, caps of the Dioscuri surmounted by stars

3.24 gr
20 mm
6h
okidoki
ComparisonJohnIIS1945.jpg
1954E JOHN II AE HALF TETARTERON S-1954 and S-1954V64 viewsOBV Full length figure of Christ standing on a dais, bearded and nimbate, wearing tunic and kolobion; right hand raised high in benediction holds Gospels in l. hand.

REV. Bust of emperor wearing stemma, divitision and chlamys; holds in r. labrum headed scepter and in l. Globus cruciger.

Bothe examples are in excellent condition, the top is S-1954 Christ hand is on book. The bottom is the variation with Christ hands raised in benediction.

Size 19mm ( Bottom coin.)

Weight 2.6 gm

Several examples of this coin have been identified, the only variation is the l. hand is raised much higher than normal. However it is of mixed consensus to this being a new variation
Simon
1248_P_Hadrian_RPC1961.jpg
1961 LYDIA, Mostene Hadrian, Hero on Horse11 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1961; vA 8238; Paris 762

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙΑΝ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕ Γ Δ Π
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΛΥΔΩΝ ΜΟСΤΗΝΩΝ
Hero with double axe on horse, standing r.; beneath horse’s foreleg, lighted altar and in front, cypress-tree

15.70 gr
30 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
ConstantiusIIAECentFelTemp.jpg
1ej Constantius II16 views337-361

Centenionalis

RIC 210?

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust, right, CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Soldier spearing fallen horseman who is kneeling forwards on ground on hands and knees. Star in right field, FEL TEMP REPARATIO. Mintmark BSIS?

Constantius II got the East when the empire was divided after Constantine the Great's death. Zosimus recorded, "The empire being thus divided, Constantius who appeared to take pains not to fall short of his father in impiety, began by shedding the blood of his nearest relations. He first caused Constantius, his father's brother, to be murdered by the soldiers; next to whom he treated Dalmatius in the same manner, as also Optatus whom Constantine had raised to the rank of a Nobilissimate. Constantine indeed first introduced that order, and made a law, that every Nobilissimate should have precedence over of the prefects of the court. At that time, Ablabius prefect of the court was also put to death; and fate was just in his punishment, because he had concerted the murder of Sopatrus the philosopher, from envy of his familiarity with Constantine. Being unnatural towards all his relations, he included Hanniballianus with the rest, suborning the solders to cry out, that they would have no governors but the children of Constantine. Such were the exploits of Constantius." He defeated the usurper Magnentius in 351-353. He died of fever while marching to confront Julian the Apostate, who had been declared emperor in Paris.
Blindado
JulianIIAE3VotX.jpg
1en Julian II "Apostate"26 views360-363

AE3

Pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding shield & spear, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath, palm branch-BSIS-palm branch in ex [?].

RIC 415

According to Zosimus: Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia. . . . CONSTANTIUS, after having acted towards Gallus Caesar in the manner I have related, left Pannonia to proceed into Italy. . . . He scarcely thought himself capable of managing affairs at this critical period. He was unwilling, however, to associate any one with himself in the government, because he so much desired to rule alone, and could esteem no man his friend. Under these circumstances he was at a loss how to act. It happened, however, that when the empire was in the greatest danger, Eusebia, the wife of Constantius, who was a woman of extraordinary learning, and of greater wisdom than her sex is usually endowed with, advised him to confer the government of the nations beyond the Alps on Julianus Caesar, who was brother to Gallus, and grandson to Constantius. As she knew that the emperor was suspicious of all his kindred, she thus circumvented him. She observed to him, that Julian was a young man unacquainted with the intrigues of state, having devoted himself totally to his studies; and that he was wholly inexperienced in worldly business. That on this account he would be more fit for his purpose than any other person. That either he would be fortunate, and his success would be attributed to the emperor's conduct, or that he would fail and perish; and that thus Constantius would have none of the imperial family to succeed to him.

Constantius, having approved her advice, sent for Julian from Athens, where he lived among the philosophers, and excelled all his masters in every kind of learning. Accordingly, Julian returning from Greece into Italy, Constantius declared him Caesar, gave him in marriage his sister Helena, and sent him beyond the Alps. . . .

Constantius, having thus disposed of Julian, marched himself into Pannonia and Moesia, and having there suppressed the Quadi and the Sarmatians, proceeded to the east, and was provoked to war by the inroads of the Persians. Julian by this time had arrived beyond the Alps into the Gallic nations which he was to rule. Perceiving that the Barbarians continued committing the same violence, Eusebia, for the same reasons as before, persuaded Constantius to place the entire management of those countries into the hands of Julian. . . . Julian finding the military affairs of Gallia Celtica in a very ruinous state, and that the Barbarians pased the Rhine without any resistance, even almost as far as the sea-port towns, he took a survey of the remaining parts of the enemy. And understanding that the people of those parts were terrified at the very name of the Barbarians, while those whom Constantius had sent along with him, who were not more than three hundred and sixty, knew nothing more, as he used to say, than how to say their prayers, he enlisted as many more as he could and took in a great number of volunteers. He also provided arms, and finding a quantity of old weapons in some town he fitted them up, and distributed them among the soldiers. The scouts bringing him intelligence, that an immense number of Barbarians had crossed the river near the city of Argentoratum (Strasburg) which stands on the Rhine, he no sooner heard of it, than he led forth his army with the greatest speed, and engaging with the enemy gained such a victory as exceeds all description.

After these events he raised a great army to make war on the whole German nation; He was opposed however by the Barbarians in vast numbers. Caesar therefore would not wait while they came up to him, but crossed the Rhine, preferring that their country should be the seat of war, and not that of the Romans, as by that means the cities would escape being again pillaged by the Barbarians. A most furious battle therefore took place; a great number of the Barbarians being slain on the field of battle, while the rest fled, and were pursued by Caesar into the Hercynian forest, and many of them killed. . . .

But while Julian was at Parisium, a small town in Germany, the soldiers, being ready to march, continued at supper till midnight in a place near the palace, which they so called there. They were as yet ignorant of any design against Caesar [by Constantius], when some tribunes, who began to suspect the contrivance against him, privately distributed a number of anonymous billets among the soldiers, in which they represented to them, that Caesar, by his judicious conduct had so managed affairs, that almost all of them had erected trophies over the Barbarians ; that he had always fought like a private soldier, and was now in extreme danger from the emperor, who would shortly deprive him of his whole army, unless they prevented it. Some of the soldiers having read these billets, and published the intrigue to the whole army, all were highly enraged. They suddenly rose from their seats in great commotion, and with the cups yet in their hands went to the palace. Breaking open the doors without ceremony, they brought out Caesar, and lifting him on a shield declared him emperor and Augustus. They then, without attending to his reluctance, placed a diadem upon his head. . . .

Arriving at Naisus, he consulted the soothsayers what measures to pursue. As the entrails signified that he must stay there for some time, he obeyed, observing likewise the time that was mentioned in his dream. When this, according to the motion of the planets, was arrived, a party of horsemen arrived from Constantinople at Naisus, with intelligence that Constantius was dead, and that the armies desired Julian to be emperor. Upon this he accepted what the gods had bestowed upon him, and proceeded on his journey. On his arrival at. Byzantium, he was received with joyful acclamations. . . .

[After slashing through Persia and crossing the Tigris,] they perceived the Persian army, with which they engaged, and having considerably the advantage, they killed a great number of Persians. Upon the following day, about noon, the Persians drew up in a large body, and once more attacked the rear of the Roman army. The Romans, being at that time out of their ranks, were surprised and alarmed at the suddenness of the attack, yet made a stout and spirited defence. The emperor, according to his custom, went round the army, encouraging them to fight with ardour. When by this means all were engaged, the emperor, who sometimes rode to the commanders and tribunes, and was at other times among the private soldiers, received a wound in the heat of the engagement, and was borne on a shield to his tent. He survived only till midnight. He then expired, after having nearly subverted the Persian empire.

Note: Julian favored the pagan faith over Christianity and was tarred by the church as "the apostate."
Blindado
20francs Or Napoleon B An 12.jpg
20 Francs From France, NAPOLEON58 viewsAU, 21mm. , Paris, France, 1803/1804
Obv:BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL
REV: REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, 20 Francs, AN 12
AN 12 means the 12th year from republican calendar= from september 24th 1803 to september 22 nd 1804
Jean Paul D
200-2_Pinaria.jpg
200/2. Pinaria - as (155 BC)12 viewsAE As (Rome, 155 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Janus; I above.
R/ Prow right; NAT above; I before; ROMA below.
26.59g; 33mm
Crawford 200/2 (13 specimens in Paris)

* Pinarius Natta:

This moneyer came from the old patrician gens Pinaria (Cicero, De Divinatione, ii. 21). Despite its ancestry, this gens produced very few noteworthy members, although some of them are recorded until the empire.

The cognomen Natta is old; the first known Pinarius to bear it was Lucius Pinarius Natta, Magister Equitum in 363, and Praetor in 349 BC. Then, nobody else of that name is recorded until our moneyer, and his probable brother (RRC 208, 150 BC), who are both completely unknown apart from their coins. Finally, the last Natta of the Republic was a Pontifex in 56, brother-in-law to Clodius Pulcher, the famous Tribune (Cicero, Pro Domo, 118). It seems that the Nattae had lost their political influence early, but retained some religious duties until the end of the Republic, as Cicero says that they learnt "their sacred ceremonies from Hercules himself" (Pro Domo, 134).

The Pinarii indeed claimed to descend from a mythical Pinarius, who had welcomed Hercules with a banquet when he came to Latium (Livy, i. 7). This myth was so deeply stuck in the Roman mythology that it was still used by Caracalla on an unique aureus (leu 93, lot 68).
Joss
200-3_Pinaria.jpg
200/3. Pinaria - semis (155 BC)8 viewsAE Semis (Rome, 155 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Saturn right; S behind.
R/ Prow right; NAT above; S before; (ROMA below).
12.48g; 27mm
Crawford 200/3 (7 specimens in Paris)
- Numismatik Naumann 57, lot 500.
Joss
coins24.JPG
202. Caracalla; Markianopolis23 viewsobv. ANTWNINOC PI - OC AVGOVST - O - C, bust, bearded, laureate, r.
rev. VP KVNTILIANO / V MARKIANOPOLIT and in field W / N, eagle with spread wings stg. on globe facing, head with wreath in beak raising r.
AMNG I, 1, 242 (2 known specimen in London and Paris)
1 commentsecoli
992_P_Sabina_RPC2089var_.JPG
2089 LYDIA, Tralles Sabina Ae 20 Demeter standing11 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2089; Paris 1659;SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -

Issue No magistrate name

Obv. СΑΒΕΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ
Diademed and draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ΤΡΑΛΛΙΑΝΩΝ
Demeter standing l., holding poppy head's in her r. hand, l. resting on sceptre

5.60 gr
20 mm
7h
okidoki
1022_P_Hadrian_RPC2090.jpg
2090 LYDIA, Nysa Hadrian Ae 30 Mên standing31 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2090; Paris 547; Regling 70

Obv. AYTOKPATOP KAICAP TPAIANOC AΔPIANOC CЄB.
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, right, with a radiated head right facing on Hadrian his bust

Rev. KAMAPЄITHC NYCAЄΩN.
Mên, wearing Phrygian cap, short chiton, long cloak and boots, standing facing, head l., holding patera in his extended r. hand, l. resting on staff

24.29 gr
30 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
rjb_2010_02_24.jpg
218b19 viewsJulia Soaemias
AE 28mm
Sidon in Phoenicia
IVLIA SEMIA AVGV
Diademed, draped bust right
COL AVR PIA METRO SID
Cart of Astarte
BMC-
Curtis Clay notes that there are no coins of Soaemias of Sidon of any type in the BM or Paris (according to Cohen) although a few examples are known. The HJB photo file contains a coin that is an obverse die duplicate of this coin.
mauseus
SNG_Cop_379_AE_Lydia_DOMICIA.jpg
22-20 - Philadelphia en Lydia - DOMICIA (81 - 96 D.C.)13 viewsAE15 - 1/2 Assarión (Provincial)
14 mm 2,86 gr 0 hr.

Anv: Busto a derecha
Rev: EΠI ΛAΓETA ΦIΛAΔEΛΦ,-[EWN], Racimo de uvas.

Domicia Longina (siglo I) fue una emperatriz romana, esposa del emperador Domiciano a quien dio en 73 D.C. su primer hijo Vespasiano, muere joven.
El emperador la repudia al enterarse de que mantenía relaciones con un comediógrafo de nombre Paris, pero sin embargo años más tarde la vuelve a llamar a su lado y tienen un segundo hijo, en el 90 D.C., al que también llaman Vespasiano, lamentablemente muere muy tempranamente, a los cinco años de edad.
Tras la muerte de este segundo hijo, Domicia encabezó la conjura que acabó con la vida de su marido y llevó al poder a Nerva. Domicia murió en tiempos de Trajano. (Fuente Wikipedia)

Acuñada 82 - 96 D.C.
Ceca: Philadelphia en Lydia - Lagetas Magistrado

Referencias: RPC II #1336; SNG München -; SNG Copenhagen # 379; BMC Lydia # 64 pag. 198,
mdelvalle
1199_P_Hadrian_RPC2225.jpg
2225 CARIA Harpasa Hadrian, Harpasos reclining16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2225; BMC 7, Delrieux 28/HP/5; Paris 676 = Wa 2394

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΑΡΠΑСΗΝΩΝ
River-god Harpasos reclining l., holding reed in r. hand, l. resting on overturned vase form which water flows

5.79 gr
23 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
Trajano_Coracesium_CILICIA.jpg
24 - 1 - 1 TRAJANO (98-117 D.C.)60 views CORACESIUM Cilicia

AE 22 mm 8.3 gr

Anv: ”AYTO NEPOYA TPAIANOC” – Cabeza laureada viendo a izquierda.
Rev: ”KOP[AKHCIΩT]ΩN” – Leyenda horaria comenzando frente al rostro - Cabeza de Tyche vistiendo gran corona mural, viendo a derecha.

Acuñada: 98 – 117 D.C.

Referencias: SNG Levante #387; SNG Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France Vol.2 #610-11 - E.Levante, The coinage of Korakesium in Cilicia, NC 1978 #1 Pag.26
mdelvalle
SNG_CBN_II_610_Coracesium_Cilicia_Trajano.jpg
24-30 - TRAJANO (98-117 D.C.)11 views CORACESIUM Cilicia

AE 22 mm 8.3 gr

Anv: ”AYTO NEPOYA TPAIANOC” – Cabeza laureada viendo a izquierda.
Rev: ”KOP[AKHCIΩT]ΩN” – Leyenda horaria comenzando frente al rostro - Cabeza de Tyche vistiendo gran corona mural, viendo a derecha.

Acuñada: 98 – 117 D.C.

Referencias: SNG Levante #387; SNG Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France Vol.2 #610-11 - E.Levante, The coinage of Korakesium in Cilicia, NC 1978 #1 Pag.26
mdelvalle
1083_P_Hadrian_pseudo_RPC2409.jpg
2409 LYDIA. Sardis. Ae 29 Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian Roma seated16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2409; BMC 77; Paris 1168

Obv. ΖΕΥС ΛΥΔΙΟС
Head of Zeus Lydios, l., hair bound with taenia

Rev. ΘΕΑ ΡΩΜΗ
Roma with crested helmet, chiton and peplos, seated l. on cuirass and shields, holding Nike on her extended r. hand, sword in sheath in l.

10.8 gr
29 mm
6h
okidoki
249-3_Maenia.jpg
249/3. Maenia - quadrans (133 BC)13 viewsAE Quadrans (Rome, 132 BC)
O/ Head of Hercules right, wearing lion's skin; 3 pellets behind.
R/ P MAE ANT M F above prow right; 3 pellets before; ROMA below.
4.65g, 19mm
Crawford 249/3 (28 specimens in Paris)
- Ex-Thersites Collection (bought on 18 April 1986)
- Roma Numismatics, e-sale 33, lot 336.

* Publius Maenius M.f. Antiaticus:

Antiaticus belonged to the plebeian gens Maenia, but his relatives are not known. Other Maenii are recorded in the 2nd century, such as Titus, Gaius, and Quintus Maenius, Praetors respectively in 186, 180, and 170, or Publius Maenius, moneyer in 194-190. However, Antiaticus mentioned on his coins that he was the son of Marcus, who is not known, and none of the aforementioned Maenii shared his cognomen.

Antiaticus must have therefore belonged to another branch of the gens, which descended from Gaius Maenius, Consul in 338, Dictator in 320 and 314, who defeated the Volsci by taking their city of Antium in 338, thus putting an end to the Second Latin War and also the conquest of Latium. The cognomen Antiaticus comes from this victory, for which Gaius Maenius was also rewarded by a statue on the Forum, possibly at the top of a column (Cicero, Pro Sestio, 58; Livy, VIII, 13).

The life of Antiaticus is still very obscure, and it seems he did not hold other office. He is only known through his coins.

Eckel read ME at the end of this legend and conjectured that it might have been the first letters of an agnomen Megellus or Medulinus (V, p. 240-1), but it seems very unlikely that a moneyer could have received an agnomen so early in his career. Perhaps Eckhel could not see good examples of this type; in any case, the legend on this coin clearly reads as MF, for "Marcus filius".
Joss
1343_P_Sabina_RPC2544.jpg
2544 LYDIA, Saitta Sabina, Dionysos standing8 viewsReference.
RPC III 2544; Wa 5172; Paris 1060; BMC -; SNG Cop. -; SNG v. Aulock 8246

Obv. ϹΑΒΕΙΝΑ ϹΕΒΑϹΤΗ
Draped bust of Sabina, right

Rev. ϹΑΙΤΤΗΝΩΝ
Dionysus standing l., holding cantharus in his r. hand, l. resting on thyrsus; at his feet, panther

4.10 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
ex Slg. Rolf Jovy, erworben 1968 von Münzen & Medaillen
1 commentsokidoki
1196_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC2591.jpg
2591 PHRYGIA, Eucarpia, Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian Tyche13 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2591; BMC 3; Paris 1045

Magistrate Pedia Secunda (epimelètheisa)

Obv. ƐΥΚΑΡΠƐΙΑ
Turreted and draped bust of City-goddess Eucarpeia, right

Rev. ƐΠΙ ΠƐΔΙΑС СƐΚΟΥΝΔΗС
Tyche standing l., holding rudder in her r. hand and cornucopia in left

3.99 gr
18 mm
6h
okidoki
1059_P_Hadrian_RPC2702.JPG
2702 PAMPHYLIA, Perga Hadrian Ae 13 Quiver8 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2702; SNG Paris 404

Obv. ΑΔΡΙΑ ΚΑΙ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r. with paludamentum, seen from rear

Rev. ΑΡΤΕΜΙΔΟС ΠΕΡΓΑΙΑС
Quiver

1.85 gr
13 mm
3h
okidoki
rjb_flor_help.jpg
27641 viewsFlorianus 276 AD
AE antoninianus
Siscia Mint
IMP C M AN FLORIANVS P AVG
Radiate, cuirassed bust right
SECVRITAS SAECVLI
Securitas seated left
-/-/XXIQ
RIC - (cf 105 in error); Estiot Paris catalogue pl 99, no. 539
1 commentsmauseus
RPC_4236_Anfipolis_Marco_Aurelio.jpg
33-49 - MARCO AURELIO como Cesar de Antonino Pio (139 - 161 D.C.)17 viewsANFÍPOLIS - Macedonia

AE 18 mm 5.5 gr

Anv: ”[OVHPOC KA]ICAP” – Cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AMΦIΠOΛEITΩN” – Artemisa estante de frente viendo a izq. portando larga antorcha en mano derecha.

Acuñada: 147 – 161 D.C.

Referencias: RPC IV #4236 - BMC V #106 - BN Paris #514 - Lingren #993 var. - AMNG III #82 var. - Varbanov #3215
mdelvalle
RPC_6860_Cesaria_Marco_Aurelio.jpg
33-52 - MARCO AURELIO (161 - 180 D.C.)16 viewsCESARIA en Capadocia
(Hoy Kayseri en Turquía)

AE 22 mm 6.4 gr

Anv: ”[AYTOK AN]-TWNEINOC CEB” – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”KAICAPEWN TΠPAPΓAIW” – Monte Argeo (Argaeus), hoy es el volcán Erciyes.

Acuñada: 161-180 D.C.

Referencias: RPC IV #6860 - BMC XX #181 - BN Paris #452-3 - Sydenham #337 - S.M.Münich #49-52
mdelvalle
029~9.JPG
34 - Montpelier, Hérault, France.9 viewsJeton Quercy (quercy Antoine, épicerie "Aux Halles de Paris",6 Place de l'Observatoire).
5 centimes, laiton, 21 mm
A/ JETON QUERCY / 5c / 1914-16
R/ 5 C
Réfs : Elie 315.1
Gabalor
Faustina_II_Hadrianopolis_Jurukova_63.jpg
34 – 2 - 1 – FAUSTINA II (161 - 175 D.C.)40 views HADRIANOPOLIS Tracia

AE 22 mm 7.2 gr

Anv: ”[ΦΑΥC]ΤΕΙΝ - Α C[ΕΒΑCΤΗ]” – Busto con vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”AΔPIANOΠ - [OΛEITΩN]” – Eusebia (= Pietas) de pié a izquierda, portando pátera en la mano de su brazo derecho y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda. A sus piés un altar (Ara).

Acuñada: 161 – 175 D.C.

Referencias: Jurukova # 63-67,71 y 76-81 pl.7 y 8 – Sear GIC # 1725 Pag.160 – SNG Cop #558 – Mc Clean II #4518 pl.169.15 – Righetti #269-70 – Fitzwilliam Museum Leake #3956, European greece, p.53.9 – ANS NY #1944.100.15685- Berlin Museo Estatal #1899/476 – Lischine #405-6 – Paris Biblioteca Nacional de Francia #603 (485), 605 (486) y 611 (491)
mdelvalle
Jurukova_63_Hadrianopolis_Tracia_Faustina_Jr.jpg
34-36 - FAUSTINA Jr. (161 - 175 D.C.)6 views HADRIANOPOLIS Tracia

AE 22 mm 7.2 gr

Anv: ”[ΦΑΥC]ΤΕΙΝ - Α C[ΕΒΑCΤΗ]” – Busto con vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”AΔPIANOΠ - [OΛEITΩN]” – Eusebia (= Pietas) de pié a izquierda, portando pátera en la mano de su brazo derecho y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda. A sus piés un altar (Ara).

Acuñada: 161 – 175 D.C.

Referencias: Jurukova # 63-67,71 y 76-81 pl.7 y 8 – Sear GIC # 1725 Pag.160 – SNG Cop #558 – Mc Clean II #4518 pl.169.15 – Righetti #269-70 – Fitzwilliam Museum Leake #3956, European greece, p.53.9 – ANS NY #1944.100.15685- Berlin Museo Estatal #1899/476 – Lischine #405-6 – Paris Biblioteca Nacional de Francia #603 (485), 605 (486) y 611 (491)
mdelvalle
986_P_Hadrian_RPC3435.jpg
3435 SYRIA, Beroea Hadrian, laurel branch in laurel-wreath10 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3435; Lindgren A1911B; Paris; Butcher pl 25, 12.; Paris 1605-1606

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙ
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. Β-Ε
Laurel branch, all within laurel-wreath

2.15 gr
15 mm
12h
okidoki
1190_P_Hadrian_RPC3470.jpg
3470 SYRIA, Chalcis ad Belum Hadrian, Laurel wreath Δ12 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3470; CRS 437/15; Butcher Pl. 25, Chalcis 15a; Paris 1762/1763

Issue Δ

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑ-ΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery on far shoulder

Rev. ΦΛ ΧΑΛ/ΚΙΔΕωΝ / Δ
laurel-wreath

10.99 gr
23 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
RPC_5773_Cirrus_Siria_Lucio_Vero.jpg
35-50 - LUCIO VERO Co-Emperador con Marco Aurelio (161 - 169 D.C.)16 viewsCYRRHUS Siria Cyrrhestica

AE 25 mm 9.2 gr

Anv: ”AVT KΛ AVPHΛOY HPOC CEB” – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”ΔIOC KATEBATOY KYPPHCTΩN” – Zeus Kataibates sentado sobre piedras, portando un rayo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido sobre una águila y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada: 161 – 169 D.C.

Referencias: SNG II #2656-9 - RPC IV online #5773 - BMC #19-24 - SNG Cop. #47 - BN Paris #1641-3.
mdelvalle
RPC_7152_Antioquia_ad_Orontes_Lucio_Vero.jpg
35-52 - LUCIO VERO Co-Emperador con Marco Aurelio (161 - 169 D.C.)7 viewsANTIOQUIA en Orontes - Seleucis y Pieria - Siria

AE 22 mm 11.6 gr

Anv: ”AVT KΛ AVPHΛ OVHPOC CEB” – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”S C” - IB debajo, todo dentro de una guirnalda.

Acuñada: 161 – 169 D.C.

Referencias: SNG Cambridge #5891 - RPC I #7152 - BN Paris #550 - SNG II #3001 - McAllee #10 - Mionnet V #443.
mdelvalle
353.jpg
353.jpg31 viewsRemi in Gallia, Région de Reims, ca. 60-40 BC.,
Æ 21 (19-21 mm / 5,45 g), bronze, axes irregular alignment ↑↖ (ca. 320°),
Obv.: [AT]ISOS (downwards before) / [RE]MOS (downwards behind) , beardless head facing left, four-pointed floral ornament behind - Tête à gauche, un torque au cou. Légende devant et derrière la tête. Fleur à quatre pétales derrière la nuque, grènetis.
Rev.: lion at bay left, dolphin below - Anépigraphe. Lion élancé à gauche, la queue entre les pattes et enroulée jusqu'au-dessus du dos. Une esse au-dessus de la croupe, grènetis.
DT. 596 ; LT. 8054 var. ; BMC Celtic 71 ; Scheers 147 ; Allen 'Coins of the Celts', illustrated as nos. 446 and 447 .

thanks to Alan ("Manzikert") for the id

Les Rèmes étaient l'un des peuples les plus puissants de la Gaule et les fidèles alliés des Romains. Le territoire des Rèmes s'étendait sur l'actuelle Champagne, le long de l'Aisne. Ils avaient pour voisins les Atuatuques, les Trévires, les Médiomatriques, les Lingons, les Suessions, les Bellovaques et les Nerviens. Ils dénoncèrent à César la coalition des peuples belges de 57 avant J.-C. dont faisaient partie, les Suessions qui partageaient les mêmes lois et les mêmes magistrats. Leur principal oppidum était Bibrax. La capitale de la civitas à l'époque gallo-romaine était Durocortorum (Reims).

The Remi were a Belgic people of north-eastern Gaul (Gallia Belgica). The Romans regarded them as a civitas, a major and influential polity of Gaul, The Remi occupied the northern Champagne plain, on the southern fringes of the Forest of Ardennes, between the rivers Mosa (Meuse) and Matrona (Marne), and along the river valleys of the Aisne and its tributaries the Aire and the Vesle.
Their capital was at Durocortum (Reims, France) the second largest oppidum of Gaul, on the Vesle. Allied with the Germanic tribes of the east, they repeatedly engaged in warfare against the Parisii and the Senones. They were renowned for their horses and cavalry.
During the Gallic Wars in the mid-1st century BC, they allied themselves under the leadership of Iccius and Andecombogius with Julius Caesar. They maintained their loyalty to Rome throughout the entire war, and were one of the few Gallic polities not to join in the rebellion of Vercingetorix.
Arminius
1185Hadrian_RIC365.jpg
365 Hadrian Denarius Roma 134-38 AD Patientia26 viewsReference.
RIC 365; Strack 202; Cohen 1010

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Laureate head right.

Rev. PATIENTIA AVGVSTI COS III
Patientia, seated left on low seat, holding out right hand and holding transverse sceptre in left

3.18 gr
17 mm
6h

Note.
BMCRE 525, pl. 57.9 (same reverse die). Cohen 1010 ;RIC II 365
The Reka Devnia hoard contained two specimens of this type, one like ours and one with a draped bust. Strack 202 records the two Reka Devnia coins in Sofia, BMCRE 525, two specimens in Paris, and only three others: Gnecchi Collection, L.A. Lawrence, and Ball VI, 1932, lot 1355. This is the sole appearance of the personification Patientia on Roman coins. Apparently her name was not well received, because it was very soon changed to INDVLGENTIA AVG, and with the new name the identical type, seated female figure extending right hand and holding scepter, was struck in substantial quantity. As Strack and Mattingly suggested, the sense of the Patientia type, since it was soon to be renamed Indulgentia, may have been "endurance of other people's troubles rather than one's own" (BMCRE III, p. cxli).
2 commentsokidoki
BNP_1644_Cirrus_Siria_Comodo.jpg
37-50 - COMODO Co-Emperador con Marco Aurelio (177 - 180 D.C.)14 viewsCYRRHUS Siria Cyrrhestica

AE 25 mm 9.7 gr

Anv: ”ΑVΤΟΚ ΛΟ ΑVΡ ΚΟΜΟΔΟС” – Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: ”ΔIOC KATEBATOV KVPPHCTΩN A” – Zeus Kataibates sentado sobre piedras, portando un rayo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido sobre una águila y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada: 177 – 180 D.C.

Referencias: RPC IV online #5778 - BMC #29 - BN Paris #1644
mdelvalle
1133_P_Hadrian_RPC3725.jpg
3725 SYRIA Antioch. Hadrian 129-30 AD. Trichalkon Tyche of Antioch9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3725; McAlee 541(a); CRS 258; Paris 436

Obv. AVTOKP KAIC TPAIAN AΔPIANOC CEBAC
Laureate head right, drapery on far shoulder

Rev. ΑΝΤΙΟΧΕωΝ ΤΗС ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛ A
Turreted and veiled bust of the City of Antioch, A to lower right.

4.37 gr
19 mm
12h
okidoki
1213_P_Hadrian_RPC3805.jpg
3805 SYRIA Laodicea ad Mare. Hadrian Tetradrachm 123-24 AD Tyche 42 viewsReference.
RPC III, 3805/6; Prieur 1109; Adra 1562-5; Paris 1157

Issue Year 170 (OP)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡ ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СΕΒΑСΤ
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Hadrian right, with gorgoneion on breastplate

Rev. ΙΟΥΛΙΕωΝ ΤωΝ ΚΑΙ ΛΑΟΔΙΚΕωΝ
Turreted and draped bust of Tyche, right; in field, right, ΟΡ soldiers arming the battlements/towers on Tyche's head

13 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
From the Michel Prieur Collection. Ex Robert O. Ebert Collection (Part I, Stack’s Bowers & Ponterio 174, 11 January 2013), lot 5142; Numismatica Ars Classica 1 (39 March 1989), lot 862; Münzen und Medaillen AG FPL 279 (August 1967), no. 40.
7 commentsokidoki
SCPanoramaBlack.jpg
382/1b C Naevius Balbus43 viewsC. Naevius Balbus. AR Denarius Serrate. Rome mint. 79 BC. Rev: Diademed head of Venus right, SC behind. Rev: Victory driving galloping triga right, CLXXVII above; C·NAE·BALB in
exergue.
Syd 769b; Naevia 6; Crawford 382/1b

By die comparison, controlnumber 127.

1 commentsPaddy
0200-1Fr_Ceres_1888.jpg
3° republique - 1 franc 1888 A115 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
. REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE ., tête de Cérès a gauche
LIBERTE . EGALITE . FRATERNITE, couronne de lauriers et d'olivier avec au centre 1 FRANC 1888 en trois lignes, a l'exergue A
Tranche cannelée
5.00 gr
Ref : Le Franc VIII # 216/10
86-015
Potator II
0190-10c_Ceres_1872.jpg
3° republique - 10 centimes 1872 A43 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
* REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE * 1872, tête de Cérès a gauche
* LIBERTE * EGALITE * FRATERNITE, couronne de lauriers et d'olivier avec au centre 10 CENTIMES en deux lignes, A dessous
Tranche lisse
9.90 gr
Ref : Le Franc VIII # 135/8
Potator II
1138_P_Hadrian_RPC4088.jpg
4088 DECAPOLIS, Gerasa Hadrian 129-30 AD Artemis9 viewsReference.
RPC III, 4088; Spijkerman 7; Paris 310

Issue Year ΙΔ

Obv. [ΔΙ] ΑΥ Κ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС С
Laureate head of Hadrian, right

Rev. ΑΡΤΕ(ΜΙ) ΤΥ ΓΕΡΑСωΝ
Draped bust of Artemis/Tyche, r., quiver on l. shoulder.

2.40 gr
15 mm
6h
okidoki
pergamum_RPC_2374.jpg
41-60 AD - Semi-Autonomous AE15 of Pergamum - struck under the time of the Claudians75 viewsobv: PEON CYNKLHTON (youthful draped bust of the Roman Senate right)
rev: PEAN PWMHN (turreted and draped bust of Roma right)
ref: RPC 2374, SNG BN Paris 1964
mint: Pergamum, Mysia (40-60 AD)
4.03gms, 15mm
Rare

Pergamum was not conquered by the Romans. In 133 B.C. Attalus III, its last king, bequeathed Pergamum to the Romans and this granted to the city and its inhabitants the continued benevolence of the new rulers (with the only exception being Marcus Antonius who deprived the Library of Pergamum of many of its volumes to replenish that of Alexandria, which had been damaged by Julius Caesar).
berserker
1194_P_Hadrian_RPC4110.jpg
4110 ARABIA, Petra. Hadrian 135-36 AD Tyche26 viewsReference.
RPC III, 4110; Spijkerman 6; Sofaer 6; Paris 114; Rosenberger I, 6

Issue Year 30

Obv. ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤΩΡ ΚΑΙСΑΡ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟϹ СƐΒΑϹΤΟС
Laureate and draped bust of Hadrian, r.; in r. field, Λ

Rev. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΗ ΠƐΤΡΑ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΙС
Turreted and veiled Tyche seated l. on rock, l., her r. hand extended, holding trophy in l.; in l. field, Λ

12.45 gr
26 mm
6h

Note.
From the Maple Leaf Collection.
2 commentsokidoki
SNG_Paris_452_Assarion_PERGA_Caracala.jpg
48-60 - CARACALLA (198 - 211 D.C.)13 viewsPERGA - Panfilia
(Hoy cerca de la Ciudad de Murtana, Turquía

AE Diarión ?
17 mm 5.4gr.

Anv: " AY K M AY ANTΩNINOC CEB" – Cab. laur. a der.
Rev: ”ΠEPΓAIΩN", Artemisa estante a der. lanzando flechas con su arco.

Acuñada: 198 - 217 D.C.

Referencias: SNG France #438 - ANS 1951.94.29 - SNG Paris III #452
mdelvalle
Philip-II-RIC-256-bust.jpg
51. Philip II as Caesar.23 viewsA comparison of the portrait of Philip II on the previous sestertius, and the marble bust of Philip II in the Capitoline Museum, Rome.Callimachus
coin275.JPG
510. Valentinian I53 viewsFlavius Valentinianus, known in English as Valentinian I, (321 - November 17, 375) was a Roman Emperor (364 - 375). He was born at Cibalis, in Pannonia, the son of a successful general, Gratian the Elder.

He had been an officer of the Praetorian guard under Julian and Jovian, and had risen high in the imperial service. Of robust frame and distinguished appearance, he possessed great courage and military capacity. After the death of Jovian, he was chosen emperor in his forty-third year by the officers of the army at Nicaea in Bithynia on February 26, 364, and shortly afterwards named his brother Valens colleague with him in the empire.

The two brothers, after passing through the chief cities of the neighbouring district, arranged the partition of the empire at Naissus (Nissa) in Upper Moesia. As Western Roman Emperor, Valentinian took Italia, Illyricum, Hispania, the Gauls, Britain and Africa, leaving to Eastern Roman Emperor Valens the eastern half of the Balkan peninsula, Greece, Aegyptus, Syria and Asia Minor as far as Persia. They were immediately confronted by the revolt of Procopius, a relative of the deceased Julian. Valens managed to defeat his army at Thyatria in Lydia in 366, and Procopius was executed shortly afterwards.

During the short reign of Valentinian there were wars in Africa, in Germany and in Britain, and Rome came into collision with barbarian peoples never of heard before, specifically the Burgundians, and the Saxons.

Valentinian's chief work was guarding the frontiers and establishing military positions. Milan was at first his headquarters for settling the affairs of northern Italy. The following year (365) Valentinian was at Paris, and then at Reims, to direct the operations of his generals against the Alamanni. These people, defeated at Scarpona (Charpeigne) and Catelauni (Châlons-en-Champagne) by Jovinus, were driven back to the German bank of the Rhine, and checked for a while by a chain of military posts and fortresses. At the close of 367, however, they suddenly crossed the Rhine, attacked Moguntiacum (Mainz) and plundered the city. Valentinian attacked them at Solicinium (Sulz am Neckar, in the Neckar valley, or Schwetzingen) with a large army, and defeated them with great slaughter. But his own losses were so considerable that Valentinian abandoned the idea of following up his success.

Later, in 374, Valentinian made peace with their king, Macrianus, who from that time remained a true friend of the Romans. The next three years he spent at Trier, which he chiefly made his headquarters, organizing the defence of the Rhine frontier, and personally superintending the construction of numerous forts.

During his reign the coasts of Gaul were harassed by the Saxon pirates, with whom the Picts and Scots of northern Britain joined hands, and ravaged the island from the Antonine Wall to the shores of Kent. In 368 Count Theodosius was sent to drive back the invaders; in this he was completely successful, and established a new British province, called Valentia in honour of the emperor.

In Africa, Firmus, raised the standard of revolt, being joined by the provincials, who had been rendered desperate by the cruelty and extortions of Comes Romanus, the military governor. The services of Theodosius were again requisitioned. He landed in Africa with a small band of veterans, and Firmus, to avoid being taken prisoner, committed suicide.

In 374 the Quadi, a Germanic tribe in what is now Moravia and Slovakia, resenting the erection of Roman forts to the north of the Danube in what they considered to be their own territory, and further exasperated by the treacherous murder of their king, Gabinius, crossed the river and laid waste the province of Pannonia. The emperor in April, 375 entered Illyricum with a powerful army. But during an audience to an embassy from the Quadi at Brigetio on the Danube (near Komárom, Hungary), Valentinian suffered a burst blood vessel in the skull while angrily yelling at the people gathered. This injury resulted in his death on November 17, 375.

His general administration seems to have been thoroughly honest and able, in some respects beneficent. If Valentinian was hard and exacting in the matter of taxes, he spent them in the defence and improvement of his dominions, not in idle show or luxury. Though himself a plain and almost illiterate soldier, Valentinian was a founder of schools. He also provided medical attendance for the poor of Rome, by appointing a physician for each of the fourteen districts of the city.

Valentinian was a Christian but permitted absolute religious freedom to all his subjects. Against all abuses, both civil and ecclesiastical, Valentinian steadily set his face, even against the increasing wealth and worldliness of the clergy. His chief flaw was his temper, which at times was frightful, and showed itself in its full fierceness in the punishment of persons accused of witchcraft, fortune-telling or magical practices.

Valentinian I; RIC IX, Siscia 15(a); C.37; second period: 24 Aug. 367-17 Nov. 375; common. obv. DN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG, bust cuir., drap., r., rev. SECVRITAS-REI PVBLICAE, Victory advancing l., holding wreath and trophy. l. field R above R with adnex, r. field F, ex. gamma SISC rev.Z dot (type xxxv)
ecoli
coin396.JPG
513. Gratian29 viewsFlavius Gratianus Augustus (April 18/May 23, 359 - August 25, 383), known as Gratian, was a Western Roman Emperor from 375 to 383. He was the son of Valentinian I by Marina Severa and was born at Sirmium in Pannonia.

On August 4, 367 he received from his father the title of Augustus. On the death of Valentinian (November 17, 375), the troops in Pannonia proclaimed his infant son (by a second wife Justina) emperor under the title of Valentinian II.

Gratian acquiesced in their choice; reserving for himself the administration of the Gallic provinces, he handed over Italy, Illyria and Africa to Valentinian and his mother, who fixed their residence at Milan. The division, however, was merely nominal, and the real authority remained in the hands of Gratian.

The Eastern Roman Empire was under the rule of his uncle Valens. In May, 378 Gratian completely defeated the Lentienses, the southernmost branch of the Alamanni, at the Battle of Argentovaria, near the site of the modern Colmar. Later that year, Valens met his death in the Battle of Adrianople on August 9.

In the same year, the government of the Eastern Empire devolved upon Gratian, but feeling himself unable to resist unaided the incursions of the barbarians, he promoted Theodosius I on January 19, 379 to govern that portion of the empire. Gratianus and Theodosius then cleared the Balkans of barbarians in the Gothic War (377–382).

For some years Gratian governed the empire with energy and success but gradually sank into indolence, occupying himself chiefly with the pleasures of the chase, and became a tool in the hands of the Frankish general Merobaudes and bishop Ambrose of Milan.

By taking into his personal service a body of Alani, and appearing in public in the dress of a Scythian warrior, he aroused the contempt and resentment of his Roman troops. A Roman general named Magnus Maximus took advantage of this feeling to raise the standard of revolt in Britain and invaded Gaul with a large army. Gratian, who was then in Paris, being deserted by his troops, fled to Lyon. There, through the treachery of the governor, Gratian was delivered over to one of the rebel generals and assassinated on August 25, 383.

RIC IX Antioch 46b S

DN GRATIA-NVS PF AVG
CONCOR-DIA AVGGG
ecoli
coin267.JPG
515b. Magnus Maximus35 viewsA Spaniard, Maximus was proclaimed emperor by his troops in 383, while serving with the army in Britain. Later legend made him King of the Britons; he handed the throne over to Caradocus when he went to Gaul to pursue his imperial ambitions.

Following his destruction of Gaul, Maximus went out to meet his main opponent, Gratian, who he defeated near Paris. Gratian, after fleeing, was killed at Lyon on August 25, 383. Soon after, Maximus managed to force Valentinian II out of Rome after which he fled to Theodosius I, the Eastern Roman Emperor. Maximus made his capital at Augusta Treverorum (Treves, Trier) in Gaul. He became a popular emperor, although also a stern persecutor of heretics.

Theodosius I and Valentinian II campaigned against Magnus Maximus in July-August 388. Maximus was defeated in the Battle of the Save, near Emona, and retreated to Aquileia. Andragathius, magister equitum of Maximus and killer of Gratian, was defeated near Siscia, his brother Marcellinus again at Poetovio. Maximus surrendered in Aquileia and although pleaded for mercy was executed. However, his wife and two daughters were spared. Maximus' son, Flavius Victor, was defeated and executed by Valentinian's magister peditum Arbogast in the fall of the same year.

What happened to his family is not related, although it is clear that they survived and that his descendants continued to occupy influential posts. We encounter a possible daughter of Magnus Maximus, Sevira, on the Pillar of Eliseg, an early medieval inscribed stone in Wales which claims her marriage to Vortigern, king of the Britons. Another daughter was possibly married to Ennodius, proconsul Africae (395). Their grandson was Petronius Maximus, who was another ill-fated emperor, ruling in Rome for but 77 days before he was stoned to death while fleeing from the Vandals on May 24, 455. Other descendants included Anicius Olybrius, emperor in 472, but also several consuls and bishops such as St. Magnus Felix Ennodius (Bishop of Pavia c. 514-21).

Magnus Maximus AE-4

Obv: MM right, DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG; Reverse: SPES ROMANORVM, campgate with two turrets and star above. Coin is nice VF for this small issue.
ecoli
585_P_Hadrian_Emmett1014_12.jpg
5717A EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 127-28 AD Nilus reclining on crocodile 28 viewsReference.
Milne/Oxford 1269; Glasgow SNG 4027; and Paris 1243; RPC III, 5717A; Emmett 1014.12; Köln --; Dattari (Savio) --; BMC --

http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/3/5717A/

Issue L ΔWΔƐΚΑΤΟΥ = year 12

Obv. AVTKAI - TPAI AΔPIA CEB
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right seen from behind.

Rev. L ΔωΔЄK (date) in exergue
Nilus reclining left on crocodile, holding reed in right and cornucopia in left hand.

20.98 gr
34 mm
11h
okidoki
1074_P_Hadrian_RPC5776.jpg
5776 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Didrachm 130-31 AD Sarapis20 viewsReference.
RPC III; 5776=Paris 1689; Emmett --; Dattari--;

Issue L IE = year 15

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian r., drapery on l. shoulder

Rev. L ΙΕ
Draped bust of Sarapis, wearing kalathos and laurel wreath, right

4.95 gr
17 mm
12h

Note.
RPC III states
Unique. Note that the obv. bust is the same as that used on small AE denominations; however the coin cannot be a cast forgery in silver since the reverse design is not used on small denominations. In addition, the fabric of the coin is different from that normal for AE (e.g. the edge is not bevelled).
1 commentsokidoki
962_P_Hadrian_Emmett1144_16.jpg
5816 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Diobol AE 131-32 AD Tyche standing18 viewsReference.
Emmett 1144.16; D1852; RPC III, 5816; Köln 1061

Issue L IϚ = year 16

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ - ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust of Hadrian, r., seen from rear

Rev. L ΙϚ
Tyche standing facing, head l., holding rudder and cornucopia

8.37 gr
25 mm
12h

Note.
Peus E-420 lot 6617
Sammlung Dr. Neussel Nr. 646
1960 Boutin, Paris
1 commentsokidoki
Philip-II-RIC-238var.jpg
70. Philip II as Augustus.57 viewsAntoninianus, 249 AD, Antioch mint.
Obverse: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG / Radiate bust of Philip II facing right.
Reverse: PM TR P VI COS P P / Radiate lion walking right.
4.40 gm., 21.5 mm.
RIC 238 / 239 var; Sear 9272 / 9273 var.

This is an apparently unpublished coin. The RIC / Sear numbers above refer to coins with the bust facing left & the lion walking right; or the bust facing right & the lion walking left. Roger Bland, in his unpublished listing of Roman imperial coins from Antioch, lists a coin with bust right & lion walking right (#97); however Curtis Clay at Harlan J Berk Ltd. feels there is an error in the listing of #97 and that it refers to a coin in Paris with a left-facing bust. Details can be found at the web site of Forum Ancient Coins (http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=47620.0).

The portrait on this coin is a superbly engraved portrait, but it is not the portrait of a 11 or 12 year old boy. A radiate lion is a symbol not often seen on Roman imperial coinage. It is associated with solar cults of the East and likely has the same meaning as the radiate crown on the emperor's portrait: the power and authority of the emperor is equated with the power and authority of the sun god. The radiate lion on this coin was certainly the invention of the mint of Antioch since the prototype on which this reverse is based -- the millennium coin with a lion on the reverse, RIC 12 -- is not a radiate lion.
1 commentsCallimachus
AugustusAE19Sardeis.jpg
702a, Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.37 viewsAugustus, 27 BC - 14 AD. AE 19mm (5.98 gm). Lydia, Sardeis. Diodoros Hermophilou. Obverse: head right. Reverse: Zeus Lydios standing facing holding scepter and eagle. RPC I, 489, 2986; SNG von Aulock 3142. aVF. Fine portrait. Ex Tom Vossen.

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers

AUGUSTUS (31 B.C. - 14 A.D.)

Garrett G. Fagan
Pennsylvania State University

In the course of his long and spectacular career, he put an end to the advancing decay of the Republic and established a new basis for Roman government that was to stand for three centuries. This system, termed the "Principate," was far from flawless, but it provided the Roman Empire with a series of rulers who presided over the longest period of unity, peace, and prosperity that Western Europe, the Middle East and the North African seaboard have known in their entire recorded history. Even if the rulers themselves on occasion left much to be desired, the scale of Augustus's achievement in establishing the system cannot be overstated. Aside from the immense importance of Augustus's reign from the broad historical perspective, he himself is an intriguing figure: at once tolerant and implacable, ruthless and forgiving, brazen and tactful. Clearly a man of many facets, he underwent three major political reinventions in his lifetime and negotiated the stormy and dangerous seas of the last phase of the Roman Revolution with skill and foresight. With Augustus established in power and with the Principate firmly rooted, the internal machinations of the imperial household provide a fascinating glimpse into the one issue that painted this otherwise gifted organizer and politician into a corner from which he could find no easy exit: the problem of the succession.

(For a very detailed and interesting account of the Age of Augustus see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/auggie.htm)

Death and Retrospective

In his later years, Augustus withdrew more and more from the public eye, although he continued to transact public business. He was getting older, and old age in ancient times must have been considerably more debilitating than it is today. In any case, Tiberius had been installed as his successor and, by AD 13, was virtually emperor already. In AD 4 he had received grants of both proconsular and tribunician power, which had been renewed as a matter of course whenever they needed to be; in AD 13, Tiberius's imperium had been made co-extensive with that of Augustus. While traveling in Campania, Augustus died peacefully at Nola on 19 August, AD 14. Tiberius, who was en route to Illyricum, hurried to the scene and, depending on the source, arrived too late or spent a day in consultation with the dying princes. The tradition that Livia poisoned her husband is scurrilous in the extreme and most unlikely to be true. Whatever the case about these details, Imperator Caesar Augustus, Son of a God, Father of his Country, the man who had ruled the Roman world alone for almost 45 years, or over half a century if the triumviral period is included, was dead. He was accorded a magnificent funeral, buried in the mausoleum he had built in Rome, and entered the Roman pantheon as Divus Augustus. In his will, he left 1,000 sesterces apiece to the men of the Praetorian guard, 500 to the urban cohorts, and 300 to each of the legionaries. In death, as in life, Augustus acknowledged the true source of his power.

The inscription entitled "The Achievements of the Divine Augustus" (Res Gestae Divi Augustae; usually abbreviated RG) remains a remarkable piece of evidence deriving from Augustus's reign. The fullest copy of it is the bilingual Greek and Latin version carved into the walls of the Temple of Rome and Augustus at Ancyra in Galatia (for this reason the RG used to be commonly referred to as the Monumentum Ancyranum). Other evidence, however, demonstrates that the original was inscribed on two bronze pillars that flanked the entrance to the Mausoleum of Augustus in Rome. The inscription remains the only first-person summary of any Roman emperor's political career and, as such, offers invaluable insights into the Augustan regime's public presentation of itself.

In looking back on the reign of Augustus and its legacy to the Roman world, its longevity ought not to be overlooked as a key factor in its success. People had been born and reached middle age without knowing any form of government other than the Principate. Had Augustus died earlier (in 23 BC, for instance), matters may have turned out very differently. The attrition of the civil wars on the old Republican aristocracy and the longevity of Augustus, therefore, must be seen as major contributing factors in the transformation of the Roman state into a monarchy in these years. Augustus's own experience, his patience, his tact, and his great political acumen also played their part. All of these factors allowed him to put an end to the chaos of the Late Republic and re-establish the Roman state on a firm footing. He directed the future of the empire down many lasting paths, from the existence of a standing professional army stationed at or near the frontiers, to the dynastic principle so often employed in the imperial succession, to the embellishment of the capital at the emperor's expense. Augustus's ultimate legacy, however, was the peace and prosperity the empire was to enjoy for the next two centuries under the system he initiated. His memory was enshrined in the political ethos of the Imperial age as a paradigm of the good emperor; although every emperor adopted his name, Caesar Augustus, only a handful earned genuine comparison with him.

Copyright © 1999, Garrett G. Fagan.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Augustus (the first Roman emperor, in whose reign Jesus Christ was born) is without any doubt one of the most important figures in Roman history.

It is reported that when he was near death, Augustus addressed those in attendance with these words, "If I have played my part well, applaud!"

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr
Cleisthenes
VespasianPax_RICii10.jpg
710a, Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.134 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II, 10, aVF, 3.5 g, 18mm, Rome mint, 69-71 AD; Obverse: IMP CAESA[R] VESPASIANV[S AV]G - Laureate head right; Reverse: COS ITER [T]R POT - Pax seated left holding branch and caduceus. Ex Imperial Coins.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 69-79)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (b. A.D. 9, d. A.D. 79, emperor A.D. 69-79) restored peace and stability to an empire in disarray following the death of Nero in A.D. 68. In the process he established the Flavian dynasty as the legitimate successor to the Imperial throne. Although we lack many details about the events and chronology of his reign, Vespasian provided practical leadership and a return to stable government - accomplishments which, when combined with his other achievements, make his emperorship particularly notable within the history of the Principate.

Early Life and Career

Vespasian was born at Falacrina near Sabine Reate on 17 November, A.D. 9, the son of T. Flavius Sabinus, a successful tax collector and banker, and Vespasia Polla. Both parents were of equestrian status. Few details of his first fifteen years survive, yet it appears that his father and mother were often away from home on business for long periods. As a result, Vespasian's early education became the responsibility of his paternal grandmother, Tertulla. [[1]] In about A.D. 25 Vespasian assumed the toga virilis and later accepted the wearing of the latus clavus, and with it the senatorial path that his older brother, T. Flavius Sabinus, had already chosen. [[2]] Although many of the particulars are lacking, the posts typically occupied by one intent upon a senatorial career soon followed: a military tribunate in Thrace, perhaps for three or four years; a quaestorship in Crete-Cyrene; and the offices of aedile and praetor, successively, under the emperor Gaius. [[3]]

It was during this period that Vespasian married Flavia Domitilla. Daughter of a treasury clerk and former mistress of an African knight, Flavia lacked the social standing and family connections that the politically ambitious usually sought through marriage. In any case, the couple produced three children, a daughter, also named Flavia Domitilla, and two sons, the future emperors Titus and Domitian . Flavia did not live to witness her husband's emperorship and after her death Vespasian returned to his former mistress Caenis, who had been secretary to Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony and mother of Claudius). Caenis apparently exerted considerable influence over Vespasian, prompting Suetonius to assert that she remained his wife in all but name, even after he became emperor. [[4]]

Following the assassination of Gaius on 24 January, A.D. 41, Vespasian advanced rapidly, thanks in large part to the new princeps Claudius, whose favor the Flavians had wisely secured with that of Antonia, the mother of Germanicus, and of Claudius' freedmen, especially Narcissus. [[5]] The emperor soon dispatched Vespasian to Argentoratum (Strasbourg) as legatus legionis II Augustae, apparently to prepare the legion for the invasion of Britain. Vespasian first appeared at the battle of Medway in A.D. 43, and soon thereafter led his legion across the south of England, where he engaged the enemy thirty times in battle, subdued two tribes, and conquered the Isle of Wight. According to Suetonius, these operations were conducted partly under Claudius and partly under Vespasian's commander, Aulus Plautius. Vespasian's contributions, however, did not go unnoticed; he received the ornamenta triumphalia and two priesthoods from Claudius for his exploits in Britain. [[6]]

By the end of A.D. 51 Vespasian had reached the consulship, the pinnacle of a political career at Rome. For reasons that remain obscure he withdrew from political life at this point, only to return when chosen proconsul of Africa about A.D. 63-64. His subsequent administration of the province was marked by severity and parsimony, earning him a reputation for being scrupulous but unpopular. [[7]] Upon completion of his term, Vespasian returned to Rome where, as a senior senator, he became a man of influence in the emperor Nero's court. [[8]] Important enough to be included on Nero's tour of Greece in A.D. 66-67, Vespasian soon found himself in the vicinity of increasing political turbulence in the East. The situation would prove pivotal in advancing his career.

Judaea and the Accession to Power

In response to rioting in Caesarea and Jerusalem that had led to the slaughter in the latter city of Jewish leaders and Roman soldiers, Nero granted to Vespasian in A.D. 66 a special command in the East with the objective of settling the revolt in Judaea. By spring A.D. 67, with 60,000 legionaries, auxiliaries, and allies under his control, Vespasian set out to subdue Galilee and then to cut off Jerusalem. Success was quick and decisive. By October all of Galilee had been pacified and plans for the strategic encirclement of Jerusalem were soon formed. [[9]] Meanwhile, at the other end of the empire, the revolts of Gaius Iulius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and Servius Sulpicius Galba , governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, had brought Nero's reign to the brink of collapse. The emperor committed suicide in June, A.D. 68, thereby ensuring chaos for the next eighteen months, as first Galba and then Marcus Salvius Otho and Aulus Vitellius acceded to power. Each lacked broad-based military and senatorial support; each would be violently deposed in turn. [[10]]

Still occupied with plans against Jerusalem, Vespasian swore allegiance to each emperor. Shortly after Vitellius assumed power in spring, A.D. 69, however, Vespasian met on the border of Judaea and Syria with Gaius Licinius Mucianus, governor of Syria, and after a series of private and public consultations, the two decided to revolt. [[11]] On July 1, at the urging of Tiberius Alexander, prefect of Egypt, the legions of Alexandria declared for Vespasian, as did the legions of Judaea two days later. By August all of Syria and the Danube legions had done likewise. Vespasian next dispatched Mucianus to Italy with 20,000 troops, while he set out from Syria to Alexandria in order to control grain shipments for the purpose of starving Italy into submission. [[12]] The siege of Jerusalem he placed in the hands of his son Titus.

Meanwhile, the Danubian legions, unwilling to wait for Mucianus' arrival, began their march against Vitellius ' forces. The latter army, suffering from a lack of discipline and training, and unaccustomed to the heat of Rome, was defeated at Cremona in late October. [[13]] By mid-December the Flavian forces had reached Carsulae, 95 kilometers north of Rome on the Flaminian Road, where the Vitellians, with no further hope of reinforcements, soon surrendered. At Rome, unable to persuade his followers to accept terms for his abdication, Vitellius was in peril. On the morning of December 20 the Flavian army entered Rome. By that afternoon, the emperor was dead. [[14]]

Tacitus records that by December 22, A.D. 69, Vespasian had been given all the honors and privileges usually granted to emperors. Even so, the issue remains unclear, owing largely to a surviving fragment of an enabling law, the lex de imperio Vespasiani, which conferred powers, privileges, and exemptions, most with Julio-Claudian precedents, on the new emperor. Whether the fragment represents a typical granting of imperial powers that has uniquely survived in Vespasian's case, or is an attempt to limit or expand such powers, remains difficult to know. In any case, the lex sanctioned all that Vespasian had done up to its passing and gave him authority to act as he saw fit on behalf of the Roman people. [[15]]

What does seem clear is that Vespasian felt the need to legitimize his new reign with vigor. He zealously publicized the number of divine omens that predicted his accession and at every opportunity he accumulated multiple consulships and imperial salutations. He also actively promoted the principle of dynastic succession, insisting that the emperorship would fall to his son. The initiative was fulfilled when Titus succeeded his father in A.D. 79.[[16]]

Emperorship

Upon his arrival in Rome in late summer, A.D. 70, Vespasian faced the daunting task of restoring a city and a government ravaged by the recent civil wars. Although many particulars are missing, a portrait nevertheles emerges of a ruler conscientiously committed to the methodical renewal of both city and empire. Concerning Rome itself, the emperor encouraged rebuilding on vacated lots, restored the Capitol (burned in A.D. 69), and also began work on several new buildings: a temple to the deified Claudius on the Caelian Hill, a project designed to identify Vespasian as a legitimate heir to the Julio-Claudians, while distancing himself from Nero ; a temple of Peace near the Forum; and the magnificent Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheatre), located on the site of the lake of Nero 's Golden House. [[17]]

Claiming that he needed forty thousand million sesterces for these projects and for others aimed at putting the state on more secure footing, Vespasian is said to have revoked various imperial immunities, manipulated the supply of certain commodities to inflate their price, and increased provincial taxation. [[18]] The measures are consistent with his characterization in the sources as both obdurate and avaricious. There were occasional political problems as well: Helvidius Priscus, an advocate of senatorial independence and a critic of the Flavian regime from the start, was exiled after A.D. 75 and later executed; Marcellus Eprius and A. Alienus Caecina were condemned by Titus for conspiracy, the former committing suicide, the latter executed in A.D. 79.
As Suetonius claims, however, in financial matters Vespasian always put revenues to the best possible advantage, regardless of their source. Tacitus, too, offers a generally favorable assessment, citing Vespasian as the first man to improve after becoming emperor. [[19]] Thus do we find the princeps offering subventions to senators not possessing the property qualifications of their rank, restoring many cities throughout the empire, and granting state salaries for the first time to teachers of Latin and Greek rhetoric. To enhance Roman economic and social life even further, he encouraged theatrical productions by building a new stage for the Theatre of Marcellus, and he also put on lavish state dinners to assist the food trades. [[20]]

In other matters the emperor displayed similar concern. He restored the depleted ranks of the senatorial and equestrian orders with eligible Italian and provincial candidates and reduced the backlog of pending court cases at Rome. Vespasian also re-established discipline in the army, while punishing or dismissing large numbers of Vitellius ' men. [[21]]
Beyond Rome, the emperor increased the number of legions in the East and continued the process of imperial expansion by the annexation of northern England, the pacification of Wales, and by advances into Scotland and southwest Germany between the Rhine and the Danube. Vespasian also conferred rights on communities abroad, especially in Spain, where the granting of Latin rights to all native communities contributed to the rapid Romanization of that province during the Imperial period. [[22]]

Death and Assessment

In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!" [[23]] In fact, public deification did follow his death, as did his internment in the Mausoleum of Augustus alongside the Julio-Claudians.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century.

Bibliography

Since the scholarship on Vespasian is more comprehensive than can be treated here, the works listed below are main accounts or bear directly upon issues discussed in the entry above. A comprehensive modern anglophone study of this emperor is yet to be produced.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Flaviani, 2 vols. Rieti, 1983.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Vespasianei, 2 vols. Rieti, 1981.

Bosworth, A.B. "Vespasian and the Provinces: Some Problems of the Early 70s A.D." Athenaeum 51 (1973): 49-78.

Brunt, P. A. "Lex de imperio Vespasiani." JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

D'Espèrey, S. Franchet. "Vespasien, Titus et la littérature." ANRW II.32.5: 3048-3086.

Dudley, D. and Webster, G. The Roman Conquest of Britain. London, 1965.

Gonzalez, J. "The Lex Irnitana: A New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

Grant, M. The Roman Emperors: A Biographical Guide to the Rulers of Rome, 31 B.C. - A.D. 476. New York, 1985.

Homo, L. Vespasien, l'Empereur du bons sens (69-79 ap. J.-C.). Paris, 1949.

Levi, M.A. "I Flavi." ANRW II.2: 177-207.

McCrum, M. and Woodhead, A. G. Select Documents of the Principates of the Flavian Emperors Including the Year of the Revolution. Cambridge, 1966.

Nicols, John. Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae. Wiesbaden, 1978.

Scarre, C. Chronicle of the Roman Emperors. The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Rome. London, 1995.

Suddington, D. B. The Development of the Roman Auxiliary Forces from Caesar to Vespasian, 49 B.C. - A.D. 79. Harare: U. of Zimbabwe, 1982.

Syme, R. Tacitus. Oxford, 1958.

Wardel, David. "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol." Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

Wellesley, K. The Long Year: A.D. 69. Bristol, 1989, 2nd ed.


Notes

[[1]] Suet. Vesp. 2.1. Suetonius remains the major source but see also Tac. Hist. 2-5; Cass. Dio 65; Joseph. BJ 3-4.

[[2]] Suetonius (Vesp. 2.1) claims that Vespasian did not accept the latus clavus, the broad striped toga worn by one aspiring to a senatorial career, immediately. The delay, however, was perhaps no more than three years. See J. Nicols, Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae (Wiesbaden, 1978), 2.

[[3]] Military tribunate and quaestorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3; aedileship: ibid., 5.3, in which Gaius, furious that Vespasian had not kept the streets clean, as was his duty, ordered some soldiers to load him with filth;,they complied by stuffing his toga with as much as it could hold. See also Dio 59.12.2-3; praetorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3, in which Vespasian is depicted as one of Gaius' leading adulators, an account consistent with Tacitus' portrayal (Hist 1.50.4; 2.5.1) of his early career. For a more complete discussion of these posts and attendant problems of dating, see Nicols, Vespasian, 2-7.

[[4]] Marriage and Caenis: Suet. Vesp. 3; Cass. Dio 65.14.

[[5]] Nicols, Vespasian, 12-39.

[[6]] Suet. Vesp. 4.1 For additional details on Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see D. Dudley and G. Webster, The Roman Conquest of Britain (London, 1965), 55 ff., 98.

[[7]] Concerning Vespasian's years between his consulship and proconsulship, see Suet. Vesp. 4.2 and Nicols, Vespasian, 9. On his unpopularity in Africa, see Suet. Vesp. 4.3, an account of a riot at Hadrumentum, where he was once pelted with turnips. In recording that Africa supported Vitellius in A.D. 69, Tacitus too suggests popular dissatisfaction with Vespasian's proconsulship. See Hist. 2.97.2.

[[8]] This despite the fact that the sources record two rebukes of Vespasian, one for extorting money from a young man seeking career advancement (Suet. Vesp. 4.3), the other for either leaving the room or dozing off during one of the emperor's recitals (Suet. Vesp. 4.4 and 14, which places the transgression in Greece; Tac. (Ann. 16.5.3), who makes Rome and the Quinquennial Games of A.D. 65 the setting; A. Braithwaite, C. Suetoni Tranquilli Divus Vespasianus, Oxford, 1927, 30, who argues for both Greece and Rome).

[[9]] Subjugation of Galilee: Joseph. BJ 3.65-4.106; siege of Jerusalem: ibid., 4.366-376, 414.

[[10]] Revolt of Vindex: Suet. Nero 40; Tac. Ann. 14.4; revolt of Galba: Suet. Galba 10; Plut. Galba, 4-5; suicide of Nero: Suet. Nero 49; Cass. Dio 63.29.2. For the most complete account of the period between Nero's death and the accession of Vespasian, see K. Wellesley, The Long Year: A.D. 69, 2nd. ed. (Bristol, 1989).

[[11]] Tac. Hist. 2.76.

[[12]] Troops in support of Vespasian: Suet. Vit. 15; Mucianus and his forces: Tac. Hist. 2.83; Vespasian and grain shipments: Joseph. BJ 4.605 ff.; see also Tac. Hist. 3.48, on Vespasian's possible plan to shut off grain shipments to Italy from Carthage as well.

[[13]] On Vitellius' army and its lack of discipline, see Tac. Hist. 2.93-94; illness of army: ibid., 2.99.1; Cremona: ibid., 3.32-33.

[[14]] On Vitellius' last days, see Tac. Hist. 3.68-81. On the complicated issue of Vitellius' death date, see L. Holzapfel, "Römische Kaiserdaten," Klio 13 (1913): 301.

[[15]] Honors, etc. Tac. Hist. 4.3. For more on the lex de imperio Vespasiani, see P. A. Brunt, "Lex de imperio Vespasiani," JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

[[16]] Omens: Suet. Vesp. 5; consulships and honors: ibid., 8; succession of sons: ibid., 25.

[[17]] On Vespasian's restoration of Rome, see Suet. Vesp. 9; Cass. Dio 65.10; D. Wardel, "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol," Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

[[18]] Suet. Vesp. 16.

[[19]] Ibid.; Tac. Hist. 1.50.

[[20]] Suet. Vesp. 17-19.

[[21]] Ibid., 8-10.

[[22]] On Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see esp. Tac., Agricola, eds. R. M. Ogilvie and I. A. Richmond (1967), and W. S. Hanson, Agricola and the Conquest of the North (1987); on the granting of Latin rights in Spain, see, e.g., J. Gonzalez, "The Lex Irnitana: a New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

[[23]] For this witticism and other anecdotes concerning Vespasian's sense of humor, see Suet. Vesp. 23.

Copyright (C) 1998, John Donahue. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, an Online Encyplopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/vespasia.htm
Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





Cleisthenes
059~4.JPG
75 - Paris, France.11 viewsComptoir d'Escompte de Paris, jeton de présence
Laiton, 38 mm
Réfs : - -
Gabalor
195~3.JPG
75 - Paris, France.9 viewsFourmi du Commerce, Paris, Seine
Zinc nickelé, 21 mm
A/ FOURMI DU COMMERCE - 76 RUE CHARLOT - PARIS // 50 c
R/ REMBOURSABLE ESPECES ET RENTES VIAGERES
Réfs : Elie F100.3
Gabalor
010~4.JPG
75 - Paris, Seine, France9 views25 centimes, aluminium, 23 mm
A/ PRISON St LAZARE
R/ 25
Réfs : Elie P245.4
Gabalor
domitian_domitia_drachme-unpubl.jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN & DOMITIA AE19 of Adramyteion43 viewsobv: AYT DOMITIANOC KAI CEB GEPM[ANIKOC] (laureate head right)
rev: DOMITIA CEB ADR[A] (draped bust right)
ref: RPC 2910 (just two specimens cited)
mint: Adramyteion
4.08gms, 19mm, plated
Very rare

Domitia Longina or simply Domitia married to Domitian in 70 A.D. In 81, Domitian became the new Roman Emperor and Domitia became the new Roman Empress. In 83 she had an affair with an actor called Paris, who was executed for this, and Domitia exiled after the divorce. In 91 Domitian recalled her from exile to Rome as a Roman Empress. Years after Domitian's death, Domitia still referred to herself as an Emperor's wife. She died peacefully about 130 AD. Some coins of her were minted during Domitian's reign.
Adramyttium (Adramyteion) was an ancient city of Mysia at the head of the Gulf of Adramyttium facing the island of Lesbos, and at the base of Mt. Ida.
berserker
RIC_71_Denario_Aureliano.jpg
96-01 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)8 viewsDenario de vellón 18x19 mm, 2.40 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELI-ANVS AVG", busto laureado y vistiendo coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VICTORIA AVG", Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando corona de laureles en mano der. y hoja de Palma en izquierda. "B" = 2da.Off. en campo izquierdo, "VSV" en exergo. Mattingly uno de los autores del RIC lo interpreta como la abreviación de "usualis" lo que marcaría a estas monedas como la norma de unidad monetaria de cuenta, es decir como un denario.

Acuñada: 10ma. Emisión Finales de 274 D.C.
Ceca: Roma 2da.Off.

Referencias: RIC Va #71 (S) P.273, RIC2 Temp #1798, Cohen VI #250 P.203, Sear Vol.III #11640 P.432, CBN #185, MIR #135f, BNC Paris #71
mdelvalle
RIC_73_Denario_Aureliano.jpg
96-02 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)10 viewsDenario de vellón 19 mm, 2.70 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELI-ANVS AVG", busto laureado y vistiendo coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VICTORIA AVG", Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando corona de laureles en mano der. y hoja de Palma en izquierda. "Γ" = 2da.Off. en exergo.

Acuñada: 11ava. Emisión inicio a sep. de 275 D.C.
Ceca: Roma 3ra.Off.

Referencias: RIC Va #73 (C) P.273, RIC2 Temp #1856, Cohen VI #256 P.203, Sear RCTV III #11643 P.432, CBN #240,259,265,283, MIR #139f, Hunter p.cix, BNC Paris #265
mdelvalle
RIC_64_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-03 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)6 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 4.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ORIENS AVG" - Sol radiado y desnudo, su manto sobre hombro izquierdo, avanzando hacia derecha y portando una rama de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un arco en la izquierda, pisa con su pié izquierdo un cautivo que levanta su mano. "XXIR" en exergo y "Γ" en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 11ava.Emisión Inicio - sep. 275 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off. 3ra.)

Referencias: RIC Va #64 (C) P.272, RIC2 Temp #1817, Sear RCTV '88 #3262, Sear RCTV III #11569 P.425, Cohen VI #159 P.192, DVM #18 P.257, Göbl#130 f1 - La Venera 1167/1203, CBN #188/217, BNC Paris #192/4
mdelvalle
RIC_260_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-05 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha. En el pecho del Emperador, sobre su coraza puede verse claramente grabada a SOL (corona radiada, conduciendo la cuadriga con la mano izquierda y levantando la izquierda). Existe 1 ejemplar http://www.ric.mom.fr/en/coinview/2620/-1942304456?q=Aurelianus+antoniniani+IOVI+CONSER+Serdica&page=2&mod=result&x=0&y=0&hpp=50&from=quick&ancre=type-specimen.
Rev: "IOVI CON-SER", Emperador laureado y con vestimenta militar a la izquierda, vuelto a la derecha, portando un cetro en mano derecha extiende la izquierda para recibir un Globo que le presenta Júpiter, desnudo, con su manto cayendo desde su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en la mano izquierda. "S" en exergo.

Acuñada 4ta. Emision (Finales del 273 al principio del 274 D.C.)
Ceca: Serdica (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: RIC Va #260 (C) P.279, Sear2 Temp.#2620, Sear RCTV III #11542 P.423, Sear RCTV '88 #3260, Cohen VI #105 P.187, DVM #12 P.257, CBN #1005, MIR #243m, BNC Paris p.395, Göbl #243m, La Venera 9867
mdelvalle
RIC_120_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-11 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" – Emperador laureado y con toga de pié a derecha, le da su mano a Concordia/Severina vestida de pié a izquierda. "S" en exergo.

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión Otoño 271 – Otoño 272 D.C.
Ceca: Milan (Off. 2ra.)

Referencias: RIC Va #120 (C) P.278, Sear RCTV III #11522 P.421, Sear RCTV '88 #3265, Cohen VI #61 P.183, DVM #7 P.257, CBN #455, MIR#48, Hunter #39, Göbl#60 c2, La Venera 2426/2623, BNC Paris #455/462
mdelvalle
RIC_232_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-17 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, acoraz. y vestido con paludamentum, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[PA]X AVGVST[I]" – Emperador laureado y con toga de pié a derecha, le da su mano a Concordia/Severina vestida de pié a izquierda. "*" en campo izquierdo y "T" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 4ta. Emisión Otoño 271 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off. 3ra.) - Sisak Croacia.

Referencias: RIC Va #232 (C) P.290, Sear RCTV III #11581 P.426, Sear RCTV '88 #3265, Cohen Vol.VI #169 P.193, Göbl#190 c4, CBN #849, MIR #216/7, Hunter p.cxiii, La Venera 6359/62, BNC Paris #754
mdelvalle
RIC_244_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-19 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)5 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" – Emperador laureado y con toga de pié a derecha, le da su mano a Concordia/Severina vestida de pié a izquierda. "·" en campo centro y "XXIVI" en exergo.

Acuñada 9na. Emisión Fase 1 Otoño 274 a Primavera 275 D.C.
Ceca: Siscia (Off. 6ta.) - Sisak Croacia.

Referencias: RIC Va #244 (C) P.292, RIC2 Temp.#2389, Sear RCTV III #11523 P.421, Sear RCTV '88 #3265, Cohen VI #60 P.182/3, DVM #7 P.257, Göbl#229 c6, La Venera 8623/54, BNC Paris #926, Hunter #89, CBN #926, MIR #229
mdelvalle
RIC_345_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-22 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)8 viewsAE Antoniniano 23 x 20 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GENIVS EXERCITI" – Genio desnudo, vistiendo Modius en la cabeza, de pié a izquierda, portando una Patera en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y una cornucopia en izquierda. Detrás de Él un estandarte militar .

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión Fin 271 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (1ra.Off) - Balkiz Turquía.

Referencias: RIC Va #345 P.304, RIC2 Temp.#2923, Sear RCTV III #11540 P.423, Cohen VI #100 P.186, CBN #1113, MIR #315, Hunter #121corr., Göbl#315 a0, La Venera 10080/90, BNC Paris #1115/31
mdelvalle
RIC_342_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-25 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)7 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIA[NVS AVG]" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[CO]NCORD MILIT" – Emperador laureado y con vestimenta militar a la izquierda, vuelto a la derecha, portando un cetro en mano derecha extiende la izquierda para recibir un Globo que le presenta Júpiter, desnudo, con su manto cayendo desde su hombro izquierdo y portando un largo cetro vertical en la mano izquierda. "*C*" en exergo..

Acuñada 2do. Período, 5ta.Emisión Temprano-verano 272 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (2da.Off) - Balkiz Turquía.

Referencias: RIC Va #342 (S) P.303, Sear RCTV III #11514 P.420, Cohen VI #23 Pag.182/3, DVM #7 P.257, Göbl#322 ac, CBN #1157, MIR #322, La Venera #10168/207, BNCParis #1157/9
mdelvalle
RIC_352_Doble_Antoniniano_Aureliano.jpg
96-26 - AURELIANO (270 - 275 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 21 x 24 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado y con coraza, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SAECVLI FELICITAS" - Emperador laureado con vestimenta militar, de pié de frente viendo a derecha, portando una lanza transversal en mano derecha y globo en la mano del brazo izquierdo extendido.

Acuñada 3ra. Emisión Fin 271 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus - Balkiz Turquía.

Referencias: RIC Va #352 (C) P.305, RIC2 Temp.#2925, Sear RCTV III #11605 P.429, Cohen VI #223 P.200, Göbl#316 a0, CBN #1137, Hunter p.cxvii, La Venera. 10093/105, BNC Paris #1137/49, Normanby #1284
mdelvalle
Fanam_vs_Multiple_Dirham.jpg
A size comparison of a Fanam with a Multiple Dirham27 views1 commentsQuant.Geek
RIC_116_Doble_Antoniniano_Floriano_1.jpg
A100-01 - FLORIANO (Abril - Jul. 276 D.C.)11 viewsAE Antoniniano 22 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP FLORIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Victoria de pié a derecha, portando una hoja de palma en mano izquierda, ofrenda, con la mano del brazo derecho extendido, una corona al Emperador con vestimentas militares, de pié a izquierda y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "P" en exergo.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Jul./Ago. 276 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off.1ra.) - Balkiz Turquía.

Referencias: RIC Va #116 (S) P.360, RIC2 Temp.#4526, Sear RCTV III #11853 P.458, Cohen VI #15 P.16/7, DVM #6 P.260, BNC Paris #1979 #1977/8, CBN #1979, Hunter #20
mdelvalle
RIC_116_Doble_Antoniniano_Floriano.jpg
A100-02 - FLORIANO (Abril - Jul. 276 D.C.)9 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP FLORIANVS AVG" - Busto radiado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA MILITVM" - Victoria de pié a derecha, portando una hoja de palma en mano izquierda, ofrenda, con la mano del brazo derecho extendido, una corona al Emperador con vestimentas militares, de pié a izquierda y portando un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "S" en exergo.

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión Jul./Ago. 276 D.C.
Ceca: Cyzicus (Off.2da.) - Balkiz Turquía.

Referencias: RIC Va #116 (S) P.360, RIC2 Temp.#4529, Sear RCTV III #11853 P.458, Cohen VI #15 P.16/7, DVM #6 P.260, La Venera. 2936/9, BNC Paris #1979 #1977/81, CBN #1979, Hunter #20
mdelvalle
Aelius.jpg
Aelius147 viewsBust of Aelius in the Louvre Museum, Paris. Photo by me taken in May 2014.Masis
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa136 viewsBust of Agrippa, on show at the "Moi, Auguste" exhibition in the Grand Palais, Paris in 2014. Photo by me, taken in May 2014Masis
5125_(1)_5126_(1).jpg
Aigiai, Cilicia, Dichalkon, AIΓΕΑΙΩΝ12 viewsAE Unit
Aigeai, Cilicia
160 - 120BC
21.5 x 20.5mm 5.90gr
O: NO LEGEND; Turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche, right.
R: AIΓΕΑΙΩΝ; Horse's head, left.
Exergue: Monogram (ATΔ), right field.
Mionnet III, 8; Paris 54; Bloesch 32-37; SNG Von Aulock 5442.
davidr814 122614119597
8/5/17 8/9/17
Featured on Wildwinds 8/10/17
Nicholas Z
alexanderx.jpg
Alexander the Great46 viewsObv: Head of beardless Herakles, right, wearing lion skin headdress.
Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ in exergue; Charioteer in Biga right, Trident below.
"Alexandria (Antigoneia)" mint, struck c.310-301 BC. Extremely rare!

Attribution to this mint has been questioned of late (Meadows, NC 2004),
although no firmer alternative has yet been put forward. A mint in the Troad
seems to be likely, given that three were found in the excavations at Troy.

This is an extremely desirable and very difficult to find item. It appears that
there are none on any of the modern sales databases, and I know of only
one other that has been offered via a 'small seller' on an online auction site.

There is one in the British museum, at least one in Berlin (I-B), one in
the Portolos collection (Athens); another in Paris (B 80); the three that
were found at Troy, the one offered online, and now this one.
Please feel free to let me know of any other known specimens.

Among the rarest bronzes of the series.
Price 1587; Gaebler p.169, 7 pl.XXXI,26;
Bellinger Troy A1; BM 1921,0213.196.
(dealer's image {edited})
OldMoney
Amblada.jpg
Amblada, Pisidia 100-25 B.C.20 viewsAmblada (BC 100-25) Ae 12.5~13.6mm. 1.89g. ca 1st cent B.C. Late autonomous. Obv: Bearded head of Herakles right. Rev: ΑΜ-ΛΑ/ΔΕ-ΩΝ around club. Aulock, Pisidien I Nr. 120f. SNG BN Paris 1036.
A´MBLADA (Asar-Dagh in N. Pisidia) a city of Pisidia, which near the boundaries of Phrygia and Caria. It produced wine that was used for medicinal purposes. The site is unknown.
ddwau
Antinous.jpg
Antinous148 viewsBust of Antinous, as a Pharoah. In the Louvre Museum, Paris. Photo taken by me in May 2014.
His appearance is more like Hadrian's.
Masis
Antiochus_IV~6.jpg
Antiochus IV 175-163 B.C.9 viewsAntiochus IV Theos Epiphanes 175-163 B.C. Quasi-municipal issue (c. 168 - 164 B.C.), Alexandria by Issus (Alexandretta, modern Iskenderun), Ae 19.5~19.9mm. 8.11g. Obv: Diademed head of Antiochus IV, right, in tondo of Macedonian shield, one diadem end flying up behind and the other falling forward over shoulder. Rev: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΕΩΝ on right, Zeus, standing facing, head left, holding wreath in outstretched hand. Controls: outer left. Ref: Seleucid Coins 1392; CSE 2, 328; SNG Paris 2405; Babelon 651.ddwau
AntoSe92.jpg
Antoninus Caesar, RIC (Hadrian) 1081, sestertius of AD 138 (Concordia)108 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.81g, Ø 32mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck under Hadrian in AD 138.
Obv.: IMP T AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus facing right.
Rev.: TRIB POT COS (around) CONCORD (in ex.) S C (in field), Concordia seated left and holding a patera; cornucopiae under her seat.
RIC (Hadrian) 1081 var. (draped bust); Cohen 131 (4 fr.); Strack (Hadrian) 898 (2 collections); BMC (Hadrian) p.550 *; Banti 53 (one single specimen - coll. Paris - without plate); RCV 4156

Numismatic note: Even though RIC rates this type as scarce only, in reality it is extremely rare: BMC only refers to C.131 (Paris), there is no specimen in B.M.); Strack lists this type in only 2 of the 30 collections, questioning one: Berlin (?; bare head); the other specimen is in Paris (draped bust, bare head; illustrated in Vol.II, plate XVII-898: same rev. die). This means that, apart from Strack's questionable Berlin specimen, all references refer to a single specimen in the Paris Cabinet des Médailles. See also Strack Vol.III, p. 316, note 6a, referring to Cohen 637 (RIC Hadr. 1078), which is probably a duplicate of Coh. 131, but without the CONCORD legend visible in exergue (exactly as on this specimen). A special variety exists with Spes figurine on back of throne, noted by Strack in his description: "Concordia s.n.l. (Spes.Füllh.) m. Schale" but not illustrated. However such a specimen now in coll. F. Diederik.

Historical note: After Aelius, the intended successor of Hadrian, suddenly died on New Year's day of AD 138, Hadrian adopted T. Aurelius Antoninus to fill the place. This coin belongs to one of the issues struck between 25 February and the death of Hadrian on 10 July 138 AD which announces the new Caesar.
1 commentsCharles S
AntoAs21.jpg
Antoninus Caesar, RIC (Hadrian) 1086, As of AD 138 (Concordia) 45 viewsÆ As (9.4g, Ø26mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck under Hadrian between 25 February and 10 July, 138 AD.
Obv.: IMP T AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS, bare draped bust of Antoninus facing right.
Rev.: CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM (around) TR P COS (in ex.) S C (in field), Concordia standing left holding eagle and signum.
RIC (Hadrian) 1086 var. (bare hd.); Cohen 144 var. (idem); BMCRE (Hadrian) p.551 * (note) ; Strack (Hadrian) 897 var. (1 coll., bare hd.)
ex Silenos Coins (2001)

Extremely rare: all references refer to a single specimen in the Paris Cabinet des Médailles (illustrated in Strack, Vol.II, plate XVII, 897). That specimen is bare hd. and from different die pair. Wildwinds lists a specimen with draped bust from the same obv. die.
1 commentsCharles S
AntoAs26.jpg
Antoninus Caesar, RIC (Hadrian) 1088, As of AD 138 (Clasped hands) 59 viewsÆ As (10.2g, Ø27mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck under Hadrian during Feb.25th-July 10th, 138 AD.
Obv.: IMP T AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus facing right.
Rev.: TRIB POT COS (around ) S C (in field), clasped hands, caduceus with two corn ears behind.
RIC (Hadrian) 1088a (S); Cohen 1066; BMC (Hadrian) 1948; Strack (Hadrian) 906 (3 coll.: Berlin, Paris, and Vienna)
ex G. Henzen (2004)
Charles S
AntoSeb6-2.jpg
Antoninus Caesar, RIC (Hadrian) 1093, sestertius of AD 138 (Pietas)72 viewsÆ Sestertius (29.2g, Ø 30mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck under Hadrian between 25 February and 10 July 138 AD.
Obv.: IMP T AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus facing right.
Rev.: TRIB POT COS DES II (around) PIETAS (in ex.) S C (in field), Pietas standing left holding right hand above lighted altar and perfume box in left hand.
RIC (Hadrian) 1093 (scarce); Cohen 612; BMCRE III (Hadrian) 1950; Strack (Hadrian) 907 (4 collections); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 279 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4203 var.
ex G.Henzen (Netherlands, 2010)

Numismatic note: Rare. Strack found this type in 4 collections (of the 30 studied): Berlin, B.M., Paris, and Naples.

Historical note: This was the first issue of Pius in 138, issued under Hadrian between February 25th and July 10th. Pietas is invoked to celebrate the adoption of Antoninus by his newly adoptive father Hadrian.
Charles S
AntoSe81-2.jpg
Antoninus Caesar, RIC (Hadrian) 1093, sestertius of AD 138 (Pietas)77 viewsÆ Sestertius (29.2g, Ø 30mm, 6h), Rome mint, first issue of Antoninus struck under Hadrian between 25 February and 10 July 138 AD.
Obv.: IMP T AELIVS CAESAR ANTONINVS, bare head of Antoninus facing right.
Rev.: TRIB POT COS DES II (around) PIETA / S C (in two lines across field), Pietas standing left holding right hand above lighted altar and perfume box in left hand.
RIC (Hadrian) 1093; Cohen 610; BMCRE III (Hadrian) 1951; Strack (Hadrian) 908; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 280 (1 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4203
ex Ancient Resource (Glendale, CA, 2008).

Numismatic note: Very rare: Strack lists only two collections for this type: B.M. and Paris; Banti only one: B.M.

Historical note: This was the first issue of Pius in 138, issued under Hadrian between February 25th and July 10th. Pietas is invoked to celebrate the adoption of Antoninus by his newly adoptive father Hadrian.
Charles S
Antoninus_Pius_Coela_Prow.JPG
Antoninus Pius Coela Prow53 viewsAntoninus Pius, Thracian Chersonesus Coela, 138 - 164, 18mm, 5.1g,
OBV: IMP CAES ANTONINVS ?, Laureate bust right
OBV: AILI MVNICIPI CVELANI, prow left, above, two ears of corn

SNG Copenhagen 872, Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale 1611
Munich, Staatliche Münzsammlung 63177
Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum 37030

RARE
Romanorvm
Antoninus_Pius_Griffin_Paw_on_Wheel~0.JPG
Antoninus pius Griffin Paw on Wheel49 viewsBithynia, Nicaea, 138 - 161 AD, 16mm, 3.7g
OBV: AYTO KAISER ANTWNEINO, Bust right within wreath
REV: NEIKAIEWN, Gryphon Paw on Wheel
WADD RG S413,115(1) / COLL PARIS(1)
SLG Lindgren I 136(2)
Same dies as the Lindgren Specimen

VERY SCARCE
1 commentsRomanorvm
Antoninus_Pius_Temple_of_Perga.JPG
Antoninus Pius Temple of Perga75 viewsANTONINUS PIUS, 138 - 161 AD, AE32, Perga, Pamphylia, 24.4g,
OBV: KAI ADRIA ANTWNEINOS, Laureate head right.
REV: ARTEMODOS PERGAIAS, Distyle temple, with fluted Ionic columns, with eagle in pediment,
containing simulacrum of Pergean Artemis; on either side of which, sphinx on pedestal.
Not in BMC, nor von Aulock.
SNG FRANCE 3, 0406(1) / COLL PARIS 317A(1)

Extremely Rare
5 commentsRomanorvm
antoninus_pius_syria.jpg
Antoninus Pius, AE 22 of Hieropolis, Syria.16 viewsAntoninus Pius, AE 22of Hieropolis, Syria
Obverse: AYTO KAI TIT AIΛ AΔΡI ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: ΘEAC CYΡI-AC IEΡOΠO and B in three lines within wreath.
BMC 13; Paris 1670 ; Butcher 15.
21.9 mm., 9.0 g
1 commentsNORMAN K
ANTOSEi7-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 542, Sestertius of AD 139 (Liberalitas)86 viewsÆ Sestertius (25,57g, Ø 33mm, 11h). Rome, AD 139.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right.
Rev.: TR POT COS II around, LIBERALITAS / [AVG] in ex., S | C, Antoninus seated left on platform on the right; before him man seated left, distributing to citizen right, mounting steps of platform; beside him, official standing, holding counting board.
RIC 542 (R2) (but hd. laureate, not bare); BMC 1143 variant of rev. (note); Cohen 482 (50 fr.) (var.: head laureate, not bare; Cohen reading PM in error in obv. legend); Strack 816; Banti 204 (1 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 124:4b
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015

Issued on the occasion of the first largesse of Antoninus Pius at his accession.
5 commentsCharles S
AntoDu06-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 553, Dupondius of AD 13935 viewsÆ Dupondius (12.6g, Ø27mm, 6h), minted AD 139, Rome
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, radiate head of Antoninus Pius right
Rev.: TR POT COS II around, S C in field, Fides, draped, standing right, holding two cornears downwards and plate of fruit on raised l. hand.
RIC 553; Cohen 847; BMC 1164; Strack 804 (3 collections: Berlin, Paris, Vienna).
ex WCNC (2001)
Charles S
ANTOSef4-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 576, Sestertius of AD 139 (crown series - Africa)28 viewsÆ Sestertius (26,92g, Ø 33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 139.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P, laureate head right.
Rev.: AFRICA around, COS II in ex., S C in field, Africa wearing elephant headdress, standing left, holding wreath and cornucopiae, scorpion at her feet.
RIC 576 (*) var. (rev. Africa holding 'basket' instead of wreath); BMCRE 1175 var. (no scorpion on reverse); Cohen 21 (*) (15 fr); Strack 772 (4 collections); Banti 12 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values) 4145 var.
Ex Almanumis (Gérard Krebs, Nîmes, France) (2015)

Part of a series celebrating Antoninus' remission of half of the special tax (aurum coronarium) normally levied on the provinces at the time of the accession of an emperor.
________________________________
(*) the term "lion's head" and "tête de lion" in the description of the reverse in RIC 576 and Cohen 21 respectively is based on a misinterpretation of the reverse representation of the Paris specimen by Cohen and should be changed to "scorpion". It is correct in Strack 771.
Charles S
AntoSec7.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 600, Sestertius of AD 142 (Concordia Exercituum) 90 viewsÆ Sestertius (30.1g, Ø32.5mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 142.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: CONCORDIA EXERCITVVM (around) S C (in field), Concordia standing left, holding Victory and a legionary standard.
RIC 600; Cohen 139 (6 fr.); BMC 1232; Strack 827 (3 coll.); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 54 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & their Values II) 4157
ex G.Henzen (2012)

Although RIC 600 rates it as "C" (common), in reality it is very rare: Strack 827 lists it for 3 (of a total of 30) collections only: British Museum, Paris, and Vienna; Banti cites two specimens only.
2 commentsCharles S
Antose96.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 608, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Juno Sospita)54 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.89g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE (around edge) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (Scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248; Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex iNumis, Paris, March 2009

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
AntoSee1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 615a, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Aeneas) 114 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.15g, Ø33mm, 11h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-44.
Obv/ ANTONINVS · AVGVSTVS PIVS, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right, aegis on left shoulder.
Rev/ P P TR P COS III (in field) [S C (in ex.)], Aeneas wearing a short tunic and cloak, advancing right, looking back, carrying Anchises on his shoulder and holding Ascanius by the hand. Anchises (veiled and draped) carries a box in left hand, Ascanius wears a short tunic and Phrygian cap and caries a pedum (shepherd's crook) in left hand.
RIC 615a (R2), BMCRE 1264, Cohen 655 (80 Fr.), Strack 904 (3 specimens found); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 309 (same obv. and rev. dies, 3 specimens found).
ex Numphil (Paris, june 2014 auction)

This type is part of a series figuring scenes from ancient Roman legends. The scene depicts Aeneas leaving Troy with his son Ascanius and his father Anchises. According to the legend, Aeneas, son of Venus and the Trojan Anchises, fled by boat with some inhabitants of Troy as it fell to the Greeks, taking the Palladium - the ancient sacred statue of Athena - and eventually made their way west to resettle in Italy. They intermarried with the local inhabitants and founded the town of Lavinium, and became the nucleus of the future Roman people. One of the descendants of Aeneas'son Ascianus was Rhea Silvia, the mother of the twins Romulus and Remus.

Numismatic note: This issue has been struck from a single obverse die with the unique obverse legend "ANTONINVS AVGVSTVS PIVS" found nowhere else in the coinage of Antoninus Pius. This obverse die was used exclusively with two reverse dies with slightly different legends: the one in the photo above, and a similar one with the legend "P P TR POT COS III". The use of the aegis on the bust is not exclusive for this issue, but very rare for Antoninus Pius.
2 commentsCharles S
ANTOSEf5-1.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 651(b), Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus & Roma)43 viewsÆ Sestertius (25,45g, Ø 30mm, 7h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate draped bust right.
Rev.: VENERI FELICI around, S C in ex., Decastyle temple with statues on roof and pediment; pellet between columns in the centre.
RIC 651(b); Cohen 1075 (4 fr.); Strack 864); Banti 504 (Paris spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
Ex Roma Numismatics E-Sale 17 (April 2015).
2 commentsCharles S
AntoSed2-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 652, Sestertius of AD 141-143 (Temple of Venus and Roma)25 viewsÆ sestertius (24.06g, 33, 12h). Rome mint struck AD 141-143.
ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
VENERI FELICI (around) S C (in ex.) decastyle temple on podium of four steps; statue of seated figure (Venus) in center space between columns; in pediment three standing figures in the center flanked by reclining figures; on roof, seated figure in the center flanked by two smaller kneeling figures; on angles, Victories standing front, holding wreaths in both hands.
RIC 652 (rare); Cohen 1074 (12 fr.); BMCRE 1324 var. (no statue between columns); Strack III 865 (listed in 3 collections: Berlin, Paris, Vienna; plate X 864: same obv. & rev. dies); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 507 (3 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4257; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 125:23
ex Nomisma auction 46 (2012)

This commemorates the completion in AD 141 of the celebrated double-temple of Venus and Roma designed by Hadrian and begun two decades before. The two sanctuaries were placed back to back and the complex formed the largest temple in Rome. A parallel issue depicts the other element of the structure, the temple of Roma.
Charles S
ANTOAS31.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 733, As of AD 143-144 (Great Sow)63 viewsÆ As (8.87g, Ø24.5mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck 143-144 AD.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right.
Rev.: IMPERATOR II (around) S C (in ex.), Great Sow, seated right under oak suckling her young; in front, two more.
RIC 733; BMC 1624; Cohen 450; 942
ex iNumis, Paris

This issue belongs to a series minted in preparation of the 900th anniversary, on April 21st, AD 147, of the founding of Rome. This series depict scenes from ancient Roman legends.
2 commentsCharles S
Antoninus_Pius_She_Wolf_Boat_2~0.JPG
Antoninus She Wolf Boat26 viewsANTONINUS PIUS, 138-161 AD. Æ As, 10.84, 25mm
Minted 143-144 AD.
OBV: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate head right
REV: IMPERATOR II S-C, wolf suckling twins, boat in ex. Cohen 448.
RIC.734, Cohen 448.
This reverse type comes in two variants, with the she-wolf either looking straight ahead, or turning her head back to look at the twins, as on this coin. This second variant is definitely the scarcer of the two: not represented in our Forvms photofile, nor in CoinArchives according to my (Curtis Clay) perhaps inadequate search. Strack 945 lists five museum specimens and one in an auction catalogue, apparently all that he knew, meaning that this variant is missing from the rich collections in Paris and Vienna.
Romanorvm
Apollo_Saurocton_Louvre.jpg
Apollo Sauroktonos43 viewsThe statue of Apollo Sauroktonos (the Lizard Killer) was a work of Praxiteles. The original is lost, but several Roman copies have been found. This one stands in the Louvre/Paris. Nikopolis ad Istrum will have had a copy too. Therefore it was depicted on many of its coins.
Jochen
Argolis,_Hermione,_AR_Triobol_.jpg
Argolis, Hermione, ca. 360-320/10 BC, AR Triobol 27 viewsWreathed head of Demeter Chthonia left.
EP monogram within wreath.

HGC 5, 745 (R2); Grandjean, Monnayage group I, emission 1A, D1/R2 (this coin cited = Coll. N. Davis169 (= Coll. Jameson 1259)); BCD Peloponnesos 1288 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 136; Jameson 1259 (this coin); Dewing 1932 (same dies).

(15 mm, 2.84 g, 11h)
Classical Numismatic Group Mail Bid Auction 79, 17 September 2008, 295; ex- BCD Collection (not in LHS sale); ex- 'Continental' collection: Classical Numismatic Group XXIV, 9 December 1992, 255; ex- N. DAvis Collection; ex- Jameson Collection.

This triobol is the coin catalogued by Grandjean as D1/R2 Coll. N. Davis 169 (= Coll. Jameson 1259). It passed into the BCD Collection via CNG XXIV (1992) after the publication of Granjean's work in 1990. The Jameson collection was auctioned in Paris in the years 1913-1932.
1 commentsn.igma
dagon.jpg
Ashdod; Lion/ Dagon27 viewsPhilistia; Gaza, Ashdod (in modern Israel), late 5th - early 4th century BC, Stater, 10,0 g, 21 mm, Lion walking right on ground / Fish god Dagon left with trident and wreath (Traité 1028, pl.CXXIII, 7, Phoenicia; BMC Phoenicia (uncertain), pl.XLV, 1; SNG Paris 421, Myriandros).2 commentsPodiceps
Antoninus_Pius_1.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Tarsus, Antoninus Pius23 viewsAntoninus Pius
Kilikia, Tarsus
Ae32
Obv.: laureate bust right, wearing cuirass and paludamentum,
[.... ]Σ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟΣ ΣΕ
Rev.: ΚΟΙΝΟΣ ΚΙΛΙΚΙΑΣ on architrave, [ΑΔΡΙΑΝΩΝ ΤΑΡ]ΣΕΩΝ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛ[ΕΩΣ], temple with ten columns, eagle in pediment
Ae, 22.7g, 32mm
Ref.: Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale 1232
1 commentsshanxi
Salonina_2.jpg
Asia Minor, Kilikia, Tarsus, Salonina25 viewsSalonina
Tarsus, Kilikia
AE 28
Obv.: ΚΟΡΝΗΛΙΑΝ CAΛΩΝΙΝΑΝ, diademed and draped bust right, set on crescent
Rev.: ΤΑPCΟV ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩC, Α [Μ] Κ – Γ/Γ, Artemis Phosphoros advancing left.
AE, 28.36mm, 11.70g
Ref.: SNG BN Paris 1836 var.
1 commentsshanxi
DSC05487.JPG
Asia Minor, Kyzikos, Mysia120 viewsObol (Silver, 0.83 g 9mm), c. 475. Forepart of boar to left with on shoulder; behind, tunny fish. Rev. Lion´s head with open jaws to left. SNG Paris 378. SNG von Aulock 7333. Von Fritze 11.

Sold at Baltimore Coin Show - 3/26/09
2 commentsCGPCGP
Pergamon_49.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Athena, bull, owl 9 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE18, 3rd century BC
Obv: Helmeted head of Athena left.
Rev: ΠΕΡΓA, Head and neck of bull left, owl right, without monogram
AE, 4.23g, 17mm
SNG von Aulock 1352; SNG Paris 1574
shanxi
Pergamon_19.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, cista mystica, serpents 37 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Cistophoric Tetradrachm, c. 85-76 BC
Obv.: Serpent emerging from cista mystica with raised lid, all within ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev.: Bow case between two coiled serpents; to left, monogram of Pergamon; above, AΠ, monogram and star; to right, thyrsos.
Ag, 28.46mm, 12g
Ref.: SNG Paris 1726. SNG von Aulock 1369
1 commentsshanxi
G_359_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, cista mystica, serpents, ΔI, thyrsos 9 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Cistophoric Tetradrachm
Obv.: Serpent emerging from cista mystica with raised lid, all within ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev.: Two snakes coiled around a bow case; between the snake heads, ΔI; to left, monogram of ΠΕΡΓ; to right, thyrsos entwined by a serpent.
Ag, 28mm, 12.54g, 1h
Ref.: Kleiner 12, SNG Paris 1734.
Ex Leu Numismatik, Webauktion 8, Lot 317
shanxi
Pergamon_45.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Herakles, Athena11 viewsMysia, Pergamon
Diobol, 330-284 BC
Obv.: head of Herakles right, clad in lion's skin
Rev.: ΠEΡΓAM, cult statue of Athena standing facing, holding spear and shield
Ag, 1.27g, 11mm
Ref.: SNG Paris 1558
Ex Solidus Numsimatik, auction11, Lot 100
shanxi
FAC_G_378_Pergamon.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Nike, Athena, Pergamos magistrate1 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE20, Mid-late 2nd century BC
Pergamos, magistrate
Obv.: EΠI ΠEPΓAMOY Head of Athena to right, wearing crested Attic helmet decorated with a star on the bowl.
Rev.: ΠEPΓAMHNΩN Nike standing right, holding wreath in her right hand and palm frond over her left shoulder.
AE, 5.45g, 20mm, 1h
Ref.: SNG Paris 1790-1793
Ex Leu Numismatik, Web Auction 8: Lot 315
shanxi
G_349_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Pergamon, Owl, Athena, club, B8 viewsMysia, Pergamon
AE16, 200-133 BC
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing Attic helmet with star
Rev.: Owl with spread wings standing on palm, ΑΘΗΝΑΣ ΝΙΚΗΦΟΡΟΥ above and below, club and B left and right
AE, 2.58g, 16mm
Ref.: SNG France, 5. Mysie Paris, 2001, n° 1929
shanxi
Aspendos_Pamphylia_Greek_Wrestlers.jpg
Aspendos Pamphylia Greek Wrestlers70 viewsPamphylia, Aspendos mint, silver stater, 370 - 333 BC, 10.383g, 22.5mm, die axis 0o, SNG Cop 233, SNG Paris 87, SNG Von Aulock -, SGCV II 5398 var
OBV: Two wrestlers, the left one holds the wrist of his opponent with his right and right forearm with his left hand, ∆Α between their legs
REV: ΕΣΤΦΕ∆ΙΙΥΣ on left, slinger, wearing short chiton, discharging sling to right, triskeles on right with feet clockwise, no trace of incuse square

In 333 B.C., after Alexander took Perga peacefully, Aspendos sent envoys to offer surrender if he would not take the taxes and horses formerly paid as tribute to the Persian king.
Agreeing, Alexander went on to Side, leaving a garrison behind. When he learned they had failed to ratify the agreement their own evnvoys had proposed, Alexander marched to the city.
The Aspendians retreated to their acropolis and again sent envoys to sue for peace. This time, however, they had to agree to harsh terms -
they would host a Macedonian garrison and pay 100 gold talents and 4.000 horses annually.

EX: Forvm Ancient Coins
4 commentsRomanorvm
Aspendos_stater_sm.jpg
Aspendos stater85 viewsca. 380/75-330/25 BC
21mm, 10.78 g, 12h
obv: wo wrestlers grappling; AΦ between
rev: Slinger in throwing stance right; triskeles to right; all within pelleted square border
SNG Paris 83 (Tekin Series 4)
2 commentsareich
coin136.jpg
Aurelian AE Antoninianus. Siscia, 274-275 AD. 12 viewsAurelian AE Antoninianus. Siscia, 274-275 AD.
IMP C AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate cuirassed bust right
Emperor standing l, receiving globe from Sol standing l,
placing foot on seated captive, also appears at Serdica
with PXXI in exergue and legend ORIENS AVG, Paris
cat. pl. 83, 220. This rev. type appears to be quite rare.
Coin #136
cars100
714559.jpg
Aurelian Antoninianus - Finest known of type7 viewsAurelian, 270-275, Antoninianus
Siscia mint, struck c. November 270.
Obv: IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Aurelian to right.
Rev. GENIVS ILLVR / T (outer, lower-right field), Genius standing, head to left, holding patera and cornucopiae, standard to right.
As RIC 223; BNC 715; RIC V online 2020 (5 recorded therein).
Same dies as the Paris and Vienna specimens, this being the best preserved of the three.
OldMoney
Rare Aurelian.JPG
Aurelian- Göbl 115d461 viewsAE Antoninianus, Rome Mint, 170-175 AD
Obverse: IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, Cuirassed bust left with shield and spear.
Reverse: ORIENS AVG, Sol standing right, 1 hand raised other holds globe. Figure? reclining left.
Q in exergue
Göbl 115d4
23mm, 3.4gm

Notes From Curtis Clay:
Göbl 115d4, pl. 65, "Rome, Issue 3", citing and illustrating one specimen only, from a 1990 Jacquier list, apparently same obv. die but diff. rev. die from yours.
Estiot, Paris catalogue, p. 292, "Rome, Issue 5, Fall 273", citing TWO specimens from Jacquier, illustrating one of them, pl. 73, 17, different from Göbl's, again same obv. die as yours but a third, different, rev. die.
Estiot describes the type as simply Sol standing by reclining captive.
your coin would appear to be the third recorded specimen of this exact variety.

1 commentsJerome Holderman
mazaios~0.jpg
Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap Mazaios266 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
4 commentsJason T
BCC_LW8_anchor_and_LW9_pellets.jpg
BCC LW8 and LW9 20 viewsLead Weights from Caesarea Maritima
Uncertain date and type - Roman - Early Byzantine?
A size comparison of two weights of very similar design. The small one (LW8) is 4.16gm.
The larger one (LW9) is 12.79gm. A specimen identical to LW9, possibly from the same
mold, was published by Lionel Holland with a weight of 14.4gm. WWOCM (2009) #176.
v-drome
nikaia_commodus_RecGen274.jpg
Bithynia, Nikaia, Commodus, Rec. Gen. 27424 viewsCommodus, AD 177-192
AE 17, 3.71g, 16.93mm, 210°
obv. AV.L.KOMODOC - ANTWNINOC
laureate head r.
rev. QHCE - A - NIKAIEIC
unbearded head of Theseus r., clad in lion's-skalp knotted under chin.
ref. Rec. Gen. I/3, 274, pl. LXXIV, 12; RPC IV online temp. no. 6026 (Paris Bibliotheque Nationale no. 930); not in Weise
rare, about VF, dark green patina, slightly excentric

Coins with Theseus are generally rare. Here Theseus is depicted as Athenian Herakles. For more information take a look at the article in the thread "Mythological Interesting Coins", coming soon
1 commentsJochen
0123-Consul_20Fs.jpg
Bonaparte I° Consul - 20 francs or An 12 A45 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL, tête nue a gauche
REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, couronne de lauriers entourant 20 FRANCS en deux lignes. A l'exergue . coq . AN 12. . A .
Tranche inscrite DIEU PROTEGE LA FRANCE
6.44 gr
Ref : Le Franc VIII # 510/2
The revolution has ended, Bonaparte is soon becoming Napoleon I Empereur, as Octavian became Augustus (note the similarities on this portrait with those of Augustus on the "bull butting" denarii), but still unsure of what is going on. We see many contradictory messages for a laïque republic : a consul on obverse, a republic on reverse, a revolutionary calendar (An 12) and ... God save France on the edge...
Now you know why you find french people so romantic...
11-249
Potator II
Bramsen 0453.JPG
Bramsen 0453. Deputation des maires de Paris a Schoenbrunn, 1805.143 viewsObv. A winged, trumpet-blowing woman runs left, carrying a tablet behind her a pile of spoils of war. Signed in the left field, BRENET F, DE GERMANIS. // IMP VRBI SVAE.
Exergue: PRIMITIAE · BELLI · ARMA · ET · SIGNA · MILITARIA E · MANVBIIS · VERTINGENS CIVITATI · DONATA VI · ID · OCT · MDCCCV
Rev. On the right Napoleon and Murat in classical dress, at their feet a nymph with an urn, approaching from the left are two men, one offering a scroll PANNONIA · SVBACTA. // SCHOENBRUNN.
Exergue: AEDILES. PARIS. IMP. NEAPOLIONI. A. VICTORIA REDVCI IN. SVBVRBANO. CAESARVM GRATES. AGVUNT. PR. ID. DECEMBR. MDCCCV
68mm.

This medal was struck to commemorate the events following the Battle of Austerlitz in the First Austrian campaign, namely the fact that Austria was subdued and Vienna taken by French forces. 1805.
LordBest
Bramsen 0557.JPG
Bramsen 0557. Arc de triomphe du Carrousel, 1806.170 viewsObv. Laureate bust right NAPOLEON EMP ET ROI
Rev. a triumphal arch, surmounted by a chariot, in which stands the Emperor drawn by four horses; on the pediment over the centre arch, a tablet with the inscription, NAPOLEON EMP ET ROI, &c. &c.; on each side of the tablet a bas relief: over the arches NAPOLEON . I . EMPEREUR DES FRANÇAIS ROI D'ITALIE, underneath bas reliefs.
Exergue, AUX ARMES MDCCCVI. BRENET F FONTAINE ARC. DENON D.

Commemorates the beginning of construction of the Arc de Triumphe, still visible in Paris today, in 1806.
LordBest
Bramsen 0631.JPG
Bramsen 0631. Sejour a Osterode, 1807.163 viewsObv. Head of Napoleon laureated. Under the head, ANDRIEU F. DENON DIRT. Legend, NAPOLEON A OSTERODE.
Rev. the head of Fabius Cunctator. Legend, FABIUS CUNCTATOR. Under the head, or exergue, DENON DIRT.

Commemorates Napoleons rest at Osterode in 1807 and alludes to his military prowess with a comparison to the Roman military leader during the Second Punic War, Q. Maximus Fabius.
LordBest
Bramsen 0868.JPG
Bramsen 0868. Ouverture du canal de l'Ourcq, 1809. 117 viewsObv. Laureate head right NAPOLEON EMP ET ROI
Rev. Paris, allegorically represented as a female, sitting to the front, on the side of an antique vessel, the prow and rudder appears on each side of her; on her head a turretted crown; her right arm and hand is stretched out, a naked Naid is pouring water over it from an urn, on which is inscribed, URCA; on her left arm, she supports a cornucopia filled with fruit and wheat-ears; another Naid on the left, on one knee, is laving her left foot with water, which she also pours from an urn, on which is inscribed, SEQUANA.
Legend, ANDRIEU F. DENON D.
Exergue, VRCA PARISIOS DEDVCTA — XV AUGUSTI MDCCCIX.

Commemorates the the construction of the Ourcq canal in 1809.
LordBest
Bramsen 0952.JPG
Bramsen 0952. Mariage a Paris avec Marie-Louise, 1810.265 viewsObv. The busts of the Emperor Napoleon laureated, and the Empress Marie Louisa crowned with a diadem. ANDRIEU. F. DENON D
Rev.Napoleon and Marie Louisa, full lengths, he habited in the Roman costume, with the imperial paludamentum clasped over his right shoulder; their right hands are joined, and with his left he embraces her shoulder, in the attitude of conducting her to the altar, on which burns the vestal flame: on the plinth of the altar, which is circular, is represented the bow and quiver of arrows of Cupid, crossed, with the torch of Hymen erect.
On the base, JOUANNIN F.
Legend, NAPOLEON EMP. ET ROI. M. LOUISE D'AUTRICHE.
Exergue, I AVRIL MDCCCX. DENON D

Struck to commemorate the wedding of Napoleon and Marie Louise of Austria in 1810
LordBest
Bramsen unknown.JPG
Bramsen ????. Mariage a Paris avec Marie-Louise, 1810. 232 viewsObv. Confronting busts of Napoleon I and Marie Louise. NAPOLEON GALL IMP ITALIIAE REX M LVDOVICIA FRANC AUST IMP FIL AA. HARNISCH
Rev. Turreted goddess insribing on shield supported by cupid, torches either side. FELICIBVS NVPTIIS. VOTA PVBLICA. VINDOB X1 MARTII MDCCCX
Silvered white metal 48mm

A beautiful medal struck to commemorate the marriage of Napoleon and Marie Louise of Austria in 1810. Struck at Vienna.
My very first Napoleonic medal. ex-HJB it was sold as a restrike but is in fact an original strike as the Vienna mint did not restrike these medals.
LordBest
HN_Italy_2497.jpg
Bruttium, Rhegion, 415-387 B.C., Drachm 26 views14mm, 3.89 grams
Reference: Sear 502; B.M.C.1.38
Lion's scalp facing.
PHΓINON, Laureate head of Apollo right, olive-sprig behind.

"Dionysios I, after concluding a peace with the Carthaginians, went about securing his power in the island of Sicily. His troops, however, rebelled against him and sought help from, among others, the city of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 14.8.2). In the ensuing campaigns, Dionyios I proceeded to enslave the citizens of Naxos and Katane, with whom the Rhegians shared a common history and identity (Diod. Sic. 14.40.1). This association was a source of anger and fear for the inhabitants of Rhegion. The Syracusan exiles living there also encouraged the Rhegians to go to war with Syracuse (Diod. Sic. 14.40.3). The overarching strategy of Dionysios I included extending his power into Italy by using Rhegion as a stepping stone to the rest of the peninsula. In 387 BC, after a siege that lasted eleven months, the Rhegians, on the brink of starvation, surrendered to Dionysus. Indeed, we are told that by the end of the siege, a medimnos of wheat cost about five minai (Diod. Sic. 14.111.2). Strabo remarks that, following Dionysios' capture of the city, the Syracusan “destroyed the illustrious city” (Strabo 6.1.6).

The next decade or so of the history of Rhegion is unclear, but sometime during his reign, Dionysios II, who succeeded his father in 367 BC, rebuilt the city, giving it the new name of Phoibia (Strabo 6.1.6). Herzfelder argues that this issue was struck by Dionysios II of Syracuse after he rebuilt the city, and dates it to the period that Dionysios II is thought to have lived in the city. Due to civil strife at Syracuse, Dionysios II was forced to garrison Region, but was ejected from the city by two of his rivals circa 351 BC (Diod. Sic. 16.45.9).

The coin types of Rhegion, founded as a colony of Chalcis, are related to its founding mythology. Some of the earliest tetradrachms of the city, from the mid-5th century BC, depict a lion’s head on the obverse, and a seated figure on the reverse. J.P. Six (in NC 1898, pp. 281-5) identified the figure as Iokastos, the oikistes (founder) of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 5.8.1; Callimachus fr. 202). Head (in HN), suggested Aristaios, son of Apollo. Iokastos was one of six sons of Aiolos, ruler of the Aeolian Islands. All of the sons of Aiolos secured their own realms in Italy and Sicily, with Iokastos taking the region around Rhegion. Aristaios, born in Libya, discovered the silphium plant, and was the patron of beekeepers (mentioned by Virgil), shepherds, vintners, and olive growers. He also protected Dionysos as a child, and was the lover of Eurydike. The replacement of the seated figure type with the head of Apollo circa 420 BC also suggests the figure could be Aristaios. An anecdote from the first-century BC geographer Strabo (6.1.6 and 6.1.9), which connects Rhegion’s founding to the orders of the Delphic Oracle and Apollo, as the reason for the advent of the new type could be simply serendipitous.

Different theories exist for the lion’s head on the coins of Rhegion. The lion’s head (or mask as it is sometimes described) first appeared on the coinage of Rhegion at the start of the reign of Anaxilas, in about 494 BC. E.S.G. Robinson, in his article “Rhegion, Zankle-Messana and the Samians” (JHS vol. 66, 1946) argues that the lion was a symbol of Apollo. He makes a comparison to the coinage of the nearby city of Kaulonia, “At Kaulonia Apollo’s animal was the deer; if at Rhegion it was the lion, the early appearance and persistence of that type is explained. The lion is a certain, though infrequent, associate of Apollo at all periods.” The link, he suggests, is that the lion was associated with the sun, as was Apollo himself.

The lion’s head could also relate to the exploits of Herakles, who had some significance for the city. The extant sources tell us that Herakles stopped at southern Italy near Rhegion on his return with the cattle of Geryon (Diod. Sic. 4.22.5). It was here that supposedly a bull broke away from the rest of the herd and swam to Sicily (Apollod. 2.5.10). Though but a passing reference in Apollodorus, it is very possible that the Rhegians venerated Herakles. Indeed, Herakles was a very important figure throughout the entire area. Dionysios of Halicarnassus says that “in many other places also in Italy [besides Rome] precincts are dedicated to this god [Herakles] and altars erected to him, both in cities and along highways; and one could scarcely find any place in Italy in which the god is not honoured” (I.40.6). As the skin of the Nemean Lion was one of the main attributes of Herakles, the lion’s head may refer to him through metonymic association."
1 commentsLeo
Sear-163(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 15 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)17 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; X/Ч across field, cross above, Є below; CON in exergue

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
Quant.Geek
Sear-163(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Constantinople, RY 16 (Sear 163; DOC 38b; MIBE 95a)25 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M; date across field, cross above, A below; CON in exergue

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
Quant.Geek
Sear-165(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Constantinople, RY 16 (Sear-165)23 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and decorated shield; cross right in field.
Rev: Large K between ANNO - XЧI, cross above; Λ below.

This particular coin is the so-called Plague Coin of Justinian. It depicts a deformed face of Justinian when he was recovering from the plague. See the following reference paper for more information:

Pottier, H., L'empereur Justinien survivant à la peste bubonique (542), Mélanges Cécile Morrisson, Paris, 2010, p. 685-691
SpongeBob
rep_2.jpg
C. Censorinus. 88 BC. Æ As.10 viewsC. Censorinus. 88 BC. Æ As. Semuncial standard. Rome mint. Jugate heads of Numa Pompilius and Ancus Marcius / Two arches; beneath left arch, a spiral column surmounted by statue of Victory; protruding from right arch, prow right; crescent above prow. Crawford 346/3 (citing 20 specimens in Paris); Sydenham 716. Podiceps
Trajan_Drachm_Caesarea.jpg
Caesarea Drachm 36 viewsAR Drachm, about 100 BC
16mm
Rev. shows head of Zeus Ammon r.
15mm, 1.72g
SNG BN Paris 336; SNG Levante 100 ff. var. (no guarantee)
2 commentsklausklage
Vlasto_1132.jpg
CALABRIA, TARAS, AR 1/6 Stater or diobol, 500-480 BC 26 viewsweight 1,25gr. | silver Ø 11mm.
obv. Dolphin right, cockle-shell below
rev. Hippocamp right, TAPA (retrograde) above
BMC 55 | cf. Vlasto 1132 | Côte 34 | cf. SNG.Copenhagen 783 |
cf. SNG.Paris 1612 | cf. Historia Numorum, Italy 829 | Sear 227 R
Rare cointype in an attractive condition.
vf
1 commentsLeo
Vlasto_1216.jpg
CALABRIA, TARAS, AR Obol - 4th century B.C.40 viewsweight 0,55gr. | silver 10mm.
obv. Female head right, surrounded by serpents
rev. Kantharos, 5 dots arround, TA above
BMC 431var. | SNG.Copenhagen- | Historia Numorum- |
SNG.Paris 2082 | SNG.München- | Jameson 131 | Vlasto 1216 RR
a very rare and intriguing cointype
vf
2 commentsLeo
vlasto_842.jpg
CALABRIA, Taras, c. 272-240 BC. AR Nomos 38 views6.57g, 3h
Nude rider on horse standing to left, crowning his horse; to right, ; below, .
Rev. Phalanthos, nude, riding on dolphin to left, holding Nike with his right hand and trident with his left; to right, bunch of grapes.
Evans VIII A, 10. HN III 1026. SNG Paris 2006 ff. Vlasto 842-4.
Extremely fine.
1 commentsLeo
Caligula_As.jpg
Caligula As46 viewsOBV: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
Bare head of Caligula left.
REV: VESTA S C
Vesta seated on ornate chair left,
holding patera and scepter.

BM-46, Paris-54, C-27, RIC-38.
A.D. 37-38
10.61gm 29 mm
3 commentsgoldenancients
Paduan_Caligula.JPG
Caligula, 37 - 41 AD148 viewsObv: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG PM TRP IIII PP, laureate head of Caligula facing left.

Rev: AGRIPPINA DRVSILLA IVLIA, The three sisters of Caligula, standing side by side; on the left, Agrippina (personified as Securitas) with head turned right, holds cornucopia, resting right hand on column, left hand on Drusilla’s shoulder; in center Drusilla (personified as Concordia), with head turned left, holding patera in right hand and cornucopia in left; on right Julia (personified as Fortuna Augusta), with head turned left, holding rudder in right hand and cornucopia in left; SC in exergue.

20.1 grams, 35 mm

This coin is a copy of a medallion made my Giovanni da Cavino of Padua, Italy. Though it's not an "ancient forgery" I would estimate it's manufacture to be sometime in the mid to late 19th Century. There appears to be genuine wear on the coin's surface along with a waxy residue visible in the lettering above Caligula's head leading me to believe this coin might have been used as a host to cast other fakes. It appears to be a direct copy of the Paduan housed in the Bibliothèque Nationale in Paris. It is pictured in Imitations and Inventions of Roman Coins by Zander H. Klawans as Caligula 1.

RIC 41, Klawans Caligula 1
SPQR Coins
1crispo_lione_unita.jpg
Campgate: Crispus, zecca di Lugdunum, (324-325 d.C.)8 viewsCrispus, Caesar (317-326 AD), Lugdunum mint
Æ 3,6 gr., 17 mm (max), R3
D/ FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS, camp-gate with two turrets, star above; PLG in ex
RIC VII 227
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 20 giugno 2015, numero catalogo 244); ex Christian Lorival collection, Paris, France, fino al giugno 2015)
paolo
1418lg.jpg
Caracalla -- Hierapolis-Kastabala46 viewsCaracalla --AE32, Hierapolis-Kastabala. Cuirassed and draped bust r. AVT KAI MAP AVPH ANTUNEINOC. Rev.: IEPOITEOY KACTABALEUN], Caracalla and Septimius Severus facing each other hands clasped. Cf. SNG von Aulock 5578 (obverse laureate bust); SNG Paris 2240 (same die, but with laureate wreath added to die after this coin was struck!).featherz
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_01.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.21 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
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right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
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*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
caracalla_AD214_AR-ant_AD213_AR-denarius-in-flip_obv_03.JPG
Caracalla AR Antoninianus.28 viewsleft: Caracalla (212 - 217 AD) AR Antoninianus - 'Bust right, seen from the front' - 'VENUS VICTRIX' reverse with Venus standing holding Victory in one hand and a sceptre in the other, a shield by her side.
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right: Caracalla 'PROFECTIO AUG' reverse - AR Denarius for size comparison.
----------------------------------
*The Denarius is inside a coin flip in these photos.*
rexesq
CaraStobe96.JPG
Caracalla, AE 23 Diassaria33 views[PIVS AVGV] ANTONINVS
Bust laureate, draped, cuirassed, right, seen from behind
MVNICIPI STOBEN
Nike advancing right with trophy (cuirass)
Josifovski 468 (V116, R158) citing Paris 1156.
Varbanov (Eng) III, 4096 citing this coin but the obverse legend and bust type is incorrect.
Kuzmanovic Collection -
whitetd49
CaraStobe111.JPG
Caracalla, AE 23 Diassaria21 viewsM AVREL AN/TONINVS AV
Bust laureate, right
STOBE MVNIC
Nike advancing left with wreath and palm, stepping on a globe
Josifovski 431 (V102, R131), citing specimen in Paris 1984/716
whitetd49
CaraStobe68.JPG
Caracalla, AE 24 Diassaria29 viewsM AVREL ANTONIN/NVS
Bust laureate, right
MVNICIP S/T/OBENSI
Nike advancing right with wreath and palm, stepping on a globe
Josifovski 441 (V64, R136), same dies, citing specimen in Paris, No. Seymour de Ricci
whitetd49
Karia_Hydisos.jpg
CARIA, HYDISOS20 views1st Century BC
AE 20 mm 4.76 g
O: Bearded helmeted head right
R: Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, ΥΔ[I]/SEW to right of eagle
Caria, Hydisos
Imhoof KM 2*; Dieudonné Paris Aquisitions 1902, 64; Wroth in NC 1903 p. 334, 26
laney
Celtic_Ring_Money.jpg
Celtic Bronze Ring Proto-Money 46 viewsAttribution: Quiggin, page 281, Plate 28, Hungary
Date: 800-500 BC
Size: 22.8 mm
(Marble statue of injured Gallic/Celtic warrior: Louvre, Paris)

Before the Celts settled in Wales, Scotland, Brittany, and Ireland, their territory extended to most of Europe. Although ancient Roman historians say the barbarian Celts had no coined money, there is evidence that they had ring-money made of bronze, silver, and gold. The rings vary in weight, but they are all exact multiples of a standard unit, showing the uniform principle regulated their size. This points to their use as current coinage.
Noah
charlesX~0.jpg
Charles de Bourbon “Charles X” (1589 - 1590)35 viewsFRANCE, Paris Catholic League Coinage
AR Quart d'ecu
O: CAROLVS. X. D: G. FRANCO. REX, Short cross with fleurs at the ends. Date around, with an initial mark of a cross.
R: . SIT. NOMEN. DOMINI. BENEDICTVM., Crowned arms flanked by II on both sides, with an initial mark of a rose.
30 mm
9.53g
Reference: DuP 1177
2 commentsMat
082~4.JPG
Charles IV, roi de France (1322-1328) - Double sol11 viewsDouble Parisis, argent, 1,09 g
A/ KAROLVS REX, couronne.
R/ MONETA DUPLEX, croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Duplessy 244b
Gabalor
104~1.JPG
Charles IX, Roi de France (1560-1574) - Sol6 viewsSol parisis, argent, 1,28 g.
Point sous la cinquième lettre pour Toulouse, B avant la date pour B. et J. Robert
A/ CAROLVS IX DI G FRAN REX, écu de France couronné
R/ + SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDIC b 1569, croix fleurdelisée formée de 4 C.
Réfs : Sb-4460
Gabalor
077~3.JPG
Charles IX, Roi de France (1560-1574) - Sol8 viewsSol parisis, argent, 1,41 g.
N dans la croix pour Montpelliers, quatrefeuille pour Mathieu Ymbert.
A/ CAROLVS IX DEI G FRAN REX, écu de France couronné
R/ + SIT NOMEN DNI BENE 1569, croix fleurdelisée formée de 4 C.
Réfs : Sb-4460
Gabalor
142~0.JPG
Charles VI, Roi de France (1380-1422) - Gros5 viewsGros dit "Florette", argent, 3,02 g.
Annelet sous la croisette, atelier de Paris
A/ + KAROLVS FRANCORV REX, trois lis sous une couronne.
R/ + SIT NOME DNI BENEDICTV, croix fleurdelisée, cantonnée de deux couronnes en 2 et 3.
Réfs : Duplessy 387
Gabalor
037~7.JPG
Charles VIII, roi de France (1483-1498) - Ecu d'or9 viewsEcu d'or au soleil, 3,41 g
Point sous la 18ème lettre, atelier de Paris.
A/ KAROLVS DEI GRA FRANCORVM REX, écu de France couronné.
R/ XPS VINCIT XPS REGNAT XPS IMPERAT, croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Duplessy 575
Gabalor
155~0.JPG
Charles X - 20 francs - 1825 Paris.5 views20 francs, or, 21 mm, 6,38 g.
A/ CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, tête de Charles X à droite.
R/ Ecu de France couronné entre deux branches de laurier, 20 F., 1825 A.
Réfs : F.-544-4 (663.764 ex.)
Gabalor
201~0.JPG
Charles X - 40 francs - 1830 Paris.3 views40 francs, or, 26 mm, 12,84 g.
A/ CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, tête de Charles X à droite.
R/ Ecu de France couronné entre deux branches de laurier, 40 F., 1830 A.
Réfs : F.-544-4
Gabalor
077~4.JPG
Charles X - 5 francs - 1828 Paris6 viewsArgent, 24,91 g, 36 mm
Av./ CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, tête nue de Charles X à gauche.
Rv./ 5 F, en accostement d'un écu de France sommé d'une couronne, entouré de deux branches de laurier nouées à leur base par un ruban, 1828 dessous.
Réfs : F-311.14 (8.800.342 ex.)
Gabalor
129~0.JPG
Charles X - Demi franc - 1827 Paris.8 views1/2 franc, argent, 18 mm, 2,42 g.
A/ CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, tête de Charles X à gauche.
R/ Ecu de France couronné entre deux branches de laurier, 1/2 F., 1827 A.
Réfs : F.-180.13 (785.438 ex.).
Gabalor
158~2.JPG
Charles X - Quart de franc - 1829 Paris.6 views1/4 franc, argent, 15 mm, 1,25 g.
A/ CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, tête de Charles X à gauche.
R/ Ecu de France couronné entre deux branches de laurier, 1/4 F., 1830 A.
Réfs : F.-164.39 (659.290 ex.).
Gabalor
059~3.JPG
Charles X, Cardinal de Bourbon (1589-1590) - Quart d'écu8 viewsQuart d'écu, argent, 8,47 g.
A sous l'écu pour Paris
A/ CAROLVS X D G FRANC REX 1590, croix fleurdelisée.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM, écu de France couronné, accosté de II et II.
Réfs : Sb-4670
Gabalor
Childebert_ab.jpg
Childebert I, Frankish King of Paris, Merovingian Dynasty85 viewsChildebert I (c. 497-558), Merovingian dynasty, Frankish king of Paris (511-558) and Orleans (524-558). Æ (14 mm, 0.81 g). Obverse: EL/DEBER/TIR (first R retrograde) in three lines. Reverse: chi-rho. Prou 36, Belfort 5454.

The coin type may have been minted in Marseille after 536. Witiges, king of the Ostrogoths, ceded Provence to the Franks in 535. The possession of Arles and Marseilles was guaranteed to Childebert by his brothers and the annexation of the province was completed in the winter of 536–537. The type with the king's name and title in three or more lines resembles contemporary Ostrogothic coins.
1 commentsJan (jbc)
Childebert2_ab.jpg
Childebert I, Frankish King of Paris, Merovingian Dynasty83 viewsChildebert I (c. 497-558), Merovingian dynasty, Frankish king of Paris (511-558) and Orleans (524-558). Æ (15 mm, 0.94 g). Obverse: chi-rho. Reverse: cross. Belfort 5459.2 commentsJan (jbc)
aigeai_hadrian_SNGlev1714.jpg
Cilicia, Aigeai, Hadrian, SNG Levante 171430 viewsHadrian, AD 117-138
AR - tetradrachm (tridrachm?), 26mm, 10.46g
struck AD 117/118 (year 164)
obv. AVTOKR KAIC TRAIANOC - ADRIANOC CEB
bust, slightly draped on l. shoulder, laureate, r.
rev. AIGEAIWN (in l. field) - ETOVC DZR (= year 164 of Caesarean era = AD 117/118)
Nymph Amaltheia as city-goddess with kalathos and in long garment, stg. facing,
head turned r., holding cornucopiae in r. arm and infant Zeus in l. arm, who wants
to crown her with a wreath in raised r. hand; r. beside her a goat r. looking back.
SNG Levante 1714; SNG Paris 2328; SNG von Auock 5450; Prieur 716
rare, about VF

This type, struck in the first year of Hadran's reign, shows a remarkable rev. depiction: The infant Zeus crowns Amaltheia with a wreath. This is an allusion to the myth of Zeus who was fed by Amaltheia in the shape of a goat. The goat is a symbol for Aigeai as a familiar pun, because goat is Greek AIX, AIGOS.
Jochen
anazarbus_commodus_SNGsupp325.jpg
Cilicia, Anazarbus, Commodus, SNG Leante Supp. 32594 viewsCommodus AD 177-192
AE 26, 12.84g, 225°
struck (Theta)QP = 199 = AD 181/182
obv. AVTO K LO A - KOMODEW CEB
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. ANAZARBE - WN ETOVC (Theta)QP
bust of Zeus Olybrius, draped, diademed, wearing necklace, seen from front, head r.
SNG Levante 325 (this ex.); SNG Paris 2041 var. (date, legend)
rare, VF, dark green patina, obv. a bit rough, impressive portrait of Zeus
added to www.wildwinds.com

This coin is much better in hand, especially the rev. is very beautiful!
4 commentsJochen
augusta_julia_RPC4014.jpg
Cilicia, Augusta, Julia-Livia, RPC 401433 viewsLivia, wife of Augustus, AD 14-29
AE 19, 5.2g
struck AD 67/8 (year 48), in the time of Nero
obv. IOVLIA - SEBASTH
Bust of Livia, draped, r.; hair bound in small bun in the neck
rev. AYGOYSTA - NW - N DP (year 48)
Tyche, in long garment and wearing mural-crown, std. r. on ornated throne,
holding long grain-ears in both hands; at her feet river-god Saros swimming r.
RPC 4014; cf. SNG Paris 1893; cf. SNG Levante 1238; Karbach 25.1
very rare, about VF

Saros, today Seyhan river in Turkey
Jochen
Coropissos_maximinusI_SNGfrance770.jpg
Cilicia, Coropissos, Maximinus I SNG Paris 77091 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 32, 15.62g
obv. AVT KG IOVH - MAXIMEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, r.
rev. KOROPICCEWN THC KHTWN MHTROPOLEW
Perseus, nude except chlamys, stg. l., holding harpe and head of Medusa in his
l. hand, clasping hands with Andromeda, stg. r. in long chiton, holding with her
l. hand fold of her garment under her chin; below the sea-monster Ketos.
SNG Levant 590; SNG Levante Supp. 157 (this ex.); SNG Paris 770; this obv. die was used in Philadelphia too, see SNG Levante 580
rare, about VF, brown-green patina

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
4 commentsJochen
hierapolis_kastabala_BMC3.jpg
Cilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala, BMC 335 viewsHieropolis-Kastabala, 2nd-1st century BC
AE 22, 5.33g
obv. Head of Tyche, draped and veiled, wearing mural-crown, r.
rev. IERO / POLITWN / TWN PROC TW / PYRAMW
River-god Pyramos, swimming r. in waves, l. hand outstretched, holding eagle
in r. hand
BMC 3; SNG Copenhagen 144; SNG Levante 1569; SNG von Aulock 5571; SNG BN Paris 2212-13
F+, brown patina with earthen highlights

Pyramos, today Ceyhan. For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'!
Jochen
kastabala_sept_severus_SNGlev1589.jpg
Cilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala, Septimius Severus, SNG Levante 158932 viewsSeptimius Severus, AD 193-211
AE 30, 15.97g
obv. AVT KAI L C - EP CEVHROC PER CE
Emperor in military cloak and wearing parazonium(?), stg. l., resting with l. hand on
spear and holding in outstretched r. hand Nike on globe, holding wreath and
palm-branch
rev. IE - ROPOLI - TWN KACTABALEW - N
Bust of young Dionysos, wearing ivy wreath and clad in panther skin, r.,
thyrsos over l. shoulder and vine-grape before.
SNG Levante 1589; SNG Paris 2339
about VF, corrosion in upper field of obv.

It's interesting that here the portrait is not the emperor's. Therefore I think it's on the rev.!
Jochen
irenopolis_marc_aurel_SNGfrance2258.jpg
Cilicia, Irenopolis, Marcus Aurelius SNG Paris 225842 viewsMarcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 20, 7.84g
obv. AVRHLIOC - KAI[CAR]
laureate head r.
rev. IRHNO[POLITWN] - MHTROP (RO ligated)
Herakles, nude, reclining l. on lion's skin, legs crossed, holding knotted club in r.
hand and with l. hand lion's skin of which the legs hanging down; from the
lion's mouth water is flowing.
ref. SNG Levante Supp. 381 (this coin); SNG Paris 2258. Both don't mentioned the flowing water!
added to www.wildwinds.com

Perhaps the reverse shows Herakles as fountain figure.
Jochen
korykos_valerianI_GIC4491.jpg
Cilicia, Korykos, Valerian I, BMC 2138 viewsValerian I, AD 253-260
AE 32, 22.19g, 32.07mm, 135°
obv. AV K PO - LIK OVALERIAN / OC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. KWRV (in ex.) KIW TW - N AV NAVAR, in r. field XI / C
Decorated price-urn inscribed QEMIA, with palmbranch between caduceus l.,
and aphlaston r., stg. on table with Dolphin shaped feet, wine pitcher under table; Dionysos,
nude, nebris around hip, wesring boots, stg. l., holding vine-grapes in r. hand and resting on tyrsos with raised l.
hand; l. at feet panther l., head turned r., raising r. foot.
ref. BMC 21; SNG Levante 820; SNG Copenhagen 123; SNG Paris 1123; SNG von Aulock 5686; Klose & Stumpf 259
about VF/VF
Jochen
valerianI_mallus_snglev1298.jpg
Cilicia, Mallos, Valerian I SNG Lev. 1298107 viewsValerian I AD 252-260
AE 31, 19.89g
obv. IMP C LIC VALERIANVS PI FE AVG (lat.)
bust, cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. MALLO COLONIA (lat.)
Amphilochos, naked except chlamys, stg. l., holding laurel branch, boar below. Behind him tripod on podium with globe above, snake winding around.
S C in exergue
SNG Levante 1298 (same obv. die); SNG Paris 1933 (same obv. die); BMC 13; SGIC 4498
Rare (only 13 coins of Valerian's time known!), about VF, light roughness, small casting spots (from making)
added to www.wildwinds.com

MALLOS was one of the oldest cities in Cilicia. The hero AMPHILOCHOS is said to be the founder. He was fighting before in Thebes and Troy. He and his brother Mopsus were the most famous seers in Greece. They decided to rule Mallos alternately. Mopsus was first. But when he should give the rule to Amphilochos it came to a deadly duel where both were killed. After their death their souls got along peacefully and temples were built to celebrate them. The oracle of Mallos was said to be more real than that of Delphi!
Under Severus Alexander Mallos became a Roman Colonia. Therefore the Latin inscriptions.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
2 commentsJochen
claudiopolis_maximiusI_SNGfrance791.jpg
Cilicia, Ninica-Claudiopolis, Maximinus I, SNG Levante Supp. 170 (plate coin)142 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-236
AE 30 mm, 14.59 g
obv. IMP.CAES.SA.IVL.VER.MAXI / MINVS
Bust, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r.
behind bust c/m Howgego 338 eagle r., head l.
rev. NINIC COL CLA / VDIOPO / L
She-wolf standing right under Ruminal fig tree, head l., suckling the twins
Remus and Romulus
SNG Levante 618 (same dies); SNG Levante Supp. 170 (this coin); SNG Paris 791 (same dies); SNG von Aulock 5775 (same dies)
Choice EF, nice olive-brown patina, rare this nice.
published on www.wildwinds.com

The fig tree was sanctified to the goddess Rumina. Later the twins were found by the shepherd Faustulus. The rest is well-known!
The legend is in Latin because the city was a Roman colonia. The she-wolf looks a bit like a horse!
6 commentsJochen
olba_SNGparis807.jpg
Cilicia, Olba, quasi-autonomous, SNG Paris 80736 viewsAE 16, 4.52g
struck under Ajas, son of Teukros, archiereus of Olba and toparch of Kennatis and Lalassis, AD 11-12 (year 2)
obv. TOPARX / KENNAT / [L]ALAS / ET B
in dotted circle
rev. Thunderbolt
above ARXIER / AIANTOS
beneath TEVKROV
in dotted circle
SNG BN Paris 807; RPC I, 3729; Staffierie, Olba 15, 14
Very rare, about EF, glossy dark-green patina
Pedigree:
ex auction F.Sternberg AG Zürich XXV, 1991, lot 160
ex. auction M&M XVII, 2005, lot 965

Olba was for a long time a quasi-autonomous priest kingdom. It's main god was Zeus Olbios. Hence the thunderbolt on the rev.
Jochen
seleukeia_ad_cal_SNGfrance903-904.jpg
Cilicia, Seleukeia ad Calycadnum, pseudo-autonomous, SNG Paris 903-90433 viewsAE 24, 6.9g, 23.40mm
struck 2nd-1st century BC
obv. Bust of Athena, draped, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and necklace, branch
before, behind SA
rev. SELEYKEWN [TWN PROS T]W | KALYKADNW |
Nike, winged and in long garment, advancing l., holding wreath in raised r. hand
in l. field monogram in two lines: NKI / KAL (NK ligate)
SNG Paris 3, nn. 903/904 (thanks to Tacrolimus)
VF
Jochen
gordianIII_SNGlev774.jpg
Cilicia, Seleukia ad Calycadnum, Gordian III SNG Lev. 774 var.110 viewsGordian III AD 238-244
AE 35, 21.23g
Seleukeia ad Calycadnum, struck after AD 241
obv. MAR ANTONIOC GORDIANOC/CEB
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. CELEYKEWN TWN PROC/KA-L/YK-AD/N-W
Aphrodite standing facing, head right, holding mirror: Erotes standing facing on
either side, each holding marriage torch.
exergue: ELEYTHE/RAC
SNG Levante 774 var.; SNG Paris 1029 var.; Howgego 670
Choice good VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

So-called MARRIAGE ISSUE
c/m on obverse: Delta containing central dot, in triangular punch
2 commentsJochen
syedra_gallienus_SNGLevante438.jpg
Cilicia, Syedra, Gallienus SNG Levante 43836 viewsGallienus AD 253-268
AE 28, 15.67g
obv. AVT KAI PO LIK GALLIHNOC [CEB]
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
IA before (for 11 Assaria)
rev. CE / MNHC / ENDOXO / TERAC / CYEDR /EWN
in six lines, surrounded by laurel wreath
SNG Levante 438 (same dies); SNG Paris 667; SNG Pfalz 1247/1248; Lindgren I, 1610; BMC 19, 160, 16
very rare, good F, some over all roughness

CEMNHC, to CEBACTOS, = venerable, dignified, nobly
ENDOXOTERAC, to ENDOXOS, famous, = the even more famous
Jochen
Gordian_III_Tarsus.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Gordian III15 viewsObverse: Bust right; radiate; draped; cuirassed. AYT K ANT GORDIANOS SEB P P. Reverse: Woman (Athena) standing; head left; wearing helmet and holding spear and shield; TARSOY MHTROPOLEWS A M K G B.

SNG FRANCE 2 1655 / COLL PARIS 1539.23
1 commentsSkySoldier
maximinI_tarsos_BMC230.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I BMC 23066 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 37, 21.89g
obv. AYT.K.G.IOY.OYH.MAXIMEINOC C
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
in field P-P
rev. TARCOY T - HC MHTROPOLEWC
Nike, on globe, advancing l., holding palmbranch and cilicarch crown with four
imperial heads
in left field AM/K
in right field G/B
SNG Levante var. 1092; SNG Paris 1594-5 (both same dies); BMC 230
rare, nice VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

The Cilicarch was the High Priest in Cilicia, the chief priest of the provincial temple or the temples of the imperial cults.
3 commentsJochen
maximinusI_tarsos.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I SNG Lev. 109957 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 37, 19.31g
obv. AVT.K.G.IOV.OVH.MAXIMEINOC
P-P in l. and r. field
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. TARCOV THC MHTROPOLEW
Apollo Lykeios, nude, laureate, standing frontal, holding a dead wolf in each
hand.
AMK in l. field, G.B in r.field
SNG Levante 1099 (this coin); SNG Paris 1590 (same dies)
(attribution by Barry Murphy)
Rare, about VF

AMK stands for 'the First, the Biggest, the most Beautiful', granted to the city AD 215 upon Caracalla's campaign against the Parths.
G.B = 3.2, capital of three provinces, keeper of two neocorates (Curtis Clay)
For the Lykios there is a very different interpretation too:
The two animals are not wolfes but dogs, symbolizing Mopsus and Amphilochus, called 'the dogs of Apollo' by Lychopron, a 3rd century poet. (Pat Lawrence)

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
Jochen
tarsos_maximinusI_SNG france1591.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Maximinus I, SNG Paris II, 159139 viewsMaximinus I, AD 235-238
AE 30, 21.49g
obv. AVT.K.G.IOV.[OVH.MAZIMEI]NOC /P - P
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. TARCOV THC MHTROPOLE[WC]
Apollo, stg. facing on omphalos, head. l., holding bow and arrow in l. hand and
in lowered r. hand dog on fore-legs
in l field A / M / K
in upper r. field G, in lower r. field B
SNG Paris II, 1591 (Thanks to Luigi!)
extremly rare, good F, brown-green patina

Most often this Apollo is named Apollo Lykeios. But this is not correct! Please look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
Cilicia,_Tarsos,_Syennesis_III_AR_stater.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Syennesis III, ca. 425-400 BC, AR Stater 18 viewsSyennesis on horseback right, wearing Persian headdress and cloak.
Nude hoplite kneeling left, wearing crested Corinthian helmet, holding spear and shield.

SNG Paris-226, SNG Levante-61.

(20 mm, 8.3 g, 1h).
Harlan J. Berk 181, November 2012, 393.

The depiction of the hoplite in a defensive posture on the reverse of this coin is most evocative of its time, notwithstanding the miserable corroded state of the coin itself, which is a type of some rarity. The initial reaction to the typology of this coin might be one of surprise at the apparently incongruous pairing of the image of a Persian dynast on horseback on the obverse with that of a Greek hoplite on the reverse. The explanation is to be found in the written historical record. The coin dates to the period of Xenophon's anabasis. Xenophon refers to the role of Syennesis (III) and his wife Epyaxa in the revolt of Cyrus the Younger, in whose employ as a mercenary Xenophon found himself. In view of the historical record left by Xenophon, the pairing of the motifs of a Persian dynast, or tributary king, on one side of this coin with a Greek hoplite on the other now seems particularly poignant, rather than incongruous. During the fifth and fourth centuries BC, the Persian dynasts routinely employed Greek hoplite mercenaries in their armies, so that the reverse typology may simply be a reflection of this reality on coinage destined perhaps for mercenary pay.

All the hereditary kings of Cilicia were termed Syennesis, a royal title more than an actual name. As described in Xenophon’s Anabasis, Syennesis (III) under the influence of his wife and queen, Epyaxa, supported the unsuccessful revolt of Cyrus the Younger against his brother Artaxerxes II in 401 BC. As much as anything this action appears to have been motivated by the desire to prevent Cryrus’ army pillaging and looting during its passage through Cilicia. Syennesis’ support included a body of troops commanded by one of his sons. However, he sent another son, accompanied by a report on Cyrus plans and army to Artaxerxes, so that whatever the outcome he might be aligned with the winning side. Syennesis' actions, however, did little to save Cilicia's autonomy. After 400 BC it became an ordinary satrapy of the Persian Empire, rather than an independent tributary or vassal state, and the role of the hereditary king of Cilicia ceased, replaced by a satrap who was appointed by the Persian king, most frequently a relative of the latter.
n.igma
tarsos_trajan_decius_SNGparis1757_1.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos, Trajan Decius, SNG Paris 175716 viewsTrajan Decius, AD 240-251
AE 35, 27.29g
obv. AV KAI G MEC KVIN.DEKIOC TRAIANO
in l. and r. field P- P
rev. TARCO - V MHTROPOLEWC GB
in l. and r. field A/M - K
Perseus, nude except chlamys over l. shoulder, stg. l., holding harpa in l. arm, head of Medusa in l. hand
and in extended r. hand cult-statue of Apollo stdg. frontal on omphalos and holding in each hand a dog
with head up.
ref. SNG Paris 1757; not in SNG Levante
rare, F+/about VF, oliv-green patina, usual roughness

Perseus was the suggested founder of Tarsos. Apollo here is often called Apollo Lykeios in error. For the correct mythology please take a look at the article 'Apollo Lykeios - or rather not' in the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
Tarsos.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. AE35. Philip I or II / Spes70 viewsCilicia, Tarsos AE35 23.4gm.

Bronze Medallion 35mm (21.94 grams) of Tarsus in Cilicia
AVT KAI IOV ΦIΛIΠΠON ЄVT ЄVC CЄ around, Π - Π in field, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
TAPCOV THC MHTPOΠOΛEΩC AMK, Elpis (Spes) standing left, holding flower and pulling on skirt, Γ B across fields.

Philip I or Philip II as Augustus, same obv. die as Ziegler, Smaller German Collections, pl. 42, 799 ("Philip II"); SNG Paris 1730 ("Philip I"); and SNG Aulock 6062 ("Philip I").

The light beard would speak for Philip I, yet the features look different and younger than other portrait dies at Tarsus that are definitely Philip I. -Curtis Clay


ancientone
mazaios.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. Satrap Mazaios. AR Stater.128 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88gm, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strike. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor even before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is both blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
6 commentsJason T
Tarsos.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. (Circa 378-372 BC)64 viewsAR Stater

23 mm, 10.28 g

Obverse: Diademed female head facing slightly to left, wearing pendant earrings and necklace.

Reverse: 𐡕𐡓𐡃𐡌𐡅 ('trkmw' in Aramaic) Bearded head of Ares (?) to left, wearing crested Attic helmet.

Casabonne type 1. SNG Levante 80. SNG Paris 276-277.

Datames (407-362 BC) served as a member of the Persian king's (Artaxerxes II - 405-359 BC) bodyguard before he became satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia upon his father's death in battle in 384 BC. After many successes, the Persian king placed him in charge of the second war against Egypt, along with Pharnabazos and Tithraustes, satrap of Caria.

To pay their armies for these expeditions, both satraps minted near-identical coins, distinguished only by their inscriptions. The reverse of these coins may show a representation of Ares, the Greek god of war. The facing head of an unidentifiable female deity (Aphrodite, the wife of Ares?) on the obverse is clearly influenced by the famous representations of the nymph Arethusa created by the artist Kimon for the coins of Syracuse. Both designs were probably meant to appeal to the thousands of Greek mercenaries that each Persian satrap hired for their Egyptian campaigns.

Datames was first, however, detained by a local revolt in Kataonia, a territory within his satrapy. This time, his success incurred the king's jealousy, and he was removed both from his command of the Egyptian expedition as well as the rule of his satrapy. Refusing to relinquish his authority, Datames himself revolted and became a virtually independent ruler. His initial success in this endeavor prompted the revolt of other satraps across the empire. Datames' success, however, was short-lived. Distrust among the satraps rendered them unable to cooperate, their rebellion disintegrated, and Datames himself was assassinated in 362 BC.
3 commentsNathan P
Gordian_tarsos_herakles.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos;Hercules standing r. AE 348 viewsGordian III; Cilicia, Tarsus, 238-244 A.D. AE 34, 22.22g. Rev: Hercules standing r., head l., holding branch (?) in r. hand and bow with arrow in l. hand, lionskin over l. shoulder and falling from l. arm. Cf. SNG Levante 1127 (same Obv. die, different Hercules rev. type). Rare: this exact Hercules type not in Paris, Levante, BMC, Righetti, Winsemann Falghera, or Lindgren. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
ARM_Levon_I_tram.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Levon I, the Great (1199-1219)37 viewsVardanyan Class A Phase 5; Bedoukian Groups 221b-258b and 264-266, specifically 248 and 265, Plate III, 228 (for Group 221b-258b); cf. Nercessian 286; Metcalf Group II/C, Plate XII, 21

AR tram, 3.01 g., 22.41 mm. max., 270°

Obv: + ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳ[ԱՒ]ՈՐ ՀԱՅՈՑ (= Lewon Tagawor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians), King seated on a throne ornamented with lion heads, feet resting on a footstool, wearing a crown and a royal mantel, holding a cross in the right hand and fleur-de-lis in the left.

Rev.:[Reverse C] + ԿԱՐՈՂՈՒԹԲՆ Ա[ՍՏ]ՈՒԾ [letter Ծ Type 6] (= Karogowt eambn astowtzoy = By the will of God), double-barred cross (Type 7c] with solid bar of pseudo-seriffed or wasted outline; dot beneath lower horizontal arm, 3 dots at the base of the shaft) entirely within circle between two lions [Type 5a] (boldly dotted mane but plain shoulder, three ribs), rampant, back-to-back, each with heads reverted. Artistic style.

The common tram of Levon I was struck during his entire reign, and probably for several years after his death until the coronation of Hetoum I as king (in 1226). According to Metcalf, the Bedoukian system (focusing on obverse inscriptions) is mechanical and not workable, and is a non-classification. According to Vardanyan, the Bedoukian system conflicts with observed die links. Metcalf focused on die comparisons. Vardanyan, also focusing on die comparisons, established a relative chronology for this coinage.
Stkp
ARM_Levon_I_tram_Nercessian_288.jpg
Cilician Armenia. Levon I, the Great (1199-1219)32 viewsVandanyan Class C Phase 1b ; Bedoukian Groups 267-283a, specifically 276 var. (no footstool); cf. Nercessian 288 var. (no footstool); Metcalf Group III/C, Plate XII, 24

AR tram/drachm, 3.20 g., 22.98 mm. max., 270°

Obv: + ԼԵՒՈՆ ԹԱԳԱՒՈՐ ՀԱՅՈՑ (= Lewon Tagawor Hayots = Levon, King of the Armenians), King wearing a crown and a royal mantel, holding a cross in the right hand and fleur-de-lis in the left, seated on a throne ornamented with lion heads, his left foot turned outward, no footstool.

Rev.: [Reverse C]: + ԿԱՐՈՂՈՒԹԲՆ ԱՍՏՈՒԾ [letter Ծ Type 6] (= Karogowt eambn astowtzoy = By the will of God), double-barred cross [Type 7c] (with outlined bar of pseudo-seriffed or wasted outline; 3 dots at the base of the shaft) entirely within circle between two lions [Type 5a] (boldly dotted mane but plain shoulder, three ribs), rampant, back-to-back, each with heads reverted. Reverse artistic style.

The obverse and reverse inscriptions and long-cross are a match for Bedoukian 276 (King's left foot turned outward, but footstool), B. 248 (but left foot not facing outward, and footstool), and B. 265 (long-cross entirely within circle, but left foot not facing outward, and footstool). None are listed with any inscription combination with both the left foot facing outward and no footstool except those with the king holding the lily in his right hand and the cross in his left (B. 662f and B. 665c-672). As such, it is not an exact match to any, and closest to B. 276.

The common tram of Levon I was struck during his entire reign, and probably for several years after his death until the coronation of Hetoum I as king (in 1226). According to Metcalf, the Bedoukian system (focusing on obverse inscriptions) is mechanical and not workable, and is a non-classification. According to Vardanyan, the Bedoukian system conflicts with observed die links. Metcalf focused on die comparisons. Vardanyan, also focusing on die comparisons, established a relative chronology for this coinage.
1 commentsStkp
SNG_Paris_1730_var_244-249_Philippus_I__Arabs.jpg
Cilicia_Tarsos_Philippus_Arabs_SNG France 1730 var.5 viewsPhilippus Arabs
AE, Cilicia, Tarsos
Struck: 244-249 / 35-36,5 mm / 23,62 g

Av: ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΙΟΥ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΝ ΕΥΤ ΕΥC CE
Radiate, cuirassed and draped bust right seen from the front

In fields: Π / Π

Rv: ΤΑΡCΟΥ ΜΗΤ-ΡΟΠΟΛΕΩC
Tyche with Kaleitos standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae

In left field: Α / Μ / Κ
In right field: Γ / B

Reference: SNG France 1730 var.
Andicz
Cistophor_Pergamon_AR26_12_37g.jpg
Cistophorus, Pergamon98 views26mm, 12.37g
obv: snake emerging from cista mystica with serpent emerging, ivy-wreath around
rev: two snakes around bow case, city monogram to left, PE and prytaneis monogram above, snake entwined thyrsos to right
SNG BN Paris 1750. Kleiner, LCP 81, 47

ex Roland Müller collection, ex Rutten & Wieland
2 commentsareich
obolo2sm.jpg
Civic Issue - Holmoi108 viewsHolmi c.380 BC, Obol, helmeted head of Athena right, rev head of Apollo right (cf SNG Paris 122 = Traité 1453).Caffaro
Thessalonika_PanStridingLeft_LegendInWreath_AE16_4.25g.jpg
Civic, Thessalonika, Pan / legend in wreath40 viewsAE16, 4.25g

Touratsoglou Emission II, Group A (time of Nerva/Trajan):

Pan naked on tip-toe walking left, shading his eyes with the raised right hand, holding pedum and nebris (fawnskin worn by Bacchus and his devotees according to OLD) in his left.
Tour. 3 (V3 R3): AMNG 29

Same type, other dies: Paris (Mionnet Supp. III/775), Munich, SNG ANS 811.
areich
AGRJSE01-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 103, for Agrippina Junior, Sestertius of AD 50-5433 viewsÆ Sestertius, 25,70g, Ø 34mm, 6h, Thracien mint, AD 50-54
Obv.: AGRIPPINA AVG GERMANICI F CAESARIS AVG, Agrippina Jr. draped bust right, hair in long plait.
Rev.: no legend, Carpentum left, drawn by two mules.
RIC (Claudius) 103 (R3); BMC p.195*; Cohen unlisted; RCV 1910
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015
Charles S
Albinus_61.jpg
Clodius Albinus - AE as or dupondius15 viewsRome
194-195 AD
head right
D CL SEPT AL_BIN CAES
Saeculum Frugiferum standing left, holding caduceus with grain ears and trident
SAECVLO FRVGIFERO COS II
S C
RIC IVa, 61 (C. 72); BMC V, 549 (Pl. 23, 8); C. 72 (Paris)
10,72 g 23 mm
Johny SYSEL
WashingtonBeforeBoston.JPG
Comitia Americana - Washington before Boston, 1776.123 viewsObv. Bust of George Washington right, GEORGIO WASHINGTON SVPREMO DVCI EXERCITVVM ADSERTORI LIBERTATIS COMITA AMERICANA [at neck truncation] DU VIVIER / PARIS . F.
Rev. Siege of Boston, HOSTIBUS PRIMO FUGATIS [in exergue] BOSTONIUM RECUPERATUM / XVII MARTII / MDCCLXXVI [at bottom right of canon in the foreground] DU VIV
AE68. 20th century US mint striking.

One of the most encouraging early victories during the Revolutionary War was the British evacuation of Boston on March 17, 1776. During the harsh winter months Henry Knox had transported a number of canon from Fort Ticonderoga in western New York to Boston. As soon as this heavy artillery arrived Washington mounted the canons on Dorchester Heights overlooking the city. Under the threat of bombardment the British troops quickly fled, making Boston the first major city liberated from British occupation. Eight days later, on March 25, 1776, the Continental Congress authorized a medal to commemorate this event. Up through 1787 Congress authorized ten additional medals commemorating war heroes, however no medals were actually produced until 1790. In that year the federal Congress commissioned the Paris mint to produce these long overdue items. The Washington Before Boston medal was considered the most important and was the largest in the series, which is now referred to as the Comitia Americana (or American Congress) medal series. A gold example was presented to Washington along with a collection of eleven silver medals (nine of which were from the eleven medals authorized by congress); the gold exampe is now in the Boston Public Library while Washington's collection of eleven silver medals now resides in the Massachusetts Historical Society.
1 commentsLordBest
WashingtonBeforeBostonParispre1860s.JPG
Comitia Americana - Washington before Boston, 1776. Paris Mint, pre 1841 or 1860.112 viewsObv. Bust of George Washington right, GEORGIO WASHINGTON SVPREMO DVCI EXERCITVVM ADSERTORI LIBERTATIS COMITA AMERICANA [at neck truncation] DU VIVIER / PARIS . F.
Rev. Siege of Boston, HOSTIBUS PRIMO FUGATIS [in exergue] BOSTONIUM RECUPERATUM / XVII MARTII / MDCCLXXVI [at bottom right of canon in the foreground] DU VIV
AE68. Paris mint, Die combination 4, before 1860, plain edge, before 1841. Holed for suspension.
LordBest
Commodus.png
Commodus Sestertius9 viewsI got this this spring in Paris while attending a conference. I had a few hours to kill around 'Bourse' and visited to coin shops there. Of the few stores I went in, this one had the grumpiest owner/clerk. The guy was inspecting some coins of his very carefully as I rang the bell, and seemed annoyed that me, a customer, had wondered in and disturbed him, that he had to buzz the door open. He was eager to get back to his coins... I liked that and it made me like the store even more.
Alex F
PC200070_comp_sm.jpg
Comparison of two ases of the same type: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL 19 viewsLeft: Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h
Right: Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Seems RIC 1389a, Faustina Minor issue by Antoninus Pius, minted in Rome, possible minting dates 145-146 or 156-161.

For more details about Faustina Minor see http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
Yurii P
CONTINE1-14-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantine I, Siscia RIC VII-261.A38 viewsAE3/4
Siscia mint, 337 A.D.
17mm, 1.63g
RIC VII-261

Obverse:
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
Rosette-diadem, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS
A SIS*
Two soldiers standing, spear in outer hand; between them one standard.

This is an interesting coin in that there is no definite way of telling if this is CI or II. This is what RIC has to say.

"In V one coin of officina A (out of 5) and one of officina E (out of 3) are attributed to Constantine II as Augustus. It is difficult to say why, because a comparison with the coins showing the younger Constantine beyond doubt as Augustus does not reveal any marked difference. On the other hand ASIS* was continued after the death of Constantine I, and all three sons of Constantine assumed the title of Augustus in the same mark. Both Constantius and Constans appear as MAX AVG in the Siscian coinage, and accordingly there must have been specimens with MAX AVG for Constantine II also. LRBC 765, referring to CG, appears to distinguish between two different diadems, 'laurel w/ rosettes' for Constsntine I, and 'diadem with pearls' for Constantine II, although the latter, according to LRBC,has not been confirmed. Another approach to the problem would be to study the distribution of officianae. It should be noted that in the preceeding mark, ASIS, Constantine I employed off. A almost exclusively, whereas in this mark there is a preponderance of off. A coins, but also a noticeable number of coins of off. B, Γ, E. Were it not for the fact that the distribution of officinae tends to be blurred in the last Constantinian issues of Siscia, one would suggest that these coins were of Constsntine II. As a matter of fact, the diadem of off. A can more readily be described as a rosette diadem than those of the other officinae."
1 commentsrubadub
0090-Louis_XVI_12D.jpg
Constitution - 12 deniers 1791 A76 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANCOIS, buste drapé a gauche, A sous le buste
LA NATION LA LOI LE ROI rose 1791 . 3 . DELALIB . faisceau surmonté d'un bonnet phrygien entre deux branches de chêne
11.82 gr
Ref : Ciani # 2253
We now have a King being on the same level as his subjects and the Law. He his king of the french instead of being king of France
03-140
1 commentsPotator II
153~0.JPG
Consulat - Bonaparte premier Consul - 1 franc - AN 12, Paris.5 viewsArgent, 23 mm, 4,94 g.
A/ BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL, tête nue de Napoléon à droite.
R/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE AN 12 A, dans une couronne de branche d'olivier, 1 FRANC.
Réfs : F. 200.8 (1.310.638 ex.)
Gabalor
234.JPG
Consulat - Bonaparte premier Consul - 40 francs - AN 12 Paris7 viewsOr, 26 mm, 12,85 g.
A/ BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL, Tête nue de Bonaparte à gauche.
R/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE AN 12, dans une couronne de branches d'oliviers, 40 FRANCS
Réfs : F.536.2
Gabalor
046~12.JPG
Consulat - Bonaparte premier Consul - 5 francs - AN XI, Paris.5 viewsArgent, 37 mm, 24,47 g.
A/ BONAPARTE PREMIER CONSUL, tête nue de Napoléon à droite.
R/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE AN XI A, dans une couronne de branche d'olivier, 5 FRANCS.
Réfs : F. 301.1(3.877.151 ex.)
Gabalor
187.JPG
Consulat - Bonaparte premier Consul - Quart de franc - AN 12 Paris.3 viewsArgent, 15 mm, 1,24 g.
A/ BONAPARTE PR. CONSUL, tête nue de Napoléon à droite.
R/ REP. FRA. AN 12 A, dans une couronne de branche d'olivier, QUART.
Réfs : F. 157.1 (171.359 ex.)
Gabalor
133~2.JPG
Consulat - Essai de Lavoisier, par Andrieu et Gengembre, AN 8, Paris3 viewsModule de 2 francs, bronze, 26 mm, 8,32 g.
A/ ANT. LAUR. LAVOISIER, tête nue à droite signé ANDRIEU F. sur la tranche du cou.
R/ REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE (foudre) en creux. Au centre en six lignes : L'AN 8/ PH. GENGEMBRE/ ESSAYAIT DE/ PERFECTIONNER/ LES/ MONNAIES.
Tranche inscrite en creux *A LA PATRIE *AUX SCIENCES.
Réfs : G.836 ; Brandon 111.
Gabalor
091~1.JPG
Consulat - Essai de Lavoisier, par Andrieu et Gengembre, AN 9, Paris5 viewsModule de 2 francs, bronze, 26 mm, 9,08 g.
A/ ANT. LAUR. LAVOISIER, tête nue à droite signé ANDRIEU F. sur la tranche du cou.
R/ En six lignes : L'AN 9/ PH. GENGEMBRE/ ESSAYAIT DE/ PERFECTIONNER/ LES/ MONNAIES.
Tranche inscrite en creux *A LA PATRIE *AUX SCIENCES.
Réfs : Brandon 113.
Gabalor
098~2.JPG
Consulat - essai de Pierre-Joseph Lorthior (1733-1813) du 2 décimes, AN 8, Paris.5 viewsBillon, 20 mm, 2,40 g
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, buste de Minerve casqué à gauche.
R/ En trois lignes, 2 // DECIMES // L'AN 8, corne d'abondance et caducée entrecroisés, au-dessous A.
Réfs : Brandon 80
Gabalor
083.JPG
Convention - 6 livres - 1793 Paris.4 viewsEcu de 6 livres au génie, argent, 29,25 g, 39 mm.
A/ REGNE DE LA LOI 1793, génie gravant la constitution.
R/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCOISE // SIX LIVRES A // L'AN II.
Réfs : Révolution, R-78.2
Gabalor
agrippa.jpg
Corinth AE, Unknown Imperator.27 viewsCORINTHI, Bare headed bust right.

C MUSSIO PRISCO IIVIR C HEIO POLLIONE ITER, in a wreath of parsley.

The identity of the obverse bust remains a mystery. I submitted it for identifcation on the boards with both archivium and Curtis Clay responding. They also were unable to attribute the bust to either Augustus, Tiberius, Agrippa Postumus or Drusus!

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=55882.0

On Curtis's advice I contacted Dr. Michael Amandry, who completed a significant work on the subject of Romano-Corinthian coinage titled "LE MONNAYAGE DES DUOVIRS CORINTHIENS."

Dr. Amandry's reply stated that the die on my coin was similar to other dies of Augustus or Drusus, but was unable to differentiate further. The identity of the bust must therefore remain partly solved until I can collect further examples of this coin for comparison.
Will Hooton
caracalla_AR_antoninianii_quarter_01.JPG
D - Caracalla AR Antoninianii31 viewsTwo different bust type Caracalla Silver Antoninianii - both have different ' VENUS VICTRIX ' reverses - next to a U.S.A. State Quarter for size comparison.
-----
Lower Left: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from the front.
5.2 grams. - *This coin is in a plastic flip in these shots.
------------------------------------
Top Right: Caracalla AR Antoninianus, Radiate bust right, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind.
5.5 grams.
rexesq
008~4.JPG
Dauphiné, Louis I (1409-1415), Dauphins de Viennois, France.5 viewsPatard de 1 denier parisis et demi, argent, 20 mm, 1,10 g
Annelet sous la 3ème lettre pour Embrun

D/ + LVDO — PRMOG — FRAN — REGS (A et N liées), Croix carrée et pattée, cantonnée au 2 d'un dauphin tourné vers la droite et au 3 d'un lis
R/ + DALPHS — VIENESIS, Ecusson carré contenant 4 cercles, avec dans le 1 et le 4, un lis et dans le 2 et le 3, un dauphin tourné vers la gauche.

Poey d'Avant n° 4935 - Morin Pons n° 62
Gabalor
Medaillen_Artemis_09_fac.jpg
Delamarre, Artemis7 viewsArtemis
Medal by Raymond Delamarre
1890–1986

Raymond Delamarre (1890–1986) was a French sculptor and medalist. His output in both spheres was huge, and he played a major role in the Art Déco movement. (wikipedia)

Obv: ARTEMIΣ, Artemis running left, stag behind, squirrel underneath
Rev: Bow, quiver, horn and rifle
AE, 50mm, 69g
Ref.: Monnaie de Paris M. 2227
shanxi
204.JPG
Deuxième république - 10 centimes - Concours de 1848, Paris. 4 views10 centimes, cuivre, 30 mm, 10,18 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE 1848 // 3 CENTIMETRES, 20 GRAMMES de part et d'autre d'un trait.
Réfs : Gadoury 240 R/d, concours de Rogat
Gabalor
225.JPG
Deuxième république - 20 francs - Concours de 1848, Paris. 3 views20 francs, étain, 21 mm, 2,75 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête à droite.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, dans une couronne de feuillages, 20 FRANCS 1848.
Réfs : Gadoury 1038, concours de Boivin
Gabalor
264.JPG
Deuxième république - 20 francs - Concours de 1848, Paris.4 views20 francs, étain, 21 mm, 3,32 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, buste à droite.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, dans une couronne de feuillages 20 FRANCS 1848.
Réfs : Gadoury 1054, concours de Montagny
Gabalor
205~0.JPG
Deuxième république - 5 francs - Concours de 1848, Paris.1 views5 francs, étain, 37 mm, 17,54 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, dans une couronne de feuillages 5 FRANCS 1848.
Réfs : Gadoury 713, concours de Tournier
Gabalor
152~2.JPG
Deuxième république - 5 francs - Concours de 1848, Paris.4 views5 francs, étain, 37 mm, 17,43g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, buste à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, dans une couronne de feuillages 5 FRANCS 1848.
Réfs : Gadoury 701, concours de Magniadas
Gabalor
144.JPG
Deuxième république - Cérès - 1 franc - 1849 Paris.3 viewsArgent, 23 mm, 4,91 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 1 FRANC 1849 dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.-211.1 (1.328.135 ex.)
Gabalor
255~0.JPG
Deuxième république - Cérès - 20 centimes - 1850 Paris.4 viewsArgent, 15 mm, 0,97 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 CENT 1850 dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.-146.3
Gabalor
016~3.JPG
Deuxième république - Cérès - 20 centimes - 1851 Paris.3 viewsArgent, 15 mm, 0,96 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE, 20 CENT 1851 dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.-146.7
Gabalor
146~4.JPG
Deuxième république - Concours de 1848, Paris - Concours de Domard.8 views10 centimes, cuivre, 30 mm, 10,45 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête à gauche.
R/ LIBERTE EGALITE FRATERNITE 1848, dans une couronne de feuillages 10 CENTS.
Réfs : Gadoury 224 R/b
Gabalor
141~0.JPG
Deuxième république - Dupré - 1 centime - 1848 Paris.4 viewsBronze, 18 mm, 1,97 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République coiffée du bonnet frygien à gauche.
R/ UN CENTIME 1848
Réfs : F.-101.1
Gabalor
261~0.JPG
Deuxième république - Dupré - 1 centime - 1849 Paris.5 viewsBronze, 18 mm, 1,99 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République coiffée du bonnet frygien à gauche.
R/ UN CENTIME 1849
Réfs : F.-101.2
Gabalor
263.JPG
Deuxième république - Dupré - 1 centime - 1850 Paris.7 viewsBronze, 18 mm, 1,96 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République coiffée du bonnet frygien à gauche.
R/ UN CENTIME 1850
Réfs : F.-101.5
Gabalor
022~5.JPG
Deuxième république - Dupré - 1 centime - 1851 Paris.5 viewsBronze, 18 mm, 2 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République coiffée du bonnet frygien à gauche.
R/ UN CENTIME 1851
Réfs : F.-101.7
Gabalor
217~0.JPG
Deuxième république - Dupré - 1 centime - 1851 Paris. 2 viewsBronze, 18 mm, 1,98 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République coiffée du bonnet frygien à gauche.
R/ UN CENTIME 1851
Réfs : F.-101.8 (sans accent sur le E de République)
Gabalor
diadumenian_marcianopolis.jpg
Diadumenian, 
Crescent moon with three stars above, AE 1738 viewsDiadumenian, Marcianopolis in Lower Moesia. 217-218 A.D. 16x17mm, 2.30g. 
Obverse: (M OΠEΛΛI)OC ANTΩNEINOC (the N and E ligate). 
Bare-headed and draped bust right. 
Reverse: (MAPK)IANOΠOΛEIT(ΩN ) 
Crescent moon with three stars above. 
The characters in brackets are not discernible on this specimen, but are known to be accurate by comparison with a photo of a die matched specimen in Megaw's "Diadumenian". 
Reference: AMNG 1 809; Varbanov I (English) 1320; Megaw MAR 1.6b. Ex MoremothPodiceps
197~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 1 centime - AN 6, Paris3 viewsBronze, 15 mm, 1,75 g.
Variante 53/36 perles
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ En trois lignes, UN // CENTIME // L'AN 6.
Réfs : F.100.4
Gabalor
260~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 1 centime - AN 6, Paris3 viewsBronze, 15 mm, 1,95 g.
Variante 53/50 perles
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ En trois lignes, UN // CENTIME // L'AN 6.
Réfs : F.100.2
Gabalor
276~1.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 1 centime - AN 7, Paris8 viewsBronze, 15 mm, 2,04 g.
53/50 perles
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ En trois lignes, UN // CENTIME // L'AN 7.
Réfs : F.100.8
Gabalor
215~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 1 centime - AN 8, Paris6 viewsBronze, 15 mm, 2,53 g.
53/50 perles
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ En trois lignes, UN // CENTIME // L'AN 8.
Réfs : F.100.10
Gabalor
120~1.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 1 centime - L'AN - - Paris, date absente.3 viewsBronze, 15 mm, 1,88 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ En trois lignes, UN // CENTIME // L'AN.
Réfs : F.100
Gabalor
187~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 2 décimes - AN 4 Paris.3 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 14,98 g.
Atelier de Paris
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ 2 DECIMES // L'AN 4 A.
Réfs : F.145.1
Gabalor
237.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 2 décimes - AN 5 Paris.4 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 17,36 g.
Atelier de Paris
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ 2 DECIMES // L'AN 5 A.
Réfs : F.145.5
Gabalor
106~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 5 centimes - AN 4 Paris.4 viewsCuivre, 23 mm, 5,15 g.
Atelier de Paris
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ 5 CENTIMES // L'AN 4 A.
Réfs : F.113.1
Gabalor
310.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 5 centimes - AN 5 Paris3 viewsBronze, 28 mm, 10,42 g
Atelier de Paris
Variante avec CNNQ (les 2 N liés)
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ Dans une couronne de feuillages, en trois lignes, CNNQ // CENTIMES // L'AN 5
Réfs : F.114.1 var.
Gabalor
264~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - 5 centimes - AN 5 Paris5 viewsCuivre, 27 mm, 9,97 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ CINQ CENTIMES // L'AN 5 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.115.14 (26.245.002 ex.)
Gabalor
093~6.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - Décime - AN 4 Paris.4 viewsCuivre, 28 mm, 9,47 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ DECIME // L'AN 4 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.126.2 (3.517.156 ex.)
Gabalor
253~0.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - Décime - AN 4 Paris.4 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 16,80 g, modification du 2 décimes.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ UN DECIME // L'AN 4 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.127.1 (--- ex.)
Gabalor
164~2.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - Décime - AN 5 Paris.6 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 18,19 g, modification du 2 décimes.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ UN DECIME // L'AN 5 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.127.3 (--- ex.)
Gabalor
075.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - Décime - AN 5 Paris.3 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 18,78 g, refrappe sur 2 décimes.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ UN DECIME // L'AN 5 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.128.1 (--- ex.)
Gabalor
098~5.JPG
Directoire - Dupré - Décime - AN 7 Paris.5 viewsCuivre, 32 mm, 20,82 g.
A/ REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE, tête de la République à gauche, coiffée d'un bonnet phrygien.
R/ UN DECIME // L'AN 7 A, dans une couronne de feuillages.
Réfs : F.129.12 (5 585 991 ex.)
Gabalor
D847.jpg
Domitia RIC 847112 viewsAR Cistophorus
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD (Domitian)
Obv: DOMITIA AVGVSTA; Bust of Domitia, draped r., hair massed in front and in long plait behind
Rev: VENVS AVG; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 847 (R). BMC 256. RSC 19. RPC 870 (8 spec.). BNC 226.
Ex CNG E424, 11 July 2018, lot 471.

A brief issue of cistophori were struck for Domitia as Augusta under Domitian in 82. Venus leaning on column was the sole reverse type chosen for her rare cistophori. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the home mint. K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary Rome mint denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. At 80% silver fineness these early cistophori were likely struck before Domitian's major coinage reform of 82 when the denarius was raised to nearly 100% fineness.

Domitia Longina was the daughter of the famed Roman general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo who was commanded to commit suicide by Nero for alleged treason. Domitian courted and married Domitia soon after Vespasian's accession, despite her already being the wife of Aelius Lamia. It was a good match - distancing the Flavians from the reign of Nero and uniting them to a beloved general's family. Soon after Domitian become emperor, Suetonius tells us he briefly divorced Domitia because of an adulterous affair she had with the actor Paris. Dio claims Domitian actually considered executing her but was persuaded from doing so by the praetorian prefect Ursus. He soon reunited with her after a brief separation alleging the people demanded it. Where this coin fits into that time frame is hard to tell. We don't know exactly when the divorce occurred or how long it lasted. However, it is likely this coin was struck after their reconciliation and can be seen as symbolically strengthening Domitia's position at court.

Struck in fine early style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
D31.JPG
Domitian RIC 31134 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS VII DES VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 31 (R2). BMC 7. RSC 59. BNC 7.

A rare "PONT" denarius minted very early in Domitian's reign. The "T" in PONT is just off flan. The "PONT" denarii were minted before Domitian completed the religious rites required to be Pontifex Maximus. Same obverse die as the BM and Paris specimens (BMC 7 & BNC 7).

A coin only a collector could love. Corroded and polished (!), but still lovely, IMHO.

NB: Thanks to Curtis Clay for additional attribution assistance.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
domitian_65var.jpg
Domitian RIC II, 65 var.143 viewsDomitian AD 81-96
AR - denar, 3.45g, 19.78mm
obv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG - GERM PM TRP IIII (with line above)
head laureate r.
Medusa head with wings, snakes, aegis on shoulder of portrait
rev. IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P
Minerva, draped, standing l. with spear
(Minerva type 4)
RIC II, 65 var; BMC 80; Paris 83; RSC 180a
Scarce; EF, exquisite obverse and very elegant reverse
added to www.wildwinds.com

RIC and Cohen have POTES in rev. legend!
One of my nicest coins.
6 commentsJochen
D184sma.jpg
Domitian RIC-18469 viewsAR Denarius, 2.93g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 184 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

In 82 AD when Domitian overhauled the mint and increased the fineness of the denarius, he also apparently brought in new engravers who began working in a more elaborate, idealised style. The second denarius issue of 84 is the first to employ the new style and it would dominate the denarius issues for the rest of Domitian's reign. Domitian adopted the title GERMANICVS in the first issue of 84, shortening it to GERMANIC here in the second issue, all of which are extremely rare. This denarius from that second issue is a fine example of the new idealised style with its large portrait and delicately rendered features. RIC cites two specimens of the type, none of which are in the BM or Paris. Notably, the coin is a detectorist find from outside the boundaries of the Empire in Eastern Europe.

Darkly toned and somewhat porous (which accounts for the low weight).
4 commentsDavid Atherton
D342_2012.jpg
Domitian RIC-342139 viewsAR Denarius, 3.13g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP•CAES DOMIT AVG•GERM P M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 342 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection. Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

Another very rare denarius from a brief series minted in 85. Interesting to note that two silver medallions (4 and 8 denarii weight) were minted in this series. Not in London or Paris. RIC cites Berlin and the Jyrki Muona collection (this coin).

Struck on a large flan (21 mm) and toned almost a chocolate brown. The portrait is pretty stylish too. Same reverse die as the RIC plate coin.
This is a wonderful coin in hand.

Thanks to Harry Sneh for additional info.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
D344.jpg
Domitian RIC-34499 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD (fifth issue)
Obv: IMP•CAES•DOMIT AVG•GERM•P•M TR P V; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP•VIIII COS XI CENS•POT P•P•; Minerva stg. l., with thunderbolt and spear; shield at her side (M3)
RIC 344 (R2). BMC -. RSC 186. BNC 87.
Ex CNG E363, 11 November 2015, lot 319.

An extremely rare denarius from the fifth issue of 85. Coined shortly after Domitian reduced the fineness of the denarius by 5% to the old Neronian level after having raised it in 82 to the Augustan standard. RIC cites Paris and Oxford with examples of this type.

Struck on a large flan (21 mm!) in superb fine style.

4 commentsDavid Atherton
D521.jpg
Domitian RIC-52170 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome mint, 87 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG - GERM P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 521 (C). BMC 114. RSC 222. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 724. Ex Berk 170, 29 July 2010, lot 175.

A denarius listed as common, but really isn't as common as one would think. According to C. Clay only one listed in the Reka Devina hoard and none in the Paris collection. TR P VII dates this to the second issue of 87.

In a pleasing style and large flan (22 mm).
4 commentsDavid Atherton
D577b.jpg
Domitian RIC-57783 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 88 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERMAN P M TR P VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XIIII COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 577 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

At first glance this Domitian Minerva denarius is nothing special, however, upon closer inspection one can see the obverse legend has the rare GERMAN spelling instead of the very common GERM. RIC cites only two specimens - one in Belgrade, another in a private collection. This is a very common issue from 88, but unusually it is peppered with scarce variants, such as this rare obverse legend. Other rarities include busts with aegis and a unique 5 aurei piece (subsequently stolen from Paris). Perhaps it's a special issue struck in conjunction with the Secular Games which were held in 88.

Worn, but with a fine style portrait.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_Dupondius.jpg
Domitian, AE Dupondius. 26 mm / 9,96 gr. 88-89 AD.13 viewsDomitian: Caesar under Vespasian 69-79 AD; Caesar under Titus 79-81 AD; Augustus 81-96 AD.

Domitian, AE Dupondius. 26 mm / 9,96 gr. 88-89 AD.
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER PP, radiate head right with aegis / VIRTVTI AVGVSTI S-C, Virtus standing right, foot on helmet, holding spear and parazonium. RIC II 645; Paris 447; cf Sear 2798 (consular year). RIC 645
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
JLTISE02-2.jpg
Domitian, RIC 717, for Julia Titi, Sestertius of AD 92-94 (Carpentum)29 viewsÆ Sestertius (23,63g, Ø 32mm, 6h). Rome, AD 92-94.
Obv.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XVI CENS PER P P around large S·C, .
Rev.: DIVAE IVLIAE AVG DIVI TITI F around, SPQR in ex, Carpentum right drawn by two mules right; the tilt rests on standing figures at each corner, three corners showing; draperies or guirlands on the side of the body of the carpentum; six spokes in wheel.
RIC Domitian 717; BMC 458; Cohen (Julia) 9 (15fr); Roman Historical Coins 93/40
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015.

Issued in honour of the consecration of Julia Titi, daughter of Titus, in AD 91.
Charles S
EB0560_scaled.JPG
EB0560 Gallienus / Apollon Propylaeus13 viewsGallienus, 253-268 AD, AE 28 of Cremna (Kremna), Pisidia.
Obv: [IMP] C PV LI GALL[IENVM], laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: COL IVL [AVG CREM], Apollon Propylaeus with bow and arrow advancing right.
References: SNG BN Paris 1523; Hans von Aulock, Pisidien 1536.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 4.919 grams.
EB
Elagabal_Antioch_Genius_AE23_6_21g.jpg
Elagabal, Antioch, Genius, AE2368 viewsPisidia, Antioch. Elagabalus, 218-222 AD.
AE 23mm (6.21 gm).
obv.: IMP CAES M AVR ANTONINVS, laureate head right.
rev.: ANTIOCH COL CAS, Genius standing facing, holding cornucopiae and ears of corn.
SNG BN Paris 1182 (same obverse die)

ex Tom Vossen
1 commentsareich
elagabalus_ar-denrius_abundantia_3_0gr_w-quarter_o_07.JPG
Elagabalus (AD 218 - 222) AR Denarius - Abundantia8 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Silver Denarius of Emperor Varius 'Elagabalus' Antoninus.
Struck at the Rome Mint.

obv: IMP ANTONINUS PIUS AUG - Laureate bust of Emperor facing right, draped.

rev: ABUNDANTIA AUG - Abundantia standing facing left, emptying the contents of a cornucopia. Star in right field.

3.0 Grams, 21mm.
-----------------------------------
*Notes: Large flan for an Elagabalus AR Denarius. Photos with U.S. Quarter (25 cents) for size comparison.
-----------------------------------
rexesq
elagabalus_ar-denrius_abundantia_3_0gr_w-n-q_o_06_r_03_001.JPG
Elagabalus (AD 218 - 222) AR Denarius - Abundantia16 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Silver Denarius of Emperor Varius 'Elagabalus' Antoninus.
Struck at the Rome Mint.

obv: IMP ANTONINUS PIUS AUG - Laureate bust of Emperor facing right, draped.

rev: ABUNDANTIA AUG - Abundantia standing facing left, emptying the contents of a cornucopia. Star in right field.

3.0 Grams, 21mm.
-----------------------------------
*Notes: Large flan for an Elagabalus AR Denarius. Photos with U.S. Quarter (25 cents) for size comparison.
-----------------------------------
rexesq
elagabalus_ar-denrius_abundantia_3_0gr_w-quarter_o_04.JPG
Elagabalus (AD 218 - 222) AR Denarius - Abundantia7 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Silver Denarius of Emperor Varius 'Elagabalus' Antoninus.
Struck at the Rome Mint.

obv: IMP ANTONINUS PIUS AUG - Laureate bust of Emperor facing right, draped.

rev: ABUNDANTIA AUG - Abundantia standing facing left, emptying the contents of a cornucopia. Star in right field.

3.0 Grams, 21mm.
-----------------------------------
*Notes: Large flan for an Elagabalus AR Denarius. Photos with U.S. Quarter (25 cents) for size comparison.
-----------------------------------
rexesq
elagabalus_ar-denrius_abundantia_3_0gr_o_04_r_03.JPG
Elagabalus (AD 218 - 222) AR Denarius - Abundantia27 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Silver Denarius of Emperor Varius 'Elagabalus' Antoninus.
Struck at the Rome Mint.

obv: IMP ANTONINUS PIUS AUG - Laureate bust of Emperor facing right, draped.

rev: ABUNDANTIA AUG - Abundantia standing facing left, emptying the contents of a cornucopia. Star in right field.

3.0 Grams, 21mm.
-----------------------------------
*Notes: Large flan for an Elagabalus AR Denarius. Photos with U.S. Quarter (25 cents) for size comparison.
-----------------------------------
4 commentsrexesq
60319LG.jpg
Elis, Olympia191 viewsOlympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I, or possibly his grandson Theodosius II in 435, abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism.

The sanctuary itself consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. To the north of the sanctuary can be found the prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the palaistra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. Enclosed within the temenos are the temples of Hera and Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the East.

Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the temple of Zeus (see photo of ruins below) which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion.

Excavation of the Olympia temple district and its surroundings began with a French expedition in 1829. German archaeologists continued the work in the latter part of the 19th century. The latter group uncovered, intact, the Hermes of Praxiteles statue, among other artifacts. In the middle of the 20th Century, the stadium where the running contests took place was excavated.

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held.

When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium.

The ancient ruins sits north of the Alfeios River and lies next to Cronius or Kronios hill (the hill of Kronos, or Saturn). Kladeos, a tributary of Alfeios, flows around the area.

The town has a school and a square (plateia). Tourism is popular throughout the late-20th century. The city has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station which the freight yard is west of it is about 300 m east of the town centre.

It is linked by GR-74 and the new road was opened in the 1980s, the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. Distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passed north of the ancient ruins.

A reservoir is located 2 km southwest damming up the Alfeios river and has a road from Olympia and Krestena which in the late-1990s has been closed.

The area is hilly and mountainous, most of the area within Olympia is forested.

Elis, Olympia. After ca. 340/30-late 3rd century B.C. Æ unit (20 mm, 5.99 g). Laureate head of Zeus right / FA above, horse trotting right; [L]U below. BCD 339.3 (this coin). Near VF, dark brown patina.
Ex BCD Collection. Ex-John C Lavender G18
ecoli73
nymph.jpg
Etenna, Nymph/ curved knife5 viewsPisidia, Etenna, 1st Century B.C. AE 15mm, 2.1g
Obverse: Nymph walking right Reverse: ET-EN, Curved knife, SNG BN Paris 1536. Ex Jerome Holderman

Podiceps
Etenna.png
Etenna, Pisidia16 viewsEtenna, Pisidia. AE15. 1st C. BC. Two male figures, naked, chlamys over shoulders, each holding bipennis (double axe) and sickle or crooked knives, running side-by-side / Female figure advancing right, grappling with snake which is rearing up, attacking her. Overturned amphora to left. Von Aulock, Pisidia II, 433; SNG BN Paris 1533. Rob D
Faustina_II_Bust_and_Denarius.jpg
Faustina II Portraits Comparison29 viewsAntonivs Protti
FAVJAS05.jpg
Faustina Jr, RIC (A. Pius) RIC 1410, As of AD 152-154 (Venus) 88 viewsÆ As (5.99g, Ø25mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 152-154.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVG (PII AVG FIL), draped bust of Faustina Minor facing right, one string of pearls in hair.
Rev.: VENVS (around) S C (in field), Venus standing right holding apple and drawing cloak over her right shoulder.
RIC 1410; BMC 2169; Cohen 257
ex iNumis, Paris
Charles S
FAVJSE24-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1717, Sestertius of AD 176-180 (biga)62 viewsÆ Sestertius (28,76g, Ø 32mm, 12h). Rome, AD 176-180.
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA PIA, draped bust right, hair knotted behind.
Rev.: SIDERIBVS RECEPTA around, S | C, Faustina, with veil flying behind head, in biga right.
RIC Marcus Aurelius 1717 (R); BMC 1591; Cohen 217 (25 fr.); Banti 123 (5 spec.)
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015

"Received amongst the stars".
1 commentsCharles S
FAVSSE17-2.jpg
Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1141, sestertius of AD 145 (carpentum) 30 viewsÆ Sestertius (23,53g, Ø 31mm, 12h). Rome, AD 145.
Obv.: DIVA AVGVSTA FAVSTINA, draped bust right with hair waived & coiled on top head.
Rev.: EX S C in ex., ornamented carpentum drawn right by two mules.
RIC Antoninus Pius 1141 (R2); Cohen 199 (40 fr.); Strack 683 (P (carpentum w. 5 statues)); Banti 66 (2 spec.)
Ex Boule (Paris), Mail Bid Auction 107, Oct. 2015.
Portrait tooled
1 commentsCharles S
2599LG.jpg
FAUSTINA Sr. (138 - 141 AD)262 viewsAR Denarius

Lifetime Issue

O: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: IVNONI REGINAE, Peacock seated on throne and scepter behind.
Rome
18mm
3.5g
RIC-340, RSC-221 BMC (Antoninus Pius) 145 (same reverse die)

Ex Robert Kutcher Collection (Triton X, 8 January 2007), lot 1606 (part of)

Ex.Hixenbaugh Ancient Art Ltd

Published on Wildwinds!

Thank you Curtis Clay for the following info!

It's in Cohen 221, citing Paris, and hence in RIC 340, citing Cohen.
BM 145 has one from the Bank of England Coll., pl. 4.7, same rev. die as yours.
Strack 221 cites specimens in BM, Paris, and Vienna, plus one with portrait left, in Berlin, ill. pl. VI.
None in Reka Devnia hoard, an indication of rarity.
14 commentsMat
Lg004N_quad_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)11 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half.

Ӕ, 23-24mm, 9.15g, die axis 11h

Another of this type:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151025
See more info there.

Their comparison:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-151893
Yurii P
FH-G-001_(0s).jpg
FH-G-00111 viewsCilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala; 200-0 BC; bronze AE22

- Draped, veiled & turreted bust of Tyche right

- ΙΕΡΟ / ΠΟΛΙΤΩΝ / ΤΩΝ ΠΡΟΣ ΤΩΙ / ΠΥΡΑΜΩΙ
- IERO / POLITWN / TWN PROS TWI / PURAMWI
- upper body of river-god Pyramos swimming right, holding eagle in right hand outstretched behind him.

8.5gm / 22mm / Axis: 0

References:
SNG Levante 1569
SNG Cop 144
BMC Cilicia pg. 82, 3
SG 5549
SNG BN Paris 2217

Notes: Dec 2, 15 - This coin is a die match to coin from collection of Roland Müller, St. Gallen, listed on acsearch here: http://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=625515
Jonathan P
Fides_Militum_Cldc.jpg
Fides Militvm Cldc43 viewsObverse: IMPCAESMAVRSEVALEXANDERAVG
Bust laureate right, draped and cuirassed
Reverse: FIDES_MI_LITVM SC left and right in field
Fides draped, standing front, head left, holding a vertical standard in each hand
BMC 228 (see note C 54, Paris), RIC 552
Weight, 24.13g; die axis, 12h.
1 commentsmix_val
RIC10b.jpg
First_RIC 892 viewsThis is a new picture of my long-time favourite. Comes from an old Italian collection the story goes - thank you Ed for that. Luckily the name is mostly off flan so I could "afford" it. As a type without comparison the commonest Otho. 3.55 gr, die-axis 7.1 commentsjmuona
127.jpg
flaviosngparis21871 viewsElagabalus
Flaviopolis, Cilicia

Obv: M AVP ANTΩNεINOC. laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
Rev: ΦΛΑVΙΟΠΟΛƐΙΤΩΝ ƐΤ ϚΜΡ. Draped bust of Sarapis, r., wearing kalathos.
32 mm, 18.82 gms

SNG France 2187, BMC 10
Charles M
fibulae_Q-001-s.jpg
For comparison.97 viewsFor comparison.quadrans
FF_Gien.JPG
France (Feudal): Gien (County of Donzy). Geoffrey III (1120-1160) or Herve III (1160-1194).24 viewsBoudeau 297, Poey d'Avant 1998 (p. 42 no. 21), Duplessy 605, Legros 1565, Roberts 1497-8

AR denier, struck 1120-1191, 19 mm.

Obv: + GOSEDVS COS (Geoffroi, count), cross with staff and hammer in second angle and triangles in other three angles.

Rev: + GIEMIS CA (Castle of Gien), degraded monogram of Fulk of Anjou (legend begins at 9 o’clock).

The deniers of Gien were derived from those of Angers and bear a degraded monogram of Fulk of Angers. The reason for this is unclear as the regions are far apart and there is no connection between them. Standards of weight and fineness appear to have been similar, as records from 1202-3 value the denier giennois at 1.5 deniers parisis and the denier angevin at 1.46 d.p.

The deniers are struck in the name of a Count Geoffrey, and the type may have begun under Geoffrey II (1169-1184) or more probably Geoffrey III (1120-1160), but was immobilized after 1160. The coin is variously attributed to either or both of them, and also to Herve III (1160-1194). It ceased to be minted in 1191 when King Phillip II Augustus (1180-1223) acquired Gien and closed its mint.
Stkp
chas x.jpg
FRANCE - CHARLES X168 viewsFRANCE -- Silver 1/2 Franc, 1827-A (Paris Mint).dpaul7
monneron_frere_FRANCE.jpg
FRANCE - First Republic - Monneron Freres81 viewsFRANCE - First Republic - Monneron Freres of Paris issue - 39.5 mm - AE 5 Sols, 1792 (L'AN IV) - A medal used as money. KM#Tn-31dpaul7
HENRI_III_DBL_TOURNOIS.jpg
FRANCE - Henri III174 viewsFRANCE - Henri III (1574 - 1589). Obverse: HENRI • III • R • DE • FRAN • ET • POL • A • (Henry the Third King of France and Poland). Laureate bust of King Henry III right. The A is the Paris Mint Mark.
Reverse: DOVBLE • TOVRNOIS • 1578 • + • Three Flur-de-lis.
dpaul7
FRANCE_HENRI_IV_DBL_TOURN_1608.jpg
FRANCE - Henri IV 95 viewsFRANCE - Henri IV (1589-1610) Cu Double Tournois, 1608-A, Paris Mint. Obv.: Laureate bust right, in circle. Mintmark A below bust, . HENRI . IIII . R . DE . FRAN . ET . NAV . Rev.: Three Fleur-de-Lis in circle; + DOVBLE . TOVRNOIS . 1608 . Reference: KM 16.1dpaul7
FRANCE_JETON_PVCA_AD_SENEFFAM.jpg
FRANCE - Jeton, Louis XIV132 viewsFRANCE -- Jeton, brass. Theme: Victory at Battle of Seneffe. Made by Lazarus Gottlieb Lauffer, Nuremberg, Germany, 1663-1709. Obverse: Bust of Louis XIV., to r.: LVDOVICVS . MAGNUS . REX . LGL. under bust. Reverse: Winged Victory flying above field of military equipment with armour, weapons, flags; carrying a flag in right hand and laurel wreath in left: PVCNA AD . SENEFFAM . Weight: 4.56 grams, 25.9 mm. Reference: Mitchiner.1808.
The Battle of Seneffe was fought on 11 August 1674 between French army under the command of Louis II de Bourbon, Prince de Condé and the Dutch-German-Spanish army under William III of Orange. During the Franco-Dutch war, William III commanded a Dutch-German-Spanish army through the southern Netherlands into the territory of Northern France. France defended this area with an army under Louis II de Bourbon, Prince de Condé. For five weeks the two armies manoeuvred without getting into combat with each other. On the 10th of August, William III decided to head for Paris in order to force the enemy into fighting. Condé sent a detachment of about 500 horsemen to keep the Dutch vanguard busy near the village of Seneffe, blocking the advance of William. In the meantime, Condé tried to surround the 60,000 allied troops with the 45,000 men at his disposal. The horsemen managed to keep the Dutch vanguard busy, but the envelopment of the main allied force failed. After ten hours Condé had 8,000 dead or wounded and William - 11,000. Both armies retreated from the battlefield and although the battle was indecisive; both sides claimed victory.
dpaul7
ARdenierLouisVIII19mm_95g.jpg
FRANCE - LOUIS VIII (The Lion)16 viewsTournois Denier.
Obverse: Cross, legend: LVDOVICVS REX.
Reverse: Crude castle or cathedral:TVRONVS CIVI.
Mint:Tours
1223-1226
19mm
.95g
ex Boutin, Paris 1963
ex CNG lot 651 4/17
wileyc
LOUIS_XIV_AR_4.jpg
FRANCE - Louis XIV237 viewsFRANCE - Louis XIV (1643-1675) AR 4 Sols, 1676, Paris mint. KM #232.1. Obv.: Bust right. .LVDOVICVS. .XIIII.D. GRA. Rev.: Crowned fleur-de-lis cross, A (Paris) mintmark in center; date divided by crown. .FRAN.ET.NAVARRAE.REX. KM#232.1.dpaul7
louis_xiii_1649_DT.jpg
FRANCE - Louis XIV196 viewsFRANCE - Louis XIV (1643-1715) AE Denier Tournois, 1649. Paris mint. Obv.: Head right, LOVIS. .XIIII. Rev.: 2 Fleur-De-Lis, A below in center; +DENIER.TOVRNOIS.1649. KM #167.dpaul7
LOUIS_XVI_GENIUS.jpg
FRANCE - Louis XVI180 viewsFRANCE - Louis XVI (1774-1792) AR 15 Sols, Year 3 - 1791. Paris mint. C-90.1.dpaul7
FRANCE_15_SOLS_1791A.jpg
FRANCE - Louis XVI51 viewsFRANCE - Louis XVI (17744-1792) Silver 15 Sols, 1791-A, Paris Mint. Obv.: Bust left, LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANCOIS Date 1791 below bust. Duck below bust. Rev.: Standing genius writing the constitution, divides value, REGNE DE LA LOI above, in exergue: L'AN 3 DE LA LIBERTE. Reference: KM #604.1dpaul7
FRANCE_NAP_I_1FR_AN_13.jpg
FRANCE - Napoleon I105 viewsFRANCE - Napoleon I (First Reign - 1804-1814) AR 1 Franc, L'An 13. (1804). Bust of Napoleon right; NAPOLEON EMPEREUR. Designer signature below bust. reverse: 1 FRANC in wreath; "REPUBLIQUE FRANCAISE" and Rooster mark - .AN 13. .A. Mintmark (Paris). KM#656.1.dpaul7
PhilipIIAugustus.jpg
FRANCE - PHILIP II AUGUSTUS153 viewsPhilip II Augustus 1180 - 1223 Arras - Denier. Parisis D 164. Ex-Maskukat Collection.
dpaul7
FRANCE_PHILIP_IV_PARISIS_1.jpg
FRANCE - PHILIP IV59 viewsFRANCE -- Philippe IV, le Bel (The Fair) (1285-1314) - Double Parisis (1st emission, 1295-1303). Floreate cross; + PhILIPPVS REX Rev.: REGA / LIS under a fleur de lis. mOnETA. DVPLEX around. Reference: Lafaurie 232.dpaul7
France_1825_5_Fr.JPG
France, Charles X, 1824 - 183010 viewsObv: CHARLES X ROI DE FRANCE, bare-headed bust facing left.

Rev: 5 F, crowned shield within a laurel wreath, 1825 A below.

Silver 5 Francs

Paris mint
SPQR Coins
France_1792_Ecu.JPG
France, Louis XVI 1774 - 179228 viewsObv: LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANÇOIS 1792, bare-headed bust facing left.

Rev: REGNE DE LA LOI, An angel inscribing "CONSTITUTION" a tablet atop a short column, fasces topped with the cap of liberty in field to left, a rooster facing left in field to right; in exergue: L'AN 4 DE LA LIBERTE.

Silver Ecu

Paris mint, L'an 4, 1792 A

Constitutional Era, Second Semester

29.6 grams, 38.6 mm
SPQR Coins
France_1813_5_Fr.JPG
France, Napoleon Bonaparte, First Reign, 1804 - 181413 viewsObv: NAPOLEON EMPEREUR, laureate head of Napoleon facing right.

Rev: EMPIRE FRANÇAIS – 1813, 5 FRANCS within a laurel wreath.

Silver 5 Francs

Paris mint
SPQR Coins
Roman_Amphitheatre_Paris.jpg
France, Paris, Arena of Lutetia70 viewsThe Roman Arena that was discovered by Théodore Vaquer during the building of Rue Monge, in the 5th arrondissement, between 1860–1869. It was first built in the 1st century AD. Victor Hugo created a preservation committee called "la Société des Amis des Arènes" to preserve it. However in the photo, taken by me in May 2014, can be seen the line of apartments on Rue Monge that cover the remaining third of the Arena.Masis
Thermes_de_Cluny.jpg
France, Paris, Roman Baths60 viewsThe Roman Baths of Cluny, Paris. Dated to the 3rd century AD, thought to have been paid for by the guild of "Lutetian Boatmen". The complex is now incorporated into the National Museum of the Middle Ages. Photo taken by me in May 2014.Masis
France_1876_5_Fr.JPG
France, Third Republic14 viewsObv: LIBERTÉ ÉGALITÉ FRATERNITÉ, Hercules standing between two female figures, engraver's name Dupré signed between stars in exergue.

Rev: 5 FRANCS in two lines over 1876, surrounded by laurel and oak branches; bee, "REPUBLIQUE FRANÇAISE", anchor and A below.

Edge: DIEU PROTEGE LA FRANCE

Paris mint

Silver 5 Francs
SPQR Coins
JET_Monneron_Confidence_Token.jpg
France. Monneron Confidence Token10 viewsAE/copper token; valued at 2 Sols; designed by Augustin Dupré and minted in 1791 (the first pieces leaving the mint on November 3, 1791) on the Watt steam presses of Matthew Boulton’s Soho Mint, Birminghan, England, for Frères Monneron; 18.28 gr. (minted at 27 to the pound), 32 mm., 180°.

KM France TN23; Guilloteau.233l; Mazard153; Brandon 217c; Droulers.62; Bouchert 54/1; Hennin 342. Pl. 32.

Obv: France in the guise of Liberty seated, facing left, raising a spear surmounted by a Phrygian cap leaning on a tablet bearing the inscription DROITS / DE / L'HOMME / ARTIC. / V. (representing the Declaration of the Rights of Man), rooster on a pillar behind her, LIBERTE SOUS LA LOI (= Liberty Under the Law), L'AN III DE LA LIBERTE (= Year III/1791 of Liberty) in exergue.

Rev: MONNERON FRERES NEGOCIANS A PARIS (= Moneron Brothers, Merchats of Paris), MEDALLE / DE CONFIANCE / DE DEUX SOLS A / ECHANGER CONTRE / DES ASSIGNATS DE / 50L ET AU DESSUS / 1791 (= Medal of Confidence of Two Sols, to be Exchanged for Assignats of 50 Livres or Above, 1791).

Edge: ⁕ BON POUR BORD MARSEI ⁕. LYON ROUEN ⁕ NANT ET STRASB (= Good for Bordeaux, Marseilles, Lyon, Rouen, Nantes and Strasbourg).

Although the Bastille was stormed in 1789, the coinage of Louis XVI continued to be struck until 1792, with a new constitutional coinage in copper or bell-metal, silver and gold commencing in 1791. Thar coinage circulated alongside the ancien régime pieces, but did little to alleviate the shortage of specie. A short-term solution was attempted by the introduction of the assignats, which were paper money backed by confiscated church properties and land. Produced in vast quantities, the assignats eventually depreciated to the point of worthlessness. The tokens of Frères Monneron were issued in response to this situation.

The Monneron brothers, Jean-Louis (1742-1805), Pierre-Antoine (1747-1811), and Joseph-François-Augustin (1756-1824), were the sons of a Huguenot lawyer from Annonay, who made his fortune by buying the rights to receive the gabelle (salt tax) for the town of Annonay. By 1791, Joseph-François-Augustin obtained the right to strike copper token coinage. Production began in late 1791. However, in March 1792, Frères Monneron went bankrupt and Pierre-Antoine fled. His Francois-Augustin resumed the business, but a law of enacted on May 3, 1792 prohibited the manufacture of private coins. These currencies of necessity circulated only until the end of 1793.

The tokens were designed by the greatest engraver of the revolutionary era, Augustin Dupré (1748-1833), who had made his name as a medalist, producing many medals commemorating the American Revolution before becoming the Engraver General of the French mints in 1791.
Stkp
JET_Reich_Omnibus_Non_Sibi.jpg
France. Omnibus Non Sibi17 viewsFeuardent 13419; Hennin Plate XXV 244-245 var. (placement of pellets); LaTour 2306 Plate XXXVI, 9 var. (placement of pellets)

Jeton, brass; minted in 1791 by Johann Christian Reich (active 1758-1814) in Nuremburg;
24 mm., 180°

Obv: LVD • XVI D • G FR -- ET• NAV • REX, bust of Louis XVI facing left, REICH on shoulder.

Rev: OMNIBUS NON SIBI • (=for everyone but not for him), a basin with a water fountain in the middle, • IETON • (with pellet beneath the E) in exergue.

On October 5, 1789 Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were imprisoned by a Parisian crowd in the Tuileries Palace in Paris. On June 21, 1791, he and his family attempted an unsuccessful flight to Varennes. This jeton was minted during the king's captivity. The legend presumably has revolutionary significance.
Stkp
France_LouisVIII1223_1266.jpg
France: Denier Tournois Louis VIII10 viewsObv: Cross;LVDOVICVS REX
Rev: Church +TVRONVS CIVI
1223-1226 AD
19mm
.87g
DY#187
ex;Boutin Paris July 63
ex;CNG lot 651 4/17
wileyc
8.JPG
François II (1433-1488)14 viewsGros de Rennes
27-28mm
3,67g
+ : FRANCISCVS : BRITONVM : DVX : R : hermine :
"François Duc des Bretons"
Écu à six mouchetures d'hermine posées 3, 2 et 1
+ : SIT : NOMEN : DNI : BENEDICTVM : hermine :
"Béni soit le nom du Seigneur"
Croix formée de trois traits, les deux latéraux s'élargissant en feuilles, celui du milieu coupé se terminant par un fleuron, cantonnée de quatre points, R en cœur.
Jézéquel 414n3
de Mey 423
Bibliothèque National - Cabinet des Médailes de Paris : 834
Bigot 1226
PYL
_T2eC16R,!yME9s5qHBPLBRbdhCYbiw~~60_1.jpg
Frankreich. Medaille 1878 (Bronze) auf die Exposition Universelle zu Paris16 viewsVs.: Kopf nach links
Rs.: Schrift
Gewicht: 8,8g. Durchmesser: 29mm
Erhaltung: entfernter Henkel, min.Rdf., sehr schön _408
Antonivs Protti
Severus_Alexander_35.jpg
G162 viewsSeverus Alexander Denarius

Attribution: RIC 212, RSC 556
Date: AD 228-231
Obverse: IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVG, Victory stg. l., holding wreath and palm
Size: 19.4 mm
Weight: 3.30 grams
(Bust of Severus Alexander: Louvre, Paris)

After being granted the title of Caesar in AD 221, Severus Alexander was elevated to Augustus a year later upon the murder of Elagabalus. To be sure, however, the true power of Alexander’s reign did not lie in his hands, but rather in the cunning of his mother, Julia Mamaea. So much influence and persuasion did she have over her feeble son, that she arranged his marriage to a patrician girl named Orbiana, and then, fearing her father, had her exiled to North Africa and had her father killed. Although Alexander cared for his wife, he did nothing to oppose his mother. Throughout his entire reign, military unrest was a constant. Nevertheless, Alexander needed the military to face a resurging foe, the Persians. In AD 226, Persian king Ardashir or Artaxerxes, rose up against and defeated the Parthian king Artabanus. The great Persian Empire had returned and placed its attention on the territories recently conquered by the Romans in northern Mesopotamia. Alexander launched a campaign to fend off the invading Persians. The Persian War in AD 232 saw heavy losses on both sides and was not viewed as a great victory. No sooner had Alexander returned to Rome when he was brought news of the Germans breaching the Rhine frontier in numerous places. In AD 234, he mustered his troops to confront this new invasion. Alexander preferred diplomacy tried to bribe the Germans into leaving. His troops saw him as a coward and further despised him for limiting their pay and bonuses. They sought new leadership in a Thracian soldier named Maximinus. One morning in AD 235, Maximinus exited his tent and was adorned with the purple imperial cloak over his shoulders and declared emperor by the army. He pretended to be surprised, but this was a staged performance carefully planned out to shift power. Alexander was encamped nearby at Vicus Britannicus and became enraged at the news. Upon the approach of Maximinus and his troops the next day, Alexander’s troops abandoned him and changed sides. “Trembling and terrified out of his wits, Alexander just managed to get back to his tent. There, the reports say, he waited for his executioner, clinging to his mother and weeping and blaming her for his misfortunes…They burst into the tent and slaughtered the emperor, his mother, and all those thought to be his friends or favorites.” – Herodian VI.9
8 commentsNoah
tavium_nero_RPC3562.jpg
Galatia, Tavium, Nero, RPC 356224 viewsNero, AD 54-68
AE 25, 13.14g
struck 62-65
obv. [NERW]NOC - [CE]BASTOV
Head, laureate, r.
rev. [POP]PAIAC - CEB[ACTHC]
Bust of Poppaea, draped, r.; hair in thick braid, curls over forehead
RPC 3562; SGICV 662; SNG von Aulock 6117; SNG Paris 2400
VF
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

AD 62 Nero divorced Messalina to marry Poppaea. He has two children from her who died early.
AD 65 Nero killed her by kicking in her pregnant belly. Poppaea was totally amoralic - she was
responsible of some of Nero's murders - but famous for her beauty too. The depiction on the rev. gives
an impression of this .
Jochen
Galba.jpg
Galba AE AS93 viewsIMP SERV GALBA CAES AVG TR P?
Bare head of Galba right

VESTA SC
Vesta seated left holding Palladium and sceptre

July 68 - January 69 AD, Rome

10.18g

Thanks to Curtis Clay attribution:

Paris 186-187, both from the same die pair
Cohen 311
RIC 374, citing Glasgow 57
Jay GT4
Screen_Shot_2018-05-06_at_5_18_39_PM.png
Galba RIC 000957 viewsGalba. 68-69 AD. Denarius, 3.50gg. (5h). Tarraco. Obv: GALBA - IM[PERATOR] Head laureate right on globe. Rx: LIB - [ERTAS] - RESTITVTA Libertas standing left, apparently emptying a cup and holding scepter. BM 198, pl. 54.3. RIC 9 (R2), pl. 24 (the BM spec.). Cf. Paris 12, pl.III (apparently no globe below bust). Cohen 133 (120 Fr.).
Ex: Dr. Jyrki Muona
Ex: Gemini XIV Lot 475, May 2018

I have 3 denarii of Galba with a 4th on the way. I purchased this one because I really liked the portrait. The bust is of high relief and seems to almost jump off of the coin. As you can read in the attribution, this coin was purchased from the Gemini auction held by Harlan Berk. Before that this coin was the property of a well known collector-Dr. Jyrki Muona. This is my second Galba denarius from his collection. The other one is in an earlier post on this site.

Another interesting fact about this coin is where it was minted. This coin was minted in Spain, specifically in Tarraco. Spanish mint denarii of Galba are sought after and actively collected. I think that one of the reasons for this has to do the interesting portraits on these coins.

Of course the reverse on this coin is also interesting. Though the full legend is not on the reverse, it was supposed to read "Libertas Restitvta" or Liberty Restored. The suicide of Nero led to a civil war. As the next emperor it was in Galba's interest to present as rosy a picture of the empire as possible. The restoration of liberty would have been a popular message with the roman populace.
3 commentsorfew
galbse05-2.jpg
Galba, RIC unlisted, Sestertius of AD 68-69 (Libertas)101 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.2g, Ø33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 68-69.
Obv.: IMP SER GALBA CAES AVG P M TR P, laureate draped bust of Galba facing right.
Rev.: LIBERTAS PVBLICA (around) S C (field), Libertas standing left, holding pileus (liberty cap) and staff.
ex D.Ruskin (Oxford, 1997)

Not listed in RIC nor Cohen. Curtis Clay confirms that this is a new variety, giving the following additional information: "The obv. die is Kraay's A88, Aes of Galba pl. VII, known to him with rev. Victory holding Palladium, one spec., Paris = Giard 173, pl. XII = RIC 353. That's the only obv. die Kraay or RIC knew with this exact obv. legend and the laureate, draped bust. ... This LIBERTAS PVBLICA rev. die was apparently unknown to Kraay in any combination."
2 commentsCharles S
ID0180_Merged.jpg
Gallienus - Doe Left25 viewsObverse:- GALLIENVSAVG, Head right with radiate crown
Reverse:- DIANAECONS[AVG], Doe standing left, looking right
Exergue:- E
RIC 177 GOBL 727b CUNETIO 1365

This is likely to be a rare variation of the left standing doe looking right, where the front legs are in the reversed position to the usual type. This is only example I've personally seen so far. The Left standing Doe is a good deal more uncommon than Right standing Doe the Cunetio lists 37 verses 228, GOBL records 38 verses 227, while La Verena 16 against 128 .

As a note of caution when comparing the figures quoted in the Gobl with those of Cunetio / Verena or other hoards. Some of the examples pictures in Gobl are referenced as coming from these hoards, therefore it is probable that some of these coins were also likely to have been included in his survey figures. Since the total numbers in Gobl clearly don't included all the coins from Cunetio & Verena or other hoards, this "double bubble" comparison could potentially skew the figures (probably making rarer coins seem less rare). That said Gobl's figures are not so far away in terms of percentages from either the Cunetio or Verena hoards & this may well have been a deliberate undertaking by the author.
nogoodnicksleft
Gallienus_Antioch_Standards.jpg
Gallienus Antioch Standards21 viewsGallienus, Pisidia, Antioch, 253 - 268, 22mm, 5.01g, SNG Paris 1333 (but dissimilar), SNG Copenhagen - , SNG von Aulock
OBV: IMP GALL-IENVS PF AVG,  Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: ANTI OCH, S - R  Aquilia between standards, labarum in center

Very crude style which is somewhat typical of this mint and date
Romanorvm
germanicus_35.jpg
Germanicus RIC I, 35117 viewsGermanicus, died 19 BC, father of Gaius Caligula, brother of Claudius
AE - As, 10.95g, 27mm
Rome 37/38 (struck under Gaius)
obv. GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIV[I] AVG F
bare head l.
rev. C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
around big SC
RIC I, Gaius 35; C.1
nearly VF

For comparison with Claudius RIC I, 97!
Jochen
GetaStobi.JPG
Geta as Caesar, AE 26 Tetrassaria45 viewsP SEPTI GETA CA
Bust bare-headed, cuirassed, draped, right, seen from behind
MVNI STOBE
Nike advancing left with wreath and palm
Cohen 242-246, Lindgren 1149, Moushmov 6561-6562
Same obverse die (V4) as Josifovski 274, citing specimen in Paris 1163
Reverse die unlisted
Kuzmanovic Collection -
whitetd49
Gordian_Neocaesarea.jpg
Gordian III - Neocaesarea12 views241-242 AD
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right from behind
AV K M ANT ΓOPΔIANOC CEB
Agnostic table with Agnostic crown on top, palm below
KOI ΠONT (MH)__NEOKAICAPI
A
ET PON
Çizmeli 356; RPC 57 b; SNG Paris 1756.
14,5g
ex Galata Numismatic
Johny SYSEL
Gordian_III_Bust_and_Denarius_Comparison.JPG
Gordian III Portraits Comparison.45 views2 commentsAntonivs Protti
gordian~1.jpg
Gordian III Sestertius12 viewsGordian III AE Sestertius
Obv: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
Rev: [PM] TR P III COS [PP] , Gordian III riding horse left, raising hand and holding spear.

RIC 295a (R), Cohen 235 (Paris, 10 francs).
RARE
Bland found one spec. in BM, two in Vienna, one in Paris.

Tanit
ARP_-_Gordian_III(2)-3.jpg
Gordian III, Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, AE268 viewsAD 238 - 244
9.67 grams
Obv.: AVT K M ANT GORDIANOC AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Rev.: MARKIANOPOLITWN, Homonoia standing left, wearing kalathos, holding patera & cornucopiae, altar (or baetyl?) at foot to left.
Moushmov 770, Paris 1097 I don't understand this but Wildwinds shows two coins with these exact attributions but with different obverse and reverse legends. Typically different legends would necessitate different attributions.
NGC Ch XF Strike: 5/5 Surface: 3/5, lt. smoothing
This coin was purchased from eBay at the same time the seller also had this coin listed on his Vcoins website. The surface score of 3/5 is a result of this coin having light smoothing which is a condition that was not been stated in either the seller's two listings. I have found that failure to mention surface smoothing is typical and is something practiced by largest of auction houses down to the smallest of dealers.
Richard M10
Pergamon.jpg
Greek - Mysia, Pergamon2 viewsMetal/Size: AE20; Weight: 7.31 grams; Denomination: Drachm; Mint: Pergamon; Date: 200-133 BCE; Obverse: Laureate head of bearded Asklepios (ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ). Reverse: AΣKΛH[ΠIOY] - ΣΩTHPOΣ; Snake around omphalos. References: Lindgren/Kovacs #298; SNG BN Paris 5, #1806; BMC #129, 158;SNG France #1803.museumguy
Hermione_AE__ex-Pozzi_Collection-_3~0.jpg
GREEK, Argolis, Hermione, 360-320/10 BC, AE Chalkous - BCD Peloponnesos 1297194 viewsWreathed head of Demeter Chthonia left / Torch flanked by E- P, all within wreath of grain ears.
Grandjean Group I, emission 2B, d33/r30 (this coin illustrated) = Pozzi (Boutin) 4276 (this coin); BCD Peloponnesos 1297; SNG Copenhagen 140-3.
(13 mm, 2.48 g, 12h)
Classical Numismatic Group Mail Bid Sale 81 (20 May 2009) Lot 2511; ex- BCD Collection (not in LHS sale), purchased from Leu, January 1979; ex- S. Pozzi Collection, 4276 (Boutin).

This coin has a notable provenance, dating back to the turn of the twentieth century and the collection of the eminent Paris surgeon Professor Samuel Pozzi (1846-1918).
1 commentsLloyd T
Baktria,_Sophytes_Hemidrachm~0.jpg
GREEK, Baktria, Sophytes, 305-295 BC, AR Hemidrachm - Nicolet-Pierre and Amandry, RN (1994), 62 (this coin)217 viewsHelmeted head of Athena right.
Eagle standing left, head right, grape bunch and leaf on vine above.
Nicolet-Pierre and Amandry, RN (1994), 62 (this coin); SNG ANS 17-18.
(11 mm, 1.60 g, 6h)
Jean Elsen et Ses Fils (January 2010); ex Gorny 148 (1990) Lot 614; ex-1990 Afghanistan Commerce Hoard

This coin was one of a group of sixty five pseudo-Athenian Baktrian coins that came to market in Paris in 1990, documented by Nicolet-Pierre and Amandry in Un Nouveau Tresor de Monnaies D’argent Pseudo-Atheniennes Venu D’Afghanistan (1990). The 1990 Afghanistan Commerce Hoard increased by at least three fold the number of known examples of this coinage. Together with the associated discoveries of attic weight Sophytes issues, this proved decisive in linking the anepigraphic pseudo-Athenian issues to the later epigraphic issues of Sophytes. This coin is number 62 of the catalogue of Nicolet-Pierre and Amandry. It is amongst the finest hemidrachms of the eagle series known.
1 commentsLloyd T
Vlasto_1603~0.jpg
Greek, Italy, CALABRIA, Taras, AR Obol 281-23542 viewsAR Obol 281-235 v. Chr.
weight 0,75gr. | silver Ø 10mm.
obv.Scallop-shell
rev. Naked Phalanthos on dolphin left, holding kantharos and distaff,
AP-monogram right, MI-monogram below
BMC- | SNG.Copenhagen- | SNG.München 782 | Vlasto 1603
SNG.Paris 2179 | SNG.ANS.1534 R
very attractive coin with fine details
xf-/vf+
Leo
Laranda_mint.jpg
GREEK, Lycaonia, Laranda mint. c. 324 - 323 B.C.21 viewsLycaonia, Laranda mint. c. 324 - 323 B.C. AR silver hemiobol, 0.486 g, 9.5 mm. Obv: crude head (Baal?) left. Rev: wolf forepart right, L above. Verify ref: cf. Klein 652 and SNG Paris 2311. Laranda was attacked and destroyed by Perdiccas in 322 B.C. This coin, which was probably minted for the city's defense, is very similar to the referenced coins. Those coins have the name of the city, LARAN, above a similar wolf forepart and are on similar slightly squared flans. This coin has only L, which surely stands for Laranda. Very rare, apparently unpublished. Bard Gram Okland
lysimachos.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Lysimachos, 323-281 BC Thrace1299 viewsAR - Tetradrachm struck in Lampsakos, 286-281 BC
Obv. Head of Alexander the Great, wearing taenia and horn of Ammon
Rev. BASILEWS – LYSIMAXOY Athena, wearing Corinthian helmet, in long robe, seated facing left on throne, left arm resting on shield decorated with lion's-head, spear pointing downwards behind her right shoulder, holding in outstretched right hand winged Nike who is crowning the name with wreath. In left field monogram HP (ligate); in exergue, crescent with cavity left.
28.8mm, 16.85g
Ref. Thompson 47; Müller 401; SNG Paris 2542
23 commentsalexB
Pontic_Kingdom,_Mithradates_Vi_ATG_Tetradrachm,_Odessos_.jpg
Greek, Mithridates VI (The Great) as Herakles192 viewsPontic Kingdom, Thrace, Odessos, Mithridates VI Megas, 120-63 BC, AR Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great, struck ca. 88-86 BC.
Head of Mithridates VI (the Great) as Herakles, wearing lion's skin headdress / ΒΑΣIΛΕΩΣ ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ.
(Reverse is of Zeus seated left, legs draped, confronting eagle held on outstretched right arm and grasping lotus-tipped sceptre, ΛAK before, OΔΗ (Odessos ethnic) in exergue.)
Callataÿ Group 3; Price 1192. Odessos ca. 88-86 BC
(30 mm, 16.04 gm, 1h)

This is amongst the last of the coinages in the style of Alexander the Great to be minted. In this final incarnation the portrait of Herakles was adapted to the features of Mithridates VI the Great, to the extent that the image of Herakles is in fact a portrait of Mithridates. Comparison with his portrait on tetradrachms minted in Pontus proves this point.
1 commentsLloyd T
Kyzikos_AE9-12_0_78g~0.jpg
GREEK, Mysia, Kyzikos, AR9-12396 views9-12mm, 0.78g
obv: forepart of boar left, tunny fish behind
rev: lion's head left, retrograde K above left.
SNG Paris 390; BMC Mysia p. 35, 121; SGCV II 3850
7 commentsareich
11193p00~0.jpg
Greek, Philetairos I, 282 - 263 B.C.323 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Meydancikkale 3000, SNG Paris 1603 var, SNG Von Aulock -, SNG Cop -, VF, 16.629g, 28.1mm, 0o, Pergamum mint, c. 265 - 263 B.C.; obverse head of Philetaerus right in taenia; reverse FILETAIROU downward on right, Athena enthroned left, right hand on shield before her, spear over shoulder in left, leaf above arm, bow right; high relief portrait; very rare.

Very lifelike, expressive portrait.
1 commentsCleisthenes
_T2eC16FHJGkE9no8fyJzBRZI+4TcWw~~60_58.jpg
Griechenland Georg I., 1863-1913. 1 Drachme 1873 A (Silber)15 viewsMünzstätte Paris
Vs.: Kopf nach links
Rs.: Gekröntes Wapppen
Gewicht: 4,9g
Erhaltung: schön _269
Antonivs Protti
_T2eC16hHJF0FFZkN,5E5BRZI-mY4Ew~~60_1.jpg
Griechenland, Georg I., 1863-1913. 50 Lepta 1874 A (Silber)14 viewsMünzstätte Paris
Vs.: Kopf nach links
Rs.: Wert unter Krone
Gewicht: 2,5g
Erhaltung: fast sehr schön _499
Antonivs Protti
D6.jpg
Gros tournois of Philip IV, King of France37 viewsObverse:
+PHILIPPVS REX in the inner circle. BENEDICTV:SIT:NOMEN:DNI:NRI:DEI:REXPI, outer circle, cross in the center

Reverse:
TRONVS CIVIS, tournois in the center

Diameter: 25mm

Notes:
Philip IV le Bel ("The Fair") ruled France from 1268 until 1314 AD. In league with the current Pope, Philip oversaw the arrest, torture, and execution of hundreds of Knights Templar.
He challenged Pope Bonifice VIII and suppressed the wealthy and powerful Knights Templar with the support of 'his' captive pope, Clement V. As he was being burned, Jacques de Molay, KT, cursed both Clement and Philip. Clement died within a month and Philip within the year. Horne's characterization: he "prove(d) one of France's most unpleasant and disastrous kings, leaving in his wake catastrophe for the country and misery in Paris. Under him a new depth of savagery manifested itself in the life of Paris, a dark retreat from the enlightenment of Sugur and Philippe Auguste."
Xerxes King of Kings
Hadrian_Sestertius_1.jpg
Hadrian Sestertius107 viewsObv. HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, draped bust right.
Rev. DACIA S C, Dacia seated left on rock, holding vexillum in right hand, curved sword in left.
Mint: Rome, 134-138 AD.

32/33mm 23.71g

RIC 849

Ex Kölner Münzkabinett, MA-Shops 2019
Ex Heidelberger Münzhandlung, Auction 76, 14th May 2018, lot 202.
Ex Thierry Parsy, Paris Auction 13/14th February 2018, lot 148.
Ex Collection Note (1910-1982)

This sestertius belongs to Hadrian's much-beloved travel series of coins depicting the provinces and cities he visited on his several tours throughout the empire. Earlier in his reign, Hadrian had reorganized the Dacian territories so recently conquered by his predecessor, Trajan, giving up to the Roxolani Sarmatians to rule as a client kingdom on behalf of Rome much of the Dacian territory that had been added to Moesia Inferior. Trajan's sweeping conquests along the Danube frontier as well as in the East had greatly extended Rome's borders, but Hadrian correctly saw the impractical nature of the additional strain this imposed on the Empire and quickly shored them.
4 commentskc
Had__tet__pan.jpg
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Aegeae, Cilicia mint89 viewsSilver tetradrachm, (Prieur 720), (SNG Paris 2331), Aegeae mint, weight 13.48g, max. diameter 26.6mm, 132 - 133 A.D.; Obv. AΥTOKΡ KAIΣ TΡAIA AΔΡIANO ΣEB Π Π (mostly off flan), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Rev. ETOΥΣ •ΘOΡ(year 179=132/3 A.D)• (AIΓEAIΩN mostly off flan), eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, recumbent goat r. in ex.

Background info. courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

The recumbent goat was the symbol for the city of Aegeae. It was a pun on AIGEAIWN (of the city of Aegeae) and AIGEIWN (of the goats). -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

2 commentsSteve E
henrii.jpg
Henri II (1547 - 1559 A.D.)23 viewsAR Douzain aux croissants
France, Royal
O: A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ +HENRICVS DEI G FRAMCORVM REX, Crowned shield of arms, with crowned crescents either side
R/ + SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDICTVM , Cross of lis with crowns and H’s in alternate angles
24mm
2.36g
Duplessy 997
1 commentsMat
005~7.JPG
Henri II, roi de France (1547-1559) - Douzain5 viewsDouzain, argent, 2,21 g.
A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ HENRICVS 2 DEI G FRACOR REX, écu de France couronné, accosté de deux croissants couronnés.
R/ + SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDICTVM 1556, croix fleurdelisée, cantonnée de deux H et de deux couronnes.
Réfs : Duplessy 997
Gabalor
075~6.JPG
Henri II, roi de France (1547-1559) - Douzain4 viewsDouzain, billon ou laiton, 3,51 g.
A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris, légende avec N inversés. Faux d'époque ?
A/ HENRICVS 2 DEI G FRACOR[...], écu de France couronné, accosté de deux croissants couronnés.
R/ + SIT NOMEN DNI BENEDICTV 1551, croix fleurdelisée, cantonnée de deux H et de deux couronnes.
Réfs : Duplessy 997
Gabalor
052~5.JPG
Henri II, roi de France (1547-1559) - Teston5 viewsTeston, argent, 5,69 g.
Point sous la 18ème lettre et A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ HENRICVS II D G FRANC REX, buste à droite.
R/ XPS VINCIT XPS REGNAT XPS IMPE 1557, écu de France couronné, accosté de deux H couronnés
Réfs : Duplessy 983
Gabalor
007~8.JPG
Henri II, roi de France (1547-1559), Pour l'atelier de Paris.8 viewsTeston, argent, 9,40 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ HENRICVS II DEI G FRANCOR REX, tête laurée à droite.
R/ CHRS VINCIT CHRS REGNAT CHRS IMP E 1553, écu de France couronné.
Réfs : Duplessy 989 (221 697 ex.)
Gabalor
084~3.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Demi franc3 viewsDemi-franc au col fraisé, argent, 6,98 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour l'atelier de Paris.
A/ HENRICVS III D G FRAN ET POL REX, buste d'Henri III, lauré, à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1587, croix feuillue centrée d'un H
Réfs : Dup. 1131b
Gabalor
153.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Denier tournois10 viewsDenier tournois, cuivre, 1,20 g.
Lettre A au revers pour Paris.
A/ +HENRI III R DE FRAN ET POL, buste d'Henri III à droite.
R/ +DENIER TOVRNOIS, deux fleur de lis dans le champ.
Réfs : CGKL 90.3
Gabalor
172~0.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Double sol9 viewsDouble sol parisis, O à midi au revers pour l'atelier de Riom.
Argent, 4,29 g, 27 mm.
Av./ + HENRICVS III D G FRAN ET P REX 1578 L, H couronné entouré de trois lis.
Rv./ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM O, croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Dup. 1136
Gabalor
041~0.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Double sol5 viewsDouble sol parisis, second type, N à midi au revers pour l'atelier de Montpellier.
Billon, 4,23 g, 27 mm.
Av./ + HENRICVS III D G FRA ET P REX 1581 , H couronné entouré de trois lis.
Rv./ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM N, croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Sb-4472
Gabalor
032.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Double sol5 viewsDouble sol parisis, H à midi à l'avers pour l'atelier de la Rochelle.
Billon, 4,06 g, 24 mm.
Av./ + HENRICVS III D G FRA ET POL REX, H couronné entouré de trois lis.
Rv./ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1586, croix fleurdelisée.
Réfs : Sb-4472
Gabalor
070~2.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Double tournois4 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 3,20 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI III R DE FRAN ET POL, buste d'Henri III à droite.
R/ +DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1579
Réfs : CGKL 84A2
Gabalor
205~1.JPG
Henri III, Roi de France (1574-1589) - Double tournois7 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,80 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI III R DE FRAN ET POL, buste d'Henri III à droite.
R/ +DOVBLE TOVRNOIS
Réfs : CGKL 86
Gabalor
043~4.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois6 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 3 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R DE FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ + DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1604
Réfs : CGKL 222a2
Gabalor
0830.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois7 viewsDenier tournois, cuivre, 1,58 g.
Lettre A sous le buste et les deux lis pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R D FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ +DENIER TOVRNOIS 1609
Réfs : CGKL 224a3
Gabalor
235~0.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois5 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,95 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R DE FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ + DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1608
Réfs : CGKL 222a1
Gabalor
114~3.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois4 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,81 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R DE FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ + DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1610
Réfs : CGKL 222c1
Gabalor
078~6.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois4 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,67 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R DE FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ + DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1599
Réfs : CGKL 222b4
Gabalor
045~9.JPG
Henri IV, Roi de France (1589-1610) - Double tournois5 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,66 g.
Lettre A sous le buste pour Paris.
A/ HENRI IIII R DE FRAN ET NAV, buste d'Henri IIII à droite.
R/ + DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1607
Réfs : CGKL 222a3
Gabalor
Hermes_fastening_his_sandals_Louvre.jpg
Hermes Fastening his Sandal40 viewsStatue of Hermes Fastening his Sandal, made by Lysipp c.320 BC. Roman copy from the Louvre/Paris. This statue is depicted on coins of Marcianopolis.

A new research by von Mosch (2013) shows that Hermes is rather loosening his sandal, which can be seen by the position of his fingers. In this way fastening is not possible!
Jochen
018n.jpg
Hygieia (bust of)145 viewsCILICIA. Irenopolis. Trajan. Æ 21 (Assarion?). A.D. 98/99 (year 47 of the era of Irenopolis). Obv: AYTO-KAICAP-TPAIANO(C). Laureate head right; countermark before neck. Rev: IPHNOΠOΛEI-(TΩN)ETOYCZM. Hygieia standing right, holding branch and snake which she feeds from patera. Ref: BMC -; SNG Paris 2253 (same obv. die); SNG Levante 1605 (same obv. die). Axis: 345°. Weight: 4.96 g. Note: Ziegler notes 40 specimens of this date. CM: Bust of Hygieia right, snake before, in rectangular punch, 4 x 5 mm. Howgego 195 (12 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
Hyria_Didrachm.JPG
Hyria, Campania179 views400-335 BC
AR Didrachm (21mm, 7.33g)
O: Head of Athena right, wearing wreathed Attic helmet decorated with an owl.
R: Man-headed bull walking right; YPIN[A] above.
Rutter 69 (O32/R??); SNG ANS 255; HN Italy 539; Sear 294v (bull left)
ex Den of Antiquity

An historically obscure city in southern Campania, Hyria may have been located approximately 25 miles east of Mt. Vesuvius. It's site was likely an old Samnite settlement, and in fact the ethnic on the reverse of these didrachms is often inscribed in Oscan.
However Imhoof-Blumer believed that these coins, along with those of neighboring Nola, may actually have been struck at Neapolis. This is suggested by die comparisons, and the man-headed bull device seemingly adds weight to the arguement.
7 commentsEnodia
india_one-rupee_1940_151121_rev_04.JPG
India - British India - 1940 - One Rupee Banknote - Reverse8 viewsBritish Empire, India.
One Rupee Banknote - 1940.
-
Reverse - *Slight Yellowing of photo - see obverse photo of this note for comparison.
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rexesq
ephesos_marcus_aurelius_AE17.jpg
Ionia, Ephesos, Marcus Aurelius unpublished44 viewsMarcus Aurelius as Caesar, AD 161-180
AE 19, 4.43g
obv. KAICAR.OV - VHROC (beginning upper right)
bust, draped, r.
rev. EFE / CIWN (in ex.)
Artemis, with waving chlamys behind, stg. r. in biga drawn by two stags,
holding reins in outstretched hands
ref. RPC IV online temp. #2267 (2 ex., Paris Wien) (thanks to archivum)
VF-

There is a similar type for Hadrian BMC 230, SNG Lewis 1447 (Ed Snible)
Jochen
magnesia_ad_maeandrum_philippI_Schultz472.jpg
Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum, Philip I, Schultz 47231 viewsPhilipp I, AD 244-249
AE 34, 15.4g
struck under grammateus Aur. Musaius
obv. AYT KM IOY - FILIPPOC
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. [EPI] GR AVR MOYCAI - OY MAGNH / TWN (in ex.)
Dionysos, stg. l., holding thyrsos in l. hand and pouring wine from kantharos
with r. hand; rape-wine over his r. shoulder; l. at his feet a small Satyr playing
with the panther, leaping l.; at his r. side a dancing maenad wearing chiton
and beating her tympanon, looking l.
ref.: S.Schultz Nr.472, pl.31 ( 1 ex. in Paris, unique, from same die pair); Dieudonne RN 1901, S.439, 53 (corr.); Bernhart JNG 1949, 1037; Coll. Paris 1573; Imhoof JIAN 1908, S.177
Very rare, F, some roughness
The satyr, barely seen, looks like a goat, leaping l.!
Thanks to Curtis Clay and Archivum for the attribution!
Jochen
Iovi_propug_eagle_Blsd.jpg
Iovi propvgnatori eagle Blsd47 viewsObverse: IMPALEXAN_DERPIUSAVG
Bust laureate right, left shoulder slightly draped
Reverse: IOVIPRO_PUGNATORI SC left and right low in field
Jupiter naked except for cloak over right shoulder, standing front, body turned left, right knee bent, head turned back right, upraised thunderbolt in right hand and eagle perched on outstretched left hand.
BMC 826* (C 85, Paris), RIC 631
Weight, 18.01g; die axis, 12h.
mix_val
isinda.jpg
Isinda; Zeus/ IΣIN, god on horseback r. AE 1913 viewsPisidia, Isinda. 1st century B.C. AE 19mm (3.82g). Obv.: head of Zeus r. Rev.: IΣIN, god on horseback going r. SNG BN Paris 1571. Ex Tom VossenPodiceps
Isis_Villa_Hadriana.jpg
Isis from the Villa Hadriana94 viewsIsis, marble statue from the Hadrian period, found in the 17th century at the Villa Hadriana near Tivoli. Isis, crowned with small throne (= aset, Egyptian name for Isis), in long garment with Isis knot over her breast, holding situla in lowered l. hand and sistrum in raised r. hand.

The original statue was acquired 1753 for the Capitoline Museums/Rome, 1798 displaced by Napoleon to Paris, 1815 donated by Pope Pius VII to King Louis XVIII, and still in the Louvre/Paris.
Jochen
05_IMG_1856q.JPG
Italy, Rome, Arch of Titus348 viewsThe Arch of Titus, on the Via Sacra, Rome, just to the south-east of the Roman Forum, was completed by Domitian in 96 A.D. to commemorate Titus' victories, including the Siege of Jerusalem in 70 A.D. The Arch of Titus has provided the general model for many of the triumphal arches erected since the 16th century—perhaps most famously it is the inspiration for the 1806 Arc de Triomphe in Paris, France, completed in 1836.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
jap_ichibu_8_6grams_US-quarter_DSC02390.JPG
Japan 1859 - 1868 Ichibu - Silver Rectangular coin43 viewsJapan ND( 1859 - 1868 ) Ichibu

Weight: 8.6 Grams
Size: verticle: 2.4 cm x horizontal: 1.9 cm
--
*US Quarter (25 cent piece) to right for size comparison.
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rexesq
jap_ichibu_8_6grams_US-quarter_DSC02388.JPG
Japan 1859 - 1868 Ichibu - Silver Rectangular coin11 viewsJapan ND( 1859 - 1868 ) Ichibu

Weight: 8.6 Grams
Size: verticle: 2.4 cm x horizontal: 1.9 cm
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*US Quarter (25 cent piece) to right for size comparison.
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rexesq
jap_ichibu_8_6grams_US-quarter_DSC02394.JPG
Japan 1859 - 1868 Ichibu - Silver Rectangular coin. Reverse.44 viewsJapan ND( 1859 - 1868 ) Ichibu

Weight: 8.6 Grams
Size: verticle: 2.4 cm x horizontal: 1.9 cm
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*US Quarter (25 cent piece) to right for size comparison.
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rexesq
1.JPG
Jean V (1389-1442)9 viewsBlanc de Rennes
25-26mm
2,42g
+ IOHANNES . BRITONV . DVX . R
"Jean Duc des Bretons"
Quatre mouchetures d'hermine posées 1, 2 et 1 dans un double hexalobe
+ SIT . NOME . DNI . BENETICTV
"Béni soit le nom du Seigneur"
Croix pattée
Jézéquel 332b2
de Mey 357
Bibliothèque National - Cabinet des Médailles de Paris : 786
PYL
JeanWarinbyDufour~0.JPG
Jean Warin, Master of all Arts. 1684.230 viewsObv: Bust of Jean Warin IEAN. VARIN. CONER. DESTAT. INTEND. GL. D. BATS. E. D. MOES. D.F
Rev: Medallic Art flanked by Painting and Sculpture. The center figure, representing Medal Making, is holding a portrait medal of Warin. .VNE. SEVLE. SVFF ISOIT. POVR. LE. RENDRE. IMMORTAL. (A Single One Would Have Sufficed to Render Him Immortal)
in ex MDCLXXXIIII
Signed: DVFOVR

Jean Warin was born at Liege about 1604 and died in Paris in 1672. He is considered to be one of the foremost medallists of France and the best French Engraver of coin-dies of the seventeenth century. Of the many medals attributed to him, most were engraved and struck although some were cast. Besides medal making Jean Warin had a variety of other interests. He distinguished himself somewhat as a painter but most particularly as a sculptor, even rivaling the great Italian sculptor Bernini. He also experimented in medal making capacity of machinery and helped develop an improved method for coin making. In fact, his fame was established more for his other artistic endeavors than for those as a medallist.

Jean Warin led a somewhat checkered personal life. He seduced the wife of one of his compatriots and was accused at one point of forging coins, for which he was sentenced to banishment for five years. Fortunately for him he had cultivated a champion in Cardinal Richelieu, who, so as not to lose the skill of this great artist, intervened on his behalf, resulting in a pardon.

Jean Warin occupies a pivotal place in the history of medallic art. He took the techniques developed during the Italian renaissance and by mastering the machinery at the Monnaie du Moulin, transformed the art to serve the state. His influence extended not only in France but throughout all of Northern Europe, well into the eighteenth century.
LordBest
Domna_Ceres.JPG
Julia Domna129 viewsJULIA DOMNA, wife of Septimius Severus, 193-217
Sestertius, late 195-early 196. AE 18.89 g. IVLIA - AVGVSTA Draped bust r., the hair in a large bun on the back of the head. Rev. CE-RES / S - C Ceres, wearing long dress and veil, standing facing, head turned l., holding long torch with her l. hand, ears in her lowered r. hand over burning round altar. RIC 848

CERES is a comparatively common type on sestertii, so must fall before the drastic cutback in the production of sestertii early in 198, and indeed even before the preliminary cutback of sestertius production in mid-196.

Its date is beyond question late 195-early 196, since CERES is the type that appeared on Julia's New Year's issue of large bronze medallions and asses for 1 January 196. In the course of 196, after defeating Albinus on 19 Feb. 196 (not 197 as all the books say), Septimius cancelled the annual New Year's issues of medallions and asses, so that none at all were issued for 1 Jan. 197 or 198.

The misdating of Julia's CERES type to 198 that appears in various resources is due to P.V. Hill, whose work on the Severan coinage is largely mere guesswork and therefore often grossly mistaken. It is a shame that Hill's largely erroneous dates have now been taken over as fact and so given wide currency by David Sear in his new Roman Coins and Their Values!

I was able to establish the true chronology of the coinage of 193-8 in my Oxford thesis of 1972, which Hill couldn't of course consult for his first edition of 1964, and didn't consult for his second edition of 1977, though the Coin Room at the BM has a copy.

This CERES sestertius is no. 1761 in my die catalogue, obv. 453, rev. 661, other specimens in BM 764, Glasgow, Paris, and Naples.

Obv. die 453 is interesting, because it was used first with the CERES rev. die 661, like this coin; then with all five recorded MATRI CASTRORVM dies, this type coming from this obv. die only on sestertii; and finally with an early rev. die of the next normal type, HILARITAS.

HILARITAS of 196 was the last comparatively common sestertius rev. type of Julia's early coinage; then came the preliminary cutback, and the next three types, DIANA LVCIFERA, IVNO REGINA, and VESTAE SANCTAE, were considerably scarcer. Thereafter came the drastic cutback early in 198. (Curtis Clay)
3 commentsAuer
Julia_Domna_Bust_and_Denarius_.JPG
Julia Domna Portrait Comparison30 viewsAntonivs Protti
JDJulDomna2.JPG
Julia Domna, AE 23 Diassaria - duplicate specimen32 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA
Bust draped, right
MVNICIP STOBE
Nike advancing right, holding wreath and palm, stepping on globe
Josifovski 232, 233, 235 same obverse die (V82), citing Vienna FL 1598, Vienna IN 5597, Paris 1989
Josifovski 234, same reverse die (R84), citing Vienna IN 5598
Kuzmanovic Collection 464-465
whitetd49
jd2012.jpg
Julia Domna, Antioch111 viewsJulia Domna
Bronze AE 23; 6.773g, 24.1mm; Pisidia, Antiocheia mint

IVLIA AV-GVSTI
draped bust right

ANTIOCH CE NI COL CAES
Tyche standing left, branch in right, cornucopia in left

SNG Paris 1126 var (IVLIA AVGVSTA vice IVLIA AV-GVSTI)
Prov. FORVM Ancient Coins

wildwinds example (this coin); thank you dane for the detailed attribution!
Krzyzanowska DOM17.40 var (obv. legend with AVGVSTA); SNG Cop 35 var; SNG Tuebingen 4362 var
5 commentsarizonarobin
juliadomnasardes.jpg
Julia Domna, Sardes16 viewsJulia Domna, 193-211 A.D.
Ae 19mm; 3.68 grams
Sardes in Lydia
IOYΛΙA CЄBACTH,
Draped bust right
CAPΔΙΑΝΩΝ B NЄΩKOPΩN,
cult image of Kore facing, wearing polos and veil, between a corn-ear on the left and poppy on the right

BMC 149; SNG Cop 529; Mionnet IV, 737; Paris 1254
1 commentsRobin Ayers
mae2.jpg
Julia Maesa (218 - 225 A.D.)65 viewsAR Denarius
O: IVLIA MAESA AVG, Draped bust right.
R: FORTVNAE REDVCI Fecunditas standing left, raising hand over child and cornucopia.
Rome
18.8m
3.1g
RSC 14

Rare Engravers Error:

Thanks to Curtis Clay for explaining the rarity of this piece!

This coin features Maesa's Fecunditas type, RIC 249 = RSC 8, and should have been labeled FECVNDITAS AVG.

It implies that Maesa's FECVNDITAS AVG type and Elagabalus' FORTVNAE REDVCI type were being produced simultaneously, that is in 219 AD, the known date of the FORTVNAE REDVCI type.

This error is not unpublished: Cohen 14 reports a specimen in Paris, RIC 252 takes it over from Cohen.

About the 6th known of this type, found two other specimens with the same combination of type and legend, both from the same reverse die but feature a young Maesa bust. This type features the older bust type.

Possibly unique to feature this particular bust.
5 commentsMat
Julia_Mamaea_Bust_and_Denarius.JPG
Julia Mamaea Bust and Denarius Portrait Face Features Comparison41 viewsAmazing match!Antonivs Protti
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Julius Caesar83 viewsBust of Julius Caesar, on show at the "Moi, Auguste" exhibition in the Grand Palais, Paris in 2014. Photo by me, taken in May 2014Masis
Caesar_Vercingetorix.jpg
Julius Caesar and Vercingetorix37 viewsTHE BATTLE OF ALESIA

Caesar describes this "battle"in his Commentaries on the war in Gaul in Book VII, “Chapters 63-90.”

The story begins in the winter of 54/53 BC when the Eburones attack and destroy the XIVth Legion. The Roman losses have been estimated to be as high as 9000 men. The atmosphere in Rome, at that time, is a politically complex and tense one for Caesar. He realizes he will not be reinforced. Before long, half of Gaul is in revolt; and for the first time individual Gallic tribes--the Senones, Parisii, Pictones, Cadurci, Turoni, Aulerci, Lemovices and Anndes--unite under the leadership of one man, Vercingetorix (Meier 317).

Vercingetorix is a charismatic, highly gifted and ambitious man. He detests the Romans but has carefully studied their tactics. Caesar, himself, comments that “in the exercise of his command Vercingetorix ‘added the utmost care to the utmost severity’” (Meier 318).

The contest between these two leaders is intriguing, and I am unable to do it justice within the confines of this thread. In his book, Caesar, Christian Meir writes not only with the authority of impressive scholarship; he carefully depicts, with the gift of a story teller, the decisions of these men.

Suffice it to say that Vercingetorix seeks temporary refuge with 80,000 men on the summit of a hill named Alesia. His position is “impregnable and impossible to take by storm” (Meier 323). Caesar sees his chance, and in an endeavor that is incredible by any standard, he builds a siege wall/trench that completely surrounds Vercingetorix’s stronghold. “The wall built by the Romans extended for fourteen kilometers, with twenty-three forts as strong points” (Meier 323).

Realizing his predicament, Vercingetorix calls for help. 250,000 Gauls march on Caesar; “the whole of Gaul was to show itself and be victorious” (Meier 324). Surrounded himself, Caesar orders his men to attempt the almost impossible: they must build another siege wall/trench that will surround their first feat of engineering. The Gauls attack Caesar on both sides, and the Romans now fight a battle on two “fronts.”

Caesar, in command of 60,000 men (10 legions or so) is seriously, numerically out numbered. And yet, because of Caesar’s ingenuity and courage; because his legions are superior warriors; perhaps, because Fortune (upon whom Caesar certainly counted) favored the brave (Virgil); and because of the Roman soldier’s other weapon—the shovel; Caesar won a stunning victory. “Few battles, says Plutarch, have been fought with such outstanding bravery and such a wealth of technical invention or ‘martial genius’” (Meier 327).

Works Cited

Meier, Christian. Caesar. London: Fontana Press: 1996.
Cleisthenes
Kommodus_Busust_and_Denarius_Portrait_Comparison.JPG
Kommodus Bust and Benarius Portrait Comparison47 views1 commentsAntonivs Protti
VA13374LG.jpg
L. Censorinus. 82 BC. 23 viewsIn the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses, Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree, near Lake Aulocrene (the Turkish Karakuyu Gölü), which Strabo noted was full of the reeds from which the pipes were fashioned. Diodorus Siculus felt that Apollo must have repented this "excessive" deed, and said that he had laid aside his lyre for a while, but Karl Kerenyi observes of the flaying of Marsyas' "shaggy hide: a penalty which will not seem especially cruel if one assumes that Marsyas' animal guise was merely a masquerade." Classical Greeks were unaware of such shamanistic overtones, and the Flaying of Marsyas became a theme for painting and sculpture. His brothers, nymphs, gods and goddesses mourned his death, and their tears, according to Ovid's Metamorphoses, were the source of the river Marsyas in Phrygia, which joins the Meander near Celaenae, where Herodotus reported that the flayed skin of Marsyas was still to be seen, and Ptolemy Hephaestion recorded a "festival of Apollo, where the skins of all those victims one has flayed are offered to the god." Plato was of the opinion that it had been made into a wineskin.

There are alternative sources of this story which state that it wasn't actually Marsyas who challenged Apollo but Apollo who challenged Marsyas because of his jealousy of the satyr's ability to play the flute. Therefore, hubris would not necessarily be a theme in this tale; rather the capricious weakness of the gods and their equally weak nature in comparison to humans.

There are several versions of the contest; according to Hyginus, Marsyas was departing as victor after the first round, when Apollo, turning his lyre upside down, played the same tune. This was something that Marsyas could not do with his flute. According to another version Marsyas was defeated when Apollo added his voice to the sound of the lyre. Marsyas protested, arguing that the skill with the instrument was to be compared, not the voice. However, Apollo replied that when Marsyas blew into the pipes, he was doing almost the same thing himself. The Muses supported Apollo's claim, leading to his victory.

Ovid touches upon the theme of Marsyas twice, very briefly telling the tale in Metamorphoses vi.383–400, where he concentrates on the tears shed into the river Marsyas, and making an allusion in Fasti, vi.649–710, where Ovid's primary focus is on the aulos and the roles of flute-players rather than Marsyas, whose name is not actually mentioned.

AR Denarius (17mm - 3.97 g)

Laureate head of Apollo right / Satyr Marsyas standing left, holding wine skin over shoulder; column surmounted by statue to right.
1 commentsecoli
Inde.jpg
La France et ses colonies: Atlas illustré cent cartes dressées d'après les cartes de Cassini, du Dépot de la guerre, des Ponts-et-chaussées et de la Marine Texte redigé d'après les documents officiels Par Ernest Poirée14 viewsMap of French India by Alexandre Aimé Vuillemin and Ernest Poirée, Published by Migeon, Paris, 1852SpongeBob
Larissa_jugs.jpg
Larissa, Thessaly37 views480-450 B.C.
Silver Obol
1.11 gm, 11 mm
Obv.: Horse prancing right; above, lion’s head right
Rev.: Λ-[A] above, RI downward to right, the nymph Larissa standing right, balancing single-handled hydra on her raised left knee; behind her, water flowing from fountain spout in the form of a lion’s head; all within incuse square
Sear 2110; BMC vii, p. 25, 31
BCD Thessaly II 358.1 (same dies), 361.3 (same rev. die)
CNG 78000457 (same dies)

same coin photographed with white background for comparison
Jaimelai
leoI_605(1).jpg
Leo I RIC X, 605103 viewsLeo I 457 - 474
AV - Solidus, 4.47g, 20mm
Constantinopolis 9. officina, AD 462 or 466
obv. DN LEO PE - RPET AVG
cuirassed bust, laureate, helmeted and pearl-diademed
head 3/4 r., with spear arcoss r. shoulder and shield with
horseman spearing enemy at l. shoulder
rev. VICTORI - A AVGGG
Victory standing l., holding jeweled long cross in r. hand
field: star and Theta
exergue: CONOB
RIC X, 605; Ratto 244-250; DOCLR. 518
about VF

An official issue of RIC 605 for comparison with the so-called Burgundian imitation!
Jochen
Liberalitas_II_Dl.jpg
Liberalitas IIII Dl40 viewsObverse: IMPSEVALE_XANDERAVG
Bust laureate right
Reverse: LIBERALITAS_AVGUSTIIIII, SC left and right in field
Liberalitas draped, standing front, head left, holding coin dispenser in right and cornucopiae in left, fold of drapery over arm
BMC 563 note (C. 137, Paris), RIC 577
Weight, 10.41g; die axis, 13h.
1 commentsmix_val
Liberalitas_IIII_Dl.jpg
Liberalitas IIII Dl41 viewsObverse: IMPSEVALE_XANDERAVG
Bust laureate right
Reverse: LIBERALITASAVGUSTIIIII, SC left and right in field
Liberalitas draped, standing front, head left, holding coin dispenser in right and cornucopiae in left, fold of drapery over arm
BMC 563 note (C. 137, Paris), RIC 577
Weight, 12.22g; die axis, 12h.
1 commentsmix_val
Liberalitas_IIII_Dl_Dup.jpg
Liberalitas IIII Dl 238 viewsObverse: IMPSEVALE_XANDERAVG
Bust laureate right
Reverse: LIBERALITASAVGUSTIIIII, SC left and right in field
Liberalitas draped, standing front, head left, holding coin dispenser in right and cornucopiae in left, fold of drapery over arm
BMC 563 note (C. 137, Paris), RIC 577
Weight, 9.96g; die axis, 12h.
1 commentsmix_val
020~5.JPG
Louis VII Roi de France (1137-1180) - Denier6 viewsDenier, argent, 1,11 g.
A/ LVDOVICVS REX, FRA NCO dans le champ.
R/ +PARISII CIVIS, croix
Réfs : Duplessy 146.
Gabalor
076~1.JPG
Louis XII Roi de France (1498-1514) - Gros5 viewsGros de Roi, argent, 4,22 g
Point sous la 18ème lettre, atelier de Paris.
A/ + LVDOVICVS DEI GRA FRANCORVM REX, écu de France couronné accosté de deux L couronnés.
R/ + SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM, croix fleurdelisée, cantonnée de deux L et de deux couronnes.
Réfs : Duplessy 662.
Gabalor
0050-Louis_XIII_quart_Ecu.jpg
Louis XIII (1610-1643) - Quart d'ecu d'argent du 3° type 1643 A48 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
LVDOVICVS . XIII . D .G . FR . ET . NAV . REX, buste lauré, drapé et cuirassé a l'antique à droite
rose SIT . NOMEN . DOMINI BENEDICTVM . 1643, ecu de France couronné, A à la pointe de l'ecu
6.86 gr
Ref : Ciani # 1661v
06-230
1 commentsPotator II
161.JPG
Louis XIII, Roi de France (1610-1643) - 1/12 d'écu8 viewsDouzième d'écu, argent, 2,25 g
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LVDOVICVS XIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste de Louis XIII lauré à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1642, écu de France couronné.
Réfs : Droulers 103 (107.069 ex.).
Gabalor
076~3.JPG
Louis XIII, Roi de France (1610-1643) - 1/12 d'écu6 viewsDouzième d'écu, argent, 2,25 g
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LVDOVICVS XIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste de Louis XIII lauré à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1643, écu de France couronné.
Réfs : Droulers 109 (6.417.130 ex.).
Gabalor
1111.JPG
Louis XIII, Roi de France (1610-1643) - Demi écu5 viewsDemi écu, argent, 13,39 g
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LVDOVICVS XIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste lauré de Louis XIII à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1642, écu de France couronné
Réfs : Droulers 101
Gabalor
020~6.JPG
Louis XIII, Roi de France (1610-1643) - Double tournois3 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,39 g
Lettre A au droit pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LOYS XIII R DE FRAN ET NAVA, tête de Louis XIII laurée à droite.
R/ DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1612, trois lis.
Réfs : CGKL 386a1
Gabalor
058~2.JPG
Louis XIII, Roi de France (1610-1643) - Double tournois4 viewsDouble tournois, cuivre, 2,91 g
Lettre A au droit pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LOYS XIII R DE FRAN ET NAVA, tête de Louis XIII laurée à droite.
R/ DOVBLE TOVRNOIS 1613, trois lis.
Réfs : CGKL 386a2
Gabalor
0060-Louis_XIV_demi_Ecu.jpg
Louis XIV (1643-1715) - Demi ecu au buste juvenile 1648 A58 viewsAtelier de Paris (A)
LVD . XIIII . D . G . FR . ET . NAV . REX, buste enfantin a la mèche tombant sur l'epaule, lauré, drapé et cuirassé a droite. Point sous le quatrieme I de XIIII
rose SIT . NOMEN . DOMINI BENEDICTVM . 1648, ecu de France couronné, A à la pointe de l'ecu
13.49 gr
Ref : Ciani # 1850
92-114
1 commentsPotator II
012~3.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - 1/12 d'écu3 views1/12 d'écu à la mèche courte, argent, 2,16 g
A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LVD XIIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste de Louis XIIII à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1644, écu de France couronné
Réfs : Droulers 297 (1.913 150 ex.)
Gabalor
172~1.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - 1/12 d'écu4 views1/12 d'écu au buste adolescent, argent, 2,27 g
A sous l'écu pour Paris
A/ LVD XIIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste de Louis XIIII à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1662, écu de France couronné.
Réfs : Droulers 330 (5.045.932 ex.)
Gabalor
062~2.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - 10 sols7 views10 sols aux insignes, argent, 3,06 g.
A au revers pour Paris
A/ LVD XIIII D G FR ET NAV REX 1705, buste de Louis XIIII à droite
R/ DOMINE SALVVM FAC REGEM.
Réfs : Droulers 463 ; L4L 334
Gabalor
021~5.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - 4 sols1 views4 sols, argent, 1,46 g
A au centre de le croix pour Paris
A/ LVDOVICVS XIIII D GRA, buste de Louis XIV à droite.
R/ FRAN ET NAVARRAE REX 1677
Réfs : Droulers 456 (11.021.530 ex.)
Gabalor
083~1.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - Denier tournois4 viewsDenier tournois, cuivre, 1,49 g, 16 mm
A au revers pour Paris
A/ LOVIS XIIII, buste de Louis XIV à droite.
R/ + DENIER TOVRNOIS 1649, A sous deux lis
Réfs : Droulers 477 (4 132 964 ex.)
Gabalor
159~2.JPG
Louis XIV, Roi de France (1643-1715) - Quart d'écu3 viewsQuart d'écu, argent, 6,70 g
A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LVD XIIII D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTVM 1643, écu de France couronné.
Réfs : Droulers 296 (666.682 ex.).
Gabalor
143~1.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - 1/10 d'écu3 views1/10 d'écu à la vielle tête, argent, 2,77 g
Lettre A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1774
Réfs : Droulers 777 (18.630 ex.)
Gabalor
061~4.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - 1/10 d'écu4 views1/10 d'écu au bandeau, argent, 2,83 g.
A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1757
Réfs : Droulers 587 (78 850 ex.)
Gabalor
190~1.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - 1/10 d'écu3 views1/10 d'écu au bandeau, argent, 2,77 g.
A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1747
Réfs : Droulers 587 (434 680 ex.)
Gabalor
111~5.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - 1/12 d'écu4 views1/12 d'écu France-Navarre, argent, 1,90 g.
A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1719, écu de France-Navarre couronné accosté de X et S.
Réfs : Droulers 565 (1 607 040 ex.)
Gabalor
228.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - 1/3 d'écu4 views1/3 d'écu de France, argent, 8,04 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1723.
Réfs : Droulers 568 (319.680 ex.).
Gabalor
054~4.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - Ecu4 viewsEcu au bandeau, argent, 29,21 g
Lettre A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris, point sous le D pour le second semestre.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1764
Réfs : Droulres 584 (253.980 ex dont 10.375 du premier semestre)
Gabalor
155~1.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - Liard6 viewsLiard à la vieille tête, cuivre, 2,79 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris.
A/ LUDOV XV D GRATIA, tête du Roi à droite.
R/ FRANC ET NAVARR REX 1768
Réfs : Droulers 608 (- - - ex.)
Gabalor
222.JPG
Louis XV, Roi de France (1715-1774) - Quart d'écu4 views1/4 d'écu Vertugadin, argent, 7,34 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour l'atelier de Paris
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à droite.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1716.
Réfs : Droulers 555 (flan réformé)
Gabalor
louisxvi.jpg
Louis XVI (1754 - 1793 A.D.)21 viewsAR Écu aux branches d'olivier
O: LUD•XVI•D•G•FR• - ET• NA•RE•BD(entrelacées); Ornamental stitching on uniform.
R: • SIT NOMEN DOMINI - BENEDICTUM 1783 A, Crowned arms of France within branches.
Paris Mint
42mm
29.48g
Dy# 1708, KM 564.1
1 commentsMat
0080-Louis_XVI_demi_Ecu.jpg
Louis XVI (1774-1792) - Demi Ecu aux lauriers 1791 A53 viewsAtelier de Paris, 2° semestre de 1791 (.A)
LUD . XVI . D . G . FR . ET . NAV . REX ., buste habillé a gauche orné du cordon du Saint Esprit. Point sous le D de LUD
. SIT . NOMEN . DOMINI BENEDICTVM lyre 1791, ecu ovale couronné entre deux branches de laurier, .A sous l'ecu
Tranche inscrite : DOMINE SALVVM FAC REGEM
14.70 gr
Ref : Ciani # 2189
This coin and the following three give a "shortcut" of how the person of the King was considered through the french revolution : on this one Louis XVI is monarch by Divine right "Ludovicus XVI Deo Gratia Fran. et Nav. Rex"
92-191
1 commentsPotator II
258.JPG
Louis XVI (au nom de Louis XV), Roi de France (1774-1788) - 1/20 d'écu7 views1/20 d'écu à la vielle tête, argent, 1,46 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête de Louis XV à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1779.
Réfs : Droulers 622 (176.070 ex.)
Gabalor
175~0.JPG
Louis XVI / Constitution (1791-1793) - 15 sols6 views15 sols, argent, 5,03 g, 22 mm.
A/ LOUIS XVI ROI DES FRANCOIS 1791, tête de Louis XVI à gauche.
R/ REGNE DE LA LOI // 15 SOLS // L'AN 3 DE LA LIBERTE, génie gravant la Constitution.
Point sous le U de LOUIS pour le second semestre.
A au revers pour l'atelier de Paris
Réfs : Révolution, R. 40-4
Gabalor
082~2.JPG
Louis XVI / Constitution (1791-1793) - Demi écu4 viewsDemi écu au buste habillé, argent, 14,61 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1792.
Réfs : Droulers 618 (92.000 ex.)
Gabalor
030~8.JPG
Louis XVI / Constitution (1791-1793) - Demi écu5 viewsDemi écu au buste habillé, argent, 13,31 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1791.
Réfs : Révolution, 7-16 var : faux moderne.
Gabalor
136~1.JPG
Louis XVI / Constitution (1791-1793) - sol4 viewsSol à l'écu, cuivre, 11,87 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUDOV XVI D GRATIA, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX 1791
Réfs : Droulers 624 (17.522.238 ex.)
Gabalor
146~3.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - 1/10 d'écu8 views1/10 d'écu au buste habillé, argent, 2,89 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris, point sous D de LUD pour le second semestre.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1786.
Réfs : Droulers 620 (44.545 ex.)
Gabalor
054~9.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - 1/10 d'écu6 views1/10 d'écu au buste habillé, argent, 2,92 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris, point sous D de LUD pour le second semestre.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1779.
Réfs : Droulers 620 (111.350 ex.)
Gabalor
052~10.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - 1/10 d'écu3 views1/10 d'écu au buste habillé, argent, 2,75 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET NAV REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1785.
Réfs : Droulers 620 (90.115 ex.)
Gabalor
056~1.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - 1/20 d'écu6 views1/20 d'écu au buste fort, argent, 1,45 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
Variété du second semestre avec la date 1779 rectifiée.
A/ LUD XVI D G FR ET N REX, buste du Roi à gauche.
R/ SIT NOMEN DOMINI BENEDICTUM 1782.
Réfs : Droulers 623 (21.860 ex.)
Gabalor
200.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - Demi sol5 viewsDemi sol à l'écu, cuivre, 5,35 g.
Lettre A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUDOV XVI D GRATIA, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ FRANCIAE ET NAVARRAE REX 1781
Réfs : Droulers 626 (peu d'ex.)
Gabalor
137.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - Liard4 viewsLiard à l'écu, cuivre, 3,02 g.
A sous l'écu pour Paris.
A/ LUDOV XVI D GRATIA, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ FRANC ET NAVARR REX 1780.
Réfs : Droulers 627 (assez peu d'exemplaires)
Gabalor
151~1.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - Louis d'or3 viewsLouis d'or à la tête nue, or, 7,61 g.
Lettre A sous les écus pour Paris.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ CHRS REGN VINC IMPER 1785
Réfs : Droulers 615 (893.656 ex.)
Gabalor
087~0.JPG
Louis XVI, Roi de France (1774-1788) - Louis d'or6 viewsLouis d'or à la tête nue, or, 7,65 g.
Lettre A sous les écus pour Paris, 1er semestre.
A/ LUD XV D G FR ET NAV REX, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ CHRS REGN VINC IMPER 1786
Réfs : Droulers 615 (4 081 749 ex.)
Gabalor
232~0.JPG
Louis XVIII - 1 franc - 1821 Paris.5 viewsArgent, 4,72 g, 23 mm.
A/ LOUIS XVIII ROI DE FRANCE, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ Ecu de France couronné accosté de 1 et F et de rameaux. 1821 dessous.
Réfs : Le Franc, type 206.36 (99.834 exemplaires)
Gabalor
231.JPG
Louis XVIII - 1/2 de franc - 1824 Paris.7 viewsArgent, 2,38 g, 18 mm.
A/ LOUIS XVIII ROI DE FRANCE, tête du Roi à gauche.
R/ Ecu de France couronné accosté de 1/2 et F et de rameaux. 1824 dessous.
Réfs : Le Franc, type 179-43 (613.070 exemplaires)
Gabalor