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Search results - "Neptun"
AGRIPPA-1.jpg
46 viewsAS - Agrippa - 37/41 (Caligula)
Obv.: M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev.: Neptune standing, head left, holding trident and little dolphin; S C at sides.
g. 10,7 mm. 28
Cohen 3, RIC 58, Sear RCV 1812
Maxentius
DenLIliusBursio.jpg
102 viewsDenarius - 85 BC. - Rome mint
L. IVLIVS BVRSIO - Gens Iulia
Obv.: Winged male head right with the attributes of Neptune, Apollo and Mercury, control-mark & trident behind
Rev.: Victory in quadriga right holding reins and wreath, L IVLI BVRSIO in ex.
Gs. 3,9 mm 19,79
Crawf. 352/1a, Sear RCV 268, Grueber 2485



Maxentius
Titus_Antioch_-_Gemini_X_Lot_758.jpg
69 viewsAR denarius (3.02 gm).

T CAES [IMP VESP] PON TR POT, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / NEP RED (N retrograde), Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre. Antioch mint, struck AD 72-73.

RIC II.1, 1561 (see note 81); BMCRE II, 516; RSC II, 122; RPC II, 1933.

From the Harry Sneh collection.

6 commentssocalcoins
Agrippa_As_2.jpg
2.75 Agrippa57 viewsAGRIPPA
Æ As. Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD

M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown / S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left.

Cohen 3, RIC 58 [Caligula], Cohen 3, BMC 161 [Tiberius] Fine, roughness
RI0003
Sosius
Nero_Prov_As.jpg
6 Nero AE As17 viewsNERO
AE As
Moesia or Balkan mint (Perinthus, Thrace?)

O: NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M, Laureate head right

R: S-C, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident.

RPC I 1760; BMCRE 391 note, pl. 48, 11; WCN pg. 245, 1 var. (obverse legend); RIC: not listed but mentioned on pp. 186-187.

Fine/Good
RI0044
Sosius
rjb_2018_05_05.jpg
84ff13 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
AE antoninianus
Obv: IMP CARAVS[IVS.....AV]G
Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: LEG XXX [VL]PIA
Neptune standing left with dolphin and trident
Unmarked (London?) mint
RIC 84-5
mauseus
rjb_car_2_05_06.jpg
8542 viewsCarausius 287-93AD
AE antoninianus
Obv: IMP CARAVSIVS P AVG
Radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: LEG XXX VLPIA VI
Neptune standing left with trident
Unmarked (London?) mint
RIC 85
mauseus
Copy_(1)_of_ag2c.jpg
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, 64 – 12 BCE27 viewsCopper as, RIC Caligula 58, BMC II 161, SRCV I 556, Rome mint, 10.2 g, 27.6 mm diam.
Obverse - M AGRIPPA L F COS II. Head left wearing a rostral crown.
Reverse - S - C . Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident vertical behind in left. Counter mark above left.
Military commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero.
Sold 5-2018
NORMAN K
Sep_Sev_RIC_228.jpg
24 Septimius Severus13 viewsSEPTIMIUS SEVERUS
AR Denarius, Rome mint. Struck 209 AD, 3.1g

SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right / P M TR P XVII COS III P P, Neptune standing l., r. foot on rock, r. elbow on knee, holding trident in l. hand. RIC IV 228; BMCRE 3; RSC 529.

Ex-Ancient Coin Society “3 Caesars” folder coin VF
Sosius
1226peg2.jpg
Gallienus, RIC V 245 Rome, 253 - 268 CE.22 viewsBronze antoninianus
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.
Reverse: NEPTVNO CONS AVG, Hippocamp right, N in ex
RIC V 245 (sole reign), Rome mint, 2.7g, 19.2mm
Reverse translation: Neptune god of the seas, preserver Augustus
NORMAN K
DSC_6021.jpg
41 viewsROME. Musa.
PB Tessera (14mm, 1.99 g, 1 h)
Crossed cornucopia, caduceus, and trident
MVSA counterclockwise around small central pellet
Rostowzew -

Ex Emporium Hamburg 67 (10 May 2012), lot 743

The attributes of the two major commercial deities, the cornucopia of Fortuna and the caduceus of Mercury, combined here with the trident of Neptune, suggest that Musa may have been involved in shipping.
Ardatirion
8322.jpg
24 viewsROME
PB Tessera (19mm, 4.71 g, 12 h)
Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
Dolphin swimming right; trident behind
Rostowzew 2120, pl. VIII, 35

Ex Artcoins Roma Electronic Auction 5 (29 May 2012), lot 247 (part of)
Ardatirion
quadrans.jpg
107 viewsROME. temp. Hadrian-Antoninus Pius. Circa AD 120-161
Æ Quadrans (16mm, 2.94 g, 7h)
Rome mint
Petasus
Winged caduceus; S C flanking
Weigel 18; RIC II 32; Cohen 36

Weigel reconsiders the anonymous quadrantes as a cohesive group. The seriesportrays a pantheon of eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules. Types are primarily a portrait of the god, with an attribute on the reverse and are usually influenced by (but not directly copied from) earlier designs, primarily from the Republic. He updates the series to the reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus.
5 commentsArdatirion
00022x00.jpg
55 viewsROME. temp. Domitian-Antoninus Pius. Circa AD 81-160
Æ Quadrans (16mm, 3.99 g, 12 h)
Rome mint
Griffin seated left, paw on wheel
Tripod; S C flanking
Weigel 15; RIC II 28; Cohen 38

Weigel reconsiders the anonymous quadrantes as a cohesive group. The seriesportrays a pantheon of eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules. Types are primarily a portrait of the god, with an attribute on the reverse and are usually influenced by (but not directly copied from) earlier designs, primarily from the Republic. He updates the series to the reigns of Hadrian and Antoninus.
Ardatirion
postume-neptvno.JPG
RIC.76 Postumus: antoninianus (Neptvno Redvci)16 viewsPostumus, Gallic emperor (usurper) (260-269)
Antoninianus: Neptvno Redvci (2ond emission, 2ond phase, 262, Trèves)

Billon (200 ‰), 3.40 g, diameter 21 mm, die axis 7h

A/ IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG; radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R/ NEPTVNO - REDVCI; Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident

EG.32
Droger
3350438.jpg
000b. Pompey the Great54 viewsThe Pompeians. Sextus Pompey. 37/6 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.49 g, 9h). Uncertain Sicilian mint, possibly Catana. Bare head of Pompey the Great right; capis to left, lituus to right / Neptune, holding aplustre and resting right foot on prow, standing left between the Catanaean brothers Anapias and Amphinomus running in opposite directions, bearing their parents on their shoulders. Crawford 511/3a; CRI 334; Sydenham 1344; RSC 17 (Pompey the Great). Fine, lightly toned, bankers’ marks on obverse.

AMPHINOMUS and ANAPIS (or Anapias), two brothers, of Silicy, respecting whom it is related that they saved their parents, at the peril of their own lives, from the flames of Etna, at the moment when an eruption of that volcano threatened their immediate destruction. This was a favourite subject with the ancients, in symbolising filial piety; and is often represented on Greek coins of Catana (Catania), where this noble action is alleged to have been performed. Of these two Sicilian brothers, types of that devoted love, which is ever cherished by good children towards the earthly anthors of their being, Cornelius Severus, alluding to Mount Edna, thus expresses himself: "Amphinomus and his brother, both equally courageous in the performance of a duty, whilst the flames murmured their threats against the neighbouring houses, rescue their decrepid father, and their aged mother."
1 commentsecoli
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_C·CAESAR_–_IMP·COS·ITER_A·ALLIENVS_–_PRO·COS_Syd-1022_Crawf_457-1_C-13_Sicily-mint_47-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_17-18,5mm_3,53g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,238 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,
avers:- C·CAESAR–IMP·COS·ITER, Diademed, draped Venus Head Right,
revers:- A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left, placing right foot on prow, holding trisceles in right hand and cloak in left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,59g, axes: 6h,
mint: Sicily, date: 47B.C., ref: Crawford-457/1, Sydneham-1022, Babelon-Julia-14, Alliena-1, C-1,
Q-001
"In late 47 BC Caesar was on Sicily, preparing for his assault on the Pompeian forces in north Africa. During this period a small issue of denarii was produced in his name by Aulus Allienus, then the proconsul of Sicily. The reverse shows a figure of Trinacrus, supposedly a son of Neptune, who may have been invented to account for the name Trinacria, commonly used for Sicily. The coins of Allienus must have seen considerable circulation: almost all surviving specimens are considerably worn."
3 commentsquadrans
coin179.JPG
002a. Agrippa 55 viewsAgrippa

A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 ) of Sextus Pompeius in the naval battles at Mylae and Naulochus (N Sicily). Agrippa took part in the war against Antony, and his naval operations were the basis of Octavian's decisive victory at Actium in 31 He was perhaps the most trusted of all Augustus' lieutenants and rendered many services, notably in putting down disorders in both the East and West. His third wife was Augustus' daughter Julia.

AS. M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown. / Neptune standing, head left, S C at sides.

It seems like the quality and price of Agrippa coins run the whole spectrum...I think a decent example can be had for as little as $20. This is a bit more than that but I am happy with the quality of the metal and portrait.
ecoli
Agrippa_AE-As_M_AGRIPPA_L_F_COS_III_S-C_RIC_58_(Caligula),_Cohen_3,_BMC_161_(Tiberius)_Q-001_h_mm_gx-s.jpg
004 Agrippa (63-12 B.C.), RIC I 058 (Tiberius), Rome, AE-As, Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin in right hand, trident in left, S-C at sides.87 views004 Agrippa (63-12 B.C.), RIC I 058 (Tiberius), Rome, AE-As, Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin in right hand, trident in left, S-C at sides.
avers:- M•AGRIPPA•L•F•COS•III, head left wearing rostral crown.
revers:- Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin in right hand, trident in left, S-C at sides.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27-29mm, weight: 10,82 g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: Struck under Caligula, 37-41 A.D., ref: RIC 58 (Caligula), Cohen 3, BMC 161(Tiberius),
Q-001
quadrans
5.jpg
005 Agrippa. AE as 10.9gm27 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III head l. wearing rostral crown
rev: SC Neptune stg. l., clocked, r. holding small dolphin, l. vert. trident
"son in law of Augustus"
hill132
IMG_6996~0.JPG
008. Marcus Agrippa, general and son-in-law of Augustus (Died 12 B.C.) 48 viewsAv.: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Rv.: Neptune, in r. hand small dolphin, in l. hand trident / S–C

AE As Ø28 / 10.2g
RIC 58 Rome, Cohen 3
Juancho
2660328.jpg
01 - 01 - Sexto Pompeyo (65 - 35 A.C.)109 viewsAR Denario 16,00 mm de 3,44 gr.

Anv: MAG·PIVS·IMP·ITER, Busto a cabeza desnuda de Pompeyo Magno a der. Capis detrás y Lituus delante.
Rev: PRAEF / CLAS·ET·ORAE / MARIT·EX·SC, Neptuno estante a izq., portando Aplustre (Acrostolium), su pié der. sobre una Proa de Galera, a ambos lados los hermanos Catanos Anapias y Amphinomus, quienes llevan a sus padres en los hombros.

Acuñada durante los años 37 - 36 A.C.
Ceca: Catania - Sicilia.

Referencias: Craw. 511/3a - Syd. #1344 - BMCRR Sicily #93 - RSC I #17, p.105 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1392, p.265 - BMCRE Sicily #7 - Cohen T.1 #17, p.5

mdelvalle
Craw_511_3a_Denario_Sexto_Pompeyo.jpg
01 - 01 - Sexto Pompeyo (65 - 35 A.C.)29 viewsAR Denario 16,00 mm de 3,44 gr.

Anv: MAG·PIVS·IMP·ITER, Busto a cabeza desnuda de Pompeyo Magno a der. Capis detrás y Lituus delante.
Rev: PRAEF / CLAS·ET·ORAE / MARIT·EX·SC, Neptuno estante a izq., portando Aplustre (Acrostolium), su pié der. sobre una Proa de Galera, a ambos lados los hermanos Catanos Anapias y Amphinomus, quienes llevan a sus padres en los hombros.

Acuñada durante los años 37 - 36 A.C.
Ceca: Catania - Sicilia.

Referencias: Craw. 511/3a - Syd. #1344 - BMCRR Sicily #93 - RSC I #17, p.105 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1392, p.265 - BMCRE Sicily #7 - Cohen T.1 #17, p.5
mdelvalle
321356_513921868644729_989151575_n.jpg
011 Agrippa77 viewsAgrippa, Æ As. Agrippa. Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown / S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. RIC 58 [Caligula], Cohen 3, BMC 161 [Tiberius]


It's a bit glossy and hard to get a great shot
7 commentsRandygeki(h2)
0189.jpg
0189 - Denarius Plautia 60 BC50 viewsObv/ Head of Neptune r.; behind, trident; before, P YPSAE SC.
Rev/ Jupiter in quadriga r., holding reins and thunderbolt; below C YPSAE COS PRIV; behind, CEPIT.

Ag, 19.7 mm, 3.88 g
Moneyer: P. Plautius Hypsaeus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 420/1a [dies o/r: 34/38 (all var.)]
ex-NAC, auction 78, lot 674
1 commentsdafnis
0219_RICIV_1_228.jpg
0219 - Denarius Septimius Severus 209 AC21 viewsObv/ SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of S.Severus r.
Rev/ PM TR P XVII COS III PP, Neptune naked standing l., cape over shoulder, foot on rock and holding trident.

Ag, 19.2 mm, 3.36 g
Mint: Roma
RIC IV.I/228 – BMCRE V/3
ex-Naville Numismatics, auction 31, lot 474
1 commentsdafnis
0220_RICI_58.jpg
0220 - As Caligula 37-41 AC21 viewsObv/ Bust of Agrippa l., wearing rostral crown; around, M AGRIPPA L F COS III.
Rev/ Neptune standing l., wearing cape and holding trident and dolphin; SC on field.

AE, 28.5 mm, 11.46 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC I/58 [C] – BMCRE I/161 (Tib.)
ex-Artemide Aste, auction XLVII, lot 255
1 commentsdafnis
RIC_I_58_AS_Agripa.jpg
03-01 - AGRIPA (27 - 12 A.C.)15 viewsAE AS 28 mm 8.3 gr.
(Emisión Póstuma realizada por Gaius (Calígula), Tiberio es también responsable por esta extensa emisión)

Anv: "M AGRIPPA · L · F · COS · III" - Busto con Corona Rostral viendo a izquierda.
"Corona Rostral" de oro (corona de laureles adornada con proas y popas de barcos, que se concedía por haber capturado una nave enemiga o bien por un gran acto de valor en combate naval)
Rev: "S C " - Neptuno de pié a izquierda, portando delfín en mano derecha y tridente en izquierda.

Acuñada 37 - 41 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #58 Pag.112 (Gaius) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1812 Pag.358 - BMCRE (Tiberius) #161 - Cohen Vol.1 #3 Pag.175/6 - DVM #4 Pag.74 - CBN #77
mdelvalle
AS Agrippa RIC 58.jpg
03-01 - AGRIPPA (27 - 12 A.C.)85 viewsAE AS (Emisión Póstuma realizada por Gaius (Calígula), Tiberio es también responsable por esta extensa emisión) 28 mm 8.3 gr.

Anv: "M AGRIPPA · L · F · COS · III" - Busto con Corona Rostral viendo a izquierda.
"Corona Rostral" de oro (corona de laureles adornada con proas y popas de barcos, que se concedía por haber capturado una nave enemiga o bien por un gran acto de valor en combate naval)
Rev: "S C " - Neptuno de pié a izquierda, portando delfín en mano derecha y tridente en izquierda.

Acuñada 37 - 41 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #58 Pag.112 (Gaius) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1812 Pag.358 - BMCRE (Tiberius) #161 - Cohen Vol.1 #3 Pag.175/6 - DVM #4 Pag.74 - CBN #77
mdelvalle
RI_030p_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 36129 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– NEP RED, Neptune, naked, standing left, right foot on globe, right knee bent, holding acrostolium in right hand, which rests on right knee, and vertical sceptre in left hand
Minted in Antioch. A.D. 72
Reference:– BMC 506. RPC 1928. RIC II (old) 361. RIC II (new) 1555. RSC 274.
maridvnvm
46b.jpg
046b Septimius Severus. AR Denarius29 viewsobv: SEVERVS PIVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PM TR P XVII COS III PP Neptune std. l. foot on globe, holding
trident in l. hand
hill132
Septimius-Severus_AR-Den_SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG-BRIT_P-M-TR-P-XVIII-COS-III-PP_RIC-IV-I-241_C-542_Rome-210_AD_Q-001_1h_17,5-18,5mm_2,95g-s.jpg
049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left,79 views049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), RIC IV-I 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left,
avers:- SEVERVS-PIVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- P-M-TR-P-XVIII-COS-III-P-P, Neptune standing left, holding trident dolphin, foot on globe.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5 mm, weight: 2,95 g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 210 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-241, p-, C-542,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 064al img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 234 20 viewsObv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune, god of the Sea, stands facing left, his right foot upon a rock, holding his Trident & rostina, hand on knee
Minted in Rome, 209 A.D
References:– VM 126/2, RIC 234, RSC 543
maridvnvm
RI 064aq img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 241 42 viewsObv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding trident dolphin, foot on globe.
References:– RIC 241, RSC 542
maridvnvm
RI_064mw_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC 24112 viewsObv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding trident dolphin, foot on globe.
References:– RIC 241, RSC 542
maridvnvm
723_P_Hadrian_RPC712A.jpg
0712A THRACE, Perinthus Hadrian, Poseidon standing14 viewsReference.
RPC 3, 712A; Pudill (GN 2015/77)

Obv. ΑΥΤΟ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС ΚΑΙСΑΡ СΕΒ ΓΕΡ
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder.

Rev. ΠΕΡΙΝ ΘΙΩΝ
Neptune/Poseidon standing, left, holding dolphin and trident, draped with chlamys.

9.95 gr
25 mm
6h
okidoki
hyppoc10~0.jpg
0743b (96)10 viewsAtelier : ROME
Droit : GALLIENVS AVG
Revers : NEPTUNO CONS AVG
2,43g ; 20mm ; 12h
Ségusiaves
A-17_Rep_AR-Den_L_Julius-Bursio_Head-Apollo-r_-beh-Contr-M__Victory-in-quadriga-r_-in-ex-L_IVLI_BVRSIO_-CXXXXVI_Craw_-352-1_Syd-728_Rome_85-BC_Q-001_axis-11h_19-20,5mm_4,08g-s.jpg
085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #180 views085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #1
avers:- Male head right, with attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune; behind, trident and control symbol ??? .
revers: - Victory in quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; in ex. L•IVLI•BVRSIO•,
exerg: -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, diameter: 19-20,5mm, weight: 4,08g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 B.C., ref: Crawford 352/1, Sydenham 728,
Q-001
quadrans
A-18_Rep_AR-Den_L_Julius-Bursio_Head-Apollo-r_-beh-Contr-Mark_Victory-in-quadriga-r_-in-ex-L_IVLI_BVRSIO__Crawford-352-1_Syd-728_Rome_85-BC_Q-002_axis-11h_17,5-19mm_4,02g-s.jpg
085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #291 views085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #2
avers:- Male head right, with attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune; behind, trident and control symbol bust of bird right.
revers: - Victory in quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; in ex. L•IVLI•BVRSIO•,
exerg: -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, diameter: 17,5-19mm, weight: 4,02g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 B.C., ref: Crawford 352/1, Sydenham 728,
Q-002
quadrans
085_B_C__L_Julius-Bursio,_Rep_AR-Den,_Head-Apollo-r_-beh-Contr-Mark_Victory-in-quadr_-r_-in-ex-L_IVLI_BVRSIO_,_Crawford-352-1a_Syd-728_Rome_Q-001_8h_19,5-20,0mm_3,24g-s.jpg
085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1a, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #3113 views085 B.C., L. Julius Bursio, Rebublic AR-Denarius, Crawford 352/1a, Rome, Victory in quadriga right, -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, #3
avers:- Male head right, with attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune, behind, trident and control symbol poppy (?).
revers: - Victory in quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; in ex. L•IVLI•BVRSIO•,
exerg: -/-//L•IVLI•BVRSIO•, diameter: 19,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,24g, axis: 8h,
mint: Rome, date: 85 B.C., ref: Crawford 352/1a, Sydenham 728,
Q-003
quadrans
88c.jpg
088c Postumus. AR-bill. antoninanus16 viewsobv: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG rad. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: NEPTVNO REDVCI Neptune std. l. holding dolpin and trident,to l. forpart of vessel
hill132
029.JPG
100 Titus83 viewsF/Fair, 3.002g, 18.2mm, 180o, Rome mint, as Caesar, 71 - 72 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, foot on globe, acrostolium in right and scepter in left.

RIC II Vesp 155, Cohen 121, RIC 366 ex Forvm

"Titus was the very popular victor of the Judean rebellion. He ruled during the eruption of Vesuvius. Titus once complained he had lost a day because twenty-four hours passed without his bestowing a gift. He was, however, generous to a fault. Had he ruled longer, he might have brought bankruptcy and lost hist popularity."

This coin gives thanks to Neptune for the safe return of Titus after the Jewish War.
6 commentsRandygeki(h2)
RI 115m img.jpg
115 - Postumus Ant. - RIC 076 A35 viewsObv:- IMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.
Rev:- NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing left with dolphin and trident.
Ref:- RIC 76 Bust Type A, attributed to Lugdunum

Nice strong portrait and reasonable reverse strike even though the legends are a bit weak.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
701Hadrian_RIC156.jpg
156 Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Neptune standing16 viewsReference.
RIC 156d; C. 304; BMC 350

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped on left shoulder, right.

Rev. COS III
Neptune, naked except for cloak over right thigh, standing right with right foot resting on prow, holding trident in right hand and acrostolium in left

2.91 gr
18 mm
7h
okidoki
22Hadrian__RIC158.jpg
158 Hadrian Denarius 125-28 AD Neptune28 viewsReference.
Strack 158; RIC 158; C.309

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS.
laureate head right

Rev. COS III.
Neptune standing left, right foot on prow, holding sceptre and acrostolium.

3.3 gr
18 mm
okidoki
189Hadrian__RIC159.jpg
159 Hadrian Denarius Roma 125-28 AD Neptune standing20 viewsScarce.

Reference.
Strack 162; RIC 159d var(slight drapery); c.313

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Laureate bust right, drapery on left shoulder

Rev. COS III
Neptune, naked except for cloak over right thigh, standing left with right foot resting on globe, holding acrostolium in right hand and trident in left

2.9 gr
18 mm
okidoki
1794_Whale_Fishery_Halfpenny.JPG
1794 AE Halfpenny Token. London Middlesex.24 viewsObverse: HALFPENNY•. Bust of Neptune, with trident across his right shoulder, facing right.
Reverse: PAYABLE AT I:FOWLER’s LONDON•. Whale fishing scene consisting of four men in a small boat harpooning a whale; below, WHALE FISHERY / 1794 in two lines.
Edge: Plain.
Diameter 29mm | Die Axis 12
Dalton & Hamer: 306

The dies for this token were engraved by Thomas Wyon and it was manufactured by Thomas Mynd in Birmingham.
The token was issued by J. Fowler who was an oil merchant and tin-plate worker with a business at 78, Long Acre, at the West End of London.
*Alex
PompeyDenNeptune.jpg
1ac1 Pompey the Great28 viewsFormed First Triumvirate with Caesar and Crassus in 60 BC. Murdered in Egypt, 48 BC.

Denarius, minted by son Sextus Pompey

42-40 BC

Head of Pompey the Great right between jug and lituus
Neptune right foot on prow, flanked by the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, with their parents on their shoulders

Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.

SRCV I 1392, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Sydenham 1344, Crawford 511/3a, BM Sicily 93

Plutarch said of Pompey: In Pompey, there were many [causes] that helped to make him the object of [the Roman people's] love; his temperance, his skill and exercise in war, his eloquence of speech, integrity of mind, and affability in conversation and address; insomuch that no man ever asked a favour with less offence, or conferred one with a better grace. When he gave, it was without assumption; when he received, it was with dignity and honour.
1 commentsBlindado
AgrippaAsNeptune.jpg
1ah Marcus Agrippa36 viewsDied 12 BC
As, minted by Caligula.

Head left wearing rostral crownt, M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left, SC

RIC 58

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (c 63 BC–12 BC) was a close friend, and defence minister of the future emperor Augustus. He was responsible for many of his military victories, most notably Actium against the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII of Egypt. He was son-in-law to Augustus, maternal grandfather of the Emperor Caligula, father-in-law of the Emperors Tiberius and Claudius, and maternal great-grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He probably served in Caesar’s campaign of 46/45 BC against Pompey and Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to study at Apollonia. From then on Agrippa played a major part in Augustus’ career, as military commander and admiral, also undertaking major public works, and writing works on geography (following his survey of the Empire) and other subjects. He erected many fine buildings in Rome, including the original Pantheon on the Campus Martius (during his third consulship 27 BC). He married Claudia Marcella the Elder, daughter of Octavia the Younger in 28 BC, and Julia the Elder in 21 BC, with whom he had five children. His daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Younger the married Tiberius, and his daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Elder married Germanicus. His last campaign initiated the conquest of the upper Danube region, which would become the Roman province of Pannonia in 13 BC. Augustus had Agrippa’s remains placed in his own mausoleum. Ronald Syme offers a compelling case that Agrippa was much more co-ruler of the empire with Augustus than he was a subordinate.
Blindado
SextPompeyAs~0.jpg
1bd1 Sextus Pompey Battles Octavian8 viewsPompey the Great

As, minted by son Sextus Pompey
43-36 BC

Janiform head with features of Pompey the Great, MAGN above.
Prow of galley, PIVS above, IMP below.

This engraver had at best a dim notion of what the great man looked like! Pompey was a member of the first triumvirate, 59-53 BC.
Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C.

Sydenham 1044a
Blindado
2550281.jpg
2) The Pompeians 68 viewsROMAN IMPERATORIAL
Pompey the Great / Sextus Pompey
37/6 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.72 g, 2h). Uncertain Sicilian mint, possibly Catana.

Bare head of Pompey the Great right; capis behind, lituus before / Neptune standing left, holding aplustre and resting foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, who carry their parents on their shoulders.

Cr 511/3a; CRI 334; Sydenham 1344; RSC 17 (Pompey the Great). Near VF, toned, scratches.

Ex CNG
RM0006
4 commentsSosius
Sextus_Pompey_Denarius.jpg
2) The Pompeians: Sextus Pompey23 viewsImperatorial Rome
Sextus Pompey.
AR Denarius, struck 42 BC. 17.45mm, 3.07g.

MAG PIVS IMP ITER, head of Neptune rt., trident over shoulder / PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C, trophy. Pompeia 21, Cr511/2b, Syd 1347.

aFine, light roughness, small flan.

Ex-Ancient Treasures
RM0042
Sosius
coins127.JPG
201a. Julia Domna11 viewsVesta

Vesta was introduced in Rome by King Numa Pompilius. She was a native Roman deity (some authors suggest received from the Sabine cults), sister of Zeus, Poseidon, Hades, Hera and Demeter, and presumably the daughter of Saturn and Ops (or Rea). However, the similarity with the cult of Greek Hestia is notable. Vesta too protected familial harmony and the res publica. Apollo and Neptune had asked for her in marriage, but she refused both, preferring to preserve her virginity, whose symbol was the perpetually lit fire in her circular fane next to the Forum which the Romans always distinguished from a temple by calling it her "house".

As Goddess of the Hearth she was the symbol of the home, around which a newborn child must be carried before it could be received into the family. Every meal began and ended with an offering to her:

Vesta, in all dwellings of men and immortals
Yours is the highest honor, the sweet wine offered
First and last at the feast, poured out to you duly.
Never without you can gods or mortals hold banquet.

Landscape with Vesta temple in Tivoli, Italy, c. 1600.Each city too had a public hearth sacred to Vesta, where the fire was never allowed to go out. If a colony was to be founded, the colonists carried with them coals from the hearth of the mother-city with which to kindle the fire on the new city's hearth.

The fire was guarded by her priestesses, the Vestales. Every March 1 the fire was renewed. It burned until 391, when the Emperor Theodosius I forbade public pagan worship. One of the Vestales was Rea Silvia, who with Mars conceived Romulus and Remus (see founding of Rome).

3070. Silver denarius, RIC 538, RSC 221, VF, 2.30g, 17.5mm, 0o, Rome mint, 193-196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right; reverse VESTA, Vesta seated left, holding palladium and scepter. Ex Forum
ecoli
rjb_post3_11_05.jpg
239835 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG
Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
NEPTVNO REDVCI
Neptune standing left, prow at feet
Mint 1 (Trier), Issue 2
Cunetio 2398
mauseus
rjb_aur_g301_06_06.jpg
270a27 viewsAurelian 270-5 AD
AE antoninianus
Cyzicus mint
Obv "IMP AVRELIANVS AVG"
Radiate and cuirassed bust right
Rev "PM TRP PP COS"
Neptune standing left holding dolphin
RIC 324; Gőbl 301a
mauseus
1168Hadrian_RIC28.jpg
28 Anonymous issues. Time of Hadrian to Antoninus Pius. Rome Quadrans 117-161 AD14 viewsReference.
RIC 28; C. 38

Obv.
Griffin seated left

Rev. S-C
Tripod.

2.43 gr
15 mm
6h

Note.
The series of Imperial-era anonymous quadrantes portrays eleven deities: Jupiter, Minerva, Roma, Neptune, Tiber, Mars, Venus, Apollo, Mercury, Bacchus/Liber, and Hercules, as well as the Four Seasons. They invariably depict either a portrait on the obverse and an attribute of the deity on the reverse, or otherwise an attribute on either side. These designs appear to be influenced, but not directly copied from, earlier designs of the Republican period.
okidoki
postume-neptunoreduci-sansproue.jpg
2e Emission - 2e Phase - (262) - Trèves - NEPTVNO REDVCI6 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
NEPTVNO REDVCI
variante sans proue
EG 32
CUNETIO 2399
RIC 76
ELMER ...
AGK 47
de Witte ...
Cohen 206
PYL
postume-neptunoreduci.jpg
2e Emission - 2e Phase - (262) - Trèves - NEPTVNO REDVCI10 viewsIMP C POSTVMVS P F AVG
NEPTVNO REDVCI
variante avec proue
EG 33
CUNETIO 2398
RIC 76
ELMER 314
AGK 46
de Witte 171
Cohen 205
PYL
rjb_2011_04_04.jpg
35220 viewsL Iuli Burso; c.85 BC
AR denarius
Obv Head right with the attributes of Apolo, Mercury and Neptune, symbols behind
Rev "L IVLI BVRSIO"
Victory in quadriga right, TI above
Rome mint
Crawford 352
Five specimens with this obverse/reverse pairing of symbols noted by De Ruyter in NC 1996
2 commentsmauseus
agrippa cmk as.jpg
37-41 AD - AGRIPPA memorial AE dupondius - struck under Caligula (by RIC)76 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III (head left wearing rostral crown)(with Vespasian countermark)
rev: - / S.C. (Neptune holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left)
ref: RIC58(Gaius), BMC(Tib)161
10.51gms, 28mm
Rare with this cmk

The capricorn originally a sign related to Augustus, it became a symbol of Vespasian' reign also. This countermark often attributed to Vespasian during the civil war, mostly found on eastern provincial coins. A similiar countermark exists on regular roman coinage from Claudius, likely applied in the balkan region. The emblem beneath could be variously interpreted as a plough or a globe with ships rudder, or maybe instrument. This Agrippa coin with Vespasian cmk was found in the balkan region, too. Top of the picture is the original counterstamp-mint.
berserker
160-agrippa as.jpg
37-41 AD - AGRIPPA memorial AE dupondius - struck under Caligula (by RIC)47 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III (head left wearing rostral crown)
rev: Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. / S.C.
ref: RIC58(Gaius), BMC(Tib)161
mint: Rome
11.10gms, 28mm

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C.
berserker
Denario Septimio Severo RIC 228.jpg
46-09 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)33 viewsAR Denario 18 x 20 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PM TR P XVII COS III P P" - Neptuno de pié a izquierda con su pié derecho sobre una roca y portando un tridente en mano izquierda

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 209 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #228 Pag.120 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6346 Pag.464 - BMCRE #356 (G3-4) - Cohen Vol.IV #529 Pag.56 - RSC Vol. III #228 Pag.45 - DVM #122 Pag.186 - Hill CSS#1059
mdelvalle
RIC_228_Denario_Septimio_Severo.jpg
46-09 - SEPTIMIO SEVERO (193 - 211 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 18 x 20 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "SEVERVS PIUS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PM TR P XVII COS III P P" - Neptuno de pié a izquierda con su pié derecho sobre una roca y portando un tridente en mano izquierda

Acuñada 1ra. Emisión 209 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.1ra)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #228 Pag.120 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6346 Pag.464 - BMCRE #3-4 Pag.356/7 (Plate 53 #2) - Cohen Vol.IV #529 Pag.56 - RSC Vol. III #228 Pag.45 - DVM #122 Pag.186 - Hill CSS#1059 - Salgado II/1 #4133.g.1 Pag.87
mdelvalle
571Hadrian_RIC632.JPG
632 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 125-28 AD Neptune standing right38 viewsReference.
Strack 605; RIC 632; Banti 170 (same die) ; C. 308; BMC 1286

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped on left shoulder, right

Rev. COS III in field S C
Neptune, naked except for cloak over left thigh, standing right, left knee bent with left foot on prow, holding dolphin in right hand and trident in left.

23.28 gr
32 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
1150Hadrian_RIC635.jpg
635 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 125-28 AD Neptune standing left20 viewsReference.
Strack 604; RIC 635; Banti 172; C. 312; BMC 1291

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped on left shoulder, right

Rev. COS III in field S C
Neptune, naked except for cloak over left thigh, standing right, left knee bent with left foot on prow, holding dolphin in right hand and trident in left.

24.75 gr
33 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
466Hadrian_RIC650.JPG
650 Hadrian Sestertius, Roma 125-28 AD Hadrian Neptune standing right25 viewsReference.
RIC 650; Banti 553

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped on left shoulder, right

Reverse. COS III S C NEP(tunus) RED(ux)
Neptune, naked except for cloak over left thigh, standing right, left knee bent with left foot on prow, holding dolphin in right hand and trident in left.

21 gr
31 mm
okidoki
1128Hadrian_RIC651.jpg
651 Hadrian Sestertius Roma 125-28 AD Neptune standing right13 viewsReference.
RIC 651; C. 980; Strack 596; BMC/RE.1317

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS
Bust of Hadrian, laureate, draped on left shoulder, right

Rev. COS III S C NEP RED
Neptune, naked except for cloak over left thigh, standing right, left knee bent with left foot on prow, holding acrostolium in right hand and trident in left

27.03 gr
35 mm
6h
okidoki
titus den-.jpg
69-79 AD - TITUS (Caesar) AR denarius - struck 72 AD40 viewsobv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT (laureate head right)
rev: NEP RED (Neptune standing right, foot on globe, holding acrostolium & scepter)
ref: RIC II 155 (Vespasian), C.121 (3frcs)
mint: Rome
3.00gms, 17mm

The reverse of this coin celebrates the return of Titus from Jerusalem with a depiction of Neptune, god of the sea, characterized in the coin's legend as the Returner. He holds his usual attributes, a trident (here scepter) and an acrostolium or bow ornament of a ship.
berserker
Antoniniano Galieno RIC 245.jpg
82-08 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)43 viewsBillon Antoniniano 19 x 22 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "NEPTVNO CONS AVG" - Hipocampo a derecha. "N" en exergo.
Invoca la protección de Neptuno contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias:
Göbl #743u - RIC Vol.V Parte I #245 Pag.152 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10292 - Cohen Vol.V #668 Pag.408 - DVM #178/1 Pag.247 - RSC Vol.IV #668 Pag.85 - Cayón #177
mdelvalle
Göbl_743u_Antoniniano_Galieno.jpg
82-08 - GALIENO (253 - 268 D.C.)14 viewsAE Antoniniano 19 x 22 mm 2.9 gr.

Anv: "GALLIENVS AVG" - Busto radiado y acorazado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "NEPTVNO CONS AVG" - Hipocampo a derecha. "N" en exergo.
Invoca la protección de Neptuno contra la revuelta de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 - 268 D.C.
Ceca: 9no. Taller de Roma

Referencias: Göbl #743u - RIC Vol.V Parte I #245 Pag.152 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10292 Pag.296 - Cohen Vol.V #668 Pag.408 - DVM #178/1 Pag.247 - RSC Vol.IV #668 Pag.85 - Cayón #177 - Hunter #121
mdelvalle
Gallienus_32.jpg
A35 viewsGallienus Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 207k
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG; radiate bust r.
Reverse: IOVICONS AVG; goat stg. l.; stigma in exergue
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 2.5 grams

Gallienus’ coinage is perhaps best know by the issuance of his Zoo series. Each coin type depicts a mythical or real animal on the reverse as a dedication to a specific Roman deity: Diana (doe, stag, antelope/gazelle), Apollo (centaur, gryphon), Sol (Pegasus/winged horse, bull), Jupiter (goat), Liber Pater (panther/tigress), Neptune (capricorn, hippocamp), Juno (doe/elk/capreolus), Mercury (hippocamp/criocamp), Hercules (lion, boar).

“The vast majority of Zoo coins were produced at the mint of Rome, with a few rare examples coming from Siscia. Each officina produced a different coin within the series, with some producing a second, less common type also. Occasionally you'll find an animal with the "wrong" officina mark. These are fascinating, and the rarity leads us to believe that they represented mistakes, perhaps when a die engraver was transferred from one workshop to another. He gets the right animal, but the wrong officina. Or maybe one workshop was falling behind, so another was temporarily enlisted to help catch up on the quota?” – from Jim’s page on Coins of Gallienus' Zoo at http://www.ruark.org/coins/Zoo/#ZooLinks
Noah
sabinas.jpg
Abduction of the Sabine women.384 viewsAR denarius. 89 BC. 3,65 grs. Bare-headed, bearded head of King Tatius righ. TA (ligate) below chin. SABIN behind / Two Roman soldiers, each carrying off a sabine woman in his arms. L TITVRI in exergue.
Crawford 344/1a. RSC Tituria 1.

Livy. History of Rome. 1.9.
The Roman state had become strong enough to hold its own in war with all the peoples along its borders, but a shortage of women meant that its greatness was fated to last for a single generation, since there was no prospect of offspring at home nor any prospect of marriage with their neighbours. Then, in accordance with the decision of the senate, Romulus sent messengers to the neighbouring peoples to ask for alliance and the right of marriage for the new people: cities, like everything else, start small but later if their own excellence and the gods assist them, they grow in strength and in fame. It was certain that at the beginning of Rome the gods had been propitiated and that it would not lack in valour. Therefore, men should not disdain to join blood and family ties with other men.
But nowhere were the emissaries given a fair hearing. Some scorned, others feared the great power growing in their midst, both for themselves and for their descendants. In more than one place the emissaries were asked, even as they were being sent packing, why they hadn't offered asylum to women (criminals) too: that way they'd have had their marriage and with others of their own rank! The youth of Rome took this insult badly and began to think seriously about the use of force. Romulus, to gain time till he found the right occasion, hid his concern and prepared to celebrate the Consualia, the solemn games in honour of equestrian Neptune. He then ordered that the spectacle be announced to the neighbouring peoples. He gave the event great publicity by the most lavish means possible in those days. Many people came, some simply out of curiosity to see the new city, and especially the nearest neighbours, from Caenina, Crustuminum and Antemnae; the entire Sabine population came, wives and children included. Received with hospitality in the houses, after having seen the position of the city, its walls, and the large number of buildings, they marvelled that Rome had grown so fast. When it was time for the show, and everybody was concentrating on this, a prearranged signal was given and all the Roman youths began to grab the women. Many just snatched the nearest woman to hand, but the most beautiful had already been reserved for the senators and these were escorted to the senators' houses by plebeians who had been given this assignment. The story goes that one woman, far and away the most beautiful, was carried off by the gang of a certain Thalassius, and because many wanted to know where they were taking her, they repeatedly shouted that they were taking her to Thalassius, and that it how the nuptial cry came to be.

The party was over, and the grieving parents of the girls ran away, accusing the Romans of having violated the laws of hospitality and invoking the god who was supposed to have been honoured at that day's festival. Nor did the girls themselves hold much hope. But Romulus went among them in person to assure them that none of this would have happened if their fathers hadn't been so inflexible in not letting them marry their neighbours. But now they would have the status of wives with all the material rewards and civil rights of citizenship and they would have children, than which nothing is dearer. They should cool their anger and give their hearts to the men who had already taken their bodies. A good relationship often begins with an offence, he said. And their husbands would treat them with extra kindness in hope of making up for the parents and country they so missed. The men added their blandishments, saying that they'd been motivated by love and passion, entreaties which are very effective with women.

benito
M.AGRPa1D+R.jpg
AGRIPPA79 viewsAE as. Cohen 3, RIC (tib.) 32, BMC 161
D/ M.AGRIPPA.L.F.COS.III Hd. l., wearing rostral crown.
R/ SC Neptune stg. l., holding dolphin and trident.
Struck by Tiberius
Rugser
agrippaII.jpg
AGRIPPA32 viewsAE As. 37-41 AD ( struck under Caligula ) 11,79 grs. . Head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown. M AGRIPPA L F COS III / Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident. S C.
RIC I 58 (Gaius). Cohen 3.
benito
Agrippa 1+.jpg
Agrippa114 viewsAGRIPPA. Died 12 BC. Æ As. Struck under Gaius Caligula, 37-41 AD. M • AGRIPPA • L • F • COS • III • , head left, wearing rostral crown / S-C across field, Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident. RIC 58 (Gaius); Cohen 3.1 commentsTanit
00020-agrippa.jpg
Agrippa 23 viewsAgrippa AS
29 mm 10.39 gm
O: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Laureate head right
R: S C
Neptune standing holding trident and dolphin.
1 commentsKoffy
image01857.jpg
Agrippa51 viewsIn the name of Agrippa.
As 37-41, Æ 11.39 g. Head of Agrippa l. wearing rostral crown. Rev. Neptune standing l., holding small dolphin and trident. C 3. RIC 58
Green patina somewhat porous
4 commentsTLP
agrippa_r_res.jpg
AGRIPPA29 views(d. 12 BC)
Struck under Caligua, 37-41 AD
AE As 30 MM 10.0 G
O: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left
R: Neptune standing, S-C
laney
agrippa_b_resi.jpg
AGRIPPA15 views(b 63 BC - d. 12 BC)
Struck under Caligua, 37-41 AD
AE As 26.5 mm 8.49.g
O: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left
R: Neptune standing left holding dolphin & trident, S-C
laney
agrippa_a_res.jpg
AGRIPPA14 views(b. 63 BC - d. 12 BC)
Struck under Caligua, 37 41 ad
AE As 28 mm 9.61 g
O: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left, wearing rostral crown
R: Neptune standing S-C
laney
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa55 viewsAgrippa, as (struck under Caligula).
Son-in-law of Augustus.
RIC 58.
11,37 g, 28-29 mm.
Rome, 37-41 A.D.
Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown.
Rev. S C either side of Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a renowned Roman general and close friend of Octavian (Augustus). As general, Agrippa defeated the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. In 21 B.C., Augustus married his own daughter Julia to Agrippa. By Julia, Agrippa had two daughters, Vipsania Julia Agrippina and Vipsania Agrippina maior, and three sons, Gaius, Lucius and Agrippa Postumus.
1 commentsMarsman
agrippa_res.jpg
AGRIPPA16 viewsd. 12 BC
AE 27 mm 9.07 g
O: Head left, wearing rostral crown
R: SC across field, Neptune standing left holding small dolphin and trident.
laney
agrippa.jpg
AGRIPPA83 viewsAE As. 37-41 AD ( struck under Caligula ) 11,79 grs. . Head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown. M AGRIPPA L F COS III / Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident. S C.
RIC I 58 (Gaius). Cohen 3.
1 commentsbenito
agrippa_01_29_res.jpg
AGRIPPA23 viewsStruck 38 AD, under Caligula
AE As 27 mm; 9.92 g
O: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown
R: Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields
Rome mint
RIC I Caligula 58, BMC II 161; SRCV I 556
laney
agrippa_06_14_res.jpg
AGRIPPA21 views(b. 63 BC - d. 12 BC)
Struck posthumously 38 AD, under Caligula
AE As 30 mm; 8.7 g
O: Head left wearing a rostral crown
R: Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields
Rome mint
RIC I Caligula 58, BMC II 161; SRCV I 556
laney
agrippa.JPG
Agrippa (Died 12 B.C.)49 viewsÆ As
O: M. AGRIPPA. F. COS. III, head left, wearing rostral crown.
R: Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident; S-C across field.
Rome mint. Struck under Gaius (Caligula)
27mm
9.72g
RIC I 58 (Gaius); MIR 3, 24-6; BMCRE 161 (Tiberius); Cohen 3
2 commentsMat
00353.jpg
Agrippa (RIC 58, Coin #353)42 views
RIC 58 (C), Copper AS, Rome, 38 AD.
Obv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left wearing a rostral crown.
Rev: S C Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left.
Size: 29.2mm 10.22gm
MaynardGee
00730.jpg
Agrippa (RIC 58, Coin #730)7 viewsRIC 58 (C), Copper As, Rome, 38 AD.
OBV: M AGRIPPA L F COS III; Head left wearing a rostral crown.
REV: S C; Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left.
SIZE: 28.0mm, 11.02g
MaynardGee
422_Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa - AE as8 viewsstruck by Caligula
Rome
38 AD
head wearing rostrate crown left
M•AGRIPPA•L_•F • COS III
Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
S C
RIC I Gaius 58; BMCRE II Tiberius 161 - 168; Cohen I 3, BnF II Caligula 77 - 97, SRCV I 1812
10,51g
Johny SYSEL
agrippa_neptunus_ric58.jpg
Agrippa - as14 viewsNeptuno
Ric 58
antvwala
agrippa_neptuno_ric58.jpg
Agrippa - as4 viewsNeptuno
ric 58
antvwala
00-agrippa.jpg
Agrippa - RIC 5817 viewsAgrippa, AE As.
Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD.
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown /
S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms,
holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left.
xokleng
Agrippa_with_title.jpg
Agrippa - Struck under Caligula48 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown
Rev: SC, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left
Size: 29mm, 11.3g
Mint: Rome, struck under Caligula 37-41AD
Id: RIC 58
Notes: I picked this one up cheap, knowing it was riddled with bronze disease, so I could learn how to deal with the disease. I cleaned it, baked it, and sealed it in 2011. It seems to have stabilized nicely.
ickster
agrippa_01.jpg
Agrippa AE As32 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S C - Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident.
Date: 37 AD
Ref: Cohen 3, RIC 58
oa
agrippa_02.jpg
Agrippa AE As20 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S C - Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident.
Date: 37 AD
Ref: Cohen 3, RIC 58
oa
Agrippa_b.jpg
Agrippa AE as78 viewsbarbaric imitation1 commentsTibsi
agrippa~0.jpg
Agrippa AE AS61 viewsOBV: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
head left wearing rostral crown
REV: S C, Neptune standing left
holding dolphin and trident
Date: 37-41 AD
28.46 mm, 10.46 grams
RIC I 58 (Caligula)
1 commentsmiffy
AgrippaSest1.jpg
Agrippa AE As15 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left, wearing rostral crown

Rev: S C - Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident

Rome 37-41 A.D.
BamaCS
agrippa.jpg
Agrippa AE As17 viewsAgrippa AE As. 37-41 A.D. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, Bust of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown / S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, holding dolphin and trident. RIC I 58Holding_History
Agrippa2_opt.jpg
AGRIPPA AE As RIC 58, 102 viewsOBV: M AGRIPPA L F COSIII - Head left, wearing rostral crown
REV: No legend - Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident; S C across fields.
11.0g, 28mm

Minted at Rome, 37-41 AD
Legatus
7Zora2X98AbfPp4FG9e2Tf3R6FNsjD.jpg
Agrippa AE As, by Caligula.27 viewsAgrippa. Died 12 BC. Æ As 28 mm, 10.5 gm. Rome mint. Struck under Gaius (Caligula), AD 37-41. Obv: Head of Agrippa facing left, wearing rostral crown Rev: Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident. RIC I 58 (Gaius). Antonivs Protti
__57Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa AE AS. Neptune.17 viewsAgrippa AE As. 37-41 A.D. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, Bust of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown / S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, holding dolphin and trident. RIC I 58 Antonivs Protti
1050.jpg
Agrippa AS112 viewsAgrippa --AE AS. Struck by Caligula. Obv.: M AGRIPPA LF COS III, Head of Agrippa l. wearing rostral crown. Rev.: S-C either side of Neptune stg. l. holding dolphin and trident. Cohen 3; RIC (Caligula) 58. Probably of provincial mintage. 1 commentsfeatherz
AgrippaAs3.jpg
Agrippa As97 viewsAgrippa head left, wearing rostral crown, M AGRIPPA L F COS III / S-C to left and right of Neptune, standing left, cloaked, holding small dolphin in right hand and trident in left. Rome mint. RIC I 58 (pg. 112); Cohen 3.
socalcoins
agrippa.jpg
Agrippa As28 viewsOBV: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Laureate bust left
REV: S C, Neptune standing left
holding dolphin and trident
Date: 37-41 AD
28.46 mm, 10.46 grams
RIC I 58 (Caligula)
miffy
Agrippa-.jpg
Agrippa As5 viewsAE As ; 37 AD; struck under Caligula, Rome
Obv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S C - Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident.

Ref: Cohen 3, RIC 58
Tanit
Agrippa_As_Neptune.jpg
Agrippa As Neptune175 viewsObv.
M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Head right, wearing Rostral Crown

Rev.
SC
Neptune standing facing, looking right, arms draped holding trident and dolphin
2 commentsancientdave
Agrippa_As_Neptune_2.jpg
Agrippa As Neptune 250 viewsObv.
M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Head left wearing rostral crown

Rev.
SC
Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left

RIC 58 Cohen 3 BMC 161
1 commentsancientdave
00027x0.jpg
Agrippa As, Issue by Caligula12 viewsMarcus Agrippa, struck by Caligula, 39 - 40 AD
Æ As, 29mm, 11.0 grams
Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, Head left.
Reverse: S C, Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident.

Reference:
RIC58 (Caligula)

Notes:
One of the first ancient coins I purchased, from a bag of mostly junk at a local coin shop mid 1980's. This coin cost me about 70 cents at the time.
Ken Dorney
AGRIPPA.jpg
Agrippa As, Neptune10 viewsAgrippa, † 12 B.C. As, Rome 37-41, Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III; head left, wearing rostral crown. Reverse: SC across field, Neptune standing left holding small dolphin and trident. Sear RCV 1812, RIC Caligula 58.Podiceps
60245p00.jpg
Agrippa Copper As32 viewsFrom Forum:RIC I Caligula 58, BMC II 161; SRCV I 556, aVF, corrosion, 11.123g, 29.7mm, 180o, Rome mint, struck under Caligula 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bare head right; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields;

This is the coin that convinced me that I'd rather pay more for quality rather than less for quantity.
1 commentsMagisterRiggs
Agrippa_1_opt.jpg
AGRIPPA RIC 58, Ae As46 viewsOBV: MAGRIPPALFCOSIII - Head left, wearing rostral crown
REV: No legend - Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident; S C across fields.
9.3g, 28mm

Minted at Rome, 37-41 AD
Legatus
agrippa_58.jpg
Agrippa RIC I, Gaius 58636 viewsAgrippa, died 12 BC, friend and son-in-law of Augustus
AE - As, 10.84g, 22.5mm
Rome, undated
obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III
head l., with corona rostrata
rev. Neptune standing l., cloaked, r. holding small dolphin,
l. vertical trident
S C l. and r.
RIC I, Gaius 58; C.3; BMCR (Tiberius)161
about VF, black patina

CORONA ROSTRATA (or CORONA NAVALIS), a crown decorated with prows, dedicated to Agrippa due to the victory over Sextus Pompeius in the naval battle of Naulochos 36 BC.
Jochen
Agrippa_Struck_by_Caligula~0.JPG
Agrippa Struck by Caligula59 viewsAgrippa Copper AS struck by Caligula RIC 58
OBV: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa facing left, wearing rostral crown.
REV: S – C on either side of Neptune, standing left, holding dolphin and trident.
37 - 41 AD, Rome, 28mm 10.5g
Cohen 3
BMCRE 161

2 commentsRomanorvm
Agrippa_RIC_I_58.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 585 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bust facing left, wearing Rostral crown.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.52 g, Diameter: 26.8 x 28 x 1.5 mm, Die axis: 160°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
Agrippa_RIC_I_58_Second_example.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 58, Second example6 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bust facing left, wearing Rostral crown.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.43 g, Diameter: 27.2 x 27 x 1.8 mm, Die axis: 220°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
Agrippa_RIC_I_58_Third_example.jpg
Agrippa, AE As, RIC I 58, Third example4 viewsAgrippa
As Consul for the third time, 27 B.C.

Coin: AE As

Obverse: M·AGRIPPA·L·F·COS·III·, bust wearing a Rostral crown, facing left.
Reverse: Neptune, standing, facing left, a Chlamys draped over his arms, holding a Dolphin in his right hand and a Trident with his left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 9.65 g, Diameter: 27.1 x 26.6 x 1.8 mm, Die axis: 210°, Mint: Rome, posthumous issue by his grandson, Gaius "Caligula", between 37-41 A.D. Reference: RIC I 58
Masis
072.jpg
AGRIPPA, AE-As. Neptune.33 viewsRoman Empire, Agrippa. Died 12 BC. AE-As. Rome Mint. Struck under Caligula. Rx./ Neptune standing lt. VG with pitting.
1350
Antonivs Protti
0035-510np_noir.jpg
Agrippa, As - *324 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather (died 12 BC)
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection

The following commentary is a (quick) translation from CGB about a similar coin :

"Although Augustus associated his close friend Agrippa in his coinage, he didn't for him alone. Gaius honoured the memory of his grandfather, recalling he had been COS III in 27 BC while Augustus was COS VII at the same time.
Gaius, however, as the new emperor would like us to remember his double filiation : Through his father, Germanicus, he's descended from Nero Drusus and Antonia, thus from Tiberius ; through his mother Agrippina the elder, he tells us Agrippa and Julia are his grand parents and he's a grand grand son of Augustus. Agrippa remained prestigious all along the first century CE, although he had died 12 BC. Titus then Domitian will also strike this type, seemingly very succesfull towards population (see RCV 2589 and 2894)"
6 commentsPotator II
Agrippa_RIC_C58.JPG
Agrippa, died 12 BC85 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa, facing left, wearing a rostral crown.

Rev: Neptune standing left, holding a dolphin in his right hand and a trident in his left; S C across field.

Copper As, Rome mint, Issue of Caligula 38 AD

10.6 grams, 27.8 mm, 180°

RIC I Caligula 58, S1812, VM Agrippa; 4

Ex: FORVM
4 commentsSPQR Matt
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero155 viewsCopper as, RIC Caligula 58, S 556, gF, 11.830g, 28.7mm, 180o, Rome mint, struck under Caligula 38 A.D.;
obverse - M AGRIPPA L F COS III, bare head right;
reverse - S C, Neptune holding a dolphin and trident;
b70
Agrippa.JPG
Agrippa, Neptune As38 viewsStruck under Caligula (37 - 41 AD)

AE AS

Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, left wearing rostral crown.
Rev: SC Neptune standing with dolphin in in right hand and trident in left.
RIC I 58

Weight: 11.6g
Diameter: 28mm
Jose Polanco
Agrippa-RIC58.JPG
Agrippa, RIC 5826 viewsM•AGRIPPA•L•F•COS•III
AE as, 27mm, 10.48g
Crowned head left
Neptune standing holding trident and dolphin
1 commentsnovacystis
AGRIPPA-1-ROMAN~0.jpg
Agrippa, RIC I-58 Rome12 viewsAE As
Rome mint, 37-41 A.D.
29mm, 10.50
RIC I-58, RCVv.1-1812

Obverse:
M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Head left, wearing rostral crown.

Reverse:
S-C
Neptune standing left, cloaked, right holding small dolphin, left vertical trident.
Will J
Agrippa_AE_As.JPG
Agrippa, Æ As. Struck under Caligula28 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. Agrippa Died 12 BC. Struck under Caligula 37-41 AD. Ref Agrippa AE As, RIC 58 [Caligula], Cohen 3, BMC 161 [Tiberius]. Sear Roman Coins and their Values (RCV 2000 Edition) Number 1812. Large 27mm. _3601
Antonivs Protti
Agrippa S C.jpg
Agrippa- Anepigraphic79 viewsAgrippa – 63- 12 BC, Military commander and friend of Augustus

Obverse:

Head left wearing a rostral crown.

M.(Marcus) AGRIPPA L.F. (Lucius Filius = son of Lucius) COS. III (Consul for the third time.)

M:Marcus
L.F: Lucius Filius = son of Lucius
COS. III: Consul for the third time

Agrippa he wears a crown on his head which is decorated by prows of (war)ships, a so-called 'rostral crown' probably given to him to honour him as a fleetcommander during the battle of Actium, the decisiove battle in which Octavian defeated Marc Antony and Cleopatra.

Reverse:

S—C, Senatus Consulto

The reverse is 'anepigraphic' without text, apart from S.C. (Senatus Consulto = by approval of the Senate) Neptune holds a trident and has a dolphin on his outstretched hand. Neptune too is a reference to the sea and Agrippa's nautical carreer.

Domination: AS, Copper, 29 mm

Mint: Rome. This AS of Agrippa is struck under Caligula.

AGRIPPA
63 - 12 BC
Roman General
Agrippa was the companion of Octavian by the time Caesar was murdered in 44 BC. Agrippa was Octavian's most brilliant military commander. He defeated Pompeius in two naval battles and was responsible for for Octavian's victory over Mark Antony. When Octavian became emperor under the name Augustus Agrippa was second only to the emperor in authority. He suppressed rebellions, founded colonies and built an extensive road-network throughout the Roman empire.
John Schou
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa. As minted under Caligula99 viewsM. AGRIPPA L.F. COS. III : head of Agrippa wearing the Rostral crown.
Rev.: Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. S C.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was Augustus' closest friend, and Caligula's grandfather. The rostral crown and the Neptune remind us of the victory of the fleet, commanded by Agrippa, at Actium in 31 BC.
Ginolerhino
Copy_(1)_of_ag2c~0.jpg
AN countermark in rectangle punch.82 viewsCopper as, RIC Caligula 58, BMC II 161, SRCV I 556, Rome mint, 10.2 g, 27.6 mm diam.
Obverse - M AGRIPPA L F COS II. Head left wearing a rostral crown.
Reverse - S - C . Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident vertical behind in left. A N in rectangle Counter mark above left.
Military commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero.
NORMAN K
Augustus_Carteia_Tyche_and_Neptune.JPG
Augustus Carteia Tyche and Neptune71 viewsAugustus, Carteia Spain, AE Semis, 27 BC - 14 AD, 21.36mm, 7.2g, RPC I 122, Villaronga 71, Burgos 662,
OBV: CARTEIA, Turreted bust of Tyche right
REV: D D, Neptune standing left, foot on rock, holding dolphin and trident

The Latin colony of Carteia was founded in 171 B.C. In 27 B.C., when Augustus had become emperor, Hispania Ulterior was divided into Baetica (modern Andalusia) and Lusitania (modern Portugal, Extremadura, and part of Castilla-León). Cantabria and Basque country were also added to Hispania Citerior.
3 commentsRomanorvm
Augustus_RIC_54a_(fourree).JPG
Augustus, 27 BC - 14 AD152 viewsObv: No legend, laureate head of Augustus facing right.

Rev: A square altar inscribed FORT RED / CAES AVG / S P Q R.

Note: Refers to the altar to Neptune erected by the Senate near Rome's gates to commemorate Augustus' safe return from Armenia in 19 BC.

Plated Denarius, Illegal mint after Patricia or Nemausus, c. 19 - 18 BC

2.9 grams, 18.6 mm, 165°

RIC I 54a, RSC 104, S1608 (var.), VM 58

Ex: FORVM
1 commentsSPQR Coins
aunep.jpg
Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune11 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.E. - 14 C.E.
AE Semis, RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, Turrited bust of Tyche right
Reverse - DD, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
21.2 mm., 4.6 g.
NORMAN K
nept516.jpg
Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune, 31 BCE-14 CE21 viewsAugustus 27 B.C.E.- 14 C.E.
AE Semis, 21.3 mm., 4.5 g. RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, Turrited bust of Tyche right
Reverse - DD, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
NORMAN K
MOD_from_1900-Barbados-3.jpg
Barbados, 1981 FM, $103 viewsObverse: National Coat of Arms

Reverse: Neptune at left looking right, dolphin fish under right hand

This coin contains 1.127 troy ounces of silver.

Proof issues of this type range from a high of 97,000 pieces in 1973 to the only yearly mintage under 3,600 which occurred in 1981 (the last year for this type). In 1981 the mintage was 835!!!
Richard M10
prusias_hypium_diadumenian_Nemesis_unbekannt.jpg
Bithynia, Prusias ad Hypium, Diadumenian, unpublished?22 viewsDiadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 22, 4.22g, 21.64mm, 225°
obv. M OPEL ANTW DIADOV[MENIANOC]
Bust, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r.
rev. PROVCIEWN - PR - OC VPIW
Female deity, in long garment, stg. fraontal, head r., holding in lowered r. hand sling and balancing on
raised l. hand rod with a knob at each end
ref. cf. Rec.Gen. 64, pl. CV, no.19, for rev.; unpublished
rare, F/F+

It is Nemesis with a bridle, but with an unusual position of the rod. Rec.Gen. 64 has Nemesis in this attitude too, but stg. l. Thanks to Tom Mullally from Neptune Numismatics for attribution!
Jochen
RPC783.jpg
Byzacene Hadrumetum - Augustus - AE Semis RPC 78332 viewsAE Semis - Time of Augustus, c. 10 AD, AE17, (3.91g) Hadrumetum, North Africa,.
Obv: L FLAMIN CAPIT Head of Neptune right, trident behind.
Rev: L ELIEV PERT Head of Sol right.
RPC 783.
Tanit
RPC773_2.jpg
Byzacene Hadrumetum As RPC 77329 viewsAE As
Obv: head of Neptune r.
Rev: head of Astarte l.

RPC 773
Tanit
MA Agrip SC dolphin.jpg
Caligula As (Issue in honour of his deceased grandfather Agrippa)23 viewsAE 29mm, Rome, 38 A.D.
Obv: M Agrippa Cos III
Rev: S.C. ( Neptune holding dolphin and trident)
Ref: Roman coins ATV, David R. Sear, vol I, p. 358 # 1812
Jean Paul D
Caligula_Perinthus_As_-_Neptune_Reverse.jpg
Caligula Perinthus As - Neptune Reverse24 viewsPlease pardon the terrible picture. It was the best I could do.

AE As
Probably Balkan mint of Perinthus
9.7 g.

C CA[ES]A[R A]VG GERMANICVS PON M TR P[OT]

Bare head left

Rx: S C Neptune standing

Condition F/G, brown patina.
cliff_marsland
ABH_1407_Semis_CARTEIA.jpg
CARTEIA - Hispania16 viewsHoy Guarranqué - San Roque - España

AE Semis 18/19 mm 4.8 gr.

Anv: "CARTEIA" (leyenda horaria), Tyche vistiendo corona mural, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "D D" en campo izquierdo. Neptuno estante a izquierda, apoyando su pié derecho en una roca?, portando delfín en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y tridente en izquierdo.

Acuñada: En tiempos de Augusto 27 A.C. - 12 D.C.

Referencias: SNG Cop #443, Vv Pl. CXXIX #2, ABH #663, Villaronga CNH #71 P.420, MBR #48, RPC I #122, Guadan #957, ACIP #2615, ABH(Ant) #1407 P.176, Ripolles #2320/2412 P.289/97, Chaves IV (1979) #29, NAH #949
mdelvalle
Claudius II_2.jpg
Claudius Gothicus11 viewsAE Antoninianus
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Rev: NEPTVN AVG ; Neptune stg. l.
C.183
Tanit
00270-Claudius_II.JPG
Claudius II15 viewsClaudius II Antoninians
22 mm 3.2 gm
O: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate and draped bust right.
R: NEPTVN AVG
Neptune standing toward left, holding a Trident and dolphin.
John Campbell
claudius II neptun com.JPG
Claudius II RIC V-1 Antioch 214 47 views20 mm 3.0 grams 268-270 AD
OBV :: IMP C CLAUDIVS AVG. Radiate, draped bust right
REV :: NEPTUN AVG. Neptune standing left holding trident and dolphin
EX :: A (Antioch )
RIC V (1) 214 Antioch
RIC rated Common
Purchased e-bay auction 12/2007
Johnny
574AA181Comb.png
Cr 348/4 L. Rubrius Dossenus Quinarius12 viewso: Head of Neptune right, DOSSEN & trident behind
r: Victory walking right, [serpent entwined around altar before], L RVBRI behind
This type has an ambitious design for the quinarius -- Neptune's head is detailed and intense; Victory is rather robust, half-draped, with gigantic wings and flamboyant fronds, approaching a post-altar that has busy design as well.
2.00 gms; 14.00 mm

PMah
591AA221combo.png
Cr 352/1 AR Denarius L. Iulius Bursio5 views85 bce; 3.83 gms; 20.50 mm
o: Male head right, with attributes of Apollo (youthful head), Mercury (winged headress) and Neptune (trident); behind, rudder.
r: Victory in quadriga right; above, numeral [xv??]; in exergue, L. IVLI. BVRSIO
This is an odd type, combining attributes of three gods on the obverse with an extremely mundane reverse. The rudder die mark is fairly rare, and I have not seen another published example. Any Republican type with a wide variety of die marks and numbers will end up representlng a large issue. I will update this posting soon, when I retrieve my Crawford set.
This coin, despite the deposits, is in excellent condition.
PMah
LouisXIV1667.JPG
Divo 101. 1667, Le Canal des deux mers195 viewsObv. Bust right LUDOVICUS XIIII REX CHRISTIANISSIMUS
Rev. Neptune parting land with trident MARIA JUNCTA FOSSA A GAR AD PORT SETIUM MDCLXVII

Commemorates the "Canal des deux mers", a canal linking the Atlantic with the Mediterranean ciathe city of Cette (Sete).
LordBest
an3~0.jpg
Dolphin - Augustus, Carteia Spain, Tyche & Neptune108 viewsAugustus 27 BCE - 14 CE
AE Semis, 20 mm diam. 4.6 g. RPC I 122, Villaranoga 71
Obverse - CARTEIA, turreted bust of Tyche right
Reverse - D D, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
NORMAN K
D54sm.jpg
Domitian RIC 54146 viewsAR Denarius, 3.02g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Dolphin coiled around anchor
RIC 54 (C2). BMC 20. RSC 568. BNC 26.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, February 2014.

This carry-over pulvinaria type from Titus' reign represents the pulvinar of Neptune. A common coin with an outstanding early style portrait. The portrait is so well executed that I can forgive the minor scrape on the reverse.

Well toned and much nicer in hand.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
D96.jpg
Domitian RIC 96116 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Rome mint, 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR POT COS VIII P P; Dolphin coiled round anchor
RIC 96 (C). BMC 29. RSC 593. BNC 32.
Acquired from Lucernae, September 2012.

A fairly common early pulvinar of Neptune reverse of Domitian which is a carry over from an issue of Titus' before his death the previous year. Most likely the reverse is part of a religious series commemorating the opening of the Colosseum. This reverse and the series it comes from would be discontinued later the same year when Domitian radically changed the coinage by introducing new types and increasing the fineness of the denarius.

A wonderful coin in hand with a few minor scrapes which don't detract from the overall eye appeal. This type is rarely seen in such fine condition.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
EB0382_scaled.JPG
EB0382 M. Agrippa / Neptune5 viewsM. Agrippa, AE As, Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD.
Obv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown
Rev: S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left.
References: RIC I 58; Cohen 3.
Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 10.455 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0383_scaled.JPG
EB0383 M. Agrippa / Neptune7 viewsM. Agrippa, AE As, Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD.
Obv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown
Rev: S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left.
References: RIC I 58; Cohen 3.
Diameter: 27.5mm, Weight: 10.316 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0480_scaled.JPG
EB0480 Septimus Severus / Neptune19 viewsSeptimus Severus, AR Denarius, 209 AD.
Obv: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right
Rev: PM TRP XVII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, nude but for chlamys draped over left shoulder and right forearm, right hand resting on upper right leg, right foot on rock, long trident vertical in left hand.
References: RIC IV 228, RSC III 529, BMCRE V 3, Hunter III 69, SRCV II 6346.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.123 grams.
1 commentsEB
Agrias03-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 58, for Agrippa, As of AD 37-41 (flatbed scan)130 viewsÆ As (11.5g, 28mm, 6h). Rome mint, struck under Gaius, AD 37-41.
Obv.: M·AGRIPPA·L·F·COS·III head of Agrippa with rostral crown facing left
Rev.: S C Neptune standing facing left, holding dolphin and trident
RIC (Gaius) 58; Cohen 3; BMC (Tiberius) 161

Perhaps struck under Caligula in memory of his maternal grandfather Agrippa, although Caligula hated him; perhaps under Tiberius starting as early as 14 AD.
Charles S
agrias03-3.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 58, for Agrippa, As of AD 37-41 (Neptune)151 viewsÆ As (11.5g, 28mm, 6h). Rome mint, struck under Gaius, AD 37-41.
Obv.: M·AGRIPPA·L·F·COS·III head of Agrippa with rostral crown facing left
Rev.: S C Neptune standing facing left, holding dolphin and trident
RIC (Gaius) 58; Cohen 3; BMC (Tiberius) 161

Perhaps struck under Caligula in memory of his maternal grandfather Agrippa, although Caligula hated him; perhaps under Tiberius starting as early as 14 AD.
6 commentsCharles S
Gaius_-_RIC_I_58_-_NavN_pic.jpg
Gaius RIC I 5840 viewsAE As. Agrippa. Struck under Caligula, 37-41 AD. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing rostral crown / S-C, Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. 3 commentsAldo
RIC_Gallienus_RIC-V_(S)_245_hippocamp.jpg
Gallienus (Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus) (253-268 A.D.)18 viewsSRCV 10292, RIC V S-245, Göbl 743b, CT 1392, Van Meter 178/1

BI Antoninianus, 2.95 g., 18.25 mm. max. (undersize flan), 180°

Rome mint, ninth officina, struck during solo reign (260-268 A.D.), in 267-268 A.D.

Obv: [GA]LLIENVS AVG, radiate head right.

Rev: NEPT[VNO CONS AVG], hippocamp swimming right. N in exergue.

Issued in 267-268 A.D. to commemorate vows to Neptune invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. The hippocamp is a mythical beast consisting of the foreparts of a horse and the sea-serpent tail. They were the chariot-beasts of Neptune.

RIC rarity C, Van Meter VB1.
1 commentsStkp
gallienus_RIC245.jpg
GALLIENUS AE antoninianus - 267-268 AD (sole reign)29 viewsobv: GALLIENVS AVG (radiate head right)
rev: NEPTVNO CONS AVG (hippocamp right), N in ex.
ref: RIC 245, RSC 667
mint: Rome
3.48gms, 19mm
scarcer

The Hippocamp was a sea horse that was half horse, half fish with a serpents tail. In Roman imagery Neptune often drives a sea-chariot drawn by hippocamps.
berserker
Gallienus_Neptune~0.JPG
Gallienus Neptune17 viewsGallienus, Antioch, 266 - 267 AD, 22 mm , 3.55g, RIC 603, SEAR (2005) 10328,
OBV: GALLIENVS AVG, Radiate, draped bust right
REV: P M TRP XV P P Exe: VIIC•, Neptune standing left with foot on ship's prow and holding trident
This coin is dated to 266-267 CE by the exergual
mark, VIIC, which means COS VII.

SCARCE
Romanorvm
ABM_gall_antioch_trp15.jpg
Gallienus, Antioch, reverse P M TR P XV P P, VIIC in exergue, Neptune standing left, c.26711 viewsGALLIENVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed (from rear) bust right
P M TR P XV P P, Neptune standing left on prow
RIC 603
Adrianus
ga245.jpg
Gallienus, RIC 245 Rome 253-268 CE60 viewsBronze antoninianus
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: NEPTVNO CONS AVG, Hippocamp right, N in ex
RIC V 245 (sole reign), Rome mint, 2.7g, 19.2mm
Reverse translation: Neptune god of the seas, preserver Augustus
3 commentsNORMAN K
1379_carteia.JPG
GREEK, PHOENICIA, Iberia, Carteia11 viewsTyche with crown
Neptune with trident and dolphin
Franz-Josef M
4290333~0.jpg
Hadrian8 viewsHadrian. AD 117-138. AR Denarius (18.5mm, 3.41 g, 8h). Rome mint. Struck circa AD 124-128. Laureate bust right, slight drapery / COS III, Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding acrostolium and trident. RIC II 158; RSC 309. Good VF, toned, minor porosity.

From the collection of a Texas Wine Doctor, purchased from Antioch Associates, 2 December 1997.

Ex CNG 429, Lot 333
arash p
Hadrian_Neptune.jpg
Hadrian6 viewsHadrian Sestertius Neptune foot on prow, Rome 126 AD, 22.2gm.Ancient Aussie
67.jpg
Hadrian Denarius - Neptune (RIC II 158)78 viewsAR Denarius
Rome 119-138 AD
2.86g

Obv: Laureate bust of Hadrian (R)
HADRIANUS AUGUSTUS

Rev: NEPTUNE standing (L) cloak over (R) thigh holding trident and aristolium. Foot on prow of ship, COS III in exergue.


RIC II 158 RSC 309
Kained but Able
hadrian_634.jpg
Hadrian RIC II, 15768 viewsHadrian 117 - 138
AR - Denar, 3.20g, 18mm
AD 125 - 128
obv. HADRIANVS [AV]GVSTVS
bust with drapery on l. shoulder, laureate head r.
rev. COS III
Neptun standing l., cloak over r. thigh, r. foot on prora, holding
trident in l. hand, leaning with r. ellbow on r. knee and
holding dolphin in r. hand
RIC II, 157 var; C.710
VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

var. because normally Neptun is holding sceptre in l. hand!
1 commentsJochen
Hadrse32-2.jpg
Hadrian, RIC 634, Sestertius of AD 125-128 (Neptune)24 viewsÆ Sestertius (24,3g, Ø 32mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 125-128.
Obv.: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right (drapery on left shoulder).
Rev.: COS III (around) S C (field), Neptune standing left, holding trident and dolphin right foot on prow.
RIC 634; Cohen 311; Strack 603.
Ex G.Henzen (1998)

Return to Rome in AD 126 after travels to Greece and Sicily, with sacrifice of thanks to Neptune, who safely brought Hadrian back across the sea.
1 commentsCharles S
Hadrse14-2.jpg
Hadrian, RIC 650, Sestertius of AD 126-128 (Neptune)25 viewsObv.: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; drapery on lleft shoulder
Rev.: COS III (around) NEP RED / S C (in two lines in field), Neptune standing right holding trident and dolphin; left foot on ships' prow.
RIC 650; BMCRE 1317; Cohen 981; Strack 595; RIC 631b; BMCRE 1281Cohen 316; Strack 600; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-2) 553 (4 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values, II) 3612 var. ; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 116/67
Ex G.Henzen (1995)

Return to Rome in AD 126 after travels to Greece and Sicily, with sacrifice of thanks to Neptune, NEPtunus REDux, who safely brought Hadrian back across the sea.
1 commentsCharles S
Hampshire_65.jpg
Hampshire 6516 viewsObv: Neptune standing in his chariot presenting a wreath to Jervis seated.

Rev: SR JOHN JERVIS | WITH 15 SAIL | PURSUED & DEFEATED | THE SPANISH FLEET OF | 27 SAIL OF THE LINE | FEBRUARY 14 | 1797.

Edge: PORTSMOUTH HALFPENNY PAYABLE AT THOS SHARPS • X •

Half Penny Conder Token

Dalton & Hamer: Hampshire 65
SPQR Coins
Portus_Claaudii-2.jpg
HARBOUR, NERO, AE Sestertius (Portus Claudii)140 viewsÆ sestertius (22.54g, maximum Ø34.24mm, 6h), Lugdunum mint, struck AD 66.
Obv.: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head of Nero right, globe below tip of bust.
Rev.: PORT AVG (below) S C (above), aerial view of the harbour of Ostia, showing pier, breakwaters, lighthouse surmounted by the statue of Neptune, seven ships, and the figure of Tiber reclining left in foreground, holding rudder and dolphin.
Mac Dowall (The western Coinages of Nero, ANS SSN 161) 476; RIC 586 (R2); BMCRE 323 var. (different obv. legend); Cohen 253 var. (emperor's head to left); CBN 74 var. (different obv. legend); Sear (RCV) 1953var.

Rome's original harbour was Ostia, situated at the mouth of the Tiber. It could not easily handle large sea-going vessels such as those of the grain fleet. Therefore, Claudius initiated the construction of a new all-weather harboru at Portus, about 4 km north of Ostia. The project was completed under Nero who renamed the harbour "Portus Augusti".

It was a huge project enclosing an area of 69 hectares, with two long curving moles projecting into the sea, and an artificial island, bearing a lighthouse, in the centre of the space between the moles. The foundation of this lighthouse was provided by filling with concrete and sinking one of the massive ships that Caligula had used to transport an obelisk from Egypt for the Circus Maximus. These giant ships had a length of around 100m and displaced a minimum of 7400 tons. The harbour opened directly to the sea on the northwest and communicated with the Tiber by a channel on the southeast. However, it was very exposed to the weather and under Trajan was superseded by a new land-locked inner basin linked to the Tiber by a canal.
3 commentsCharles S
crepereia~1.jpg
HIPPOCAMPUS133 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphitrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.
Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.
1 commentsbenito
Gallienus-Antoninian-MEDIOLANUM-GOEBL1014n.jpg
II - GALLIENUS -b- Antoninian - MEDIOLANUM - GOEBL 1014n14 viewsA) GALLIENVS AVG
Radiated and cuirassed bust right

R) LEG XI CL VI P VI F
Neptunus standing right, holding trident and dolphin

Weight:1,75g; Ø: 19mm; Reference: GOEBL: 1014n
sulcipius
20150822_113041a.jpg
Italy, Herculaneum, House of the Neptune mosaic17 viewsThe House of the Neptune mosaic is named after the stunning mosaic that dominates the centre of the back wall. The mosaic shows Neptune and Amphitrite surrounded by a decorative motif.

From my visit to Herculaneum in August 2015
maridvnvm
20150822_113047.jpg
Italy, Herculaneum, House of the Neptune mosaic - nymphaeum13 viewsOn the far end wall of the court of the House of the Neptune mosaic is a nympheum. It is surmounted by the head of Silenus accompanied by two marble theatrical masks.

From my visit to Herculaneum in August 2015
maridvnvm
20150822_113041.jpg
Italy, Herculaneum, Mosaic of Neptune and Amphitrite 13 viewsThe mosaic of Neptune and Amphitrite.

From my visit to Herculaneum in August 2015
maridvnvm
IMG_2301wp.jpg
Italy, Rome, Pantheon158 viewsbuilt by Agrippa 27 BC
rebuilt by Hadrian into present shape in 123 AD

remains of Neptune's basilica
Johny SYSEL
IMG_2452.JPG
Jupiter, Pluto, Persephone, Neptune, Amphitrite129 viewsPallazo AltempsJohny SYSEL
bur.jpg
L. Julius Bursio (85 B.C.)90 viewsAR Denarius
O:Laureate, draped and winged bust of Genius (or Apollo Vejovis) right (attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune) trident and flower in left field.
R: Victory in fast quadriga right, reins in left hand, wreath upward in right, HV above.
L IVLIO BVRSIO in ex.
Rome
3.7g
19.6mm
Julia 5b; Crawford 352/1c; Sydenham 728c
2 commentsMat
00785.jpg
L. Julius Bursio (RSC Julia 5b, Coin #785)12 viewsRSC Julia 5b, AR Denarius, Rome, 85 BC
OBV: Laureate head of Neptune right; trident and control mark behind.
REV: L IVLI BVRSIO, Victory driving a quadriga right, holding wreath palm.
SIZE: 20.4mm, 4.02g
MaynardGee
L__Julius_Bursio.jpg
L. Julius Bursio - AR Denarius6 viewsRome
¹²85 BC
laureate and winged male* head right, trident and poppy stem left
Victory in quadriga right, holding wreath and reins
HV
L·IVLI·BVRSIO
¹Crawford 352/1c, Syd. 728e
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aureo and Calico

*The strange deity on the obverse combines attributes of Apollo, Mercury and Neptune.
Johny SYSEL
jean_elsen_1.jpg
L. Lucretius Trio30 viewsAR denarius. 76 BC. 3.94 gr. Laureate head of Neptune right; trident and number V behind. / Cupid or genius riding a dolphin right. L LUCRETI / TRIO in two lines below. Toned. Craw 390/2. RSC Lucretia 3. Smyth IX/43. Jean Elsen 89. Lot 921. benito
00luctrio2.jpg
L. LUCRETIUS TRIO53 viewsAR denarius. 76 BC. 3.94 gr. Laureate head of Neptune right; trident and number V behind. / Cupid or genius riding a dolphin right. L LUCRETI / TRIO in two lines below. Toned. Craw 390/2. RSC Lucretia 3. Smyth IX/43. Jean Elsen 89. Lot 921.1 commentsbenito
L__Lucretius_Trio_-_New.jpg
L. Lucretius Trio - Lucretia-3105 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. ROMAN REPUBLIC L. Lucretius Trio 76 BC AR denarius, Rome mint, (18.1 mm 3.825 gm die axis 180o), obverse laureate head of Neptune right, with trident over shoulder, ˄XT control number behind; reverse winged boy (Cupid?) riding dolphin right, L LVCRET TRIO below. SRCV 322, Sydenham 784, Crawford 390/2, RSC I Lucretia 36 commentsBud Stewart
rubrius_dossenus_Cr348_4.jpg
L. Rubrius Dossenus, Crawford 348/426 viewsL. Rubrius Dossenus, gens Rubria (his name only known from coins)
AR - Quinarius, 1.57g, 15.39mm, 0°
obv. Bearded head of Neptun r., trident over l. shoulder
behind DOS-SEN
rev. Victoria, half nude, head thrown back, advancing tiptoed r., holding over l. shoulder palm branch to which
three wreaths are attached; before her girlanded altar with omphalos atop around which snake is coiled.
beneath L.RVBRI
ref. Crawford 348/4; Sydenham 708; Rubria 4
F+, toned, obv. a bit excentric, altar clearly seen

Interesting reverse type, inadequately described in BMCRR, Sydenham, and Crawford. The same altar with
omphalos and snake separates the two faces of Janus on the obverse of an as struck by the same moneyer,
Crawford 348/5, pl. xlvi.
Jochen
0123.jpg
L. Rubrius Dossenus, Quinarius16 viewsL. Rubrius Dossenus, Quinarius

RRC 348/4
87 bc
1,90gr

Av: Laureate head of Neptune right; trident to left. Behind DOS.SEN downwards
Rv: Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm frond; to right, garlanded altar with snake coiled round top. Behind L.RVBRI downwards

Ex CNG e-auction 388, 14.12.2016, sold as from the estate of Thomas Bentley Cederlind.
Norbert
3A6BD457-EE9B-4A65-BAC6-CAC41B0ECA9C.jpeg
L. Rubrius Dossenus, Quinarius5 viewsL. Rubrius Dossenus
Rome, 87 BC
AR Quinarius

Laureate head of Neptune right; trident to left

Victory advancing right, holding wreath and palm frond; to right, garlanded altar with snake coiled round top

Crawford 348/4; RBW 1325; RSC Rubria 4
Robin Ayers
1000-17-171.jpg
L. Titurius20 viewsL. Titurius L.f. Sabinus, 89 BC. AR Denarius (4.27 gm). Head of the Sabine king Tatius / Two soldiers, each carrying a Sabine woman. Tituria.2. Cr.344/1b. Toned aVF.

The Rape is supposed to have occurred in the early history of Rome, shortly after its founding by Romulus and his mostly male followers. Seeking wives in order to found families, the Romans negotiated unsuccessfully with the Sabines, who populated the area. Fearing the emergence of a rival society, the Sabines refused to allow their women to marry the Romans. Consequently, the Romans planned to abduct Sabine women, during a festival of Neptune Equester and proclaimed the festival among Rome's neighbours. According to Livy, many people from Rome's neighbours including folk from the Caeninenses, Crustumini, and Antemnates, and many of the Sabines attended. At the festival Romulus gave a signal, at which the Romans grabbed the Sabine women and fought off the Sabine men. The indignant abductees were soon implored by Romulus to accept Roman husbands.
ecoli
Algier_1816_Lord_Exmouth.jpg
Lord Exmouth, Algier 1816, Elmer 108513 viewsAE 41, 37.97g, 0°
Admiral Lord Exmouth, AD 1757-1833
struck in 1820 by Brenet and Gerard for Mudies National Medals Series.
obv. ADMIRAL - LORD EXMOUTH
Bust in uniform r.
rev. Neptun, crowned, with waving cloak, stg. l. on hippocampus, ready to kill him with his trident
in ex. in 2 lines: ALGIERS AUGUST 18 / 1816
ref. Mudie 39; BHM 921; Elmer 1085
Jochen
lucania_paestum.jpg
Lucania. Paestum. Semis. Head of Neptune/ rudder & anchor10 viewsLucania. Paestum. Semis. Head of Neptune right, S and trident behind/ ΠΑΕ, rudder and anchor crossed?, Crawford 20. Ex Sayles & Lavender.Podiceps
Agrippa~0.jpg
Marcus Agrippa 40 viewsM AGRIPPA L F COS III
head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown

Rev. SC either side of Neptune standing holding dolphin and trident

Issued by Caligula in honour of his deceased grandfather Agrippa

Minted in Rome 37-41 A.D.

Sold!
Titus Pullo
Agrippa~2.jpg
Marcus Agrippa98 viewsM AGRIPPA L F COS III
head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown

SC
Neptune standing holding dolphin and trident

AE As
Issued by Caligula in honour of his deceased grandfather Agrippa

Minted in Rome 37-41 A.D.

9.06g

Ex- Ancient Treasures
5 commentsJay GT4
agrippa-reshoot.jpg
Marcus Agrippa AE As. - Neptune35 viewsRoman Imperial, Marcus Agrippa AE As, Rome mint, (37-41 AD), 10.2g, 28mm, Axis 180° .

Obverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III: Head left wearing rostral crown.

Reverse: S-C: Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left.

Reference: RIC-58, C-3, aorta 4

Ex: Imperator Coins
Gil-galad
M Agrippa.jpg
Marcus Agrippa AS37 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Agrippa facing left

Rev:S C
Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
rick fox
Marcus_Agrippa.jpg
Marcus Agrippa As4 viewsOBV: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Head of Marcus Agrippa, left wearing rostral crown
REV: S-C Neptune standing facing, head left, naked
except for cloak draped behind him & over both
arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical
trident in left.

Cohen 3; RIC 58; Sear 5 #1812
A.D. 37-41
11.01gm 27mm
goldenancients
aprippa1.JPG
Marcus Agrippa, Struck under Caligula34 viewsRome mint, struck under Caligula, A.D. 37
Obverse: M • AGRIPPA • L • F • COS • III, head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown
Reverse: S C across field, Neptune standing facing, head left, holding small dolphin in right hand and trident in left.

General of the battle of Actium, and friend of Octavian Augustus
1 commentsDk0311USMC
00130-MarcusA~0.JPG
Marcus Aurelius 36 viewsMarcus Aurelius AS
28 mm 10.87 gm
O: M ANTONINVS AVG - GERM SARM TR P XXXI
Laureate bust right, slight drapery
R: IMP VIII COS III / FELICITATI / AVG P P / S - C
Galley left with four rowers; at stern, Neptune seated left, holding dolphin and trident
2 commentsKoffy
Marcus_Aurelius_RIC_1193__Dupondius.jpg
Marcus Aurelius BMCRE Type 1615 variation Dupondius27 viewsObverse: M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM TR P XXXI. Radiate head of Marcus Aurelius facing right.
Reverse: FELICITATI AVG M ANTONINVS AVG P P IMP VIII COS III S.C. Ship with four rowers l.;statue of Neptune on stern.
11.77gr, 26mm.
Rome, struck between December 176 A.D. and early 177 A.D.

This coin matches BMCRE 1615. No coin in RIC matches it exactly. The obverse matches RIC III type 1193, but the reverse appears to be a variation of RIC III type 1199, both on page 307.

According to the historian Capitolinus, the emperor encountered a dangerous storm on a voyage home from the east, thus this coin is likely to celebrate the safe return of the emperor.
fnord123
8FdNj3SJJE4r5KcW6X7a9fRn96eDSZ.jpg
Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 180 AD, AE As, Galley with Rowers19 viewsMarcus Aurelius, 161 - 180 AD
AE As, Rome Mint, 26mm, 8.92 grams
Obverse: M ANTONINVS AVG GER-M SARM TR[P X]XXI, laureate head of Marcus Aurelius right.
Reverse: FELICI/TATI AVG/P P in three lines above, [C]OS III in exergue, [S] C across lower field, galley rowed right by three oarsmen; at stern, Neptune standing right, foot on rock, holding trident and aplustre.
RIC 1195 // BMC 1618 // Cohen 191
Ex Colosseum Coin Exchange 66 (23 November 1992), 265. _8008
Antonivs Protti
05475q00.jpg
MARKET, NERO, (Macellum Magnum)2629 viewsOrichalcum dupondius, RIC 400, S 1963 variety, VF, 13.65g, 28.9mm, 180o, Lugdunum mint, 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P, laureate head left; reverse MAC AVG S C, front view of the Macellum Magnum (great market), two-story domed section with porticoes approached by steps with a dolphin on each side and containing statue of Neptune holding a long scepter on pedestal, wings of two stories of unequal height.

The Macellum Magnum was a shopping mall located on the Caelian Hill in Rome, dedicated by Nero in 59 A.D. It had flanking wings of slightly different construction and a central dome possibly 120 feet (36 meters) in diameter. Records indicate it was still open in the 4th century. Part of it may be incorporated into the church of S. Stefano Rotundo which stands today. It was the model for many medieval government buildings in Europe, all U.S. state capitols and the U.S. national capitol building.
5 commentsJoe Sermarini
RI 064aq img~0.jpg
Neptune216 viewsSeptimius Severus denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding trident dolphin, foot on globe
References:– RIC 241, RSC 542

God of the sea, Neptune is shown nude with a trident. He is often (as here)shown with one foot raised on a rock
maridvnvm
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II
AgrippaAsNeptune_2.jpg
Neptune6 viewsAgrippa
As

Head left wearing rostral crownt, M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left, SC

RIC 58
Blindado
crepereiaIIII.jpg
Neptune and Amphytrite151 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphytrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.

Amphytrite daughter of Nereid and Doris was courted by Neptune. But she fled from his advances to Atlas, at the farthest ends of the sea. There the dolphin of Neptune sought her through the islands of the sea, and finding her, spoke persuasively on behalf of Poseidon. As Hyginus writes he was rewarded by being placed among the stars as the constellation Delphinus.












1 commentsbenito
IMG_2453.JPG
Neptune, Apollo, Cybele, Luna, Mercury, Hephaestus, Helios, Mars, Venus, Hercules, Bacchus118 viewsPallazo AltempsJohny SYSEL
Roman_Empire__Emperor_Nero_AE_As_Perinthus__Thrace.jpg
Nero / AE . As / Perinthus Thrace / Very Rare.29 viewsNero AE As, Moesia or Balkan mint (Perinthus, Thrace?). NERO CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M, Laureate head right / S-C, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. RPC I 1760; BMCRE 391 note, pl. 48, 11; WCN pg. 245, 1 var. (obverse legend); RIC: not listed but mentioned on pp. 186-187. RPC 1760. 27mm.

From the Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
NeroNeptune.jpg
Nero Billon tetradrachm,225 viewsNEΡΩ KΛAΥ KAIΣ ΣEB ΓEΡ AΥ
radiate bust left with aegis LIΔ year

ΠOΣEIΔΩN IΣΘMIOΣ
bust of Poseidon right, wearing taenia, trident behind shoulder

14.21g
Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 67 - 9 Jun 68 A.D

Dattari 244; Milne 298; Curtis 152, Sear 2014

Ex-Zurgieh

This type is from a series of tetradrachms depicting and naming a variety of Greek deities; issued to commemorate Nero's sojourn in Greece in 67 - 68 A.D.
5 commentsJay GT4
NeroSe21-2.jpg
Nero, RIC 179, Sestertius of AD 64 (port of Ostia) 109 viewsÆ sestertius (26.8g, Ø33mm, 5h), Rome mint, struck AD 64.
Obv.: NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate head of Nero facing left.
Rev.: AVGVSTI (around above) S POR OST C (around below), Bird's-eye view of the harbour of Ostia, with at the top a statue of Neptune on pharos; at the bottom reclining Tiber river-god holding a dolphin; to left, crescent-shaped pier with portico; to right, crescent shaped row of breakwaters; in the centre, eight ships.
RIC 179 (S); Cohen 40; BMC 223
ex Künker Auction 153
1 commentsCharles S
nerose14-2.jpg
Nero, RIC 586, Sestertius of AD 66 (Ostia harbour)77 viewsÆ sestertius (22.6g, Ø34mm, 6h), Lugdunum mint, struck AD 66.
Obv.: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head of Nero facing left, globe below tip of bust.
Rev.: PORT AVG (below) S C (above, left and right in field), Port of Ostia, seven ships, top Neptune on pharos, bottom reclining Tiber.
RIC 586 (R2); Sear 2000 (RCV) 1953var.
Charles S
nerose14c.jpg
Nero, RIC 586, Sestertius of AD 66 (Portus Augusti)72 viewsÆ sestertius (22.54g, maximum Ø34.24mm, 6h), Lugdunum mint, struck AD 66.
Obv.: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG P MAX TR P P P, laureate head of Nero right, globe below tip of bust.
Rev.: PORT AVG (below) S C (above), aerial view of the harbor of Ostia, showing pier, breakwaters, lighthouse surmounted by the statue of Neptune, seven ships, and the figure of Tiber reclining left in foreground, holding rudder and dolphin.
Mac Dowall (The western Coinages of Nero, ANS SSN 161) 476; RIC 586 (R2); BMCRE 323 var. (different obv. legend); Cohen 253 var. (emperor's head to left); CBN 74 var. (different obv. legend); Sear (RCV) 1953var.

Certificate of Authenticity: David R Sear / A.C.C.S. Ref. 100CR/RI/C/V (January 6, 2015): "Grade: F and very rare, one of the most interesting types of Nero's sestertius series "

Extract of Sear's Historical and Numismatic Note: "This example commemorates the completion of the great harbor project to serve the needs of the imperial capital initiated by Claudius and completed under Nero. Ostia is situated at the mouth of the Tiber, but could not easily handle large sea-going vessels such as those of the grain fleet. Accordingly, Claudius initiated the construction of a new all-weather harbor at Portus, about two miles along the coast line to the north. This was a huge project, involving the construction of two great moles jutting out into the sea. The lighthouse erected at the end of one of these moles was built on foundations formed by sinking a large ship that Caligula had used to transport an obelisk from Egypt. This harbor, however, was very exposed to the weather and under Trajan was superseded by a new land-locked inner basin linked to the Tiber by a canal (cf. P.Connolly and H.Hodge, The Ancient City. Life in Classical Athens and Rome, pp. 128-30)"
3 commentsCharles S
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P.PLAUTIUS HYPSAEUS24 viewsAR denarius. 60 BC. 3,87 grs. Head of Neptune right.Trident behind. P YPSAE SC before. / Jupiter in quadriga left,brandishing thunderbolt. CEPIT behind. C YPSAE COS PRIV in exergue.
Craw 420/1a. RSC Plautia 11.
Dr Busso. 374.Lot 441.
benito
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P.PLAUTIUS HYPSAEUS 21 viewsAR denarius. 60 BC. 3,87 grs. Head of Neptune right.Trident behind. P YPSAE SC before. / Jupiter in quadriga left,brandishing thunderbolt. CEPIT behind. C YPSAE COS PRIV in exergue.
Craw 420/1a. RSC Plautia 11.
Dr Busso. 374.Lot 441.
benito
Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI RIC 76.jpg
Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI RIC V/2 7657 viewsAnt, 23mm, 4.28g.

Obverse: IMP C POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust R.

Reverse: NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing L with dolphin and trident.

Trier, Officina 2, Issue 2. RIC 76, C.

A seriously worn reverse die, but this is typical of Postumus.

Robert_Brenchley
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Q.CREPEREIUS M.f. ROCUS41 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphitrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.
Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.

3 commentsbenito
crepereia.jpg
Q.CREPEREIUS M.f.ROCUS71 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphitrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.
Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.
1 commentsbenito
Vespasian_Neptune.jpg
RIC 1555 Vespasian Neptune177 viewsIMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII.
Laureate bust right.

NEP RED.
Neptune standing left, foot set on globe, holding sceptre and acrostolium.

Antioch mint

3.35g

RIC² 1555(C); RPC 1928

Ex-Ancient Treasures
10 commentsJay GT4
RIC_1555_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 1555 Vespasianus28 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right
Rev: NEP RED, Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
AR/Denarius (16.71 mm 2.81 g 6h) Struck in Antiochia ad Orontem (Syria, Seleucis and Pieria) 72-73 A D
RIC 1555 (C), RSC 274, BMCRE 508, RPC 1928
FlaviusDomitianus
RIC_V_1561_Titus.jpg
RIC 1561 Titus30 viewsObv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, Laureate head right, bust draped
Rev: NEP RED, Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
AR/Denarius (17.50 mm 3.01 g 6h) Struck in Antiochia ad Orontem (Syria, Seleucis and Pieria) 72-73 A D
RIC 1561 (C, Vespasian), BMCRE 516 (Vespasian), RSC 122, RPC 1933
Ex Gorny & Mosch Auction 196 Lot 2592
3 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
coin78.jpg
RIC 214 Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus.9 viewsRIC 214 Claudius II Gothicus AE Antoninianus.
Antioch mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate
head left / NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left
with dolphin & trident. Cohen 183, Sear'88 #3213
Coin #78
cars100
Marcus_Agrippa_2.jpg
RIC 5828 viewsMAGRIPPA LF COS III

SC
Neptune standing holding a trident and w/ dolphin
Tacitus
Marcus_Agrippa_1.jpg
RIC 58, BMC 16126 viewsMAGRIPPA LF COS III

SC
Neptune standing holding a trident and w/ dolphin
Tacitus
Agrippa.jpg
Roman Agrippa AE As24 viewsAE As ; 37 AD; struck under Caligula, Rome
Obv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S C - Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident.

Ref: Cohen 3, RIC 58
Tanit
bpJ1B1Agrippa.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa50 viewsObv: M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Head, left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev: S C
Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident.
As 11.1 gm 29 mm Mint: Rome RIC 58
Comment: Issued by Caligula
Massanutten
Agrippa.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, AGRIPPA AS1469 viewsObverse: M AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head left. Reverse: SC - Neptune standing, holding trident and dolphin. Rome Mint: AD 37-41. RIC I Caligula 58, Cohen 313 commentspostumus
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58452 viewsAgrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero

Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58, SRCV I 556, superb EF, weight 10.34 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields; bold high relief strike on a large flan with no wear, beautiful green patina, extraordinary portrait, spectacular!

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.

7 commentsJoe Sermarini
IMG_0984_Agrippa_800_400.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Rome mint, struck 37 AD, AE As40 viewsM AGRIPPA L F COS III bust left wearing rostral crown
S-C Neptune standing left
RIC Gaius 58; Cohen 3
very fine, thick olive green patina
dupondius
ag.jpg
Roman Empire, Agrippa, Struck c.A.D.38 under Caligula.225 viewsAgrippa, 43–12 BC.
AE as, Roma mint, Struck c.A.D 38.
Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left, wearing rostral crown.
Rev. SC, Neptune standing half-left, arms draped, holding small dolphin and grounded trident.
RIC I : 58.
21,14g, 28mm.

Provenance: Numismatik Lanz, Auction 147, lot 254.
3 commentsapyatygin
hadrien.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, AE Sestertius8 viewsSesterce d'Hadrien. RIC 635
Avers: HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS. Tête laurée à droite, avec pan de draperie sur l'épaule gauche
Revers: COS III S C. Neptune debout à gauche, le pied droit posé sur une proue de navire, tenant un long trident et un aplustre
Kenobi O
86120q00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.20 viewsSH86120. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC I 178, BMCRE I 131, Cohen I 37, Mac Dowall WCN 120, BnF I -, VF, well centered, nice portrait, near black patina, scratches on obverse lower right field, some porosity and tiny pitting, weight 26.031 g, maximum diameter 34.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, c. 64 A.D.; obverse NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P, laureate bust right, wearing aegis; reverse AVGVSTI above, S - C divided by POR OST below, bird's-eye view Ostia harbor: pharos lighthouse with Neptune statue on top at far side center; crescent-shaped pier with building and figure sacrificing at far end, crescent-shaped row of breakwaters or slips on right with figure seated on rock at far end, 7 ships within port; river god Tiber reclining left holding rudder and dolphin below; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 195 (7 Mar 2011), lot 405Joe Sermarini
Nero_Harbour.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero, Sestertius, AE Rome mint, struck 64 AD658 viewsNERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER P M TR P IMP P P laureate-headed bust right with aegis on left shoulder
AVGVSTI, POR OST, SC bird’s eye view of a the new Ostia harbor; at top pharos surmounted by a statue (light house); at bottom, reclining figure of Neptune left, holding rudder and dolphin
RIC 181, Cohen 33 (20 Fr.)

ex. Arthur Bally-Herzog collection

15 commentsdupondius
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Postumus NEPTVNO REDVCI32 viewsPostumus, 262 A.D., Trier.
OBV: IMP POSTVMVS PF AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: NEPTVNO REDVCI, Neptune standing left, holding trident and dolphin, prow at feet.
ancientcoins
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Septimius Severus denarius67 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius - Neptune

OBVERSE: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: PM TRP XVII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding a trident, foot on globe
18mm - 3 grams
REFERENCE: RIC228
EF
3 commentssseverus
2991LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Septimius Severus denarius 25 viewsOBVERSE: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: PM TRP XVII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding a trident, foot on globe
18mm - 3 grams
REFERENCE: RIC228
EF
Nico
37595p00.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Gold aureus17 viewsSH37595. Gold aureus, SRCV I 2418; RIC II part 1, Vesp. 365; Cohen I 120; BnF III 65, VF, nice high relief portrait, a few marks, weight 7.068 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, foot on globe, acrostolium in right hand, scepter in left handJoe Sermarini
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Brutus with Casca Longus, AR Denarius - Crawford 507/236 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Brutus with Casca Longus. 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.88g; 21mm).
Military mint, 42 BCE.

Obverse: CASCA LONGVS; Neptune's head facing right; trident below.

Reverse: BRVTVS IMP; Victory advancing right on broken scepter, holding filleted diadem and palm.

References: Crawford 507/2; HCRI 212; Sydenham1298 (R6); BMCRR (East) 63; Junia 44; Servilia 35.

Provenance: Ex V.L. Nummus Auction 12 (15 Sep 2019) Lot 68; Brüder Egger Auction 45 (12 Nov 1913) Lot 871.

Publius Servilius Casca Longus was one of the leading conspirators against Julius Caesar, and he was Tribune of the Plebs at the time of the assassination. Plutarch reports that a nervous Casca was the first to stab Caesar on the Ides of March with a glancing blow: “Casca gave him the first cut, in the neck, which was not mortal nor dangerous, as coming from one who at the beginning of such a bold action was probably very much disturbed. Caesar immediately turned about and laid his hand upon the dagger and kept hold of it. And both of them at the same time cried out, he that received the blow, in Latin, ‘Vile Casca, what does this mean?’ and he that gave it, in Greek, to his brother [Gaius] ‘Brother, help!’” [Plutarch: Lives of the noble Grecians and Romans, Arthur Clough (Ed.)] After Caesar’s assassination, Casca was given command of Brutus’ fleet. Nothing is known of Casca following the Battle of Philippi in October 42 BCE, where he likely perished or committed suicide in the aftermath.

The Neptune obverse refers to Casca’s naval command and the naval superiority of the conspirators before Philippi. Coins of the conspirators are replete with depictions of liberty and victory, and this coin is no exception. The reverse, with its broken scepter, clearly alludes to the assassins’ hope to eliminate monarchy in the Roman state and restore the Republic. Some authors have speculated that Victory is breaking the regal diadem on this type, although I don’t think that is abundantly clear.
8 commentsCarausius
2951797.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE45 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 21mm).
Sicilian mint.

Obv: [M]AG PIVS IMP [ITER]. Bust of Neptune facing right; trident over shoulder.

Rev: [PR]AEF CLAS ET OR[AE MAR IT EX S C]. Naval trophy.

References: Crawford 511/2; HCRI 333; Sydenham 1347 (R5).

Provenance: Ex Stack's Bowers August 2016 ANA (10 Aug 2016), Lot 20139; ex Nomos Obolos 4 (21 Feb 2016), Lot 522; ex RBW Collection [NAC 63 (17 May 2012), Lot 538]; privately purchased from SKA Zurich, July 1985.

Sextus Pompey was a son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts". Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE.
4 commentsCarausius
4303550l.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Sextus Pompey, AR Denarius30 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Sextus Pompey, 42-36 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.49g; 20mm).
Sicilian mint, 42-40 BCE.

Obverse: MAG PIVS IMP ITER; Pharos of Messina with two windows and a balcony, surmounted by statue of Neptune wearing helmet and holding trident and resting foot on prow; galley with aquila passing before.

Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C; the monster, Scylla, her body terminating in two fish-tails and the foreparts of three dogs, facing left and wielding a rudder with two hands.

References: Crawford 511/4a; HCRI 335; Sydenham 1348; BMCRR (Sicily) 18-19; Banti 8/3 (this coin illustrated); Pompeia 22.

Provenance: Ex Kuenker Auction 312 (8 Oct 2018), Lot 2712; Walter Niggeler (d. 1964) Collection [Leu/Muenzen und Medaillen (21-22 Oct 1966), Lot 964].

Sextus Pompey was younger son of Pompey the Great. After Caesar's assassination, in 43 BCE, he was honored by the Senate with the title "Commander of the Fleet and Sea Coasts" (Praefectus classis et orae maritimae). Shortly following this honor, the Second Triumvirate was formed and placed Sextus' name on their proscription list. Sextus soon occupied Sicily where he provided haven to other Romans proscribed by the Triumvirs. He retained control of Sicily from 42 to 36 BCE. In 42 BCE, Octavian sent Salvidienus Rufus to dislodge Sextus, but Rufus was defeated. It was likely between this defeat of Rufus and the Pact of Misenum with the Triumvirs (39 BCE) that Sextus struck much of his coinage, including this type. The rough seas around Sicily were beneficial to Sextus and particularly rough on his enemies, thus Neptune and the marine monster Scylla, destroyer of ships, are prominently displayed on this coin.
3 commentsCarausius
002.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Pompey the Great, 49 to 48 BC.48 viewsGnaeus Pompeius Magnus, 49–48 BC.
AR Denarius, uncertain Sicilian mint, 42-40 BC.
Obv.MAG PIVS IMP ITER, bare head of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus right; capis (jug) to left, lituus to right.
Rev. PRÆF, Neptune standing left, holding aplustre and resting foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, who carry their parents on their shoulders, in ex. CLAS ET ORÆ / MARIT EX SC.
RSC 17 (I, 105); Crawford 511/3a; Sydenham 1344.
3,83g.
Provenance: Classical Numismatic Group, Auction 79, lot 1037.
apyatygin
Q__Nasidius.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Sextus Pompeius/Q. Nasidius410 viewsDenarius (grs 3,92 and 19 mm) from one of the admirals of Sextus Pompeius. Main hypot. for issuance : 44-43 BC in Massalia (other : mint moving with Sextus in Sicily around 40 BC).
Obverse: Head looking right of Cn. Pompeius Magnus ; bef. trident ; below, dolphin ; behind, NEPTUNI.
Reverse : galley sailing right ; above, star ; below, Q. NASIDIUS.
Crawford 483/2. Sydenham 1350. Sear (Imp.) 235. Babelon Pompeia 28 (p. 354, vol. 2).
Again (see the didrachm from Akragas) the clear advantage of concavity for the reverse (with no neg. impacts on the observe).
12 commentslabienus
0048LG.jpeg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L Lucretius Trio, AR Denarius49 viewsL Lucretius Trio Denarius. 74 BC. Laureate head of Neptune right, trident over shoulder, numeral above / L LVCRETI TRIO in two lines, infant Genius riding dolphin right.

This coin may refer to an ancestor, C. Lucretius Gallus, who in 181 BC was created duumvir navalis, and later commanded the fleet against Perseus of Macedon.
1 commentsFabiusMaximus
1681183l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, P. Plautius Hypsaeus, AR Denarius - Crawford 420/2a30 viewsRome, The Republic.
P. Plautius Hypsaeus, 57 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.96g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Draped bust of Leuconoe facing right; dolphin behind; P.YPSAE·S·C before.

Reverse: Jupiter driving quadriga left; C·YPSAE·COS / PRIV – CEPIT in exergue and behind.

References: Crawford 420/2a; RBW 1515 (this coin); Sydenham 911; Plautia 12.

Provenance: Ex NAC 84 (20 May 2015), Lot 807; RBW Collection [NAC 63 (2012), Lot 291]; Crédit de la Bourse (April 1995), Lot 1068; NAC 6 (11 Mar 1993), Lot 285.

This coin is a special issue by Senatorial decree (S.C.) for reasons unknown to history. The moneyer, P. Plautius Hypsaeus, struck coins individually, as moneyer, and jointly with M. Aemilius Scaurus as Curule Aedile. On both series, he used this reverse type, referring to the capture of the Volscian town of Privernum by his ancestor, C. Plautius Decianus, consul in 329 BCE. The obverse refers to the mythical descent of the Plautia gens from Leuconoe, the daughter of Neptune.

Crawford thought Hypsaeus’ individual series preceded his joint series as Curule Aedile with Scaurus; however, the individual coins were absent from the Mesagne Hoard, suggesting it must have post-dated the 58 BCE terminus of that large hoard. Accordingly, Hersh and Walker redated Hypsaeus’ individual series to 57 BCE.
2 commentsCarausius
60- Rubrius Quinarius.JPG
Rubrius Quinarius31 viewsSilver quinarius, Rome mint, 87 B.C
Obverse: laureate head of Neptune right, DOSSEN and trident behind
Reverse: Victory, half-nude, head thrown back, walking r. and holding over shoulder palm branch to which three wreaths are attached; before her, altar bearing omphalos around which snake is entwined; behind, L. RVBRI.
S 261, Syd 708, Craw 348/4, RSC Rubria 4,
1.90g, 15.7mm,
Jerome Holderman
sept3.jpg
Septimius Servus 193-211 denarius32 viewsOb. SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT Head right
Rev. P M TR P XVII COS III PP Neptune standing left, foot on rock holding trident.
Ref. Sear 1678

Lucius Septimius Severus was born on 1 April AD 145 at Lepcis Magna in Tripolitania. His father was Publius Septimius Geta.

-:Bacchus:-
1 commentsBacchus
fbdfg.jpg
Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.) 72 viewsAR Denarius
O: SEVERVS - PIVS AVG, Laureate head right.
R: PM TRP XVII - COS III PP, Neptune standing left, leaning on raised right leg set on rocks and holding trident.
Rome, 209 AD
18mm
3.2g
RIC 228, Cohen 529, BMCRE 003
5 commentsMat
259_Septimius_Neptun.jpg
Septimius Severus - AR denarius11 viewsRome
209 AD
laureate head right
SEVERVS__PIVS AVG
Neptune standing left, holding trident, right foot on rock
P M TR P XVII__COS III P P
RIC IV 228, RSC III 529
2,84 g 19 mm
Johny SYSEL
IVi-241.jpg
Septimius Severus - Neptune80 viewsAR Denarius, Rome, 210 (2.24gm)
RIC IVi.241, RCV.6350v (c)
Ox: SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT
O: Laureate head right.
Rx: P M TR P XVIII COS III PP
R: Neptune standing left, right foot on rock, right hand resting on upper leg, holding long trident.

ex. Dimitre Genoff (AAH)
Paul DiMarzio
S19.jpg
Septimius Severus - Neptune111 viewsDenarius 209
O/ SEVERUS - PIUS AUG Laureate head right
R/ P m TR P XVII - COS III P P Neptune, naked but for cloak from shoulder, standing half-left, foot on rock, holding trident and resting right hand on knee
C 529 - RIC 228
Mint: Rome (1st off., 1st emission)
septimus
SeptSeverus.jpg
Septimius Severus - Neptune25 viewsDenarius, 3.20 g, 19 mm, 6 h, 210-211 AD

Obverse: SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT
Laureate bust right

Reverse: P M TR P XIX COS III P P
Neptune standing left, holding cloak in left hand and trident in right hand, right foot on globe

Rome mint

RIV IVi 244
1 commentsdrjbca
Septimius_Severus_Neptune_RIC_228.JPG
Septimius Severus Neptune RIC 22822 viewsSeptimius Severus, Silver denarius, 209 AD, Rome, RIC Iva Pg 120 228, Cohen 529
OBV: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate bust right
REV: P M TR P XVII COS III PP, Neptune, naked but for cloak over shoulder,
standing left, right foot on globe, holding trident in left hand
Romanorvm
Septimius_Severus_RIC_228_neu.jpg
Septimius Severus RIC 22842 viewsDenarius (18mm-3.2g)
obv. SEVERVS PIVS AVG
laureate head right
rev. PM TRP XVII COS III PP
Neptune standing left, foot on rock,holding trident
RIC 228
minted in Rom 209 AD
1 commentsHG
Septimius_Severus_RIC_228~0.JPG
Septimius Severus, 193 - 211 AD17 viewsObv: SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head of Septimius Severus facing right.

Rev: PM TRP XVII COS III PP, Neptune, naked except for cloak draped over left shoulder, standing facing, head turned left, foot on rock, holding a trident in left hand.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 209 AD

3.1 grams, 18.55 mm, 180°

RIC IVii 228, RSC 529, S6346, VM 122
SPQR Coins
SeptimiusBrit.jpg
Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.14 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 241, RSC 542, gVF, Rome mint, AD 210; Obverse: SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate head right; Reverse: P M TR P XVIII COS III P P, Neptune standing left, holding trident dolphin, foot on globe. Ex Maridvnvm.


Septimius Severus

His health fading and weak from gout, Severus would set out one last time on military campaign. This time it was Britain which demanded the emperor's attention. The Antonine Wall had never really acted as a perfectly successful barrier to the troublesome barbarians to the north of it. By this time it had in fact been virtually abandoned, leaving the British provinces vulnerable to attack from the north. In AD 208 Severus left for Britain with his two quarrelsome sons. Large military campaigns now drove deep into Scotland but didn't really manage to create any lasting solution to the problem.

Lucius Septimius Severus died at York, England, 4 February, 211.

Throughout his reign Severus was one of the outstanding imperial builders. He restored a very large number of ancient buildings - and inscribed on them his own name, as though he had erected them. His home town Lepcis Magna benefited in particular. But most of all the famous Triumphal Arch of Severus at the Forum of Rome bears witness to his reign.
(http://www.roman-empire.net/index.html)


Septimius Severus, a native of Leptis Magna, Africa was proclaimed emperor by his troops after the murder of Pertinax. He is at the same time credited with strengthening and reviving an empire facing imminent decline and, through the same policies that saved it, causing its eventual fall. Severus eliminated the dangerous praetorians, unified the empire after turmoil and civil war, strengthened the army, defeated Rome's most powerful enemy, and founded a successful dynasty. His pay increases for the army, however, established a severe burden on Rome. Future emperors were expected to increase pay as well. These raises resulted in ever-increasing taxes that damaged the economy. Some historians believe high taxes, initiated by Severus policies, played a significant role in Rome's long-term decline. . . (Joseph Sermarini).


Severus had clear political vision, still he cared nothing for the interests of Rome and Italy. He nourished within himself the Punic hatred of the Roman spirit and instinct and furthered the provincials in every way. He was revengeful and cruel towards his opponents, and was influenced by a blindly superstitious belief in his destiny as written in the stars. With iron will he labored to reorganize the Roman Empire on the model of an Oriental despotism. . .

Severus rested his power mainly upon the legions of barbarian troops; he immortalized them upon the coinage, granted them, besides large gifts of money and the right of marriage, a great number of privileges in the military and civil service, so that gradually the races living on the borders were able to force Rome to do their will. . .

During the reign of Severus the fifth persecution of the Christians broke out. He forbade conversion to Judaism and to Christianity. The persecution raged especially in Syria and Africa.
Written by Karl Hoeber. Transcribed by Joseph E. O'Connor.
The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume XIII. Published 1912. New York: Robert Appleton Company.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
7496_7497.jpg
Septimius Severus, Denarius, PM TR P XVIII COS III PP7 viewsAR Denarius
Septimius Severus
Augustus: 193 - 211AD
Issued: January - June, 210AD
20.0mm 3.28gr 0h
O: SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT; Laureate head, right.
R: PM TR P XVIII COS III PP; Neptune naked except for cloak over shoulder and right arm, standing left, holding trident in left hand, right foot on globe, right hand on right knee.
Rome Mint
VF
RIC 241; RSC 542; BMCRE 26
Aorta: B3, O82, R260, T129, M4.
ancient_treasures 202350272988
7/1/18 8/6/18
Nicholas Z
Septimius_Severus_RIC_234~0.JPG
Septimius Severus, RIC 23426 viewsSEVERVS PIVS AVG
PM TR P XVIII COS III PP
AR DENARIUS, 21mm, 3.26g
Laureate bust right
Neptune standing left, holding trident, with foot on globe
Rome mint 210 AD
novacystis
sese_neptun.jpg
Septimius_Severus_Denar_P_M_TR_P_XVII_COS_III_P_P4 viewsNumis-Student
AAHAb_small.png
Septimus Severus Denarius15 viewsSeptimus Severus. 193-211 AD.

Rome. AD 210.

18mm., 2.25g.

SEVERVS PIVS AVG BRIT. Head of Septimius Severus, laureate, right

P M TR P XVIII COS III P P. Neptune, naked except for cloak over left shoulder and right arm, standing left, right foot set on globe, holding trident in left hand

References: RIC IV Septimius Severus 241

AAHA
RL
Sextus.jpg
Sextus Pompey75 viewsMAG PIVS IMP ITER
Bare head of Pompey Magnus right; capis behind, lituus before

Neptune standing left, holding aplustre in right hand, resting right foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, carrying their parents on their shoulders, PRAEF above, CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C in two lines in exergue.

Uncertain mint in Sicily, (Catania?)

37-36 BC

3.25g

Rare

Crawford 511/3a; Sydenham 1344; Sear 334; RRC 511/3a; BMCRR Sicily 7; Pompeia 27; Catalli 2001, 824

Ex-Londinium

Numiswiki:
Struck by Sextus Pompey after his victory over Salvidienus and relates to his acclamation as the Son of Neptune. Although Sextus Pompey was the supreme naval commander, Octavian had the Senate declare him a public enemy. He turned to piracy and came close to defeating Octavian. He was, however, defeated by Marcus Agrippa at the naval battle of Naulochus (3 September 36 B.C.). He was executed by order of Mark Antony in 35 B.C
1 commentsJay GT4
IMG_3708.jpg
Sextus Pompey41 viewsSextus Pompey Denarius. Sicily, 40 BC. MAG PIVS IMP ITER, bare head of Pompey the Great right between lituus and capis / Neptune left, foot on prow, between brothers Anapias and Amphinomus, parents on their shoulders, PR’F above, in ex CLAS ET OR’ / MARIT EX SC. Pompeia 27, Cr511/3a, Syd 1344 RIC 17
ex Orfew
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
00457.jpg
Sextus Pompey (RSC 17, Coin #457)26 viewsRSC 17, AR Denarius, Sicily, 42 - 40 BC.
Obv: MAG PIVS IMP ITER Bare head of Sextus' father, Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus, right between lituus and capis.
Rev: PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT S C Neptune standing left with foot on prow, between the Kataean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, with their parents on their shoulders.
Size: 19.1mm 3.30gm
1 commentsMaynardGee
777_511_Sextus_Pompey.JPG
Sextus Pompey - AR denarius6 viewsSicily
37-36 BC
bare head of Pompey the Great right; capis (jug) to left, lituus to right
MAG·PIVS·IMP·ITER
Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding aplustre and chlamys; the brothers Anapias and Amphinomus running in opposite directions on either side, holding their parents on their shoulders.
PRAEF
CLAS·ET·OR(AE) / (MAR)IT·EX·S·C
Crawford 511/3a, SRCV I 1392, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Sydenham 1344, BM Sicily 93
3,4g
ex Aurea Numismatika

scarce

Reverse depicts Sicilian story of Amphinomus and Anapias which also indicate probable location of the mint (Catania):
"A stream of fire burst forth from Etna. This stream, so the story goes, flowing over the countryside, drew near a certain city of the Sicilians. Most men, thinking of their own safety, took to flight; but one of the youths, seeing that his father, now advanced in years, could not escape and was being overtaken by the fire, lifted him up and carried him. Hindered no doubt by the additional weight of his burden, he too was overtaken. And now let us observe the mercy shown by the Gods towards good men. For we are told that the fire spread round that spot in a ring and only those two men were saved, so that the place is still called the Place of the Pious, while those who had fled in haste, leaving their parents to their fate, were all consumed."

Neptune symbolizes Sextus' command of the seas and obverse is a reference to his piety in upholding the Republican ideals of his late father.
1 comments
Johny SYSEL
rr_1073_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Neptune and Naval Trophy95 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]
Obv: [MAG or MA (ligatured) G]⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER; Portrait of Neptune facing r., diademed and bearded, trident over l. shoulder. Border of dots.
Rev: [PRAE (AE ligatured) F⦁CLAS⦁ET⦁ORAE (AE ligatured)]⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C⦁; Naval trophy with trident on top and anchor on bottom, prow stem on l. and aplustre on r., at base two representations of Charybdis and two dog heads of Scylla. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location1; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC2; Weight: 3.89g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 333; BMCRR v. II Sicily 15, 16, and 17 variant3; Sydenham 1347 variant3; Crawford RRC 511/2a or 2b4.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Sear CRI, Crawford RRC, Sydenham, and DeRose Evans (1987) all place the minting of this coin type in Sicily, but they do not reference a possible location. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily suggests Messana.
2This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.562 proposes 38 - 36 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 adopts the same datation. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.
3Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily 15, 16, and 17 and Sydenham 1347 only list a reverse legend containing MAR (ligatured) I but the coin here is MAR (ligatured) IT.
4It is impossible to see the full obverse legend, so it cannot be determined if MA is ligatured or not. The reverse legend is clearly the first variety of 2a or 2b, a variety not found on 2c.

Provenance: from the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland; acquired from Hess AG in Luzern, from the Ernst Haeberlin collection, Cahn & Hess, Frankfurt, July 17, 1933, lot 2889.

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
7 commentsTracy Aiello
lot+2889_Adolph+E+Cahn_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Neptune and Naval Trophy Auction Catalog41 viewsCahn & Hess auction, Frankfurt, July 17, 1933, Ernst Haeberlin collection, lot 2889

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics
1 commentsTracy Aiello
Sextus_Pompey_Scylla.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pharos and Scylla71 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]
Obv: MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER; Pharos of Messana, Neptune on top standing r. with r. hand on a trident and l. hand on a rudder, resting l. foot on prow. Galley sailing l., aquila atop a tripod placed in prow and a scepter tied with a fillet in stern. Border of dots.
Rev: PRAEF⦁ORAE⦁MARIT⦁ET⦁CLAS⦁S⦁C [AEs and MAR ligatured]; Scylla attacking l. wielding a rudder in both hands, the torso of a nude woman with two fishtails and the foreparts of three dogs as the lower body. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location1; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC2; Weight: 3.566g; Diameter: 19.8mm; Die axis: 225º; References, for example: BMCRR v. II Sicily 20 variant3, Sydenham 1349 variant3; Crawford RRC 511/4d; Sear CRI 335b.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁ET⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.557 and Sear CRI, p. 203 suggest Messana as a possible mint location. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 124 hesitatingly suggests Mitylene (on the island of Lesbos).

2This is the date range suggested by Estiot 2006, p. 145, as she recommends going back to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.556 proposes 38 - 36 BC. Sydenham, p.211 follows Grueber. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 submits 35 BC.

3Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily 20 and Sydenham 1349 list MAR (ligatured) I but the coin here is clearly MAR (ligatured) IT. Neither Grueber nor Sydenham record MAR (ligatured) IT as part of this reverse legend for this coin type. Crawford and Sear do.

Photo credits: Forum Ancient Coins

Sources

Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
7 commentsTracy Aiello
rr_1074_revised_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pompey the Great and Neptune with Catanaean Brothers44 viewsSextus Pompey, Imperator and Prefect of the Fleet
[Youngest Son of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus (Pompey the Great)]

Obv: [MAG⦁PIVS⦁IMP⦁ITER]; portrait of Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus r.; behind jug; before lituus. Border of dots.
Rev: above, [PRAE (AE ligatured) F]; in exergue, CLAS⦁ET⦁[ORAE (AE ligatured)⦁MAR (ligatured) IT⦁EX⦁S⦁C]; Neptune standing l., wearing diadem, aplustre in r. hand, cloak over l. arm, r. foot on prow,; on either side a Catanaean brother bearing one of his parents on his shoulders1. Border of dots.
Denomination: silver denarius; Mint: Sicily, uncertain location2; Date: summer 42 - summer 39 BC3; Weight: 3.68g; Diameter: 17mm; Die axis: 30º; References, for example: Sear CRI 334; BMCRR v. II Sicily 7, 8, 9, and 10; Sydenham 1344; Crawford RRC 511/3a.

Notes:

Obverse legend: MAG[NUS]⦁PIVS⦁IMP[ERATOR]⦁ITER[UM]
Reverse legend: PRAEF[ECTUS]⦁CLAS[SIS]⦁ET⦁ORAE⦁MARIT[IMAE]⦁EX⦁S[ENATUS]⦁C[ONSULTO]

1Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily appears a bit hesitant in his pronouncement that the representation of the Catanaean brothers in fact refers to Sextus’ title Pius (p. 561), but Sear CRI appears to have no such hesitation when he states “...the type illustrates the theme of ‘Pietas’ in connection with the assumption of the name Pius.” (p.203). DeRose Evans (1987) goes further (pp. 115 - 116), arguing that Sextus chose the Catanaean brothers (“...he consciously identifies himself with the south Italian heroes”) as a way to deliberately contrast his Pietas with that of Octavian’s.
2Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily tentatively suggests Catana as a possible location and Sear CRI follows suit.
3This is the date range argued for in Estiot 2006 (p. 145). Estiot recommends returning to Crawford’s proposal of 42 - 40 BC. Crawford RRC, p. 521 suggests the period in 42 BC after Sextus Pompey defeated Q. Salvidienus Rufus. Grueber BMCRR v. II Sicily, p.560 proposes 42 - 38 BC and Sydenham, p. 210 follows suit. DeRose Evans (1987), p. 129 offers a time between late summer 36 and September 36 BC.

Provenance: From the collection of W. F. Stoecklin, Amriswil, Switzerland, acquired from Hess AG in Luzern prior to 1975. Ex Dr. Jacob Hirsch 33, 17 November 1913, lot 1058

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics

Sources

BMCRR: Grueber, H. A. Coins of the Roman Republic in the British Museum v. II. London: 1910.
Crawford, Michael H. Roman Republican Coinage v. I. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2019 reprint with the 1982 corrections.
DeRose Evans, Jane. "The Sicilian Coinage of Sextus Pompeius (Crawford 511)" in Museum Notes (American Numismatic Society), vol. 32 (1987): 97 - 157.
Estiot, Sylviane. “Sex. Pompée, La Sicile et La Monnaie: Problèmes de Datation.” In Aere Perennivs, en hommage á Hubert Zehnacker, édité par Jacqueline Champeaux et Martine Chassignet. Paris: L’Université Paris - Sorbonne, 2006.
Sear, David R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. London: Spink, 1998.
Sydenham, Edward A. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. New York: Arno Press, 1975, rev. ed.
2 commentsTracy Aiello
reference_rr_1074_Hirsch_Auc_Cat_Large.jpg
Sextus Pompey -- Pompey the Great and Neptune with Catanaean Brothers Hirsch Auction Catalog25 viewsDr. Jacob Hirsch 33, 17 November 1913, lot 1058

Photo credits: Shanna Schmidt Numismatics
Tracy Aiello
pompeius.jpg
Son of Neptune21 viewsDenarius, 20 mm, Sicily BC 40
obverse MAG.PIVS.IMP.ITER, head of Pompey the Great right between jug and lituus; reverse PRAEF CLAS ET ORAE MARIT EX S C, Neptune left foot on prow, between the Catanaean brothers, Anapias and Amphinomus, with their parents on their shoulders
Sear RCV I 1392, RSC I Pompey the Great 17, Syd 1344, Craw 511/3a, BM Sicily 93
1 commentsPodiceps
carteia3b.jpg
SPAIN, CARTEIA30 viewsafter 44 BC
probably struck 27 BC - 14 AD
(Time of Augustus)
AE 21 mm, 6.32 g
O: CARTEIA Turreted head of city goddess facing right
R: Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident; right foot on rock
Hispania (Spain), Carteia (under Roman rule); RPC 122
laney
IMG_9909.JPG
Spain, Carteia4 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis. Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122. CM on reverse.
ecoli
IMG_9908.JPG
Spain, Carteia8 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis (21mm, 8.26 g, 9h). Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122.
ecoli
IMG_9907.JPG
Spain, Carteia5 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis, Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122.
ecoli
IMG_9916.JPG
Spain, Carteia10 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis (21mm, 8.26 g, 9h). Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122. VF, rough earthen green patina.
ecoli
IMG_9915.JPG
Spain, Carteia4 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis (21mm, 8.26 g, 9h). Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122. VF, rough earthen green patina.
ecoli
IMG_9914.JPG
Spain, Carteia6 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. After 44 BC. Æ Semis. Turreted head of Fortuna right / Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident. ACIP 2615; RPC I 122.
ecoli
iberianOR.jpg
Spain, Carteia mint, Semis (Under Roman Rule), RPC 122104 viewsSpain, Carteia mint, Semis (Under Roman Rule) end of First Century B.C. beginning of first century A.D. AE, 21mm 5.74g, RPC 122
O: CARTEIA head of Fortuna right
R: D D, Neptune standing left, holding dolphin and trident
casata137ec
carteia.jpg
Spain, Carteia. AE Semis. Neptune29 viewsSpain, Carteia. AE Semis. Under Roman rule.
Obv: Turreted head of city goddess facing right.
Rev: Neptune standing left, holding trident and dolphin.
Minted after 44 B.C. to the beginning of first century A.D.
RPC 122.
ancientone
Spain,_Carteia__Time_of_Augustus_27_BC_-_14_AD__AE_Quadrans__Neptune.JPG
Spain, Carteia. Time of Augustus 27 BC - 14 AD. AE Quadrans. Neptune / Dolphin15 viewsTime of Augustus 27 BC - 14 AD.
AE Quadrans (18 mm ; 3.88 gm)
Obv: IIII VIT TR ; Laureate head of Neptune, right.
Rev: CARTEIA , C MINI CF ; Dolphin swimming right.
Carteia was the first Roman colony outside of Italy. Originally it was a Phoenician and then a Punic colony, before it became a Roman colony.

Reference: Burgos 526
Antonivs Protti
neptunusfloor.jpg
Spain, Santiponce, Italica.33 viewsItalica is famous for its Mosaic floors. This is from the house of Neptunus. Who knows, perhaps Trajanus was born at this very Place? May, 2002.jmuona
neptunus.jpg
Spain, Santiponce, Italica.35 viewsDetail showing Neptunus himself. Floor of the house of Neptunus. May, 2002.jmuona
croco.jpg
Spain, Santiponce, Italica.66 viewsCrocodile and the playful youngster... Detail of the floor of the house of Neptunus. May, 2002.jmuona
Titus_RIC_112.jpg
Titus62 viewsTitus, denarius.
RIC 112, RSC 309.
Rome mint, AD 80.
19 mm, 2.89 g.
Obv. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right.
Rev. TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, dolphin coiled around anchor.

The reverse type of dolphin and anchor was part of a series by Titus honoring various deities (here, Neptune) following the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius that destroyed Pompeii.
2 commentsMarsman
titonept.jpg
TITUS19 viewsAR denarius. Antioch,72 AD. 3,48 g. Laureate head right. T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT / Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding aplustre and sceptre. NEP RED.
RIC 366. RSC 122.
benito
titonept~0.jpg
TITUS17 viewsAR denarius. Antioch,72 AD. 3,48 g. Laureate head right. T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT / Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding aplustre and sceptre. NEP RED.
RIC 366. RSC 122.

benito
TitusAnchorDolphinI.jpg
TITUS58 viewsTitus. 79-81 AD. Rome mint, 18mm 3.2g, Struck January-July 80 AD.
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, dolphin coiled around anchor. - RIC II 26a; BMCRE 72; RSC 309

The short reign of Titus witnessed three major calamities. First, on 24 August 79 AD, only one month after his accession, was the eruption of Mount Vesuvius which overwhelmed Pompeii, Herculaneum, Stabiae, and Oplontis. The following year, while still in Campania supervising the relief work , a devastating fire and epidemic of plague broke out in Rome.

The above coin was minted in 80 AD, and, according to Mattingly, in BMC II, pp. lxxii-lxxiii, was part of a series commemorating the supplicatio and lectisternium voted by the Senate after the eruption. As part of the atonement ceremony to seek peace with heaven, sacred couches, pulvinaria, were arranged, each bearing attributes or emblems of the gods. In this particular case the dolphin and anchor represent Neptune.

In contrast, B. Damsky, in "The throne and curule chair types of Titus and Domitian," in SNR 74 (1995), pp. 59-70, after reviewing all the interpretations suggested by various scholars, theorized that this coin, and others minted at the same time, refers not to the ceremony following the eruption, but rather to the occasion for rejoicing and spectacles held in June 80 to inaugurate the completion and opening of the Amphitheatrum Flavium or Colosseum.

Others claim this reverse is a connection to Augustus. The Roman historian Suetonius, in De vita Caesarum, tells that Augustus deplored rashness in a military commander and so σπεῦδε βραδέως (speûde bradéōs) was one of his favorite sayings. This classical adage and oxymoron meaning "make haste slowly" or "more haste, less speed" benefitted the two most praised Roman emperors, Augustus and Titus.

Both of these men possessed a unique greatness of soul, and with an incredible gentleness joined with courtesy and the amiable popularity of their manners, they bound the hearts of all to them. But, nonetheless, when affairs demanded force, they accomplished the greatest actions with diligence equal to their gentleness.
2 commentsNemonater
TitusNeptune.jpg
Titus / Neptune46 viewsTitus. As Caesar, AR Denarius (19mm, 3.16 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Vespasian, AD 73.
O: Laureate bust right, T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS.
R: Neptune standing left, with right foot on globe, nude except for cloak hanging down behind from shoulders, holding acrostolium and scepter, NEP RED.

Unpublished with CENS in the obverse legend. This type, reported by Harry Sneh to the RIC authors, will be 528A in the RIC II Addenda. This coin is the ex-Moonmoth example mentioned in the Gemini X catalog describing lot 637.
3 commentsNemonater
TitusNeptuneRome.jpg
Titus / Neptune45 viewsTitus as Caesar AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 72-73 AD, 18mm., 3.13g.
O: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Titus, bearded, laureate, right.
R: NEP RED; Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
- RIC V366 (C), BMC V80, RSC 121

Not the easiest coin to find, only four specimens in Reka Devnia hoard. This type of "Neptune the Returner" refers to the sea voyages of Vespasian and Titus from the East to Rome in 70 and 71 AD respectively .
Researchers have long recognized that many of Vespasian's and Titus' reverse types recall types from earlier reigns, most especially those from the age of Augustus. Attempts have been made to connect his ‘Augustan’ types with the centenaries of the Battle of Actium (ending in 70) and the ‘foundation’ of the empire (ending in 74), but all seem to have failed, as the relevant types are strewn throughout Vespasian’s ten-year reign. It is perhaps better to view his recycling of types as a political strategy favored by Vespasian and Titus, but subsequently abandoned by Domitian. In this case we have a depiction of the sea-god Neptune that certainly is derived from Octavian’s pre-Imperial coinage struck in commemoration of Actium.
4 commentsNemonater
titus as caesar nep red.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 366453 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Titus, bearded, laureate, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 366 (C). BMC 80. RSC 121. BNC 68.
Acquired from Tom Cederlind, February 2008.

A reverse type that commemorates Titus' return to Rome after his completion of the Jewish War. Neptune, the god of waters, would be an appropriate deity to give thanks to after a safe sea voyage.

This coin is rated as common in RIC, but it's not one you find very often.
Vespasian70
V528A.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 528A99 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., r. foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 528A. BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 637. Ex Gorny & Mosch 122, 10 March 2003, lot 2043 = 113, 18 October 2001, lot 5729.

An unpublished Neptune type with CENS in the obverse legend. The coin will be 528A (under Vespasian) in the RIC II Addenda. It fits nicely alongside my unpublished V529A Salus from the same series. I think there are still a few other unknown types that will surface for this series - this Neptune reverse for the corresponding Vespasian issue is one that so far is awaiting discovery.

A beautiful denarius in hand with an amazing early portrait. The other two denarii I have from this series also have exemplary portraits. An issue style wise to take note of then.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
Titus_as_Caesar_RIC_II_V366.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC II V036639 viewsTitus as Caesar. 69-79 A.D. Rome Mint. 72-73 A.D. (3.38g, 19.7mm, 6h). Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head r. Rev: NEP RED, Neptune stg. l. r. foot on globe with acrostolium and sceptre. RIC II V 366, BMC V80, RSC 121. Ex Harry N. Sneh collection.

A type issued earlier for Vespasian in 71 AD for Rome, and again in Antioch. This is a type that gives thanks to Neptune for a successful return by sea voyage, here probably Titus’ return from the east following his success in the Jewish War. Despite the wear and irregular flan, this example has a nice portrait.
1 commentsLucas H
Titus_nep_ant.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (1)94 viewsAR Denarius, 2.98g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP - RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Ex Harry N. Sneh Collection.

This denarius of Titus as Caesar minted in Antioch has a lot of problems with it. The odd flan shape, the poor surfaces, and of course the double strike, all conspire to create a very unique and problematic coin! Antioch did not have superb quality control at the time...this coin is a great example of such.

Despite all that, I'm quite taken with it. The portrait is quite lovely and the horribly double struck reverse is oddly interesting.


David Atherton
V1561.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1561 (2)85 viewsAR Denarius, 3.24g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT; Bust of Titus, laureate, draped, bearded, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune stg. l., foot on globe, with acrostolium and sceptre
RIC 1561 (C). BMC 516. RSC 122. RPC 1933 ( 14 spec.). BNC 321.
Acquired from Dr Busso Peus Nachfolger, March 2017.

The Neptune type was struck for Vespasian and Titus Caesar at both Rome and Antioch. Likely, it was commemorating their recent sea voyages and safe return to Rome.

I previously acquired a double struck specimen from Harry Sneh 7 years ago that has a few condition issues. Comparatively speaking, I think my new coin is a significant upgrade. Struck on a tight flan, but in good metal and fine style.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
eRW4MY6cm7yDLf85GG8wQ9oAedH3t2.jpg
TITUS CAESAR AR silver denarius. Rome, 72-73 AD. NEP RED, Neptune standing, foot on globe.100 viewsTITUS, as Caesar, AR silver denarius. Rome mint, 72-73 AD. T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head right. Reverse - NEP RED, Neptune standing right, foot on globe, holding acrostolium & scepter. RSC 121, RIC 366. 17mm, 3.0g. Very scarce. _8400

This reverse, alluding to 'Neptune the Returner', gives thanks for the safe return of Titus to Rome, from Antioch, by sea in 71 AD, on what must have been a hazardous voyage. The same type was also issued at Antioch, showing Titus with a draped bust.
4 commentsAntonivs Protti
titus_denarius.png
Titus under Vespasian Fourée Denarius28 viewsTitus under Vespasian Fourée Denarius

Obverse:
T CAES IMP VESP POИ TR POT CENS
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right

Reverse:
NEP RED
Neptune standing left, resting foot on globe, holding acrostolium and scepter
1 commentsHarry G
Titus_RIC_26.JPG
Titus, 79 - 81 AD110 viewsObv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head of Titus facing right.

Rev: TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, a dolphin coiled around an anchor.

Note: The dolphin coiled around an anchor reverse represents Neptune. This coin was part of the "pulvinaria" series issued by Emperor Titus to commemorate the opening games at the Colosseum. My thanks to David Atherton for this information.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 80 AD

3.3 grams, 18.15 mm, 0°

RIC II 26, RSC 309, S2517, VM 33/1
2 commentsSPQR Coins
vespNeptune~0.jpg
Vespasian97 viewsIMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII
Laureate head of Vespasian right

NEP RED
Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding aplustre and sceptre

Antioch
76 AD

2.46g

Sear 2276, RIC 361

Scarce!

The reverse of this type is copied from the coinage of Octavian

Sold Forum Auctions Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
vespasian.jpg
VESPASIAN 69-79 AD130 viewsVespasian. 69-79 AD. AR Denarius (3.49 gm; 16 mm). Struck 72 AD. Antioch mint.
Obverse- IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII Laureate head right.
Reverse- NEP RED Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding acrostolium in right hand, sceptre in left.
RIC II 361; BMCRE 506; RPC II 1928; RSC 274.
2 commentsb70
Vespasian_RIC_1555.jpg
Vespasian - [RIC 1555, BMCRE 506, RSC 274]60 viewsSilver denarius, 2.98g, 17.44mm, 165 degree, Antioch mint, 72 A.D.

Obv. - [IMP CAE]S VESP AVG PM COS IIII, laureate head right

Rev. - NEP RED, Neptune standing left, naked but for cloak, right foot on globe, right knee bent, holding aphlaston (acrostolium) in right hand which rests on knee, and vertical scepter in left

Neptune head weak, uneven yet attractive toning, high relief obverse typical of this mint slightly off center.
___________

Purchased from eBay
3 commentsrenegade3220
VespasianRIC25.jpg
Vespasian / Neptune82 viewsVespasian. AD 69-79. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.29 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck January-June AD 70.
O: Laureate head right, IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG.
R: Neptune standing left, with right foot on prow, holding dolphin and trident, COS ITER TR POT.
- RIC 25 (R)
4 commentsNemonater
VespNepDen.jpg
Vespasian / Neptune Denarius72 viewsVespasian. 69-79 AD. Denarius, 3.10g. 18mm. Lyon Mint, 70 AD.
O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P; Laureate head of Vespasian right.
R: COS ITER TR POT; Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding dolphin.
- RIC 1109 (R), BMC 375 note, RSC 93.
2 commentsNemonater
Vespasian_Antioch_RIC_1555.jpg
Vespasian from Antioch. NEP RED.46 viewsDenarius for Vespasian from the Antioch mint. 72-73 AD.
3.24 grs and 16 mm.
Obs. : Laureate head right. IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII.
Rev. : Neptune standing left, right foot on globe, holding sceptre and acrostolium. NEP RED.
RIC 1555. Group 5.
Rarity : C.
labienus
vesp nep~0.jpg
Vespasian RIC 2592 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Neptune stg. l., foot on prow, with dolphin and trident
RIC 25 (R). BMC 14. RSC 90. BNC - .
Acquired from Nemesis, February 2008.

This coin commemorates Vespasian's return to Rome in October of 70 AD (RIC II p 19). Neptune, as god of the sea, is given his just due in Vespasian's safe voyage home. This coin type was copied by Lugdunum. Antioch also had a variation of the Neptune reverse (with a globe instead of a prow).

Considered rare by the RIC, I had a most difficult time locating this reverse type from Rome. Vespasian looks a bit bemused in this portrait, which I find very appealing.
Vespasian70
Vespsian_RIC_II_1555.jpg
Vespasian RIC II 155518 viewsVespasian 69-79 A.D. AR Denarius. Antioch Mint 72-73 A.D. (3.23 g./16.5m). Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right. Rev: NEP RED, Neptune standing left, foot on globe, acrostolium in right, long vertical scepter in left. RIC II 1555, RPC II 1928. RSC II 274. Ex Forvm.

Tight flan. High relief portrait which does not show well in picture. I must be learning something because I think I could tell the style was not quite the same and the Flavians I have minted in Rome. Love this coin.
Lucas H
vesp concordia rome.jpg
Vespasian RIC-357155 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome Mint, 72-73 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESP A-VG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGVSTI; Concordia, draped, seated l., holding patera extended in r. hand and cornucopiae in l.
RIC 357 (C2). BMC 65. RSC 74. BNC 51.
Acquired from Neptune Numismatics, January 2006.

A fairly common coin for Vespasian issued early in his reign. The BMC states that this coin celebrates Vespasian sharing power with Titus.

This revese was also issued from the Antioch mint.
2 commentsVespasian70
Vespasian_RIC_25.JPG
Vespasian, 69 - 79 AD36 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head of Vespasian facing right.

Rev: COS ITER TR POT, Neptune standing left, foot on prow, holding a dolphin in his right hand and a trident in his left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 70 AD

3.6 grams, 17.8 mm, 180°

RIC II 25, RSC II 90, S2261 (variety), VM 18/2
1 commentsMatt Inglima
V1109sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1109107 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Lyon mint, 70 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Neptune stg. l., foot on prow, with dolphin
RIC 1109 (R). BMC 375 note. RSC 93. BNC -.

A fairly rare Neptune type which is part of an early issue from Lyon (Lugdunum) struck in 70. Rome also minted the same type but the two can be distinguished by style and obverse legend. Style wise Lyon is known for its large headed portraits and neat, blocky legends. TR P (either I or II) is also recorded in the obverse legend, unlike at Rome. The reverse type also has a more ornate prow than Rome. Many Lyon denarius types are copied from those minted in Rome and are sometimes misattributed by less diligent cataloguers.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
Vesp Nep.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1555135 viewsAR Denarius, 3.30g
Antioch Mint, 72-73 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: NEP RED; Neptune, naked, standing l., r. foot on globe, r. knee bent, holding acrostolium in r. hand, which rests on r. knee, and vertical sceptre in l. hand
RIC 1555 (C). BMC 506. RSC, 274. RPC 1928 (9 spec.). BNC 54.
Acquired from Nemesis, ANA Pittsburgh, August 2004.

Neptune, the home-bringer, here copies a Rome mint type from a couple of years before. When the Rome mint issued their example it signified the safe return home by sea of Vespasian after the Civil War. In 72 AD I'm not quite sure what the meaning of this Antioch issue would be.

A wonderful coin in excellent condition. I quite like the Antioch denarii, this is a good example why.
Vespasian70
Valerian1RIC232.jpg
[1112a] Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.70 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 232, RSC 10, VF, worn die reverse, Mediolanum mint, 3.909g, 22.2mm, 180o, 257 A.D.; Obverse: IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AETERNITATI AVGG, Sol standing left, raising right, globe in left; nice portrait, good silver for the reign. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.
Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright Richard D. Weigel, 2007. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian I was proclaimed emperor after the death of Trajan Decius. He successfully repulsed many barbarian incursions but the standard of living declined and would never recover. In 260 A.D., after four years of war during which Roman forces suffered great losses in battle and to plague, he arranged for peace talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sassinian emperor Sapor and was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown, but in Rome it was rumored that he had been murdered and that Sapor was using his stuffed body as a footstool. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.72 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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CIIGRICV214.jpg
[1114b] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.53 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC V 214, VF, 2.930g, 20.3mm, 180o, Antioch mint; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate bust right; Reverse: NEPTVN AVG, Neptune standing left, dolphin in right, trident in left hand, • in exergue; excellent centering. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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