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Search results - "Lucilla"
LucillaVenusDenarius.jpg
82 viewsLucilla denarius, standing Venus, mint state2 commentsmarandnumiz
Lucilla_Cohen_2.jpg
19.5 Lucilla11 viewsLucilla
AE Sestertius, Rome mint
164 A.D., 21.5g, 31mm
LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / CERES S C, Ceres seated left, holding stalks of grain and torch
RIC III 1728, BMCRE IV 1194, Cohen 2; aF
RI0098
Sosius
lu2l.jpg
Lucilla RIC 1756, 164-169 CE.45 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus
Obverse - LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG FB, draped bust right.
Reverse – PIETAS, Pietas standing left, right hand over lighted altar and holding box of incense in left. SC in field
30 mm diam. 19.8g. RIC 1756
Reverse clearly shows an inverse portrait caused by a clashed die
sold 1-2018
1 commentsNORMAN K
lucilla.jpg
(0161) LUCILLA36 views(wife of Lucius Verus; sister of Commodus)
Ca. 149 - 182 AD
AE SESTERTIUS 30 mm 19.78 g
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANT[ONINI AVG]
DRAPED BUST R
R: VEN[VS] SC
VENUS SEATED LEFT HOLDING VICTORY AND SCEPTER
ROME
BM 1176 COHEN 83
laney
lucilla_res.jpg
(0161) LUCILLA30 views(wife of Lucius Verus; sister of Commodus)
164 - 182 AD (As Augusta)
AE SESTERTIUS 30 mm 22.88 g
O: Draped bust right.
R:Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar at her feet left, S-C
laney
Lucilla_denar.jpg
003 - Lucilla (163-181 AD), denarius - RIC 75943 viewsObv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and double cornucopia.
Minted in Rome 166-169 AD.
pierre_p77
Lucilla.jpg
004 - Lucilla (wife of Lucius Verus 161-169 AD), As - RIC 175841 viewsAdv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
Rev: PVDICITIA S - C, Pudicitia standing, facing left.
Minted in Rome 164-166 AD.

References: RIC 1758, Cohen 61, BMC 1184
pierre_p77
0127.jpg
0127 - Denarius Lucilla 166-9 AC16 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding Victory and leaning on shield.

Ag, 19.1 mm, 3.13 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
LucillaDenConcord.JPG
016. Lucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, wife of Lucius Verus, c148-182A.D. AR Denarius,50 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F

Rev. Concordia seated left holding patera CONCORDIA.

RIC758. CHVF.
LordBest
LucillaDenVota.JPG
016. Lucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, wife of Lucius Verus, c148-182A.D. AR Denarius,35 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F

Rev. within wreath VOTA PVBLI CA.

RIC791. VF.

My first Roman coin.
LordBest
0203_RICIII_786.jpg
0203 - Denarius Lucilla 166-169 AC12 viewsObv/ LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bust of L. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing r., holding Victory on r.h., leaning l.h. on engraved shield.

Ag, 18.4 mm, 3.21 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/786 [C] – BMCRE IV/353
ex-Savoca Coins, auction e1, lot 326
1 commentsdafnis
Personajes_Imperiales_3.jpg
03 - Personalities of the Empire54 viewsNerva, Trajan, Plotina, Marciana, Matidia, Hadrian, Sabina, Aelius, Antoninus Pius, Faustina I, Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus and Lucillamdelvalle
Faustina-fil_AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_16-18mm_3,11g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0495a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus, 168 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0495a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16-17mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-495a (Antoninus Pius), p-93 , C-15,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina-Filia-den_FAVSTINA-AVG-PII-AVG-FIL_CON-C-ORDIA_RIC-502a_C-54_Rome_154-156_Q-001_16-17mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0502a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, #185 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0502a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-PII-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: - CON-C-ORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding flower in right hand and resting elbow on cornucopiae, which is by her chair, under chair, globe.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16-17mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-502a (Antoninus Pius), p-93, C-54,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_CONCO-RDIA_RIC-502a_RSC-54_BMC-1086_Rome-153-54_AD-Q-001_0-h_18mm_3,26g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0502a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, #2132 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0502a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-PII-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: - CONCO-RDIA, Concordia seated left, holding flower in right hand and resting elbow on cornucopiae, which is by her chair, under chair, globe.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16-17mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 153-154 A.D., ref: RIC-III-502a (Antoninus Pius), p-93, C-54, BMC-1086
Q-002
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVG_P-II-AVG-FIL_VE-NVS_RIC-_Q-001_-h_mm_ga-s~0.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0517c (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS, Venus standing left, Scarce!, #1115 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0517c (Ant.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS, Venus standing left, Scarce!, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, showing Strack's coiffure a, with band of pearls in hair.
revers: VE-NVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder, dolphin coiled around rudder.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 2,91g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 517c, p-95,(Ant.Pius), Strack 495. BMCRE 1067. Cohen 266.
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Sest_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_30mm_19,67g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367 (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,81 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367 (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 30mm, weight: 19,67g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1367 (Antoninus Pius), p-191 , C-16,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Sest-vers-AE-Dup-vers-AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_mm_g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367, RIC III 495a and RIC III 1389a (all under Ant.Pius), AE-Sestertius, AR-Denarius and AE-Dupondius, Rome, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,80 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1367, RIC III 495a and RIC III 1389a (all under Ant.Pius), AE-Sestertius, AR-Denarius and AE-Dupondius, Rome, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
Exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 30mm, 23-25mm, 16-17mm, weight: 19,67g, 10,46g, 3,11g, axis: h, h, h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-1367, C-16; RIC-495a (all under Antoninus Pius), C-15; RIC-1389a, C-17;
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_S-C_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_23-25mm_10,46g-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1389a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,104 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1389a (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, AVGVSTI P II FIL, Venus,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: 10,46g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 156-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1389a (Antoninus Pius), p-193, C-17,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-001_5h_27mm_13,86ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #1100 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 13,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-002_6h_25-26mm_13,01ga-s.jpg
038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #275 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, AE-Dupondius, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 25-26mm, weight: 13,01g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA_FECVN-DITAS_RIC-_Q-001_-h_mm_ga-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #1209 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: FECVN-DITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 677, (Marcus Aurelius), Sear , RSC II 99, BMCRE IV 91
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA_FECVN-DITAS_RIC-_Q-001_-h_mm_ga-s~0.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #167 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: FECVN-DITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 677, (Marcus Aurelius), Sear , RSC II 99, BMCRE IV 91
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_FECVN-DITAS_RIC-III-677_Q-002_0h_18,5-19,5mm_3,49g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #2210 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: FECVN-DITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 3,49g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 677, (Marcus Aurelius), Sear , RSC II 99, BMCRE IV 91
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_FECVN-DITAS_RIC-III-677_Q-003_0h_18,0-19,0mm_3,43ga-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #3110 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #3
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: FECVN-DITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 3,43g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 677, (Marcus Aurelius), Sear , RSC II 99, BMCRE IV 91
Q-003
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_FECVN-DITAS_RIC-III-677_Q-004_0h_18,0mm_2,97g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #4117 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0677 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas standing right, #4
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: FECVN-DITAS, Fecunditas standing right holding scepter in right and infant in left.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 2,97g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 677, (Marcus Aurelius), Sear , RSC II 99, BMCRE IV 91
Q-004
quadrans
038b_Faustina_(II)_Filia,_RIC_III_0711_(Marc_Aur_),_Rome,_AR-Den,_FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA,_SAECVLI_FELICIT,_161_AD,_Q-002,_6h,_16,7-17mm,_3,35g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0711 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #1143 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0711 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bare-headed, bust right.
reverse: SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,7-17,0mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 161 A.D., ref: RIC III 711 (Marcus Aurelius), p-271 , RSC 191, BMC 139,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_SAECVLI-FELICIT_Q-002_axis-5h_17-17,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #1109 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped diademed, bust right.
reverse: SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17-17,5mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-712 (Marcus Aurelius), p-271 , C-191,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA_SAECVLI-FELICIT_Q-001_axis-h_x,xxmm_2_70g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #287 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped diademed, bust right.
reverse: SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 3,18g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-712 (Marcus Aurelius), p-271 , C-191,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
038b_Faustina_(II)_Filia,_RIC_III_0712_(Marc_Aur_),_Rome,_AR-Den,_FAVSTINA_AVGVSTA,_SAECVLI_FELICIT,_161_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,25g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #3158 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0712 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children, #3
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped diademed, bust right.
reverse: SAECVLI FELICIT, Throne with two children.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,25g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 161 A.D., ref: RIC III 712 (Marcus Aurelius), p-271 , RSC 191, BMC 139,
Q-003
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_VES-TA_RIC-_Q-001_axis-h_x,xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0737 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, #1110 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0737 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed, draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: VES-TA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, holding Palladium and sceptre.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter:16,5-17,5mm, weight: 3,45g, axis:7h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 737, (Marcus Aurelius), p- , C-, ; Sear 5270,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_VESTA_Q-002_h_mm_3,10g-s.jpg
038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0737 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, #2116 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), RIC III 0737 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VESTA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, #2
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed, draped bust right, chignon behind head, hair waved.
revers: VES-TA, Vesta, veiled, seated left, holding Palladium and sceptre.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 737, (Marcus Aurelius), p- , C-, ; Sear 5270,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
39.jpg
039 Lucilla. AR Denarius 39 viewsobv: LVCILLAE AVG ATONINI AVG F drp. bust r.
rev" CONCORDIA Concordia seated l. holding patera and resting
her elbows on statue of Spes
"wife of L. Verus, doughter of M. Aurelius and Faustina Jr."
1 commentshill132
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F_CONCORDIA_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-758_RSC-6a_Rome_-AD_Q-001_0h_18-18,5mm_2,68g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #1155 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and resting elbow on statuette of Spes.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,68g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-758 (Marc.Aur.), p-, RSC-6a.,
Q-001
quadrans
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F_CONCORDIA_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-758_RSC-6a_Rome_-AD_Q-002_11h_18-18,5mm_3,56g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #2153 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0758 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, #2
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE-AVG-ANTONINI-AVG-F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and resting elbow on statuette of Spes.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 3,56g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-758 (Marc.Aur.), p-, RSC-6a.,
Q-002
quadrans
Lucilla_AR-Den_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_VENVS-VIC-TRIX__RIC-III-(M_Aur)-786_C-89_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-h_16-17mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #188 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VIC TRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,94g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
040_Lucilla,_RIC_III(M_Aur)_786,_AR-Den,_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA,_VENVS_VICTRIX,__RSC-89,_Rome_166-67-AD,_Q-002,_h,_17mm,_2,84g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #283 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 0786 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS VICTRIX, Venus, #2
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, holding Victory and resting left hand on shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 2,84g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC III 786 (Marc.Aur.), p-276, RSC-89.,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO_S-C_RIC-III-_(Marc_Aur_)-1744-p353_C-33_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_24-26mm_10,72g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock, 143 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 10,72g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1744 (Marc.Aur.), p-353, C-33.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO-REGINA_S-C_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-1752-p_C-_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_6h_23-26mm_9,44g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock, 87 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 23-26mm, weight: 9,44g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1752 (Marc.Aur.), p-, C-.,
Q-001
quadrans
Lucilla,_RIC_III_(M_Aur)_1756,_AE-Sest,_LVCILLAE_AVG_ANTONINI_AVG_F,_PIETAS,_S-C,_C-54,_BMC_1161,_Rome,_161-62_AD,_Q-001,_1h,_29-30,5mm,_20,48g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-Sestertius, PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, #166 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-Sestertius, PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, #1
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
reverse: PIETAS, Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before, S-C across the field.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 29,0-30,5mm, weight: 20,48g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 161-62 A.D., ref: RIC III 1756 (Marc.Aur.), C-54, BMC 1161
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RI 054a img.jpg
054 - Lucilla denarius - RIC 78856 viewsObv:– LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta standing left, sacrificing out of simpulum over lighted altar and holding palladium
Reference RIC 788
maridvnvm
RI_054b_img.jpg
054 - Lucilla Sestertius - RIC III 176327 viewsObv:– LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS S-C, Venus standing left holding apple & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMCRE 1167. Cohen 72. RIC III 1763

26.83g, 32.85mm, 0o
maridvnvm
IMG_6711.JPG
063. Lucilla (wife of Lucius Verus) 21 viewsAv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Rv.: PIETAS / S - C

Ae Sestertius Ø32 / 25.4g
RIC III 1756 Rome (Marcus Aurelius), Cohen 54
Juancho
Lucilla-RIC-772.jpg
065. Lucilla.17 viewsDenarius, 164-169 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA / Bust of Lucilla.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA / Juno standing, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at her feet.
3.01 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #482; Sear #5487.
Callimachus
coin283.JPG
105c. Lucilla32 viewsAnnia Aurelia Galeria Lucilla (March 7, 150–183) was the daughter of the Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and Faustina the Younger.

In AD 164, she was betrothed by her father to his co-emperor and adoptive brother, Lucius Verus, gaining the title of Augusta. Following his death she married Pompeianus. Lucilla was implicated in several plots to overthrow Commodus (her brother and then emperor) and was banished to the island of Capreae in AD 182. Shortly afterwards she was put to death by Commodus.

Silver Denarius Obv: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F - Bare head right, draped. Rev: VENVS - Venus standing left, holding apple and scepter. Rome mint: AD 165-169 RIC III, 784, page 276 - Cohen 70- SEAR RCV II (2002), 5491, page 370 /3.05 g.
ecoli
coin194.JPG
106a. Crispina50 viewsCrispina married the sixteen year-old, Commodus in the summer of 178 and brought him, as a dowry, a large number of estates. These, when added to the Imperial holdings, gave him control of a substantial part of Lucanian territory. The actual ceremony was modest but was commemorated on coinage and largesse was distributed to the people. An epithalamium for the occasion was composed by the sophist Julius Pollux.

Upon her marriage, Crispina received the title of Augusta, and thus, became Empress of the Roman Empire as her husband was co-emperor with her father-in-law at the time. The previous empress and her mother-in-law, Faustina the Younger, having died three years prior to her arrival.

Like most marriages of young members of the nobiles, it was arranged by paters: in Crispina's case by her father and her father-in-law, Emperor Marcus Aurelius. Crispina probably meant little to her egocentric husband though she was a beautiful woman. The other possible reason being that Commodus was known to prefer the company of men. Crispina is described as being a graceful person with a susceptible heart, but there is no medal extant of her.

As Augusta, Crispina was extensively honoured with public images, during the last two years of her father-in-law's reign and the initial years of her husband's reign. She did not seem to have any significant political influence over her husband during his bizarre reign. However, she was not exempted from court politics either as her sister-in-law, Lucilla, was an ambitious woman and was reportedly jealous of Crispina, the reigning empress, due to her position and power.

Crispina's marriage failed to produce an heir due to her husband's inability, which led to a dynastic succession crisis. In fact, both Anistius Burrus (with whom Commodus had share his first consulate as sole ruler) and Gaius Arrius Antoninus, who were probably related to the imperial family, were allegedly put to death 'on the suspicion of pretending to the throne'.

After ten years of marriage, Crispina was falsely charged with adultery by her husband and was banished to the island of Capri in 188, where she was later executed. After her banishment, Commodus did not marry again but took on a mistress, a woman named Marcia, who was later said to have conspired in his murder.

Crispina, wife of Commodus, 177-192, AE Dupondius or As (24x25mm), aVF. Sear RCV 6018. Obv. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right. Rev. IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter. The coin is brown and green, on a squarish flan.
ecoli
faustinaII as.jpg
145-161 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius - struck 145-46 AD46 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: PIETAS / S.C. (Pietas standing left, holding cornucopiae, child -Lucilla?- at her feet left)
ref: RIC III 1402 (Ant.Pius), Cohen 174, BMC 2189
mint: Rome
8.42gms, 26mm

This coin was struck after her wedding with Aurelius Caesar.
berserker
lucilla as-.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE dupondius or as26 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: IVNO REGINA / S.C. (Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet)
ref: RIC III 1752(M.Aurelius), C.44
berserker
lucilla sest-.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE sestertius38 viewsobv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F (draped bust right)
rev: PIETAS / S.C. (Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before)
ref: RIC III 1756 (M.Aurelius), C.53
20.06gms, 29mm
berserker
lucilla sestertius.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE sestertius49 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: FECVNDITAS / S.C. (Fecunditas - or Lucilla seated right, nursing child in arms, two children at feet)
ref: RIC III 1736 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 21, BMC 1197
22.42g, 26-28mm
Scarce

Annia Lucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, wife of Lucius Verus. She conspired against Commodus, by whom she was exiled to Capreae, where she was put to death (perhaps together Crispina in 183 AD).
berserker
lucilla denar.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AR denarius31 viewsobv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F (draped bust right)
rev: VESTA (Vesta standing left, sacrificing from a simpulum over a lit altar left, holding palladium)
ref: RIC III 788 (M.Aurelius), C.92
berserker
lucilla fourre denar.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA fouree denarius 28 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: PVDICITIA (Pudicitia, veiled, standing left)
ref: RIC III 780 (M.Aurelius), C.80
berserker
faustinaII dup.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE dupondius or as - struck 161-176 AD44 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (diademed bust right)
rev: VE-NVS (Venus standing facing, head right, drawing back cloak with right hand over right shoulder and holding apple in extended left hand), S-C across field
ref: reverse RIC III 1770 (Marcus Aurelius)
11.38gms, 26mm
Rare - not in RIC

A nice hybrid Dupondius or orichalcum As with Faustina Junior obverse and Lucilla reverse. Thanks to Rupert for identify.
berserker
LucillaSestVenus.jpg
1bm Lucilla167 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164.

According to Herodian: For the present, however, the memory of his father and his respect for his advisers held Commodus in check. But then a disastrous stroke of ill fortune completely altered his previously mild, moderate disposition. It happened this way. The oldest of the emperor's sisters was Lucilla. She had formerly been married to Lucius Verus Caesar. . . . But after Lucius died, Lucilla, who retained all the privileges of her imperial position, was married by her father to Pompeianus.

Commodus, too, allowed his sister to retain the imperial honors; she continued to occupy the imperial seat at the theaters, and the sacred fire was carried before her. But when Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure, and felt that any honor paid to the empress was an insult to her; but since she was well aware that her husband Pompeianus was devoted to Commodus, she told him nothing about her plans to seize control of the empire. Instead, she tested the sentiments of a wealthy young nobleman, Quadratus, with whom she was rumored to be sleeping in secret. Complaining constantly about this matter of imperial precedence, she soon persuaded the young man to set in motion a plot which brought destruction upon himself and the entire senate.

Quadratus, in selecting confederates among the prominent senators, prevailed upon Quintianus, a bold and reckless young senator, to conceal a dagger beneath his robe and, watching for a suitable time and place, to stab Commodus; as for the rest, he assured Quintianus that he would set matters straight by bribes.

But the assassin, standing in the entrance to the amphitheater (it was dark there and he hoped to escape detection), drew his dagger and shouted at Commodus that he had been sent by the Senate to kill him. Quintianus wasted time making his little speech and waving his dagger; as a result, he was seized by the emperor's bodyguards before he could strike, and died for his stupidity in revealing the plot prematurely.

This was the initial reason for the young emperor's hatred of the Senate. He took Quintianus' words to heart and, ever mindful of what his attacker had said, now considered the entire Senate his collective enemy.

This incident also gave Perennis sufficient excuse for taking action, for he was always advising the emperor to eliminate and destroy the prominent men. By confiscating their property, Perennis easily made himself the richest man of his time. After the attempt at assassination had been thoroughly investigated by the prefect, Commodus without mercy put to death his sister, all those actually involved in the plot, and any who were under the slightest suspicion as well.
3 commentsBlindado
CrispinaAsJuno.jpg
1bo Crispina26 viewsWife of Commodus

As

Draped bust, right, CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Juno, IVNO LVCINA

RIC 680

We know little about Crispina. The Historia Augusta notes, "[W]hen Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure. . . . His wife, whom he caught in adultery, he drove from his house, then banished her, and later put her to death."
1 commentsBlindado
DidJulSestConMil.jpg
1bq Didius Julianus93 views193

Sestertius

Laureate head, right, IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG
Concorde w/ standard, CONCORDIA MILIT SC

RIC 14

According to the Historia Augusta: Didius Julianus. . . was reared at the home of Domitia Lucilla, the mother of the Emperor Marcus. . . . [T]hrough the support of Marcus he attained to the office of aedile [and] praetor. After his praetorship he commanded the XXII Legion, the Primigenia, in Germany, and following that he ruled Belgium long and well. Here, with auxiliaries hastily levied from the provinces, he held out against the Chauci as they attempted to burst through the border; and for these services, on the recommendation of the Emperor, he was deemed worthy of the consulship. He also gained a crushing victory over the Chatti. Next he took charge of Dalmatia and cleared it of the hostile tribes on its borders. Then he governed Lower Germany. . . .

His consulship he served with Pertinax; in the proconsulship of Africa, moreover, he succeeded him. Pertinax always spoke of him as his colleague and successor. After [Pertinax'] death, when Sulpicianus was making plans to be hailed emperor in the camp, Julianus, together with his son-in-law, . . . discovered two tribunes, Publius Florianus and Vectius Aper, who immediately began urging him to seize the throne; and. . . conducted him to the praetorian camp. When they arrived at the camp, however, Sulpicianus, the prefect of the city and the father-in-law of Pertinax, was holding an assembly and claiming the empire himself, and no one would let Julianus inside, despite the huge promises he made from outside the wall. Julianus then . . . wrote on placards that he would restore the good name of Commodus; so he was admitted and proclaimed emperor. . . .

Julianus had no fear of either the British or the Illyrian army; but being chiefly afraid of the Syrian army, he despatched a centurion of the first rank with orders to murder Niger. Consequently Pescennius Niger in Syria and Septimius Severus in Illyricum, together with the armies which they commanded, revolted from Julianus. But when he received the news of the revolt of Severus, whom he had not suspected, then he was greatly troubled and came to the senate and prevailed upon them to declare Severus a public enemy. . . . Severus was approaching the city with a hostile army. . . and the populace hated and laughed at him more and more every day.

In a short time Julianus was deserted by all and left alone in the Palace with one of his prefects, Genialis, and with Repentinus, his son-in-law. Finally, it was propose'd that the imperial power be taken away from Julianus by order of the senate. This was done, and Severus was forthwith acclaimed emperor, while it was given out that Julianus had taken poison. Nevertheless, the senate despatched a delegation and through their efforts Julianus was slain in the Palace by a common soldier. . . .
Blindado
Denario_Lucilla_RIC_786.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)87 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_786_Denario_Lucila.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 Pag.432 (Plate 59 #10) - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 Pag.234 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
AS o Dupondio LUCILA RIC 1764.jpg
36-12 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)45 viewsAE AS 25 x 22 mm 10.9 gr.
Hija de Marco Aurelio y Faustina hija, esposa de Lucio Vero.

Anv: "LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AV[G F]" - Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS - S C" - Venus de pié a izquierda portando una manzana en la mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada 164 - 166 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #1764 Pag.354 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5524 Pag.373 - BMCRE #1189 - Cohen Vol.III #73 Pag.220 - DVM #32 var Pag.158 - MIR Vol.18 #16
mdelvalle
RIC_1764_Sestercio_Lucila.jpg
36-12 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)8 viewsAE AS 25 x 22 mm 10.9 gr.
Hija de Marco Aurelio y Faustina hija, esposa de Lucio Vero.

Anv: "LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AV[G F]" - Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS - S C" - Venus de pié a izquierda portando una manzana en la mano derecha y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.

Acuñada 164 - 166 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #1764 Pag.354 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5524 Pag.373 - BMCRE IV #1189 Pag.574 (Plates 77 #8 y 9) - Cohen Vol.III #73 Pag.220 - DVM #32 var Pag.158 - MIR Vol.18 #16
mdelvalle
Lucilla_02_portrait.jpg
AD 166-169 - LVCILLA9 viewsLucilla

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucilla (148 or 150 – 182) was the second daughter and third child of Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius and Roman Empress Faustina II. She was the wife of her father's co-ruler Lucius Verus.

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
IMG_3326.JPG
Antoninus Pius12 viewsAntoninus Pius. AD 138-161. AR Denarius (2.72g). Rome mint. Struck AD 155-156. Laureate head right / Pietas standing facing, head left, placing hands on heads of "two grandchildren of Antoninus, daughters of Marcus Caesar and Faustina II, who were alive when the type was struck in 156 AD. One of them, the elder, was certainly Lucilla, who was to marry Lucius Verus in c. 164, then be executed early in the reign of her younger brother Commodus, for conspiring against him." (Commentary from Curtis Clay). RIC III 253a; RSC 992a.Molinari
AntoSe27-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 857, Sestertius of AD 149 (Temporum Felicitas) 59 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.4g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 149.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XII, laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: TEMPORVM FELICITAS (around) COS IIII (below) S C (in field), Busts of infants on crossed cornucopiae.
RIC 857(S); BMC 1827; Cohen 813; Strack 1026; Banti 410 (23 spec.); RHC 130:70

Issued to commemorate the birth of the Antoninus Pius' grand children Lucilla and T.Aurelius Antoninus, twins to Marcus Aurelius and Faustina in AD 149. Only Lucilla survived, the boy died that same year. (This legend was used again in the abbreviated form "TEMPOR FELIC" 12 years later, in AD 161 to celebrate the birth of second twins: Commodus and Antoninus).
1 commentsCharles S
AntoSe42-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 1002, Sestertius of AD 159 (Pietas)40 viewsÆ sestertius (22.3, Ø30mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 159.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXII , laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: PIETATI AVG COS IIII (around) S C (in field), Faustina as Pietas standing left, holding apple and, on her left arm, an infant; two children beside her.
RIC 1002 (C); BMC 2061-62; Cohen 620; Strack 1164; Foss (RHC) 132:89

This type refers to the growth of the family of Aurelius and Faustina Filia: Faustina holding new born infant Fadilla, while Faustina and Lucilla, age 13 and 10 respectively, stand beside her.
Charles S
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 1031, Sestertius of AD 159-16033 viewsÆ sestertius (22.3, Ø30mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 159-160.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII , laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right.
Rev.: PIETATI AVG COS IIII (around) S C (in field), Faustina as Pietas standing left, holding apple, and on her left arm an infant, two children beside her.
RIC 1031 (C); BMC 2089-00; Foss (RHC) 132:89

This type refers to the growth of the family of Aurelius and Faustina Minor: Faustina is holds the new born infant Fadilla, while Faustina and Lucilla, age 13 and 10 respectively, stand by her sides.
Charles S
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ANTONINUS PIUS. 138-161 AD. Æ Sestertius15 viewsANTONINUS PIUS. 138-161 AD. Æ Sestertius (33mm, 26.75 g.)
Struck 159/160 AD.
Obverse..ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P XXIII, laureate head right
Rev. PIETATI AVG COS IIII SC, Pietas standing left holding globe, Faustina Junior as Pietas standing left, between Faustina Minima, Lucilla & holding baby Fadilla.
RIC III 1031
Paul R3
Lucilla_09_artemis.jpg
Artemis, Lydia, Hierocaesarea8 viewsLydia. Hierocaesaraea

Rev: ΙЄΡΟΚΑΙСΑΡЄΩΝ, Artemis standing right, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver on back.
Æ, 19.2mm, 5.34g

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Lucilla_09.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Lucilla, Artemis 22 viewsdouble die match of:
Lydia, Hierocaesaraea
Lucilla (Augusta, 164-182)
Bronze, AE 19
Obv: ΛΟVΚΙΛΛΑ СЄΒΑС, Draped bust right.
Rev: ΙЄΡΟΚΑΙСΑΡЄΩΝ, Artemis standing right, holding bow and drawing arrow from quiver on back.
Æ, 19.2mm, 5.34g
RPC IV online 1588-6 (this coin)
Æ, 19.3mm, 5.33g
RPC IV online 1588-9 (this coin)
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 43, lot 703
Ex Numismatik Naumann, auction 46, lot 383
shanxi
Lucilla_13.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Lucilla, Tyche?7 viewsLydia, Hierocaesaraea
Lucilla (Augusta, 164-182)
Bronze, AE 19
Obv: ΛΟVΚΙΛΛΑ СЄΒΑС, Draped bust right.
Rev: ΙЄΡΟΚΑΙСΑΡЄΩΝ, Female figure (Tyche?) standing left with cornucopia
Æ, 19mm, 5g
RPC online -, ISEGRIM -
shanxi
IMG_3431.JPG
Caesarea Maritima Lucilla AE22 164–16945 viewsCaesarea Maritima Lucilla AE22 164–169
Obv:draped bust of Lucilla, r.LVCILLIA AVGVST
Rev:male figure standing, l., wearing toga, holding patera over thymiaterium and cornucopia
COL PRIM FL AVG CAESAREA
1 commentsMaritima
Hieropolis-KastabalaLucilla.jpg
Cilicia, Hieropolis-Kastabala. Lucilla AE2468 views
Lucilla, Augusta, 164-182 AD. AE24
Obv: Draped bust of Lucilla right, wearing stephane.
Rev: Turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Artemis-Tyche left; torch before.
SNG von Aulock 5573
ancientone
lust1.jpg
Clashed die of Lucilla (wife of Lucius Verus) Struck 164 - 169 C.E.32 viewsObverse - LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG FB. Draped bust right.
Reverse - PIETAS. Pietas standing left, right hand over lighted altar and holding box of incense in left. SC in field
30 mm diam. 19.8g. RIC 1756
Reverse clearly shows an inverse portrait caused by a clashed die
sold 1-2018
2 commentsNORMAN K
Faustina-fil_AR-Den_FAVSTINA-AVGVSTA_AVGV-S-TI-P-II-FIL_RIC-495a_C-15_Q-001_16-18mm_3,11g-s.jpg
Faustina II, Filia (128-175 AD.). AR denarius, AVGVSTI P II FIL,179 viewsFaustina (II) Filia AR denarius
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
revers: AVGVS-TI-P-II-FIL, Venus standing left, holding Victory and shield on helmet.
date: 156-161 AD.
mint: Rome
diameter: 16-17mm
weight:3,11g
ref: RIC-495a (Antoninus Pius) , C-15
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina Jr.jpg
Faustina Jr. , Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Mother of Lucilla, and Commodus35 viewsThe daughter, wife and mothers of emperors and empresses, Faustina II was born around 130 A.D. to Antoninus Pius and Faustina I. She was married to her cousin Marcus Aurelius in 145 A.D. In 146 A.D., she gave birth to the first of many children. To celebrate this occasion she was given the Title Augusta, which technically made her superior in rank then her husband. Faustina II was a devoted wife and mother, and accompanied her husband on all his military campaigns. Her son Commodus went on to became emperor after his father’s death, and her daughter Lucilla became Augusta when she married Lucius Verus in 164 A.D. She died at the city of Halala in Asia Minor in 175 A.D. plagued by many baseless rumors about her infidelity. She was deified soon after and a grand temple was erected to her in the city where she died.1 commentsDumanyu2
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Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1635, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)40 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.3g, Ø35mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding two infants in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) 1635; BMC 902; Cohen 96; Foss (RHC) 143:8

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The four children are four surviving girls (of a total of 8 children born) around late 160: they were at the time the dies were designed: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1) and Cornifica (0).
Charles S
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Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1649, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)53 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.38g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: IVNONI LVCINAE (around) S C (in field), Faustina as Juno, standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) 1649; Sear 2000 (RCV) 5277
ex Byzantine Coin Store (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).
Charles S
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Faustina Junior, RIC unlisted, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)76 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.86g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
Strack 1335 (1 coll.: Naples); RIC (Aurelius) unlisted (legend corresponds to RIC 1635 and the representation to RIC 1649); Cohen: (idem with nos. 96 and 136)
ex Aeternitas Coins & Antiquities (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).

Additional information from Curtis Clay through the forum discussion group: "This type commemorating the birth of a third survivng daughter usually has the legend IVNONI LVCINAE, whereas the type FECVND AVGVSTAE commemorates the birth of the next daughter about a year or so later and shows Fecunditas/Faustina holding two children in her arms while two more stand at her feet.

Strack 1335 knew a sestertius like yours in only one specimen, in Naples, but unfortunately does not illustrate the coin.

The Naples collection was stolen in 1977. Your coin is of nice quality, and has an old-collection look, lightly cleaned on the reverse. I would not be at all surprised if it is the actual Naples coin! "
Charles S
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FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
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Ionia, Smyrna. Lucilla AE 24. Nemeses standing vis-à-vis. p Aelius Arizelos.39 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, 164 - 177. AE24 of p Aelius Arizelos, 175-177.
Obv: LOVKILLA CEBASTH Draped bust of Lucilla r.
Rev: CTPARIZ HL Vo CMVPN AIWN Nemesis in long robe standing r. holding bridle in his lowered left hand , pulling garment at the neck towards a second Nemesis in long robe standing l., tablet in l., also pulling garment at the neck. Rare.
ancientone
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Juno Lucina, the protectress of midwives and childbirth.288 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.
AR denarius (18mm, 3.24g), Rome mint, 166 CE.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing. l., holding baby in swaddling clothes in left arm.
RIC-771, Sear-5485, BMC-313, Cohen-38.

Lucina is the Roman name for the Greek goddess, Eileithyia, who was the protectress of midwives and who assisted during birth. She was later identified with Hera or Artemis. On Roman coins, Lucina is identified as an aspect of the goddess Juno associated with light and childbirth, during which she eased the pain and made sure all went well. Coins portraying Lucina may commemorate a birth in the Imperial family or that the help of the goddess had been invoked. She is usually portrayed with or holding children. A variety of objects may accompany her, sometimes a patera and scepter--attributes of Juno--or more commonly, a flower.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla96 viewsLucilla

Obv: LVCILLAE AVG M ANTININI AVG F
Rev: VESTA
RIC 788
Barry
00136-Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla 12 viewsLucilla Denarius
19 mm 3.00 gm
O: LCVILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Draped bust right
R: VENVS
Venus standing left holding apple and sceptre
Koffy
lucilla.jpg
LUCILLA23 viewsAR denarius. 161-162 AD. 3.28 gm, 5 h. Draped bust right. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F. / VOTA/PV•BLI/CA in three lines within wreath. RIC III 791. RSC 98.benito
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LUCILLA40 viewsAR denarius. 161-162 AD. 3.28 gm, 5 h. Draped bust right. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F. / VOTA/PV•BLI/CA in three lines within wreath. RIC III 792. RSC 98.
benito
Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla33 viewsRoman Empire
Lucilla
(Daughter of Marcus Aurelius, Married to Lucius Verus (her adoptive uncle), executed after failed assassination and coup attempt against Commodus)
(b. 148-150 AD, d. 182 AD)



Obverse: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped Bust of Lucilla facing right

Reverse: VOTA PVBLICA in wreath



Silver Denarius
Minted in Rome 164-169 AD


Translations:

LVILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F= For Lucilla Empress, Daughter of Emperor Antoninus

VOTA PVBLICA=Public Vows









References:
RIC III 791
ERIC II 38
2 commentsSphinx357
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Lucilla6 viewsAR Denarius, Struck 164-169 AD, Rome Mint
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in a bun
Reverse: VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing half left, right breast bare, Victory in right hand, left hand on grounded shield
References: RIC 786, Sear 5492, RSC 89
Justin L
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Lucilla9 viewsarash p
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Lucilla ( 164 - 182 A.D.)93 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia veiled standing left.
Rome
2.95g
19mm
RIC 780
5 commentsMat
luccon3.jpg
Lucilla ( 164 - 182 A.D.)36 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
Rome mint
19mm
2.83g
RIC 759; Cohen 7
1 commentsMat
lucives.jpg
Lucilla ( 164 - 183 A.D.)55 viewsAR Denarius

O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.

R: VESTA, Vesta standing left, sacrificing from a simpulum over a lit altar left, holding palladium.

Rome, 164 – 167 A.D.

18mm

3.3g

RIC 788, RSC 92, BMC 325
2 commentsMat
lucildup.jpg
Lucilla (161 - 182 A.D.)52 viewsÆ Dupondius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: SALVS S-C, Salus seated left feeding serpent entwined around altar.
Rome Mint
15.6g
25mm
RIC 1760
3 commentsMat
constand.jpg
Lucilla (162 - 182 A.D.)161 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, Concordia standing facing, head left, holding patera and double cornucopiae.
Rome Mint
19mm
3.27g
RIC III 760.

Ex. Cabinet Numismatique, Genève.

Rare
7 commentsMat
lucses2.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 169 A.D.)80 viewsÆ Sestertius
O: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE S-C, Juno seated left, holding a flower & infant.
18.94g
30mm
RIC 1747, Cohen 37.
3 commentsMat
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Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)52 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: Venus, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre.
Rome
18mm
3.36g
RIC 784
4 commentsMat
luci~0.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)106 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and resting elbow on statue of Spes.
Rome
18mm
3.42g
RIC 758 S 5479 BMCRE 306
2 commentsMat
lu1.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)54 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet.
Rome
19mm
3.4g
RIC 772, RSC 41, BMC 339
2 commentsMat
ld2.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)94 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left holding torch with both hands.
Rome
17.5mm
3.4g
RIC 762 RSC 14

Scarce
8 commentsMat
lueq.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)57 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: PIETAS, Pietas standing left, raising hand over altar and holding box of incense.
Rome
19mm
2.9g
RIC 775
2 commentsMat
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Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)57 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno Lucina standing facing, head left, extending right, infant in left.
Rome
3.07g
18.9mm
RIC III 771, RSC II 38

Originally the goddess of childbirth, Lucina later became an epithet for Juno as “the one who brings children into the light.” The line, “Juno Lucina, fer opem, serva me, obsecro,” (Juno Lucina, help me and give me strength, I beg of you) written by the Roman playwright Terence in Andria, exemplifies the custom for expectant mothers to address their prayers unto her.
2 commentsMat
lucses1.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)51 viewsÆ Sestertius
O: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust righ
R: VENVS S-C, Venus standing left holding apple & scepte.
Rome
22.8g
30mm
RIC 1763, Cohen 72, BMC 1167
2 commentsMat
16116LG.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)88 viewsAR Denarus
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia, veiled, seated left, and holding right hand on breast.
Rome
17mm
3.08g
RIC 781; RSC 62

Ex Roma
1 commentsMat
luven.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)109 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: VENVS VICTRIX,Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield.
Rome
2.8g
18mm
RIC 786, RSC II 89, BMCRE IV 353
2 commentsMat
hilar.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)61 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R:HILARITAS - Hilaritas standing left, holding palm and cornucopia.
Rome
3.3g
19mm
RIC 769 (Marcus Aurelius)
5 commentsMat
vota.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)88 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped Bust Right.
R: VOTA / PVBLI / CA, Legend in three lines within wreathm dot in middle.
Rome
3.48g
RIC III 791 RSC 98
7 commentsMat
fec.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)44 viewsAR Denarius
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas or Lucilla seated right, holding child on lap; before her, a second child standing left, reaching towards her.
Rome
2.58g
RIC III 765 (Aurelius); RSC 19

Rare

Published on Wildwinds!
3 commentsMat
luseated.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)66 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE Juno seated left, holding flower and infant.
3.2g
19mm
RIC M. Aurelius 770. C. 36. BMC M. Aurelius 342

Ex. Goldberg Auctions, Sept. 22, 2013, Sale 75 Lot 2706 (part of)
3 commentsMat
lucillae.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)102 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: LAETITIA; Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and rudder.
Rome, 166 - 169 A.D.
18mm
3.5g
RIC 773; BMC 346; RSC 45

Rare
5 commentsMat
luciltet.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)58 viewsEgypt, Alexandria
Billon Tetradrachm
O: ΛOVKIΛΛA C–ЄB ANT CЄ ΘV, draped bust right.
R: Elpis stdg. l. holding flowers & lifting skirt. LS=6th yr.
Alexandria Mint
24mm
11.33g
Dattari 3816, Emmett 2473, R5

Published on Wildwinds!

Very Rare
6 commentsMat
W5.png
Lucilla (daughter of M. Aurelius) AR Denarius.8 viewsRome, AD 164-169. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right / VOTA PVBLICA in three lines within wreath with jewel at apex. RIC 791 (Aurelius); RSC 98. 2.84g, 19mm, 6h. Very Fine.Chris C2
00439.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 1741, Coin #439)15 viewsRIC 1741 (C), AE AS, Rome, 164 - 182 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right.
Rev: HILARITAS S C Hilaritas standing left, long palm branch in right, cornucopia in left.
Size: 26.0mm 10.26gm
MaynardGee
00475.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 1751, Coin #475)31 viewsRIC 1751, AE Sestertius, Rome, 166 - 169 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO REGINA S C Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and scepter; at her feet, a peacock.
Size: 33.0mm 26.86gm
1 commentsMaynardGee
00553.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 1756, Coin #553)18 views
RIC 1756, AE Sestertius, Rome, 164 - 166 AD.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F Draped bust right.
Rev: PIETAS S C Pietas, veiled, standing left, raising
her right hand over lighted altar and holding a perfume-box.
Size: 31.0mm 20.24gm

1 commentsMaynardGee
00736.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 1763, Coin #736)10 viewsRIC 1763 (Scarce), AE Sestertius, Rome, 161-169 AD.
OBV: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F; Draped bust right.
REV: VENVS S C; Venus standing left holding an apple and sceptre.
SIZE: 30.8mm, 20.66g
MaynardGee
00401.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 788, Coin #401)26 viewsRIC 788 (C), AR Denarius, Rome, 164 - 166 AD.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F Draped bust right.
Rev: VESTA Vesta standing lt., sacrificing over an altar out of a simpulum and holding a palladium.
Size: 18.3mm 3.28gm
2 commentsMaynardGee
lucilla12s~0.jpg
Lucilla (wife of Lucius Verus) AE Sesterius, struck 164-169 A.D.158 viewsObverse - LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG FB. Draped bust right.
Reverse - PIETAS. Pietas standing left, right hand over lighted altar and holding box of incense in left hand. S C in field
30 mm diam. 19.8g. RIC 1756
Reverse clearly shows the inverse portrait caused by a clashed die
sold 1-2018
1 commentsNORMAN K
Lucilla_sestertius.jpg
Lucilla - AE sestertius6 viewsRome
164-166 AD
draped bust right
LVCILLAE AVG__ANTONINI AVG F
Venus facing, head left, holding apple and scepter
VENVS
S__C
RIC III MA 1763; SRCV II 5507, BMCRE IV 1172, Cohen III 77
Johny SYSEL
Lucilla_758.jpg
Lucilla - AR denarius22 viewsRome
164-166 AD
draped bust right
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Concordia seated left holding patera
CONCO_RDIA
RIC III 758, SRCV II 5479, BMCRE IV 306, RSC II 6a
2,8g 18-17 mm
Johny SYSEL
lucilla_ric_759.jpg
Lucilla - RIC 7599 viewsLucilla,
AR denarius.
LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right /
CONCORDIA, Concordia enthroned left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
xokleng
lucilla-reshoot.jpg
Lucilla AE As - Juno22 viewsRoman Imperial, Lucilla AE As 11.2g, 24mm

Obverse: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.

Reverse: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, raising right hand and holding an infant. SC in fields.

Reference: RIC III 1749

Ex: Rudi Smits

Not at Wildwinds.
Gil-galad
Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla AE As. RIC 1774 var10 viewsLucilla AE As. AD 164-170. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right / VENVS, Venus seated left, holding Victory and sceptre. SC across fields. RIC 1774 var (obv legend); Cohen 55; BMC p. 575.simmurray
Lucilla_AE_SESTERTIUS.JPG
Lucilla AE Sestertius. 164-168/169 AD. 45 views23.27 grams.
30-32 mm.
Lucilla AE Sestertius. LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO REGINA S-C, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet. RIC 1751
sear5 #5502.
Lucilla, granddaughter of Antoninus Pius, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, wife of Lucius Verus and sister of Commodus. 164-168/169 AD. SOLD
Antonivs Protti
lucilla_01.jpg
Lucilla AR Denarius46 viewsObv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F - Draped bust right.
Rev: CONCORDIA - Concordia seated left, holding patera and resting left arm on statuette of Spes.
Mint: Rome
Date: 164 AD
Ref: RIC III 758
oa
DSC03036_forum.JPG
Lucilla AR Denarius14 viewsObv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F - Draped bust right.
Rev: CONCORDIA - Concordia seated left, holding patera and resting left arm on statuette of Spes.
Mint: Rome
Date: 164 AD
Ref: RIC III 758
oa
Lucilla_Cult_Statue_of_Kore.jpg
Lucilla Cult Statue of Kore23 viewsLucilla, Lydia Silandus (Caria), 163 - 181 AD, 20mm, 7.2g, BMC 19, SNG von Aulock 3174
OBV: Bust right,
REV: Cult statue of Kore facing between poppy and grain ear

If you know the legends please post

RARE
Romanorvm
Lucilla_b.jpg
Lucilla denarius46 viewsVENVS VICTRIX
wife of Lucius Verus
1 commentsTibsi
Lucilla_opt.jpg
LUCILLA Denarius RIC 781, Pudicitia15 viewsOBV: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
REV: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, veiled & holding hand on breast
2.5g, 18.5mm

Minted at Rome, 165-169 AD
Legatus
luutray~0.jpg
Lucilla Denarius Set60 viewsA Set of Lucilla Reverse Types.

Includes rarer reverse types.
4 commentsMat
Lucilla_Dupondius_Salus.jpg
Lucilla Dupondius Salus37 viewsObv.
LVCILLA AVGVSTA

Rev.
SALVS
SC
Salus seated left, feeding serpent entwined around altar
1 commentsancientdave
lucilla_ric1748.jpg
Lucilla RIC 174810 views AE sestertius,
struck by Marcus Aurelius, 164-169 AD.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right /
IVNONI LVCINAE, S-C, Juno, veiled, standing left,
extending right hand and holding an infant wrapped in swaddling clothes.
xokleng
lu1752.jpg
Lucilla RIC 175217 viewsAE As, Dupondius
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet. S C across field.
26 mm., 10.0 g.
sold 3-2018
NORMAN K
lucilla com.JPG
Lucilla RIC 175611 viewsLUCILLA, wife of Lucius Verus
AE 29-30 mm 20.4 grams 164-169 AD
Obv :: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right
Rev :: PIETAS . Pietas standing left, altar at feet
Minted in Rome
RIC 1756; Coh. 54; BMC 1161.
purchased 04/2008
Johnny
Lucilla_RIC_1763.JPG
Lucilla RIC 176324 viewsLVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Draped bust right
VENVS
Venus standing left holding apple and scepter, SC in fields to sides
AE sestertius, 31mm, 21.32g
novacystis
lucilla_788.jpg
Lucilla RIC III, 78863 viewsLucilla, killed 182, wife of Lucius Verus, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, sister of Commodus
AR - Denar, 3.29g, 17mm
obv. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
draped, diademed bust r.
rev. VES - TA
Vesta, veiled, standing l., before draped and lightened
altar, holding patera in r. and palladium in l. hand
RIC III, 788; C.92
about EF

PALLADIUM, from Pallas, meaning 'maiden', a title of Athena, was a statue, stolen from
Troy, later brought to Italy by Aeneas, with great protective power. In art it stands for a statuette of Athena, often a attribute of Vesta and other goddesses.

Jochen
L.jpg
Lucilla RIC:784 10 viewsLucilla Denarius...165-169 AD Rome 2.64g...18mm

Obverse- LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right

Reverse- VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre.

RIC:784
Paul R3
Lucilla~1.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius18 viewsLUCILLA, wife of Lucius Verus. AE Sestertius . Struck 164-169 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA ; Draped bust right
Rev: PIETAS S C ; Pietas standing left, holding hand over altar and box of perfumes.

RIC III 1755 (Marcus Aurelius); Cohen 53.
Tanit
Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius28 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F ; dr. bust r.
Rev: VENVS S C ; Venus stg. l., holding apple and scepter

RIC 1763
Tanit
Lucilla~0.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius24 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA ; dr. bust r.
Rev: HILARITAS S C ; Hilaritas holding a long palm frond and a cornucopiae.

Cohen 31
Tanit
Lucilla_.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius20 viewsLucilla AE Sesterius
LVCILLAE AVG M ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right / VENVS S-C, Venus seated left holding Victory & scepter
RIC 1773, Cohen 83, BMC 1176
Tanit
Lucilla.JPG
LUCILLA sestertius 24 views
Ref Lucilla AE Sesterius, RIC 1756, Cohen 54, BMC 1161

Lucilla Æ Sestertius. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right / PIETAS S-C, Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before. Cohen 53. 31 mm. in diameter - 18.58 in weight
Marjan E
Lucilla_Sestertius_Pietas.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius Pietas46 viewsObv.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Draped bust right

Rev.
PIETAS
SC
Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before
1 commentsancientdave
Lucilla_Sestertius_RIC_1742.JPG
Lucilla Sestertius RIC 174255 viewsAE sestertius
Lucilla, Rome Mint, 161-169 AD
Obverse: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right
Reverse: HILARITAS- SC, Hilaritas standing right
RIC 1742
30mm, 27.6gm
Jerome Holderman
ROMAN1.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius, 163-164 AD. AE31mm59 viewsLucilla Sestertius, 163-164 AD, Rome.

Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE / S C, Juno seated left, holding flower and infant
Ref. BMC-IV-1154.

UK Find.
Lee S
Lucilla_Venus_RIC_784_(Large).JPG
Lucilla Venus RIC 78421 viewsLucilla, Denarius, Rome, 165 - 169, 20.5mm, 2.73g, Sear 5491, RSC 70, RIC 784
OBV: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
REV: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre
Romanorvm
Lucilla.png
Lucilla – RIC-786 (Aurelius)43 viewsLucilla Denarius (2mm - 3.4g). LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in a bun / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing, head left, holding Victory and resting hand on shield. RIC 786, RSC 89, BMC 353: RCV 54923 commentsBud Stewart
lucilla_k.jpg
Lucilla, AD 164-1826 viewsAR denarius, 18mm, 2.8g, 6h; Rome mint, AD 166-169.
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA; Bare head right, draped.
Rev.: PVDICITIA; Pudicitia standing front, head left, veiled and holding hand at breast.
Reference: RIC III 780, p. 276 / 16-316-75
John Anthony
Lucilla_RIC_III_1750.jpg
Lucilla, AE Sestertius, RIC III 175072 viewsLucilla
Augusta, 164 - 169 A.D.

Coin: AE Sestertius

Obverse: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust facing right.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno, standing, facing left, holding a Patera with her right hand and a Sceptre with her left. A Peacock, to the left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 23.87 g, Diameter: 30 x 29.3 x 4.7 mm, Die axis: 160°, Mint: Rome, struck between 164 - 169 A.D. Referencee: RIC III 1750, Note: A metal detecting find, near Marlborough in the County of Wiltshire, England in April 2013

Rated Scarce
Masis
Lucilla_RIC_III_1778.jpg
Lucilla, AE Sestertius, RIC III 177877 viewsLucilla
Augusta, 164 - 169 A.D.

Coin: AE Sestertius

Obverse: LVCILLA - AVGVSTA, draped bust facing right.
Reverse: VENVS GENETRIX, Venus, seated to the left, holding an Apple with her right hand over Cupid,who raises his hands to it, to the left and holding a Sceptre with her left hand. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 18.49 g, Diameter: 27.6 x 27.6 x 3.4 mm, Die axis: 340°, Mint: Rome, struck between 164 - 169 A.D, Reference: RIC III 1778
Masis
Lucilla_AE18.jpg
Lucilla, AE1822 viewsobv: ΛΟΥΚΙΛΛ [A ΣΕΒΑΣ]; draped bust right
rev: [ΙΕΡΟΚΑΙ[ΣΑΡΕΩ]Ν]; Artemis standing, r., drawing arrow from quiver at shoulder, holding bow

http://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/1588/
areich
4552_4553.jpg
Lucilla, As, S C7 viewsAE As
Lucilla
Born circa 148AD - Died 182AD
Augusta: 164 - 169AD
Issued: 164 - 169AD
24.0mm 12.57gr 6h
O: LVCILLAE AVG; Diademed head, right.
R: VENVS; Venus standing left, holding apple and lifting dress off shoulder.
Exergue: S, left field; C, right field.
Rome Mint
RIC 770; Aorta: 66: B1, O3, R16, T36.
lucernae/Antonio Pareja Hinojosa 281114502254
6/5/13 1/17/20
Nicholas Z
Lucilla_Augusta.jpg
Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D.8 viewsLucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus. Ae 30.3~31.9mm. 21.75g. Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right. Rev: VENVS S-C, Venus standing left holding apple and sceptre. Cohen 74. RIC 1765 ddwau
Comb21112018160554.jpg
Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus, Sestertius Rome mint 168/9 AD7 viewsObv. LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back.
Rev. FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas (fertility) seated right, nursing child, one boy behind and one before her, S C in exergue.
Ref. RIC III 1736, BMCRE IV 1197, Cohen III 21, Hunter II 48, MIR 18 29, SRCV II 5499, 32.0mm, 20.1 grams.
Canaan
Lucilla.jpg
Lucilla, Daughter of Marcus Aurelius25 viewsLucilla was the daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II and was born in 149 A.D. She was married to the co-emperor Lucius Verus in 164 A.D. and bore him several children. She was exiled and then executed after being implicated in a conspiracy to assassinate her brother Commodus in 182 A.D.

Silver denarius, RIC M. Aur. 758, S 5479, BM 306, RSC 6a, aVF, Rome mint, 3.324g, 18.8mm, 0o, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, patera in extended right, resting left elbow on small statue of Spes
Dumanyu2
3099_(1)_3100_(1).jpg
Lucilla, Denarius, CONCORDIA6 viewsAR Denarius
Lucilla
born ca. 148 - died, 182AD
Issued: 164 - 169AD
19.5 x 19.0mm 3.30gr 6h
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA; Draped bust, right.
R: CONCORDIA; Concordia seated left, holding patera and (1) cornucopia.
Rome Mint
RIC 759; Cohen 7; Aorta: 12: B1, O2, R2, T4.
7820vidas 311732329259
11/3/16 1/17/20
Nicholas Z
lucilla1.jpg
Lucilla, Pietas60 viewsLVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Draped bust of Lucilla right

PIETAS
Pietas sacrificing over altar

Ar denarius; 3.28g; 17-18mm
arizonarobin
lucilla_copy.jpg
Lucilla, Pudicitia50 viewsLVCILLA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

PVDI-CITIA
Pudicitia standing

Ar Denarius, 20mm; 3.33g
RSC 60
2 commentsarizonarobin
LUCiSE06.jpg
Lucilla, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1740, Sestertius of AD 164-169 (Hilaritas)21 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.34g, 31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 164-169 (under Marcus Aurelius).
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust of Lucilla (wife of Lucius Verus), right, with hair elaborately waved and fastened in chignon low on back of head.
Rev.: HILARITAS around, S C across field, Hilaritas standing left holding long palm branch and cornucopiae.
RIC (M. Aurelius) 1742; BMCRE (Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus) 1147; Cohen 31; Sear (Roman Coins & their Values II) 5500.
Ex Jean Elsen, Auction 98 (Dec. 2008)
Charles S
LUCILLA-1-ROMAN.jpg
Lucilla, RIC III-1763 Rome30 viewsBrass Sestertius
Rome mint, 164-166 A.D.
31mm, 26.43g
RIC III-1763, RCVv.2-5506

Obverse:
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Draped bust right.

Reverse:
VENVS
S-C
Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre.
Will J
0151-320np_noir.jpg
Lucilla, Sestertius 111 viewsRome mint, ca.166-169 AD.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right
IVNONI REGINAE (sic !) Juno Lucina seated left holding flower and a baby
22.85 gr
12/10/13 - 0280

Potator II
0151-310np_noir.jpg
Lucilla, Sestertius - *70 viewsRome mint, circa 164-166 AD
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right
VENVS, Venus standing left, holding an apple and raising drapery from left shoulder, SC in field
24.42 gr
Ref : Cohen # 77, RCV # 5507
Potator II
2013-10-030.jpg
Lucilla, Venus40 viewsAr Denarius; 18mm;3.49g

LVCILLA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

VE-NVS
Venus standing left, holding apple and scepter

RIC 785
3 commentsRobin Ayers
Lucilla_RIC_786.JPG
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus19 viewsObv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, bare-headed, draped bust of Lucilla facing right.

Rev: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding Victory in her right hand and resting her left on a shield.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 166 - 169 AD

2.3 grams, 17.7 mm, 180°

RIC III M. Aurelius 786, RSC 89, S5492, VM 15
SPQR Matt
LUCILLA-1.jpg
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.206 viewsAR Denarius (19 mm, 2.92 gm). Rome mint, 164-166 CE.
Obv: LUCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F,
draped bust right,
Rev: CONCORDIA, Concordia seated holding patera.
RIC 757; Sear 5479; BMC 306; Cohen 7.
EmpressCollector
LUCINA.JPG
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.173 viewsÆ Sestertius (31mm), Rome mint, AD 166.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE SC, Juno Lucina seated left, holding flower and an infant in swaddling clothes.
RIC 1747, BMC 1154, Sear 5504, Cohen 37.
EmpressCollector
00lucilla33.jpg
LUCILLA. Wife of Lucius Verus.225 viewsAR denarius. 161-162 AD. 3.28 gm, 5 h. Draped bust right. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F. / VOTA/PV•BLI/CA in three lines within wreath. RIC III 791. RSC 98.

2 commentsbenito
lucilla.jpg
Lucilla: CONCORDIA6 viewsLucilla, AR Denarius. Rev. CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left holding Patera and cornucopiae. 2.9 g, 19 mm. RIC 759, RCV 5480.Podiceps
Lucilla_IVNO_REGINA.jpg
Lucilla_Denar_IVNO_REGINA5 viewsNumis-Student
Lucius Verus.jpg
Lucius Verus, Husband of Lucilla25 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 516, RSC 230, F, Rome mint, 2.819g, 18.2mm, 180o, 163 - 164 A.D.; obverse L VERVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate head right; reverse TR P IIII IMP II COS II, Mars advancing right, holding spear and resting left arm on shield;Dumanyu2
AntPiusSestBetrothal.jpg
MAFJ1 The Betrothal of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior38 viewsAntoninus Pius

Sestertius
ca 140

Laureate head of Antoninus Pius, right, ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TRP COS III
CONCORDIAE - Antoninus Pius standing right on left, holding Concordia, shaking hands with Faustina I to right; Marcus Aurelius and Faustina below in center, also shaking hands.

RIC 601

Marcus Annius Verus was born in Rome in 121. He was first betrothed to the daughter of Aelius Caesar, but after Aelius' death, Antoninus Pius adopted him. He took the name Marcus Aelius Aurelius Verus.

The Historia Augusta records: Marcus Antoninus was a man who devoted himself to philosophy throughout his life and he excels all the principles in purity of character. His father was Annius Verus, who died during his praetorship. . . . His mother was Domitia Lucilla, daughter of the consul Calvisius Tullus. . . .He was brought up partly in the place where he was born and partly in the house of his grandfather Verus, next to the Lateran Palace. He was to marry his first cousin, Annia Faustina. . . . He assumed the toga of manhood in his fifteenth year [134] and at once was betrothed, at Hadrian's wish, to the daughter of Lucius Commodus. . . . After Hadrian's death, Pius immediately got his wife to ask Marcus if he would break off his betrothal to the daughter of Lucius Commodus and marry their own daughter Faustina (whom Hadrian had wanted to marry Commodus' son, even though he was badly matched in age). After thinking the matter over, Marcus replied he was willing. When this was arranged, Pius designated Marcus to be consul with himself [139]. . . and gave him the name of Caesar.

Marcus, at least, was given a choice, and would already have known Faustina well. One can imagine that Faustina, if she was old enough to grasp the implications, was relieved at the prospect of marrying the studious young man rather than someone far older than her.
1 commentsBlindado
MarAurFaustinaCombo2.jpg
MAFJ4 Parents in an Age of Poor Medicine14 viewsMarcus Aurelius as Caesar
Denarius
157-158

Bare head right, right, AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG P II F
Felicitas leaning on column left, holding caduceus and sceptre, TR POT X COS II

RIC 475a

Faustina II
Denarius

Draped bust right, stephane around head, FAVSTINAE AVG PII AVG FIL
Venus standing left, holding apple and dolphin-enwined rudder, VENVS

RIC 517b

Marcus is about 37 years old and has grown a beard. Faustina has born seven children, including Lucilla, who would one day marry Lucius Verus. Over half of her children have died. Her portrait seems to reveal a woman approaching middle age in privilege but sadness.
Blindado
MarAurFaustinaCombo3.jpg
MAFJ5 Emperor and Empress18 viewsMarcus Aurelius
Sestertius
Dec 162-Autumn 163

Sestertius
Laureate head, right, IMP CAES M AVREL ANTONINVS AVG PM
Salus stg, SALVTI AVGVSTOR TR P XVII COS III SC

RIC 843

Faustina II
Denarius

Draped bust right, hair in a bun behind, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Fecundity (Faustina) standing left between two children, holding two more in arms, FECVND AVGVSTAE

RIC 676

The sestertius portrays Marcus within two years of his elevation to emperor in 161. Faustina's denarius, although undated in RIC, probably is from the same timeframe and presumably depicts the young girls Annia Aurelia Galeria Faustina and Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucilla, and the twin babies Titus Aurelius Fulvus Antoninus and Lucius Aurelius Commodus Antoninus (Commodus). Her portrait has taken on a more matronly air.
Blindado
LVerusAsTrophies~0.jpg
MAFJ6 Brother and Emperor6 viewsLucius Verus

As
166-167

Laureate head, right, L VERVS AVG ARM PARTH MAX
3 trophies, TR P VII IMP III[I] COS III

RIC 1464

Son of Aelius Caesar and adopted son of Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius elevated his adoptive brother to co-ruler in 161. At that time, according to the Historia Augusta, "To Lucius, legally his brother, he betrothed his daughter Lucilla. In honor of this union, they gave orders that new institutions of boys and girls, named after them, should be added to the state child-welfare scheme."

The Parthians launched an attack against Roman Syria that it had planned before the death of Pius, and Marcus, with the agreement of the Senate, dispatched Lucius to deal with the crisis. According to the Historia Augusta, "Verus, of course, after he arrived in Syria, lived in luxury at Antioch and Daphne, although he was acclaimed imperator while waging the Parthian war through legates." This coin's reverse honors his military victory over the Parthians in 165.

When Lucius returned to Rome, according to the Historia Augusta, "Lucius requested that Marcus should triumph with him. Lucius requested further that the sons [Commodus and M. Annius Verus] of Marcus should be called Caesars. But Marcus had such great moderation that, although he triumphed together with Lucius, yet after Lucius' death he called himself Germanicus only, because he had won that name for himself in his own war. At the triumph, moreover, they let Marcus' children of both sexes ride with them, even the unmarried girls." A family affair!
Blindado
LucillaSestVenus~1.jpg
MAFJ7 Daughter and Empress16 viewsLucilla

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Marcus Aurelius betrothed Lucilla to Lucius Verus upon his elevation to the purple in 161. In 164, while Lucius was in the East waging the Parthian war, Marcus sent his daughter off to be wed. According to the Historia Augusta, "In the middle of the war, [Marcus] conducted as far as Brundisium both Civica, Verus' uncle, and his own daughter who was about to be married, in the care of her sister, having endowed her with money, and sent them to Verus." Lucius received her in Ephesus. She was implicated in a plot against her brother Commodus and dispatched in 182.
1 commentsBlindado
Maause16-2.jpg
Marcus Aurelius, RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1280, Sestertius of AD 149 23 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.1g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 149 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG P II F, bare head right.
Rev.: TR POT III COS II around, PIETAS in ex., S C across field, Pietas standing left holding baby, and right hand above a second child standing besides her.
RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1280; BMCRE 1854; Cohen 444; Strack 1030; Banti 225 (2 spec.); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 135/7
Ex G.Henzen (Netrherlands, 1995).

The reverse celebrates the growing family of Marcus Aurelius: Faustina Jr. is represented as Pietas with the child standing at her side, young Faustina, born 146, and holding the baby, Lucilla, born 149.
1 commentsCharles S
MaauSe08-2.jpg
Marcus Aurelius, RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1280, Sestertius of AD 14915 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.0g, Ø 32mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 149 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: AVRELIVS CAESAR AVG P II F, bare head right.
Rev.: TR [POT III COS II] around, PIETAS in ex., S C across field, Faustina (as Pietas) standing left, holding a baby and setting a hand on head of small child
RIC Antoninus Pius 1280; BMCRE 1854; Cohen 444; Strack 1030; Banti 225 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values) 4807; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 135/7
Ex G.Henzen (1994).
Issued to celebrate the birth of Lucilla, second daughter of Aurelius and Faustina, born A.D. 149. The girl standing besides Faustina is her first daughter (Annia Galeria Aurelia) Faustina.
Charles S
dionysopolis_commodus_Jekov10.jpg
Moesia inferior, Dionysopolis, Commodus, Jekov 10160 viewsCommodus, AD 177-192
AE 16, 3.41g
obv. AVT KAI M AVRH - KO - MODOC (beginning upper right)
Bearded bust, laureate, r.
rev. DIONYCO - POLEITWN (beginning upper right)
flaming Thymiaterion
not in AMNG (but the same rev. known for Lucilla); Jekov 10 (R5); Varbanov (engl.) 446
rare, VF, nice dark-green patina

Thymiaterion is an incence burner often in the shape of a candelabra. It was used for mainly religious purposes.
Jochen
Lucilla_Faustina_Mule~0.jpg
Mule (Lucilla obverse, Faustina Jr. reverse) - As - not in RIC17 viewsObv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust r.
Rev: LAETITIA S C, Laetitia standing r., holding scepter and wreath.
Size: 26 mm
Weight: 10,01 g
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC: -, Cohen: -, possible mule sources: obverse e.g. RIC 1770 (Marcus Aurelius - Lucilla), reverse: RIC 1657 (Marcus Aurelius - Faustina Jr.)
Provenance: Roma Numismatics sale, Sep, 2010
Windwinds reference (this coin): http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/lucilla/RIC_1770cf.txt
Note by Johny SYSEL: "It could be mule combining Lucilla obverse with Faustna II reverse. But definitely there is Laetitia on reverse not Venus."
Note by Curtis Clay: "I think Johny S is right: a mule with a LAETITIA reverse die meant for Faustina II. Rome mint mules are rare. This one might help to establish the chronology of Lucilla's and Faustina's respective coinages."
vs1969
sillyum.jpg
Pamphylia, Sillyon(Sillyum). Lucilla AE24. Bust of Men79 viewsLucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, wife of Lucius Verus, Augusta, 164-182 AD. AE24, 9.5g.
Obv: ΛΟΥΚΙΛΛΑ CEBACTH. Draped bust right, hair gathered in back in Chignon.
Rev: CIΛΛYEΩN. Draped bust of Mên right, crescent at shoulders.
ancientone
Lucilla_04.jpg
RIC 3, p.274, 758 - Lucilla, Concordia45 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LUCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust of Lucilla right
Rev.: CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding patera and resting arm on statue of Spes; without cornucopia under seat.
Ag, 18.3mm, 3.15g
Ref.: RIC III, p.274, 758, CRE 244 [C]
shanxi
Lucilla_06.jpg
RIC 3, p.274, 759 - Lucilla, Concordia26 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right
Rev.: CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding cornucopia and patera
Ag, 18.4mm, 3.45g
Ref.: RIC III, p.274, 759, CRE 245 [C]
shanxi
Lucilla_08.jpg
RIC 3, p.275, 765 - Lucilla, Denar, Fecunditas, children13 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right
Rev.: FECUNDITAS, Fecunditas or Lucilla seated right, holding child on lap; before her, a second child standing left, reaching towards her.
Ag, 18mm, 3.29g
Ref.: RIC III, p.275, 765, CRE 249 [R]
shanxi
Lucilla_05.jpg
RIC 3, p.275, 769 - Lucilla, Hilaritas 30 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm and cornucopia.
Ag, 17.7mm, 2.73g
Ref.: RIC III, p.275, 769, CRE 251 [S]
shanxi
R654_Lucilla_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.275, 772 - Lucilla, Ivno Regina7 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right
Rev.: IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled and standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, peacock.
Ag, 18mm, 3.23g
Ref.: RIC III, p.275, 772, CRE 255 [S]
shanxi
Lucilla_14.jpg
RIC 3, p.275, 775 - Lucilla, Pietas22 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 166-169
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev.: PIETAS, Pietas standing left, raising hand over altar and holding box
Ag, 18mm, 3.06g
Ref.: RIC 775, CRE 258 [S]
shanxi
Lucilla_02.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 780 - Lucilla, Pudicitia 43 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 166-169
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia standing front, head left.
Ag, 2.96g, 18.2mm
Ref.: Kamp. 40.11, RIC 780, CRE 259 [S]
1 commentsshanxi
R645_Lucilla_fac~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 781 - Lucilla, Pudicitia seated11 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 166-169
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated, veiled and draped
Ag, 16.8mm
Ref.: RIC 781, CRE 260 [C]
shanxi
Lucilla_11.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 784 - Lucilla, Venus 30 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 161-169
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre
Ag, 3.40g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 784, CRE 261 [C]
1 commentsshanxi
Lucilla_01.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 785 - Lucilla, Venus34 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 161-169
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre
Ag, 2.90g, 17.7mm
Ref.: RIC 785, CRE 262 [R]
shanxi
Lucilla_12.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 785 - Lucilla, Venus 24 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 161-169
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre
Ag, 3.42g, 19mm
Ref.: RIC 785, CRE 262 [R] var, hairstyle variation
1 commentsshanxi
Lucilla_10.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 786 - Lucilla, Denar, VENVS VICTRIX33 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LUCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Lucilla right
Rev.: VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding Victory and leaning on shield left.
Ag, 3.26g
Ref.: RIC III, p.276, 786, CRE 268 [C]
1 commentsshanxi
Lucilla_03.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 788 - Lucilla, Vesta41 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar, AD 161-163
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev.: VESTA, Vesta veiled, standing left by altar, decorated and lighted, holding simpulum and palladium.
Ag, 17.5mm, 2.85g
Ref.: RIC III, p.276, 788, CRE 274 [S]
2 commentsshanxi
Lucilla_R614_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 791 - Lucilla, VOTA PVBLICA within wreath23 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev.: VOTA PVBLICA, legend within wreath
Ag, 15mm, 3.22g
Ref.: RIC III, p.276, 791, CRE 275 [C]
1 commentsshanxi
Lucilla_09~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.276, 792 - Lucilla, VOTA PVBLICA round wreath40 viewsLucilla
AR-Denar
Obv.: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right
Rev.: VOTA PVBLICA, Wreath surrounded by legend, in centre, a dot
Ag, 18mm, 2.98g
Ref.: RIC III, p.276, 792, CRE 276 [R3]
2 commentsshanxi
Didius_Julianus,_AE_sestertius.jpg
Roman Empire / Emperor Didius Julianus, Bronze sestertius107 viewsDidius Julianus, AE sestertius

Obverse : IMP CAES M DID SE VERIVLIAN AVG
Laureate head right.

Reverse : P M TR P COS Fortuna standing holding rudder set on globe and cornucopiae , S C at sides

Fine , weight 21.290g, maximum diameter 28.6mm, die axis 180o, 28 Mar - 2 Jun 193 A.D.

Rare. RIC IV 15 , Cohen 12 (30 Fr.), SRCV II 6076

From the Sam Mansourati collection.

“Auction of the Empire”, Didius Julianus became an emperor placing the biggest bid.

Caesar Marcus Didius Severus Julianus Augustus, the son of Quintus Petronius Didius Severus and Aemilia Clara, was born in Milan on either 30 January 133 or 2 February 137 with the correct date being unknown. He was raised and educated in the household of Domitia Lucilla, mother of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius, and rose through Roman public distinction through the support of the Emperor and his mother. In 170 CE, Julianus commanded the XXII Primigenia Legion in Mogontiacum (Mainz), Germany. Then he replaced Pertinax as proconsul of Africa., and Pertinax, now emperor, was murdered by the Praetorian Guard. This began the event known as, “Auction of the Empire”, which Didius Julianus is infamous for winning. He outbidded the father-in-law of Pertinax, Titus Flavius Claudius Sulpicianus, who was the prefect of Rome, by offering to pay the Praetorian Guard 25000 sesterces for the throne.The Senate declared Julianus emperor in fear of the Roman army, but his rule was to be short-lived; Three other generals and governors across the empire declared themselves the rightful heir, and Septimius Severus marched on Rome. The people of Rome despised and rejected Julianus from the start, because they believed he was involved with the corruption. Without the support of Rome, the Imperial Guard would not fight for Julianus and Severus marched into the palace, declared himself emperor, and killed Didius Julianus after just sixty-six days of rule.
2 commentsSam
LUCILLA 0354.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Lucilla, Augusta10 viewsROME - Lucilla, Augusta (162-182 A.D.). Sestertius. dpaul7
Faustina-fil_AE-Dup_FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL_S-C_RIC-1405b-A-Pius-_C-207_Rome_145-146-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_27mm_13,86g-s.jpg
Roman Empire, Faustina II (Filia) (128-175 A.D.), AE-Dupondius, RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!,399 views038a Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), AE-Dupondius, RIC III 1405b (Ant.Pius), Rome, No legend, S-C, Diana, Scarce!,
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, with hair waved and coiled on back of head, band of pearls and necklace.
revers: No legend - Diana standing left, holding arrow and resting hand on bow, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 27mm, weight: 13,86g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 145-146 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1405b (Antoninus Pius), p-194, C-207,209,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Faustina_jun_FAVSTINA-AVG_P-II-AVG-FIL_VE-NVS_RIC-_Q-001_-h_mm_ga-s.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina II (Filia) (128-175 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC III 517c (Marc.Aur), Rome, VENVS, FAVSTINA AVG P II AVG FIL, #1317 views038b Faustina (II) Filia (128-175 A.D.), AR-Denarius, RIC III 517c (Marc.Aur), Rome, VENVS, FAVSTINA AVG P II AVG FIL, #1
"Daughter of Antoninus Pius and Faustina Sr. and wife of Marcus Aurelius. She was also the mother of Commodus and Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus."
avers:- FAVSTINA-AVG-P-II-AVG-FIL, Draped bust right, showing Strack's coiffure a, with band of pearls in hair.
revers: VE-NVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and rudder, dolphin coiled around rudder.
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-RIC 517c, (Marcus Aurelius), Strack 495. BMCRE 1067. Cohen 266.
Q-001
quadrans
Favjse12-2~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Faustina Junior, Sestertius of AD 161, RIC (M.Aurelius) unlisted 151 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.86g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: FECVND AVGVSTA (around) S C (in field), Fecunditas standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) unlisted, legend corresponds to RIC 1635 and the representation to RIC 1649
ex Aeternitas Coins & Antiquities (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).

Additional information provided by Curtis Clay (19 july 2012): "This type commemorating the birth of a third survivng daughter usually has the legend IVNONI LVCINAE, whereas the type FECVND AVGVSTAE commemorates the birth of the next daughter about a year or so later and shows Fecunditas/Faustina holding two children in her arms while two more stand at her feet.

Strack 1335 knew a sestertius like yours in only one specimen, in Naples, but unfortunately does not illustrate the coin.

The Naples collection was stolen in 1977. Your coin is of nice quality, and has an old-collection look, lightly cleaned on the reverse. I would not be at all surprised if it is the actual Naples coin! ..."
Charles S
constand~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Lucilla (162 - 182 A.D.)78 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, Concordia standing facing, head left, holding patera and double cornucopiae.
Rome Mint
19mm
3.27g
RIC III 760.

Ex. Cabinet Numismatique, Genève.

Rare
4 commentsMat
LucillaSestVenus~2.jpg
Roman Empire, Lucilla, Sestertius49 viewsSestertius

Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767
1 commentsBlindado
bpAnto1K3Lucilla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Lucilla, AE Sestertius48 viewsObv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA
Bare headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO REGINA S C
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre with peacock at feet.
Sestertius, 22.8 gm, 29.9 mm, RIC 1751
Massanutten
Lucilla Denarius Venus Victrix.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Lucilla, AR denarius120 views1 commentsOptimus
Lucilla_Faustina_Mule.jpg
Roman Empire, Mule (Lucilla obverse, Faustina Jr. reverse) - As - not in RIC75 viewsObv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust r.
Rev: LAETITIA S C, Laetitia standing r., holding scepter and wreath.
Size: 26 mm
Weight: 10,01 g
Mint: Rome
Ref: RIC: -, Cohen: -, possible mule sources: obverse e.g. RIC 1770 (Marcus Aurelius - Lucilla), reverse: RIC 1657 (Marcus Aurelius - Faustina Jr.)
Provenance: Roma Numismatics, Sep. 2010
Wildwinds reference (this coin): http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/lucilla/RIC_1770cf.txt

Wildwinds citation (from the text accompanying Roma numismatics sale):
"Lucilla, AE As. 9.97g; 26mm. 164-166 AD. Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right. Rev: unclear legend, Venus standing right, holding apple and sceptre, S-C across fields. cf. RIC 1770; Cohen 80. This is the only Lucilla coin in RIC which has a deity standing right holding a sceptre (there is a Diana holding a torch with both hands). The legend seems to contain ..IT or AT.. and ends in A, but there are no coins in RIC which have such a legend. This coin is almost identical to one sold by Noble Coins Australia with the same description, though that one was a dupondius)"

Note by Johny SYSEL: "It could be mule combining Lucilla obverse with Faustna II reverse. But definitely there is Laetitia on reverse not Venus."

Note by Curtis Clay: "I think Johny S is right: a mule with a LAETITIA reverse die meant for Faustina II. Rome mint mules are rare. This one might help to establish the chronology of Lucilla's and Faustina's respective coinages."
vs1969
Screenshot_2019-05-20_12_36_22.png
Roman Imperial, Lucilla as Augusta, Orichalcum Sestertius.48 viewsRome 163-164 A.D. 20.91g - 29.3mm, Axis 5h.

Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F - Draped bust right.

Rev: [IVNONI LVCINAE / S-C] - Juno seated left, holding a flower & infant.

RIC III 1747, Cohen 37, BMC 1154.
scarli
seal010.jpg
ROMAN LEAD IMPERIAL SEAL153 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus AD 161-169, Roman lead imperial seal (bulla)

Draped bust right

Reverse blank

Cf. M�nzzentrum Rheinland 151 (2009) 861; CNG 217 (2009), 375 (�Faustina II?�); 13.67g; 19mm; near very fine

From the Gert Boersema sold files
Jay GT4
LucillaSestVenus~0.jpg
Roman, Lucilla124 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius

Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164. She was implicated in a plot against her brother Commodus and dispatched.

RIC 1767
1 commentsBlindado
lu2l[1].jpg
Roman, Lucilla, RIC 175676 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus
Obverse: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG FB, draped bust right.
Reverse: Pietas standing left, right hand over lighted altar and holding box of incense. S C in field.
30mm., 19.8g
Reverse clearly shows an inverse portrait caused by a clashed die.
sold 1-2018
NORMAN K
Lucilla_sesterz.jpg
Sestertius; PIETAS S-C4 viewsLUCILLA AE sestertius. LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right. Reverse - PIETAS S-C, Pietas standing, head right, holding patera, altar before. Sear RCV 5505. 31mm, 21.5g. Ex IncitatusPodiceps
The_Ladies_opt.jpg
The Ladies of Rome54 viewsFaustina I
Faustina II
Lucilla
Julia Soaemias
Julia Domna
Julia Maesa
Helena
Herennia Etruscilla
Salonina
Severina
Fausta
Aelia Flaccilla
Legatus
LucillaSestVenus~3.jpg
Venus1 views1bm Lucilla
166 views
Wife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164.
Blindado
MarcusAureliusLiberalitas_sestertius.jpg
[905a] Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.139 viewsMARCUS AURELIUS AE [b[Sestertius. RIC 1222. 30mm, 24.5g. Struck at Rome, 177 AD. Obverse: M ANTONINUS AVG GERM SARM TR P XXXI, laureate head right; Reverse: LIBERALITAS AVG VII IMP VIIII COS III P P, Liberalitas standing left holding coin counter & cornucopia, SC in fields. Nice portrait. Ex Incitatus. Photo courtesy of Incitatus.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Marcus Aurelius (A.D. 161-180)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University


Introduction and Sources
The Vita of the emperor in the collection known as the Historia Augusta identifies him in its heading as Marcus Antoninus Philosophus, "Marcus Antoninus the Philosopher." Toward the end of the work, the following is reported about him, sententia Platonis semper in ore illius fuit, florere civitates si aut philosophi imperarent aut imperantes philosopharentur (27.7), "Plato's judgment was always on his lips, that states flourished if philosophers ruled or rulers were philosophers." It is this quality of Marcus' character which has made him a unique figure in Roman history, since he was the first emperor whose life was molded by, and devoted to, philosophy (Julian was the second and last). His reign was long and troubled, and in some ways showed the weaknesses of empire which ultimately led to the "Decline and Fall," yet his personal reputation, indeed his sanctity, have never failed of admirers. Contributing to his fame and reputation is a slender volume of Stoic philosophy which served as a kind of diary while he was involved in military campaigns, the Meditations, a book which can be described as an aureus libellus, a little golden book.

The sources for understanding Marcus and his reign are varied but generally disappointing. There is no major historian. The chief literary sources are the biography in the Historia Augusta, as well as those of Hadrian, Antoninus, Verus, and Avidius Cassius. Debate about this collection of imperial biographies has been heated and contentious for more than a century. In all likelihood, it is the work of a single author writing in the last years of the fourth-century. The information offered ranges from the precisely accurate to the wildly imaginative.

Cassius Dio, who wrote in the decade of the 230s, produced a long history of the empire which has survived, for our period, only in an abbreviated version. Fourth century historians, such as Aurelius Victor and Eutropius, occasionally furnish bits of information. Marcus' teacher, Fronto, a distinguished orator and rhetorician, is extremely useful. Papyri, inscriptions, coins, legal writings, and some of the church writers, such as Tertullian, Eusebius, and Orosius, are very important. Archaeology and art history, with their interpretation of monuments, make the history of Marcus' principate literally visible and offer important clues for understanding the context of his actions.

Early Life
He was born M. Annius Verus on April 26, 121, the scion of a distinguished family of Spanish origin (PIR2 A697). His father was Annius Verus (PIR2 A696), his mother Domitia Lucilla (PIR2 D183). His grandfather held his second consulate in that year and went on to reach a third in 126, a rare distinction in the entire history of the principate, and also served Hadrian as city prefect. The youth's education embraced both rhetoric and philosophy; his manner was serious, his intellectual pursuits deep and devoted, so that the emperor Hadrian took an interest in him and called him "Verissimus," "Most truthful," by punning on his name. He received public honors from an early age and seems to have long been in Hadrian's mind as a potential successor. When Hadrian's first choice as successor, L. Ceionius Commodus, died before his adoptive father, the second choice proved more fruitful. The distinguished senator T. Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus, from Cisalpine Gaul, did succeed Hadrian, whose arrangements for the succession planned for the next generation as well. He required Antoninus to adopt the young Verus, now to be known as M. Aelius Aurelius Verus, as well as Commodus' son, henceforth known as L. Aelius Aurelius Commodus (PIR2 C606). The former was a bit more than seventeen years old, the latter was eight.

Career under Antoninus Pius
The long tenure of Antoninus Pius proved one of the most peaceful and prosperous in Roman history. The emperor himself was disinclined to military undertakings and never left Italy during his reign. Disturbances to the pax Romana occurred on the fringes of empire. Responses were decisive and successful, with legates in charge in the provinces. As a consequence, neither Caesar gained military experience nor was shown to the armies, a failing which later could have proved decisive and disastrous. Marcus rose steadily through the cursus honorum, holding consulates in 140 and 145, combining magistracies with priesthoods. He received the tribunicia potestas in 147, and perhaps also imperium proconsulare. Yet he never neglected the artes liberals. His closest contacts were with Fronto (c.95-c.160), the distinguished rhetorician and orator. His acquaintance included many other distinguished thinkers, such as Herodes Atticus (c.95-177), the Athenian millionaire and sophist, and Aelius Aristides (117-c.181), two of whose great speeches have survived and which reveal much of the mood and beliefs of the age. Yet it was Epictetus (c.50-c.120) who had the greatest philosophical impact and made him a firm Stoic. In the year 161 Marcus celebrated his fortieth birthday, a figure of noble appearance and unblemished character. He was leading a life which gave him as much honor and glory as he could have desired, probably much more than his private nature enjoyed, yet his life, and that of the empire, was soon to change. The emperor died on March 7, but not before clearly indicating to magistrates and senate alike his desire that Marcus succeed him by having the statue of Fortuna, which had been in his bedroom, transferred to Marcus. There was no opposition, no contrary voice, to his succession. He immediately chose his brother as co-emperor, as Hadrian had planned. From the beginning of the year they were joint consuls and held office for the entire year. Their official titulature was now Imperator Caesar M. Aurelius Antoninus Augustus and Imperator Caesar L. Aurelius Verus Augustus. The military qualities adumbrated by the word Imperator were soon much in demand, for the empire was under pressure in the year 161 in Britain, in Raetia, and in the east, where Parthia once again posed a significant danger.

The Parthian War (161-166)
The incursion in northern Britain and the difficulties along the Danube were soon satisfactorily managed by legates. The danger in the East was of a different magnitude. Tensions between Rome and Parthia had intensified in the last years of Antoninus' reign over control of Armenia, the vast buffer state which had often aroused enmity between the two powers, since each wished to be able to impose a king favorable to its interests. With Antoninus' death and the uncertainty attendant upon a new emperor (in this case two, a dyarchy, for the first time in Rome's history), the Parthian monarch, Vologaeses III, struck rapidly, placed his own candidate upon the Armenian throne, and inflicted severe setbacks upon the Roman forces sent to oppose him. Marcus decided to send his colleague Lucius Verus, whose imperial prestige would underscore the seriousness of the empire's response. Verus lacked military experience and was sorely lacking in the attributes of leadership and command; further, he was notorious for being chiefly interested in amusements and luxury. But Marcus surrounded him with several of the best generals at the empire's disposal, chief among them Avidius Cassius (c.130-175) (PIR2 A1402). From 162 on, Rome's successes and conquests were extensive and decisive. Most of Parthia's significant cities and strongholds, such as Seleucia and Ctesiphon, were stormed and destroyed, and the army's movements eastward recalled the movements of Alexander the Great some five centuries earlier. By 166, Parthia had capitulated and a Roman nominee sat on the Armenian throne. The victory appeared to be the most decisive since Trajan's conquest of Dacia, but, when Verus returned to Italy with his triumphant army, there came also a devastating plague, which had enormous effect on all provinces.
As is the case with all ancient diseases, it is almost impossible to identify this one. In all likelihood, however, it was smallpox; how severe the toll was is debated. Clearly, it cast a pall over the triumph celebrated by the two emperors, who were honored with the titles Armeniacus and Parthicus. The last years of this decade were dominated by efforts to overcome the plague and provide succour to its victims. But already in 166, the German tribes smashed the Danubian limes, threatening the empire's stability and even existence, more than Parthia had ever done. The first campaigns were punctuated by the death of Verus in 169, leaving Marcus as sole emperor. And so began the most difficult period of his life.

The German Wars
Early in 169, the Marcomanni and Quadi crossed the Danube, penetrated the intervening provinces, and entered Italy. The culmination of their onslaught was a siege of Aquileia. The effect upon the inhabitants of the peninsula was frightful. This was the first invasion of Italy since the late second century B.C., when the Cimbri and Teutones had been separately crushed by Marius. Perhaps more vivid in the collective imagination was the sack of Rome by the Gauls in 387, when the city was saved only by the payment of ransom.
The two emperors hastened north, after a rapid mobilization of forces, which included the drafting of slaves, since the manpower potential of the empire had been so impaired by the consequences of the plague and the losses and troop commitments in the East. Verus died while in the north; Marcus returned to Rome with the body and gave his brother full honors. He then turned north again and began his counterattacks against the barbarians. He did not know it at the time, but he was destined to spend most of his remaining years on the northern frontier. The only interlude was caused by revolt in the east.

We have no record of Marcus' ultimate intentions in these campaigns, yet the various stages were clear. First and foremost, the enemy had to be driven out of Italy and then into their own territory beyond the Danube. He strove to isolate the tribes and then defeat them individually, so that the ultimate manpower superiority of the empire and its greater skill in warfare and logistics could more easily be brought to bear. It was a successful strategy, as one tribe after another suffered defeat and reestablished ties with Rome. But it was a time-consuming and expensive operation, requiring the recruitment of two new legions, II Italica and III Italica, the construction of many new camps, such as the legionary fortress at Regensburg, with success accruing year by year. He intended to create two new provinces, Marcomannia and Sarmatia, thereby eliminating the Hungarian Plain and the headwaters of the Elbe as staging areas for invasion.

This steady, slow progress was interrupted in 175 by the action of the distinguished general Avidius Cassius, governor of Syria, who claimed the empire for himself. Whether he responded to a rumor of Marcus' death or, as gossip had it, conspired with Marcus' wife, the emperor's response was quick and decisive. Leaving the northern wars, he traveled to the East, but Avidius was killed before Marcus arrived in the region. After spending time settling affairs and showing himself to some of the provinces, with particular attention shown to Athens, where he was initiated into the Eleusinian mysteries, as Hadrian and Verus had been. He returned to Italy and soon answered the call to duty once more on the northern frontier. He took with him as colleague his son Commodus, now merely sixteen years old but already long since marked out as his father's intended successor. The military campaigns proved successful, but in the spring of 180, when Marcus died, at least one more year of warfare was necessary for the attainment of the grand enterprise. Marcus recommended to Commodus continuation of the war, but the new emperor was eager to return to Rome and the ease and luxury of the imperial court and entered into a peace agreement. Never again was Rome to hold the upper hand in its dealings with the Germanic tribes beyond the now reestablished borders of the empire.

Administrative and Religious Policy
Marcus was a conscientious and careful administrator who devoted much attention to judicial matters. His appointments to major administrative positions were for the most part admirable. Difficult tasks were put in the charge of the most capable men; he was not afraid of comparison with his subordinates. Social mobility continued as it had been under his predecessors, with men from the provinces advancing into the upper echelons of the Roman aristocracy. Those of humble birth could make a good career; such a one was Pertinax (126-193), a gifted general, who in early 193 became emperor for a space of less than three months.

The judicial administration of Italy was put in the hands of iuridici, who represented the emperor and thus spoke with his authority. This was a practice which had been established by Hadrian but had been allowed to lapse by Antoninus. The centralization of government continued apace. The imperial finances were sorely stretched by the almost continuous wars. Trajan had brought great wealth, Decebalus' treasure, into the empire after his conquest of Dacia. No such profit awaited Marcus. When preparing for the northern wars, he auctioned off much of the imperial palace's valuables. In spite of the enormous expenses of war, Commodus found ample funds upon his accession as sole emperor for his expenditures and amusements.

Although Marcus was a devoted thinker and philosopher, he was deeply religious, at least outwardly. The state cult received full honor, and he recognized the validity of other people's beliefs, so that the variety of religions in the vast extent of the empire caused no difficulties for inhabitants or government, with one significant exception. The Christians were not hampered by any official policy; indeed the impact of the church spread enormously in the second century. Yet their availability as scapegoats for local crises made them subject to abuse or worse. There was violence against them in 167, and perhaps the worst stain on Marcus' principate stemmed from the pogrom of Christians in Lugdunum in southern France in 177. He did not cause it, nor, on the other hand, did he or his officials move to stop it. Indeed, Tertullian called him a friend of Christianity. Yet the events were a precursor of what would come in the century and a quarter which followed.

Building Programs and Monuments
Many of Marcus' predecessors transformed the face of the capital with their building programs, either by the vast range of their undertaking or by the extraordinary significance of individual monuments. Others did very little to leave a tangible mark. Marcus fell into the latter group. There is record of very few monuments for which he and his brother were responsible. Very early in their reign they honored the deceased Antoninus with a column in the Campus Martius, no longer in situ but largely surviving. The shaft, which seems not to have been sculpted, was used for the restoration of Augustus' obelisk, now in Piazza Montecitorio, in the eighteenth century. The base, which was sculpted on all four sides, is now on display in the Vatican Museum. The chief feature is the apotheosis of the emperor and his long deceased wife, the elder Faustina, as they are borne to heaven. Also presented on this relief are two eagles and personifications of the goddess Roma and of the Campus Martius, represented as a young male figure.

There were three arches which commemorated the military achievements of the two emperors. No trace has been found of an early monument to Verus. Two arches later honored Marcus, both of which have disappeared but have left significant sculptural remains. The eight rectangular reliefs preserved on the Arch of Constantine came from one arch. Similarly, the three reliefs displayed in the stairwell of the Conservatori Museum on the Capitoline Hill came from another. One relief has disappeared from the latter monument.

Certainly the best known monument of Marcus' principate is the column, which rises from Piazza Colonna. It is twin to Trajan's column in height and design, although the artistic craftsmanship of the reliefs which envelop the shaft is much inferior. The subject is Marcus' campaigns against the Marcomanni and Sarmati in the years 172-75. The most interesting panel represents the famous rainstorm, when the army, overwhelmed by drought, was suddenly saved by the divine intervention of rain. Although begun in the latter part of the decade, the column was not completed until 193, when Septimius Severus had become emperor.

The famous equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, which survived the centuries near San Giovanni in Laterano because the rider was identified as Constantine, no longer greets the visitor to the Capitoline, where Michelangelo had placed it in the sixteenth century. It was removed in the 1980s because pollution was destroying it. After careful treatment and restoration, it is now displayed within the museum, with a replica placed in the center of the piazza.

Although outside Rome, mention should be made of the monumental frieze commemorating Lucius Verus' victory over the Parthians in 165. It was an ornament of the city of Ephesus; the extensive sculptural remains are now in the Ephesus Museum in Vienna.

Family
As part of Hadrian's plans for his succession, when Ceionius Commodus was his choice, Marcus was betrothed to the latter's daughter. But when Ceionius died and Antoninus became Hadrian's successor, that arrangement was nullified and Marcus was chosen for the Emperor's daughter, the younger Faustina (PIR2 A716). She had been born in 129, was hence eight years younger than he. They were married in 145; the marriage endured for thirty years. She bore him thirteen children, of whom several died young; the most important were a daughter, Lucilla, and a son Commodus. Lucilla was deployed for political purposes, married first to Lucius Verus in 164, when she was seventeen, and then, after his death, to Claudius Pompeianus Quintianus of Antioch, a much older man who was an important associate of her father /ii]PIR2 C973). Commodus became joint-emperor with his father in 177 and three years later ruled alone.

Faustina's reputation suffered much abuse. She was accused of employing poison and of murdering people, as well as being free with her favors with gladiators, sailors, and also men of rank, particularly Avidius Cassius. Yet Marcus trusted her implicitly and defended her vigorously. She accompanied him on several campaigns and was honored with the title mater castrorum. She was with him in camp at Halala in southern Cappadocia in the winter of 175 when she died in an accident. Marcus dedicated a temple to her honor and had the name of the city changed to Faustinopolis.

Death and Succession
In early 180, while Marcus and Commodus were fighting in the north, Marcus became ill. Which disease carried him off we do not know, but for some days Marcus took no food or drink, being now eager to die. He died on March 17, in the city of Vindobona, although one source reports that it was in Sirmium. His ashes were brought to Rome and placed in Hadrian's mausoleum. Commodus succeeded to all power without opposition, and soon withdrew from the war, thereby stymieing his father's designs and ambitions. It was a change of rulers that proved disastrous for people and empire. Dio called the succession a change from a golden kingdom to one of iron and rust.

Reputation
Gibbon called Marcus "that philosophic monarch," a combination of adjective and noun which sets Marcus apart from all other Roman emperors. His renown has, in subsequent centuries, suffered little, although he was by no means a "perfect" person. He was perhaps too tolerant of other people's failings, he himself used opium. The abundance of children whom his wife bore him included, alas, a male who was to prove one of Rome's worst rulers. How much better it would have been if Marcus had had no son and had chosen a successor by adoption, so that the line of the five good emperors, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus, Marcus, could have been extended. It was not to be, and for that Marcus must accept some responsibility.

Yet he was a man of ability and a sense of duty who sacrificed his own delights and interests to the well-being of the state. He was capax imperii, he did his best, and history has been kind to him. As Hamlet said to Horatio, when awaiting the appearance of the ghost of his father,

"He was a man! Take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again." (I 2, 187-88)

His memory remains vivid and tactile because of the famous column, the equestrian statue, and his slender volume of thoughts, written in Greek, the Meditations, from which I choose two quotations with which to conclude:

"If mind is common to us, then also the reason, whereby we are reasoning beings, is common. If this be so, then also the reason which enjoins what is to be done or left undone is common. If this be so, law also is common; if this be so, we are citizens; if this be so, we are partakers in one constitution; if this be so, the Universe is a kind of Commonwealth." (4.4)

"At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: 'I am called to man's labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?'" (5.1; both in Farquharson's translation)

Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CommodusRSC190.jpg
[906a]Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.168 viewsCOMMODUS AR silver denarius. RSC 190. RCV 5644. 16.5mm, 2.3g. F. Obverse: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, bust of Commodus wearing lion skin in imitation of Hercules and Alexander the Great, facing right; Reverse: HER-CVL RO-MAN AV-GV either side of club of Hercules, all in wreath. RARE. Ex Incitatus.

This coin refers to Commodus' belief that he was Hercules reincarnated. According to the historian Herodian, "he issued orders that he was to be called not Commodus, son of Marcus, but Hercules, son of Jupiter. Abandoning the Roman and imperial mode of dress, he donned the lion-skin, and carried the club of Hercules..." (Joseph Sermarini).

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Commodus (A.D. 180-192)

Dennis Quinn

Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus, the son of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius and his wife-cousin Faustina, was born in Lanuvium in 161 AD. Commodus was named Caesar at the age of 5, and co-Augustus at the age of 17, spending most of his early life accompanying his father on his campaigns against the Quadi and the Marcomanni along the Danubian frontier. His father died, possibly of the plague, at a military encampment at Bononia on the Danube on 17 March 180, leaving the Roman Empire to his nineteen-year-old son.[[1]] Upon hearing of his father's death, Commodus made preparations for Marcus' funeral, made concessions to the northern tribes, and made haste to return back to Rome in order to enjoy peace after nearly two decades of war. Commodus, and much of the Roman army behind him, entered the capital on 22 October, 180 in a triumphal procession, receiving a hero's welcome. Indeed, the youthful Commodus must have appeared in the parade as an icon of new, happier days to come; his arrival sparked the highest hopes in the Roman people, who believed he would rule as his father had ruled.[[2]]

The coins issued in his first year all display the triumphant general, a warrior in action who brought the spoils of victory to the citizens of Rome.[[3]] There is a great deal of evidence to support the fact that Commodus was popular among many of the people, at least for a majority of his reign. He seems to have been quite generous.[[4]]. Coin types from around 183 onward often contain the legend, Munificentia Augusta[[5]], indicating that generosity was indeed a part of his imperial program. Coins show nine occasions on which Commodus gave largesses, seven when he was sole emperor.[[6]] According to Dio, the emperor obtained some of this funding by taxing members of the senatorial class.[[7]] This policy of munificence certainly caused tensions between Commodus and the Senate. In 191 it was noted in the official Actus Urbis that the gods had given Commodus to Populus Senatusque Romanus. Normally the phrase Senatus Populusque Romanus was used. [[8]] While the Senate hated Commodus, the army and the lower classes loved him.[[9]] Because of the bad relationship between the Senate and Commodus as well as a senatorial conspiracy,[[10]] Rome "...was virtually governed by the praetorian prefects Perennis (182-185) and Cleander (186-9)."[[11]]

Commodus began to dress like the god Hercules, wearing lion skins and carrying a club.[[12]] Thus he appropriated the Antonines' traditional identification with Hercules, but even more aggressively. Commodus' complete identification with Hercules can be seen as an attempt to solidify his claim as new founder of Rome, which he now called the Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana. This was legitimized by his direct link to Hercules, son of Father Jupiter.[[13]] He probably took the title of Hercules officially some time before mid-September 192.[[14]]

While the literary sources, especially Dio, Herodian, and the Historia Augusta, all ridicule the antics of his later career, they also give important insight into Commodus' relationship to the people.[[15]] His most important maneuver to solidify his claims as Hercules Romanus was to show himself as the god to the Roman people by taking part in spectacles in the amphitheater. Not only would Commodus fight and defeat the most skilled gladiators, he would also test his talents by encountering the most ferocious of the beasts.[[16]]

Commodus won all of his bouts against the gladiators.[[17]] The slayer of wild beasts, Hercules, was the mythical symbol of Commodus' rule, as protector of the Empire.[[18]]

During his final years he declared that his age should be called the "Golden Age."[[19]] He wanted all to revel in peace and happiness in his age of glory, praise the felicitas Commodi, the glorious libertas, his pietas, providential, his victoria and virtus aeterna.[[20]] Commodus wanted there to be no doubt that this "Golden Age" had been achieved through his munificence as Nobilissimus Princeps. He had declared a brand new day in Rome, founding it anew in 190, declaring himself the new Romulus.[[21]] Rome was now to be called Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana, as noted above, and deemed "the Immortal," "the Fortunate," "the Universal Colony of the Earth."[[22]] Coins represent the archaic rituals of city-[re]foundation, identifying Commodus as a new founder and his age as new days.[[23]]

Also in 190 he renamed all the months to correspond exactly with his titles. From January, they run as follows: Lucius, Aelius, Aurelius, Commodus, Augustus, Herculeus, Romanus, Exsuperatorius, Amazonius, Invictus, Felix, Pius.[[24]] According to Dio Cassius, the changing of the names of the months was all part of Commodus' megalomania.[[25]] Commodus was the first and last in the Antonine dynasty to change the names of the months.


The legions were renamed Commodianae, the fleet which imported grain from Africa was called Alexandria Commodiana Togata, the Senate was deemed the Commodian Fortunate Senate, his palace and the Roman people were all given the name Commodianus.[[26]] The day that these new names were announced was also given a new title: Dies Commodianus.[[27]] Indeed, the emperor presented himself with growing vigor as the center of Roman life and the fountainhead of religion. New expressions of old religious thought and new cults previously restricted to private worship invade the highest level of imperial power.[[28]]

If Eusebius of Caesarea [[29]] is to be believed, the reign of Commodus inaugurated a period of numerous conversions to Christianity. Commodus did not pursue his father's prohibitions against the Christians, although he did not actually change their legal position. Rather, he relaxed persecutions, after minor efforts early in his reign.[[30]] Tradition credits Commodus's policy to the influence of his concubine Marcia; she was probably his favorite,[[31]] but it is not clear that she was a Christian.[[32]] More likely, Commodus preferred to neglect the sect, so that persecutions would not detract from his claims to be leading the Empire through a "Golden Age."[[33]]

During his reign several attempts were made on Commodus' life.[[34]] After a few botched efforts, an orchestrated plot was carried out early in December 192, apparently including his mistress Marcia. On 31 December an athlete named Narcissus strangled him in his bath,[[35]] and the emperor's memory was cursed. This brought an end to the Antonine Dynasty.


SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alföldy, G. "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.

Aymard, J. "Commode-Hercule foundateur de Rome," Revue des études latines 14 (1936): 340-64.

Birley, A. R. The African Emperor: Septimius Severus. -- rev. ed.-- London, 1988.
________. Marcus Aurelius: A Biography. London, 1987.

Breckenridge, J. D. "Roman Imperial Portraiture from Augustus to Gallienus," ANRW 2.17. 1 (1981): 477-512.

Chantraine, H. "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quartalschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975): 1-31.

Ferguson, J. The Religions of the Roman Empire. Ithaca, 1970.

Fishwick, D. The Imperial Cult in the Latin West. Leiden, 1987.

Gagé, J. "La mystique imperiale et l'épreuve des jeux. Commode-Hercule et l'anthropologie hercaléenne," ANRW 2.17.2 (1981), 663-83.

Garzetti, A. From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192. London, 1974.

Grosso F. La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo. Turin, 1964.

Hammond, M. The Antonine Monarchy. Rome, 1956.

Helgeland, J. "Roman Army Religion," ANRW II.16.2 (1978): 1470-1505.

Howe, L. L. The Praetorian Prefect from Commodus to Diocletian (A. D. 180-305). Chicago, 1942.

Keresztes, P. "A Favorable Aspect of Commodus' Rule," in Hommages à Marcel Renard 2. Bruxelles, 1969.

Mattingly, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. London, 1930.

Nock, A. D. "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947): 102-116.

Parker, H. M. D. A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337. London, 1935.
________. and B.H. Warmington. "Commodus." OCD2, col. 276.

Raubitschek, A. E. "Commodus and Athens." Studies in Honor of Theodore Leslie Shear. Hesperia, Supp. 8, 1948.

Rostovtzeff, M. I. "Commodus-Hercules in Britain," Journal of Roman Studies 13 (1923): 91-105.

Sordi, M. "Un senatore cristano dell'éta di Commodo." Epigraphica 17 (1959): 104-112.

Speidel, M. P. "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993): 109-114.

Stanton, G. R. "Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus, and Commodus: 1962-1972." ANRW II.2 (1975): 478-549.

Notes
[[1]] For a discussion of the circumstances surrounding the death of Marcus Aurelius, see A. R. Birley, Marcus Aurelius: A Biography -- rev. ed. -- (London, 1987), 210.
Aurelius Victor, De Caes. 16.4, writing around the year 360, claimed Aurelius died at Vindobona, modern Vienna. However, Tertullian, Apol. 25, who wrote some seventeen years after Marcus' death, fixed his place of death at Sirmium, twenty miles south of Bononia. A. R. Birley (Marcus Aurelius, 209-10) cogently argues Tertullian is much more accurate in his general description of where Marcus was campaigning during his last days.
For the dating of Marcus Aurelius' death and the accession of Commodus, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy (Rome, 1956), 179-80.

[[2]] For the army's attitude toward peace, the attitude of the city toward the peace, and the reception of the emperor and his forces into Rome, see Herodian, 1.7.1-4; for Commodus' subsequent political policies concerning the northern tribes, see G. Alföldy, "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.
For a commentary on the early years of Commodus in the public perception as days of optimism, see A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192 (London, 1974), 530. For a more critical, and much more negative portrayal, see the first chapter of F. Grosso, La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo (Turin, 1964).

[[3]]The gods Minerva and Jupiter Victor are invoked on the currency as harbingers of victory; Jupiter Conservator on his coins watches over Commodus and his Empire, and thanks is given to divine Providence (H. Mattingly, The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [London, 1930] 356-7, 366-7). In 181, new coin types appear defining the new reign of Commodus. Victory and peace are stressed. Coins extol Securitas Publica, Felicitas, Libertas, Annona, and Aequitas (ibid., 357).
By 186 Commodus is depicted as the victorious princes, the most noble of all born to the purple. Herodian (1.5.5) describes how Commodus boasted to his soldiers that he was born to be emperor. See also H. Chantraine, "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quatralschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975), 26. He is called Triumphator and Rector Orbis, and associated with the Nobilitas of Trojan descent (Mattingly, RIC III.359; idem, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. Volume IV: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [Oxford, 1940], clxii).

[[4]] Dio tells us that Commodus liked giving gifts and often gave members of the populace 140 denarii apiece (Cass. Dio, 73.16), whereas the Historia Augusta reports that he gave each man 725 denarii (SHA, Comm., 16.3).

[[5]]Mattingly, RIC, III.358.

[[6]] Idem., CBM, IV.clxxiv.

[[7]]Cass. Dio, 73.16.

[[8]]M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 113.

[[9]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.xii. Commodus was also popular amongst the northern divisions of the army because he allowed them to wield axes in battle, a practice banned by all preceding emperors. See, Speidel, JRS 83 (1993), 114.

[[10]]Infra, n. 34.

[[11]] H. Parker and B.H. Warmington, OCD2, s.v. "Commodus," col. 276; after 189, he was influenced by his mistress Marcia, Eclectus his chamberlain, and Laetus (who became praetorian prefect in 191 (Idem.).

[[12]]Herodian, 1.14.8. Hadrian appears on medallions in lion skins; but as far as the sources tell us, he never appeared in public in them. See J. Toynbee, Roman Medallions,(New York, 1986), 208.
He would often appear at public festivals and shows dressed in purple robes embroidered with gold. He would wear a crown made of gold, inlaid with the finest gems of India. He often carried a herald's staff as if imitating the god Mercury. According to Dio Cassius, Commodus' lion's skin and club were carried before him in the procession, and at the theaters these vestiges of Hercules were placed on a gilded chair for all to see (Cass. Dio, 73.17). For the implications of the golden chair carried in procession in relation to the imperial cult, see D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West, (Leiden, 1987-91 ), 555.

[[13]] H. M. D. Parker, A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337, (London, 1935), 34; For medallions that express the relationship between Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius, and Lucius Verus extolling Hercules as a symbol of civic virtue, see Toynbee, Roman Medallions, 208. For a general statement on the symbolism of Hercules in the Antonine age, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy, 238.
For a discussion of Commodus' association with Hercules, see
Rostovtzeff, "Commodus-Hercules," 104-6.
Herodian spells out the emperor's metamorphosis in detail (1.14.8).

[[14]]See Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor," 114. He argues this general date because a papyrus from Egypt's Fayum records Hercules in Commodus' title on 11 October 192.

[[15]]For a preliminary example, Herodian writes (1.13.8), "people in general responded well to him."

[[16]]As Dio reports, Commodus, with his own hands, gave the finishing stroke to five hippopotami at one time. Commodus also killed two elephants, several rhinoceroses, and a giraffe with the greatest of ease. (Cass. Dio, 73.10), and with his left hand (ibid., 73.19). Herodian maintains that from his specially constructed terrace which encircled the arena (enabling Commodus to avoid risking his life by fighting these animals at close quarters), the emperor also killed deer, roebuck, various horned animals, lions, and leopards, always killing them painlessly with a single blow. He purportedly killed one hundred leopards with one hundred javelins, and he cleanly shot the heads off countless ostriches with crescent-headed arrows. The crowd cheered as these headless birds continued to run around the amphitheater (1.15-4-6; for Commodus' popularity at these brutal spectacles, see Birley, The African Emperor, 86) (and Dio tells his readers that in public Commodus was less brutal than he was in private [73.17ff]).

[[17]] According to Herodian (1.15-17), "In his gladiatorial combats, he defeated his opponents with ease, and he did no more than wound them, since they all submitted to him, but only because they knew he was the emperor, not because he was truly a gladiator."

[[18]]Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.360.

[[19]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[20]] Mattingly, RIC, III.361. For Commodus' propaganda of peace, see W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392.

[[21]] W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392-3. In 189 a coin type was issued with the legend Romulus Conditor, perhaps indicating he began the official renaming process during that year. For a discussion on Commodus as Romulus, see A. D. Nock, "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947), 103.

[[22]] HA, Comm. 7.1; Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[23]]Mattingly, RIC, III.361. See also, Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.386.

[[24]]The title Felix is first used by the emperor Commodus, and is used in the titles of almost all successive emperors to the fifth century. See, D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West (Leiden, 1987-91), 473.
HA, Comm., 12.315; Cass. Dio, 73.15; Herodian, I.14.9. These new names for the months seem to have actually been used, at least by the army, as confirmed by Tittianus' Altar. See M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 112.

[[25]] Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[26]]Legions:Idem.; the Grain fleet: SHA, Comm., 12.7. For a further discussion of Commodus' newly named fleet, see, A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines, 547. For coins issued extolling the fleet, see Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxix; RIC, III.359; the Senate: Cass. Dio, 73.15; the Imperial Palace: SHA, Comm., 12.7; the Roman People: Ibid., 15.5.

[[27]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[28]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxxxiv.

[[29]]Eusebius, Hist.Ecc., 5.21.1.

[[30]]For a discussion of the treatment of Christianity during the reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus as well as persecutions during the reign of Commodus, see Keresztes, "A Favorable Aspect," 374, 376-377.

[[31]]Herodian, 1.16.4; Dio, 73.4. A Medallion from early 192 shows Commodus juxtaposed with the goddess Roma, which some scholars have argued incorporates the features of Marcia. See, Roman Medallions, "Introduction." Commodus was married, however, to a woman named Crispina. He commissioned several coins early in his rule to honor her.

[[32]]The Christian apologist Hippolytus tells that she was a Christian (Philos. 9.2.12), Dio tells that she simply favored the Christians (73.4). Herodian does not take a stand on the matter either way (1.16.4).

[[33]]Cass. Dio, 73.15. He pronounces Commodus' edict that his rule should be henceforth called the "Golden Age."

[[34]]H. Parker and B.H. Warmington note that Commodus..."resorted to government by means of favorites...which was exacerbated by an abortive conspiracy promoted by Lucilla and Ummidius Quadratus (182)." (OCD2, col. 276).

[[35]]Herodian, 1.17.2-11; Dio Cass., 73.22; SHA, Comm.,17.1-2.

Copyright (C) 1998, Dennis Quinn. This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and this copyright notice, remain intact. Used by Permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


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