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Search results - "Julia"
r1066w.jpg
101 viewsJulia Domna
Stobi, Macedonia
2 Assaria
Obv. Dr bust r, IVLIA · AV-GVSTA round
Rev. Nike walking r, palm over l shoulder, wreath in raised r hand, wheel at her feet, MVNICIP - STOBENSIV round.
5.08 gm, 23 mm
5 commentsManzikert
r1055.jpg
67 viewsJulia Domna
Stobi, Macedonia
2 assaria
Obv. Dr bust r, IVLIA - AVGV[STA] round.
Rev. Nike walking l, palm over l shoulder, wreath in raised r hand, wheel at her feet, MVNICI STO - BEN round.
5.57 gm, 23 mm
Cohen IV 266-267, BMCG 8
1 commentsManzikert
r955.jpg
85 viewsJulia Domna
Stobi, Macedonia
2 assaria
Obv. Dr bust r, IVLIA - AVGVSTA round.
Rev. Nike walking r, palm over l shoulder, wreath in raised r hand, MVNIC - S - TOBEN round
6.05 gm, 23 mm
Cohen IV 269, SNG Cop 332, Josifovski 212, same dies (V63, R68), citing Vienna 9885 [from whitetd49]
2 commentsManzikert
Julian-9.jpg
115 viewsJULIAN II - AR Siliqua - 361-363 AD - Mint of Lugdvnvm
Obv.: FL CL IVLIANVS P P AVG
Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: VOTIS V MVLTIS X. In ex. PLVG
Legend in three lines within wreath
g. 1,9 mm. 17
Cohen 163, RIC 227
2 commentsMaxentius
JULIAN-2.JPG
61 viewsJULIAN II - AE1 - 361-363 - Mint of Antioch
Obv.: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: SECVRITAS REIPVB
Bull standing right, two stars above; (palm) ANTB (palm).
Maxentius
Julian-8.jpg
34 viewsJVLIAN II - AE3 - 361-363 AD. Constantinople mint
Obv.: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left with sheild and spear
Rev.: VOT X MVLT XX, four lines in laurel wreath, (dot) CONSPB (branch) in ex.
Gs.: 3,3 mm. 20,6
RIC 167
Maxentius
JULIAN-3.JPG
33 viewsJVLIAN II AE3 - 361-363 AD. - Rome mint
Obv.: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left with sheild and spear
Rev.: VOT X MVLT XX, four lines in laurel wreath, VRB ROMP in ex.
Gs. 2,9 mm. 22,5
RIC 329
Maxentius
Julian-7.jpg
49 viewsJVLIAN II - AE3 - 355/360 - Aquileia mint
Obv.: D N CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev.: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman. AQT in ex.
Gs. 2,5 mm. 16,7
RIC 213
Maxentius
julia_domna_ric_IVa-557.jpg
20 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius
17.8 mm, 3.1 grams

OBV: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
REV: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left with palm & cornucopiae, children to either side of her.
RIC-IVa – 557
ziggy9
julia_mamaea_ric_IVb_335.jpg
19 viewsJULIA MAMAEA
AR Denarius
20 mm, 3.2 grams

OBV: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right REV: FELICITAS PVBLICA, Felicitas standing front, head left, legs crossed, holding caduceus & leaning left arm on column.
RIC-IVb- 335
ziggy9
Augustus,_Julia_Traducta,.JPG
16 viewsAntonivs Protti
Augustus,_Julia_Traducta,_Hispania~0.JPG
14 viewsAntonivs Protti
Augustus_Julia_Traducta.JPG
9 viewsAntonivs Protti
cjd.jpg
Caracalla & Julia Domna, AE 27 Pentassarion of Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior21 viewsCaracalla & Julia Domna AE27 Pentassarion of Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior.
Obverse: ANTWNINOC AVGOVCTOC IOVLIA DOMNA, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left.
Reverse: UP KUNTILIANOU MARKIANOPOLITWN, Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae, Epsilon in upper left field.
Varbanov 1054 ; AMNG 678. 26.3 mm diam., 12.3 g
Previously a Forum coin RP63352
NORMAN K
Livia_prov.jpg
2.5 Livia, Wife of Augustus17 viewsJULIA AUGUSTA (LIVIA)
Cilicia
14-29 AD. Æ 23mm

Draped bust right / Tyche seated right, holding grain ears; river-god swimming right below.

RPC I 4013; SNG Levante 1238; SNG France -.
Rare. Only two specimens cited in RPC.
RI0041
Sosius
j100.jpg
Julian II RIC 100, Heraclea 355-360 CE25 viewsObverse: DN IVLIA-NVS NOB C, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SPES REI-PVBLIC, emperor helmeted in military dress, standing left, holding globe and spear.
SMHD in ex. Heraclea mint. 17.4 mm., 1.8 g.
NORMAN K
ju167.jpg
Julian II, AE3 Constantinople RIC 167, 361-363 CE 16 viewsObverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right, holding spear forward and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines across field within wreath.
Dot CONSPB (palm) in ex. RIC VIII 167. 18.5 mm, 3.4 g.
NORMAN K
rjb_cast9_07_05.jpg
162 viewsSeverus Alexander and Julia Mamaea
222-235
AE 26 mm
Rome Mint
mauseus
Julia_Dom_Moushmov_6261.jpg
1.5 Julia Domna17 viewsJulia Domna
AE25 of Edessa, Macedonia.

ΙΟΥΛΙΑ ΔΟMNA CEB, draped bust right / ΕΔΕC/CΕΩΝ (below), Roma Nikephoros seated l. on cuirass, shield behind, goat to l., Tyche of Edessa behind, crowning her with wreath.

Moushmov 6261; BMC 20; Mionnet Supp. III, 443.
Sosius
Screen_Shot_2017-05-11_at_10_49_26_AM.png
11.5 Julia Titi41 viewsJulia Titi, Daughter of Titus (A.D. 79-80). Augusta, A.D. 79-90/1. AE dupondius. Rome mint, struck A.D. 79/80 by Titus. From the RJM Collection.
Julia Titi, Daughter of Titus (A.D. 79-80). Augusta, A.D. 79-90/1. AE dupondius (27.82 mm, 10.08 g, 5 h). Rome mint, struck A.D. 79/80 by Titus. IVLIA IMP T AVG F AVGVSTA, draped bust of Julia right, hair drawn-up in bun / Vesta seated left holding palladium and scepter; S - C // VESTA. RIC 398 (Titus); BN (Titus) 270, 271; BMC (Titus) 256, 257. Fine, green patina, cleaning marks.

From the RJM Collection.

Ex Agora Auctions, 5/9/2017
3 commentsSosius
2550311.jpg
22 Didius Julianus70 viewsROMAN IMPERIAL
Didius Julianus
AD 193
Æ Sestertius (28mm, 19.82 g, 11h). Rome mint.

Laureate head right / Fortuna standing left, holding rudder set on globe and cornucopia.

RIC IV 15. Fine, brown patina, scratches
Ex CNG
RI0128
6 commentsSosius
Julia_Domna_BI_Den.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna16 viewsJULIA DOMNA
BI Denarius

Bust of Julia / Ceres seated left, holding grain ears and torch

From an ancient forger's lot authenticated by David Sear
Ex Ancient Treasures
Sosius
Julia_Domna_RIC_648.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna20 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius. Laodicea mint, 197 A.D. 2.8g

IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VESTAE SANCTAE, Vesta standing left holding patera & scepter.

RIC 648, Sear5 #6614, RSC 246.
Sosius
Julia_Domna_Den_RIC_388c.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna12 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius. (3.2g), 216 AD

IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right / VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.

RIC 388c [Caracalla], RSC 212, BMC 23B; VF
Ex. Ancient Roman Coins, Fort Collins, CO
Sosius
Julia_Domna_Den_RIC_557.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna11 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius (3.2g), 196 AD

IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right / HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left between two children (Caracalla and Geta) holding palm frond and cornucopia

RIC 557 (Sept Sev); Sear 1840, Cohen 79; aVF/F
Ex. Ancient Roman Coins, Fort Collins, CO
Sosius
Julia_Domna_Den_RIC_644.jpg
24.5 Julia Domna13 viewsJULIA DOMNA
AR Denarius. Laodicea mint
196-202 AD

IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, raising drapery from shoulder

Sear 6602; RIC 644, RSC 168, BMC 514. VF, compact flan.
Sosius
Julia_Paula_Pieces.jpg
29.1 Julia Paula38 viewsWhat happens when an eBay seller mails a crystallized coin in a plain white envelope?

At least I got my money refunded!
1 commentsSosius
Julia_Paula_RIC_211_.jpg
29.1 Julia Paula15 viewsJULIA PAULA
AR Denarius. 220 AD

IVLIA PAVLA AVG, draped bust right / CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left, holding patera; star in left field.

RSC 6, RIC 211, Sear 7655
Condition: Holed and Ugly
Sosius
Julia_Soemias_RIC_241.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias12 viewsJulia Soaemias
Mother of Elagabalus
AR Denarius, 3.05g, AD 220

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre, star in field

RIC 241; C 8; RCV 7719
Ex Ancient Treasures
Sosius
Julia_Soaemias_Sear_2170.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias10 viewsROMAN IMPERIAL
Julia Soaemias
Mother of Elagabalus
AR Denarius, 3.05g, AD 220

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, holding apple and sceptre, star in field

RIC 241; C 8; RCV 7719
Sosius
Julia_Soaemias_RIC_243~0.jpg
29.4 Julia Soaemias52 viewsJULIA SOAEMIAS,
AR denarius, Rome (2.8g)

IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right / VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus diademed seated left on throne, apple in right, scepter in left, child at her feet

SRCV II 7720, RIC IV 243, RSC III 14 EF
Ex Blanchard & Co. - Control # 72454
3 commentsSosius
Julia_Maesa_RIC_266.jpg
29.5 Julia Maesa13 viewsJulia Maesa
Denarius (Limes?) 218-222 AD

IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right / PIETAS AVG, Pietas standing left, raising both hands up, lighted altar to left.

RIC 266; Sear 7755
Sosius
Sev_Alex_SGI_3390_.jpg
30 Severus Alexander and Julia Mamaea27 viewsSEVERUS ALEXANDER & JULIA MAMAEA
AE27, Edessa, Mesopotamia

Confronting portraits of Severus Alexander and Julia Mamaea / City-goddess seated left, holding small temple; River-god swimming beneath her

SGI 3390
Sosius
2550341.jpg
76 Julian II39 viewsROMAN IMPERIAL
Julian II
AD 360-363. AR Siliqua (18mm, 1.87 g, 12h). Lugdunum (Lyon) mint. Struck AD 361.

O: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right R: Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / VOTIS/ V/ MVLTIS/ X in four lines within wreath; LVG.

RIC VIII 218; RSC 163a. Sear (2014) 19130. VF, toned, flan crack, graffiti on reverse.

Ex CNG
2 commentsSosius
cjd1.jpg
Caracalla & Julia Domna, 19 viewsObverse: ANTWNINOC AVGOVCTOC IOVLIA DOMNA, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left.
Reverse: UP KUNTILIANOU MARKIANOPOLITWN, Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopiae, Epsilon in upper left field.
Varbanov 1054 ; AMNG 678. 26.3 mm diam., 12.3 g
NORMAN K
julianii370.jpg
Julian II RIC 370 Siscia, 355-360 CE19 viewsObverse: DN IVLIANVS NOB CAES, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman who is wearing Phrygian helmet, reaching backwards, M to left, DSIS-Zigzag in ex
RIC VIII Siscia 370, 16.9 mm., 2.2 g.
NORMAN K
tgtb.jpg
JULIAN II, RIC VIII 108 Sirmium 22 viewsJulian II, 361-363 CE. Æ 20.5 mm., 3.3 g. Sirmium mint.
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust right, holding spear forward and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines across field within wreath; ASIRM.; LRBC 1619. hard green patina
NORMAN K
julian210.jpg
Julian II, RIC VIII 210 Thessalonica25 viewsJulian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.
Bronze AE 2
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed and cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath.
SMTS in ex. Thessalonica mint, 20.6 mm, 3.0 g.
NORMAN K
julian315.jpg
Julian II, RIC VIII 315 Rome22 viewsJulian II, AE, Rome.
Obverse: DN CL IVL IVLIANVS NC, bare-headed, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier standing left, one kneeraised, spearing a fallen horseman who is looking left,reaching backwards, wearing Phrygian helmet.
Mintmark R dot M dot S. 16mm, 2.4 g.
NORMAN K
julian382b.jpg
Julian II, RIC VIII 376 Siscia23 viewsJulian II "the Apostate," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.
Bronze AE 3, as Caesar 355 - 361 A.D.; Obverse: D N IVLIANVS NOB CAES, cuirassed bust right
Reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, M in left field, pellet in right.
ΔSISD in ex.,RIC VIII 376 Siscia mint, 2.2g, 16.9mm, scarce
NORMAN K
186.jpg
Г (incised)401 viewsPISIDIA. Ariassus. Julia Mamaea. Æ 25. A.D. 222-235. Obv: IOVΛIAMA-MEAC(EB...). Diademed and draped bust right; Incises countermark before. Rev: (A)PIACC(EΩN). Dioscuri standing naked, each infront of a horse, holding a spear; above star in crescent. Ref: BMC -; SNG France (3) -; SNG Aul -. Axis: 195°. Weight: 9.29 g. CM: Г (incised), incuse, 4 x 6 mm. Howgego 778 (11 pcs). Collection Automan.Automan
JULIAN_AND_OCTAVIAN.jpg
(01) OCTAVIAN AND DIVUS JULIUS CAESAR68 viewsca 28 - 27 BC
AE 20 mm 7.62 g
O: JULIUS CAESAR, BARE HEAD R
R: OCTAVIAN (AUGUSTUS) CAESAR, HEAD R
THESSALONICA
RPC 1554
laney
didius_b_res.jpg
(0193) DIDIUS JULIANUS38 views193 AD
AE Sestertius, 26 mm; 15.36 g
O: Laureate head right
R: Fortuna standing left, holding rudder set on globe
Rome mint; RIC IV 15; Banti 5. Rare
ex CNG
laney
julia_domna.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA36 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
193 - 211 AD
AE 20 4.19 g
O: IOVLIA DOMNA C
DRAPED BUST RIGHT
R: DIONYCOPOLEITWN; B IN LEFT FIELD
HERACLES HOLDING CLUB AND APPLES OF HESPERIDES
Dionysopolis. Moesia Inferior
Varbanov (Eng.) 474, R4
laney
JULIA.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA23 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
196 - 211 AD (STRUCK 202 AD)
AR DENARIUS 19mm 1.90 g
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA
DRAPED BUST R
R:HILARITAS
HILARITAS STANDING L HOLDING PALM AND CORNUCOPIA, BETWEEN 2 SMALL BOYS
ROME
RSC 79
laney
JULIA_DOMNA_LION.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA31 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
d. 217 AD
AE 16 mm 2.39 g
O: DRASPED BUST R
R: LION WALKING RIGHT
NICOPOLIS AD ISTRUM
MOESIA INFERIOR
laney
JULIA_DOMNA_NIK.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA26 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
JULIA DOMNA
193 - 217 AD
AE 23 mm 6.90 g
O: BUST R
R: NEMESIS "PROPER" STANDING LEFT, LIFTING HER GARMENT OVER HER SHOULDER, A SHORT SCEPTER ON LEFT ARM, WHEEL BELOW (ETHNIC MISSPELLED)
NIKOPOLIS
RARE
(Probably pre-dates Gallus and coincides with the two years when Caracalla was Caesar)
laney
domna_bagis_blk_res.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA24 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
AE 23.5 mm, 5.38 g
laney
Phigaleia_res.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA31 viewsb. ca. 170, d. 217
(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
Struck ca 198 - 209 AD
AE Assarion 22 X 25 mm, 4.58 g
O: Draped bust right
R: Hermes facing, as a terminal figure, holding kerykeion in his right hand and purse in his left
Arcadia, Phigaleia; NCP, V XII (very rare)
1 commentslaney
julia_dom_artemis_markian~0.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA20 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
193 - 211 AD
AE 26 mm; 8.26 g
O:. IOVLIA - AVGOVCTA draped bust r.
R: MARKIANO - POLITWN Artemis as huntress advancing r., holding bow in extended l. hand and pulling with
r. hand arrow from quiver over r. shoulder
Markianopolis mint
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) not in Varbanov (engl.): this obv. legend not listed
c) not in Hristova/Jekov: (new obverse type)
No.6.17.13.1 has IOVLIA DOMNA CEB. The legend IOVLIA AVGOVCTA
is not listed
laney
jul_domna_odessa_b.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA24 views(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
b. ca. 170, d. 217
struck ca. 193 - 211
AE 21.5 mm 5.16 g
IOVLIA DOMNA C, draped bust right
ODHCEITWN, Demeter, standing right, holding long torch
facing Persephone, standing left, holding two corn ears and torch.
Thrace, Odessos; Varbanov 4358; AMNG 2272.
laney
domna_bith_altar.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA15 views(0193) JULIA DOMNA
(wife of Septimius Severus; mother of emperors Geta and Caracalla)
b. ca. 170, d. 217
Struck 193 - 217 AD
AE 14 mm, 1.98 g
O: IOVLIA CEV CEBACTH, Draped bust right.
R: NIKAIEWN, garlanded, lighted altar.
Nicaea, Bithynia; cf. RecGen 392, SGI 2314
laney
domna_herak_diosynop_a.jpg
(0193) JULIA DOMNA (Dionysopolis)20 views193 - 217 AD
AE 18.5 mm; 3.95 g
O: Laureate, draped bust right
R: Herakles standing facing, head right, resting on club and holding lionskin over arm, B in lower right field.
Moesia Inferior, Dionysopolis mint
Varbanov 470; Moushmov 92
laney
septimius_artemis_philippop_a.jpg
(0193) SEPTIMIUS SEVERUS22 views193 - 211 AD
AE 17 mm, 3.68 g
O: Laureate bust of Septimius Severus right
R: Draped bust of Artemis* right
*(according to Moushmov, the reverse bust belongs to Julia Domna, but most likely a diety—probably Artemis—is depicted)
d.s.
Thrace, Philippopolis; Varbanov III 1378
laney
domna_felix_b.jpg
(0194) JULIA DOMNA17 views(wife of Septimius Severus)
194-217 AD
Fouree denarius, 19.5 mm, 3.74 g
O:IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, hair in chignon in back
R: FEL—IC—ITAS, veiled Felicitas standing half-left, holding caduceus and long scepter
(Mule--obverse of RIC 375, RSC 49; with reverse of RIC 551, RSC 47)
laney
caracalla_domna_conf_serapis.jpg
(0198) CARACALLA & JULIA DOMNA22 views198-217 AD
Æ 28 mm; 10.74 g
Struck 215 AD
(Quintilianus, consular legate)
O: Confronted busts of Caracalla right, laureate, and Julia Domna left, draped
R:Draped bust of Serapis right, wearing kalathos; Є (denomination mark) before.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis; ref. Hristova & Jekov 6.19.6.4; Moushmov 476; AMNG 658 v.
laney
carac_julia_homon_markian.jpg
(0198) CARACALLA & JULIA DOMNA26 views198 - 217 AD
struck 211-217 AD
AE 28 mm, 11.60 g
O: Confronting busts of Caracalla and his mother Julia Domna
R: Homonoia standing left, holding cornucopia and sacrifcing from patera over flaming altar
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis; AMNG 677 v.
laney
aug_comb_B.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS63 viewsAE 24.5 mm 10.61 g
27 BC - 14 AD
O: Bare Head of Augustus R
R: IVLIA / TRAD within Wreath

Julia Traducta, Spain
laney
aug_trad1.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS69 views AUGUSTUS
AUGUSTUS
27 BC - 14 AD
AE 24mm 12.02g
O: [PERM C]AE[S] AVG
BUST L
R: IVLIA TRAD WITHIN OAK WREATH
JULIA TRADUCTA, SPAIN
1 commentslaney
AUGUSTUS_JULIA_TRAD3.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS22 views27 BC - 14 AD
AE 25mm 11.81g
O: PERM CAES [AVG]
BARE HEAD L
R: [IVL]IA [TR]AD WITHIN WREATH
JULIA TRADUCTA, SPAIN
laney
AUGUSTUS_JULIA_TRAD4.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS29 views27 BC - 14 AD
AE 25mm 10.47g
O: BARE HEAD L
R: IVLIA TRAD WITHIN WREATH
SPAIN, JULIA TRADUCTA
laney
AUG_TRAD_05_15.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS28 views27 BC - 14 AD
AE 24 mm 7.88 g
O: PERM CAES AV[G]
BARE HEAD LEFT
R: IVLIA TRAD WITHIN WREATH
SPAIN, JULIA TRADUCTA
laney
augustus_iulia_trad.jpg
(02) AUGUSTUS10 views27 BC- 14 AD,  AE 23 mm, 6.61 g O: PERM CAES AVG. around bare head of
Augustus, left R: IVLIA TRADUCTA in two lines within
wreath. Hispania Baetica (Spain), Julia Traducta mint
RPC I, 108, SNG Copenhagen 459.
laney
elag_maesa_dionys.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & JULIA MAESA31 views218 - 225 AD
Æ 5 Assaria. 26 mm; 8.99 g
O: Confronted busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa
R: Dionysos standing left, holding thyrsus and pouring wine from kantharos; E in right field
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis (Marcianopolis)
Varbanov 1623; Pick 953
laney
elagab_maesa_bon_event.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & Julia Maesa35 views218 – 222 AD
AE 23 mm, 9 g
O: Confronted busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa
R: Naked Bonus Eventus standing left holding patera in right hand and two grain ears in left hand; in left field retrograde E /WN in ligature.
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis (Marcianopolis);
AMNG 949; not in Hristova/Jekov (2014), not in Pfeiffer (2013)
[reverse is described in AMNG 949 as: "Genius (Bonus Eventus")]
laney
elagab_maesa_hermes_mark.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & JULIA MAESA43 views218 - 222 AD
AE Pentassarion 27 mm, 11.85 g
(Julius Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
O: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC AVΓ IOVΛIA MAICA AVΓ.
Laureate and cuirassed bust of Elagabal right, facing draped bust of Julia Maesa left. (confronted busts)
d.s.
R: YΠ IOYΛ ANT CEΛEYKOY MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN.
Hermes standing left, holding purse and caduceus, resting with elbow on column; E in right field.
MOESIA INFERIOR. Marcianopolis; cf. Varbanov 1612
d.s.
1 commentslaney
elagab_maesa_bonus_eventus_r.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & Julia Maesa9 views218 – 222 AD
AE 28 mm, 13.18 g
O: Confronted busts of Elagabalus and Julia Maesa
R: Naked Bonus Eventus standing left holding patera in right hand and two grain ears in left hand;
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis (Marcianopolis); ?retrograde E to left?
cf AMNG 949 [reverse is described in AMNG 949 as: "Genius (Bonus Eventus")]
laney
elagab_maesa_hera_2.jpg
(0218) ELAGABALUS & JULIA MAESA11 views218-222 AD (Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
AE 29 mm, 11.25 g
O: Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus right vis à vis draped bust of Julia Maesa left
R: Hera standing left, holding patera and scepter, E in right field
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis. cf. Mouchmov 688; Varbanov 1626
laney
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(0218) ELAGABALUS (with Julia Maesa)11 viewsAD 218-222. (Julius Antonius Seleucus, consular legate)
Æ Pentassarion 27 mm; 10.92 g
O: Laureate head of Elagabalus right vis à vis diadmed and draped bust left of Maesa
R: Hygieia (Salus) standing right, feeding serpent held in arms; E (denomination) to left.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. AMNG I 959; Hristova & Jekov 6.28.21.2; Varbanov 1636
laney
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(0218) Elagabalus, with Julia Maesa11 viewsAD 218-222. (Julius Antonius Seleucus, legatus consularis)
AE Pentassarian 27 mm, 8.95 g
O: Confronted busts of Elagabalus right, laureate, draped, and cuirassed, and Maesa left, draped and wearing stephane
R: Zeus standing left, holding patera and scepter; E (mark of value) to right.
MOESIA INFERIOR, Marcianopolis. ref. a) AMNG I/1, 936
b) Varbanov (engl.) 1642
c) Hristova/Jekov (2013) No. 6.28.1.2 var. (E in right field)
laney
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(0218) JULIA MAESA (WITH SEVERUS ALEXANDER)44 views(sister of Julia Domna; mother of Julia Soaemias; grandmother of Elegabalus and Severus Alexander)
222 - 235 AD
AE PENTASSARION 25.5 mm 10.85 g
O: AVT K M AVP CEVH
CONFRONTED BUSTS OF SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA
R: VP TIB IOVL FHCTOV MARKIANOPOLEITWN, "E" IN RIGHT FIELD
HOMONIA STANDING LEFT HOLDING PATERA AND CORNUCOPIA
MARKIANOPOLIS
laney
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(0218a) JULIA SOAEMIAS24 views(mother of Elagabalus)
218 - 222 AD (Augusta)
AR Denarius 17 mm 2.07 g
Obv: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left holding apple and scepter, child standing before her.
Rome
RIC 243
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(0222) JULIA MAMAEA25 views(mother of Severus Alexander)
190 - 235 AD (STRUCK 226 AD)
AR DENARIUS 18 mm 2.38 g
O: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG
DIAD DR BUST R
R:VESTA
VESTA STANDING L HOLDING PALLADIUM AND SCEPTER
ROME
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(0222) JULIA MAMAEA21 views(mother of Severus Alexander)
227 - 238 AD
AE As 25.5 mm 7.02 g
O: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA
DIAD BUST R
R: [FELICI]TAS PVBLICA SC
FELICITAS STANADING FRONT, HEAD L, LEGS CROSSED, HOLDING CADUCEUS AND LEANING ON COLUMN
laney
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(0222) JULIA MAMAEA17 views(mother of Severus Alexander)
AE 23.5 mm, 8.18 g
222 - 235 AD
O: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed draped bust right
R: COL FL PAC DEVLTUM, Fortuna standing left with rudder & cornucopiae.
Deultum mint; Moushmov 3630
laney
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER & JULIA MAESA8 views222-235 AD
(under governor Tiberius Julius Festus)
AE 26 mm max, 7.34 g
O: Confronted busts of Severus Alexander and Julia Mamaea
R: Hera standing head left holding patera and long scepter; E in left field
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA60 views222 - 235 AD
AE PENTASSARION 25.5 mm 10.85 g
O: AVT K M AVP CEVH
CONFRONTED BUSTS OF SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA
R: VP TIB IOVL FHCTOV MARKIANOPOLEITWN, "E" IN RIGHT FIELD
HOMONOIA STANDING LEFT HOLDING PATERA AND CORNUCOPIA
MARKIANOPOLIS
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA58 views222 - 235 AD
AE 25 mm 9.68 g
O: CONFRONTING BUSTS OF SEV. ALEX. AND JUL. MAES.
R: CONCORDIA STANDING L HOLDING PATERA AND CORNCOPIA, "E" TO LEFT
MARKIANOPOLIS
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA41 views222 - 235 AD
AE PENTASSARION 25.5 mm 10.85 g
O: AVT K M AVP CEVH
CONFRONTED BUSTS OF SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA
R: VP TIB IOVL FHCTOV MARKIANOPOLEITWN, "E" IN RIGHT FIELD
HOMONOIA STANDING LEFT HOLDING PATERA AND CORNUCOPIA
MARKIANOPOLIS
1 commentslaney
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA10 views222 - 235 AD
AE PENTASSARION 27.5 mm, 9.38 g
O: CONFRONTED BUSTS OF SEVERUS ALEXANDER AND JULIA MAESA
R: VP TIB IOVL FHCTOV MARKIANOPOLEITWN, "E" IN RIGHT FIELD. HOMONOIA STANDING LEFT HOLDING PATERA AND CORNUCOPIA
Moesia Inferior, MARKIANOPOLIS
laney
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(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER and JULIA MAMAEA27 views222-235 AD
AE 26 mm; 10.64 g
O: Confronting busts of Severus Alexander and Julia Mamaea
R:Draped figure of Demeter standing left, holding ears of corn and long torch, E to right.
Moesia Inferior, Markianopolis; Moushmov 739
d.s.
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(0355) JULIAN II35 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
struck 360 - 363 AD as Augustus
AE 20 mm 3.69 g
O: [DN FL CL] IVLIANVS PF AVG
HELMETED DIAD DUIR BUST L HOLDING SHIELD AND SPEAR
R: VOT/X/MVLT/XX WITHIN WREATH
BSIRM IN EXE
SIRMIUM
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(0355) JULIAN II32 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
struck 360 - 363 AD, as Augustus
AE 15.5 mm max. 1.51 g
Obv: FL CL IVLIAN-VS P F AVG, diademed draped bust right
Rev: SPES REIPVBLICAE, emperor standing left in military dress holding globe & spear
Rare
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(0355) JULIAN II20 viewsAE 15.5 mm; 1.72 g
O: D N FL CL IVLIANVS NOB CS, draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: SPES REIPVBLICE, emperor standing left holding globe and spear; uncertain mark in left field
Cyzicus mint
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(0355) JULIAN II (as Caesar)32 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 15.5 mm, 1.83 g
O: DN CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES, bare headed, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: SPES REI-PVBLICAE, emperor standing left, helmeted, in military dress, globe in right, spear in left; ASIS in exe.
Siscia Mint
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(0355) JULIAN II (as Caesar)21 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 17 mm 2.21 g
O: D N IVLIANVS NOB C bare-headed bust right
R: FEL TEMPO REPARATIO soldier spearing fallen horseman; ESIS in exe.
Siscia mint
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(0355) JULIAN II (as Caesar)21 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 17.5 mm 2.37 g
O: D N IVLIANVS NOB CAES; bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier spearing fallen horseman; RBQ iin exe.
Rome mint
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(0355) JULIAN II (as Caesar)23 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 18 mm
O: IVLIANVS NOB C; bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO emperor spearing fallen horseman; M in center
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(0355) JULIAN II (as Caesar)6 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 16 mm, 2.12 g
O: IVLIANVS NOB C; bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO emperor spearing fallen horseman;
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(0355) JULIAN II (The Apostate)24 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 17 mm max., 2.75 g
O: Bare-headed draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, M in left field
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(0355) JULIAN II The Apostate (as Caesar)26 viewsJulian II as Caesar
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 18 mm; 2.29 g
O: D N IVLIAN-VS NOB C, bare-headed draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, M in left field
Siscia mint
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)17 viewsJulian II as Caesar
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 16 mm max; 2.65 g
O: Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust facing right, M behind bust
R: Soldier standing l., spearing fallen horseman
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)27 viewsJulian II as Caesar
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
struck 355 - 360 AD (Officina 2)
AE 17.5 mm; 2.33 g
Obv.: FL CL IVLIANVS NOB C / M , his bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust facing right
Rev.: FEL TEMP - REPARATIO helmeted soldier standing l., spearing fallen horseman; horseman, wearing pointed hat, leaning l. on horse, turned r. and raising hand, shield on ground r.; MSLG in exe.
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
RIC VIII, 191, 200 (R) ; Bastien 248 (3 ex) ; nummus-bible-database.com: only 1 piece, also from officina 2. Rare
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)22 viewsJulian II as Caesar
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 17 mm; 1.91 g
O: DN IVLIANV-S NOB CAES draped cuirassed bust right
R: SPES REIPVBLICE, emperor standing left holding globe and spear
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)18 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 16.5 mm; 2.25 g
O: D N CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, helmeted soldier left spearing fallen horseman
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)13 viewsCaesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
AE 18.5 mm max. 1.92 g
O: DN IVLIAN-VS NOB CAES
R: FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO, emperor spearing fallen horseman, M in center, PCON or TCON in ex.
Arles mint
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(0355) JULIAN II THE APOSTATE (as Caesar)16 viewsJulian II as Caesar
AE 16 mm max; 1.83 g
Caesar: 355 –360
Augustus: 360 -- 361.
Sole Augustus: 361 –363
O: DN IVLIAN-VS NOB C draped and cuirassed bust right.
R: SPES REIPVBLICE, emperor standing left holding globe and spear
Siscia mint
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(194-217) Julia Domna44 views15mm, 2,3g
Julia Domna AE16 of Nicaea, Bithynia.
obv: IOVLIA CEBASTH, draped bust right
rev: NIKAIEWN, bull standing right.
Unlisted in Varbanov and SNG Copenhagen.
2 commentsSégusiaves
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*SOLD*83 viewsJulian II AE 1

Attribution: RIC VIII 164, Constantinople, scarce
Date: AD 361-363
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB dot, Apis bull stg. r., two stars above,
palm CONSPA palm in exergue (double struck)
Size: 28.9 mm
Weight: 8.7 grams
ex-Forvm
4 commentsNoah
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*SOLD*22 viewsElagabalus & Julia Maesa AE26 Pentassarion

Attribution: Moushmov 679, Marcianopolis, rare
Date: AD 218-222
Obverse: AVT KM AVP ANTWNEINOC, laureate & draped bust of Elagabalus and draped bust of Julia Maesa facing
Reverse: ANT VP IOVL CELEVKOV MARKIANO POLITWN, coiled serpent,
“E” in l. field, AMNG in exergue
Size: 28 mm
Weight: 12.24 grams
Noah
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*SOLD*22 viewsElagabalus and Julia Maesa AE 27 Pentassarion

Attribution: Moushmov 660; Varbanov 1661, Marcianopolis, Moesia Inferior
Date: AD 218-222
Obverse: AVT K M AcP ANT Ω NEINOC AY IOY Λ IA COVAIMI, laureate, draped, & cuirassed bust of emperor r. facing draped bust of Julia Maesa l.
Reverse:Y Π IOY Λ ANT CE Λ EYKOY MAPKINANO Π O Λ IT Ω N, Bonus Eventus stg. l. holding patera and corn ears (or laurel branch), “E” in l. field
Size: 26 mm
Noah
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. JULIA DOMNA, Wife of Septimius Severus. 193-211 AD.25 views Æ 16mm. (2.1 gm)
Draped bust right / Eagle standing right on globe, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak
MOESIA INFERIOR. Nicopolis ad Istrum
Marjan E
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0007 - Denarius Julia Domna 198 AC26 viewsObv/IVLIA AVGVSTA, Julia Domna bust, draped, r.
Rev/HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing l., holding long palm and cornucopiae.

Ag, 18.8mm, 3.67g
Mint: Laodicea ad Mare.
RIC IVa/639 [S] - RCV 6586 - Cohen 72 - BMCRE 277, 600 - RSC 72
ex-sjblencoe (ebay)
dafnis
Caesar_AR-Den_Diademed-Venus-Head-Right_C·CAESAR_–_IMP·COS·ITER_A·ALLIENVS_–_PRO·COS_Syd-1022_Crawf_457-1_C-13_Sicily-mint_47-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_17-18,5mm_3,53g-s.jpg
001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,235 views001 Caesar (100-44 B.C.), Crawf 457-1, Sicily, AR-denarius, A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left,
avers:- C·CAESAR–IMP·COS·ITER, Diademed, draped Venus Head Right,
revers:- A·ALLIENVS–PRO·COS, Trinacrus standing left, placing right foot on prow, holding trisceles in right hand and cloak in left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 3,59g, axes: 6h,
mint: Sicily, date: 47B.C., ref: Crawford-457/1, Sydneham-1022, Babelon-Julia-14, Alliena-1, C-1,
Q-001
"In late 47 BC Caesar was on Sicily, preparing for his assault on the Pompeian forces in north Africa. During this period a small issue of denarii was produced in his name by Aulus Allienus, then the proconsul of Sicily. The reverse shows a figure of Trinacrus, supposedly a son of Neptune, who may have been invented to account for the name Trinacria, commonly used for Sicily. The coins of Allienus must have seen considerable circulation: almost all surviving specimens are considerably worn."
3 commentsquadrans
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002a. Agrippa 54 viewsAgrippa

A close friend of Octavian (later Emperor Augustus), he won a name in the wars in Gaul before becoming consul in 37 He organized Octavian's fleet and is generally given much credit for the defeat (36 ) of Sextus Pompeius in the naval battles at Mylae and Naulochus (N Sicily). Agrippa took part in the war against Antony, and his naval operations were the basis of Octavian's decisive victory at Actium in 31 He was perhaps the most trusted of all Augustus' lieutenants and rendered many services, notably in putting down disorders in both the East and West. His third wife was Augustus' daughter Julia.

AS. M AGRIPPA L F COS III Head left, wearing rostral crown. / Neptune standing, head left, S C at sides.

It seems like the quality and price of Agrippa coins run the whole spectrum...I think a decent example can be had for as little as $20. This is a bit more than that but I am happy with the quality of the metal and portrait.
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002c. Gaius and Lucius Caesars65 viewsJulia, daughter of Augustus, who has had no child by Marcellus (she is only sixteen when he dies), is married to Agrippa, a soldier who has long been the emperor's most trusted supporter. They have two sons, Gaius and Lucius, born in 20 and 17 BC. The boys are adopted by the emperor. The intention now, if Augustus dies, is that Agrippa should rule until one of these grandsons is of an age to take control. But Agrippa dies in 12 BC.

Julia has had a total of five children by Agrippa (the two sons adopted by the emperor, two daughters, and another posthumous son, Agrippa Posthumus). She now has one son by Tiberius, but the child dies in infancy.

By 6 BC it is evident that Tiberius is being set aside. Julia refuses to live with him, and her eldest son Gaius (at the age of fourteen) is given a nominal high appointment as consul. Gaius and Lucius Caesar, grandsons and adopted sons of the emperor, are now clearly the family members in line for the succession. But they die young, Lucius Caesar in AD 2 and then Gaius in AD 4.

LYDIA, Magnesia ad Sipylum. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ 19mm (4.93 g). Jugate heads of Augustus and Livia right / Confronted heads of Gaius and Lucius Caesars. RPC 2449. Fair. Rare. Ex-Cng
ecoli
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002d. Julia and Livia, Pergamon, Mysia43 viewsBronze AE 18, RPC I 2359, SNG Cop 467, aF, weight 3.903 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, obverse ΛIBIAN HPAN CAPINOΣ, draped bust of Livia right; reverse IOYΛIAN AΦPO∆ITHN, draped bust of Julia right; ex Forum, ex Malter Galleries

Julia was Augustus' only natural child, the daughter of his second wife Scribonia. She was born the same day that Octavian divorced Scribonia, to marry Livia.

Julia's tragic destiny was to serve as a pawn in her father's dynastic plans. At age two, she was betrothed to Mark Antony's ten-year-old son, but the fathers' hostility ended the engagement. At age 14, she was married to her cousin but he died two years later. In 21 B.C., Julia married Agrippa, nearly 25 years her elder, Augustus' most trusted general and friend. Augustus had been advised, "You have made him so great that he must either become your son-in-law or be slain." Agrippa died suddenly in 12 B.C. and Julia was married in 11 B.C. to Tiberius.

During her marriages to Agrippa and Tiberius Julia took lovers. In 2 B.C., Julia was arrested for adultery and treason. Augustus declared her marriage null and void. He also asserted in public that she had been plotting against his own life. Reluctant to execute her, Augustus had her exiled, with no men in sight, forbidden even to drink wine. Scribonia, Julia's mother, accompanied her into exile. Five years later, she was allowed to move to Rhegium but Augustus never forgave her. When Tiberius became emperor, he cut off her allowance and put her in solitary confinement in one room in her house. Within months she died from malnutrition.
ecoli
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004 - Julian II "the Apostate" (360-363 AD), AE 3 - RIC 10857 viewsObv: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, pearldiademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding spear in right and shield in left hand.
Rev: VOT / X / MVLT / XX within wreath.
Minted in Sirmium (ASIRM in exe), first officina, summer 361 - 26 Jun 363 AD.
3 commentspierre_p77
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005d. Agrippina II89 viewsLYDIA, Hypaepa. Agrippina Jr., mother of Nero. Augusta, 50-59 AD. Æ 14mm (2.33 gm). Draped bust of Agrippina right / Cult statue of Artemis. RPC I 2541; SNG Copenhagen -.

Julia Vipsania Agrippina Minor or Agrippina Minor (Latin for "the younger") (November 7, AD 15 – March 59), often called "Agrippinilla" to distinguish her from her mother, was the daughter of Germanicus and Agrippina Major. She was sister of Caligula, granddaughter and great-niece to Tiberius, niece and wife of Claudius, and the mother of Nero. She was born at Oppidum Ubiorum on the Rhine, afterwards named in her honour Colonia Agrippinae (modern Cologne, Germany).

Agrippina was first married to (1st century AD) Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. From this marriage she gave birth to Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, who would become Roman Emperor Nero. Her husband died in January, 40. While still married, Agrippina participated openly in her brother Caligula's decadent court, where, according to some sources, at his instigation she prostituted herself in a palace. While it was generally agreed that Agrippinilla, as well as her sisters, had ongoing sexual relationships with their brother Caligula, incest was an oft-used criminal accusation against the aristocracy, because it was impossible to refute successfully. As Agrippina and her sister became more problematic for their brother, Caligula sent them into exile for a time, where it is said she was forced to dive for sponges to make a living. In January, 41, Agrippina had a second marriage to the affluent Gaius Sallustius Crispus Passienus. He died between 44 and 47, leaving his estate to Agrippina.

As a widow, Agrippina was courted by the freedman Pallas as a possible marriage match to her own uncle, Emperor Claudius, and became his favourite councillor, even granted the honor of being called Augusta (a title which no other queen had ever received). They were married on New Year's Day of 49, after the death of Claudius's first wife Messalina. Agrippina then proceeded to persuade Claudius to adopt her son, thereby placing Nero in the line of succession to the Imperial throne over Claudius's own son, Brittanicus. A true Imperial politician, Agrippina did not reject murder as a way to win her battles. Many ancient sources credited her with poisoning Claudius in 54 with a plate of poisened mushrooms, hence enabling Nero to quickly take the throne as emperor.

For some time, Agrippina influenced Nero as he was relatively ill-equipped to rule on his own. But Nero eventually felt that she was taking on too much power relative to her position as a woman of Rome. He deprived her of her honours and exiled her from the palace, but that was not enough. Three times Nero tried to poison Agrippina, but she had been raised in the Imperial family and was accustomed to taking antidotes. Nero had a machine built and attached to the roof of her bedroom. The machine was designed to make the ceiling collapse — the plot failed with the machine. According to the historians Tacitus and Suetonius, Nero then plotted her death by sending for her in a boat constructed to collapse, intending to drown Agrippina. However, only some of the crew were in on the plot; their efforts were hampered by the rest of the crew trying to save the ship. As the ship sank, one of her handmaidens thought to save herself by crying that she was Agrippina, thinking they would take special care of her. Instead the maid was instantly beaten to death with oars and chains. The real Agrippina realised what was happening and in the confusion managed to swim away where a passing fisherman picked her up. Terrified that his cover had been blown, Nero instantly sent men to charge her with treason and summarily execute her. Legend states that when the Emperor's soldiers came to kill her, Agrippina pulled back her clothes and ordered them to stab her in the belly that had housed such a monstrous son.

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006 Gaius Caesar. AE17 3.4gm APAMIA38 viewsobv: GAOIS KAISAR laur. head r.
rev: ROUFOS/MASONIOS/APAMEWN cult statue of artimis
"son of Agrippa and Julia"
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006a. Claudia16 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Nero, with Claudia. AD 54-68. BI Tetradrachm (22mm, 10.74 g, 12h). Dated RY 3 (AD 56/57). Laureate head of Nero right / Draped bust of Claudia Octavia right; L Γ (date) below chin. Köln 122-4; Dattari (Savio) 190; K&G 14.7; RPC I 5202; Emmett 127.3. Near VF. Ex - CNG

Furthermore, the carefully contrived marriage between Octavia and Nero was a disaster on a personal level. Nero soon embarked on a serious relationship with a freedman named Acte, and more importantly developed an active dislike for his wife. "Quickly feeling aversion to intimacy with Octavia, he replied to his friends who were finding fault with him that she ought to be satisfied with the outward trappings of a wife." This antipthy was not likely to produce offspring who would unite the Julian and Claudian lines. By 58 Nero was becoming involved with a freeborn mistress, Poppaea, whom he would want to make his empress in exchange for Octavia. But the legitimacy of his principate derived from his relationship with his predecessor, and he was not so secure that he could do without the connection with Claudius provided through his mother and his wife. In 59 he was able to arrange for Agrippina's death, but it was not until 62 that he felt free to divorce Octavia and marry Poppaea. The initial grounds for putting Octavia aside was the charge that she was barren because she had had no children. But a more aggressive attack was needed when opposition arose from those who still challenged Nero's prncipate and remained loyal to Octavia as the last representative of her family. With the connivance of Poppaea, charges of adultery were added, Octavia was banished to Campania and then to the island of Pandataria off the coast, and finally killed. Her severed head was sent to Rome.
2 commentsecoli
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007 Lucius Caesar. AE21 6.7gm28 viewsobv: CAESAR CORINTH bare head r. of Augustus
rev: C SERVILIO M ANTONIO HIPPARCHO IIVIR/ CL confronted busts of Lucis and Gaius Caesar
"sons of Agrippa and Julia, grandsons of Augustus"
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0098 - Denarius Julia Domna 193-6 AC19 viewsObv/ IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust r.
Rev/ VENERI VICTR, Venus, seen from behind, naked to below the buttocks, holding palm and apple, resting left elbow on column.

Ag, 18.6 mm, 3.27 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.1/536 - BMCRE V/49
ex-Freeman & Sear, e-auction feb 2011, lot #KALA1292 064
1 commentsdafnis
DSC07046_obv_03_DSC07051_rev_04.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows49 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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4 commentsrexesq
DSC07044_obv_01_DSC07048__rev_01JPG.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows36 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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2 commentsrexesq
Julian-II_AR-Siliqua_vows_1_9gr_03_rev-85%.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - 00139 views Roman Empire, 4th century AD Silver Siliqua.
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, struck 361 - 363 AD, Constantinople Mint, Prima Officinae.

obverse: " DN JULIANUS P F AUG " - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.

reverse: " VOTIS V MULTIS X " - within wreath, '' P CON '' in exergue (below), for Constantinople mint.

Size: 19 dia.
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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5 commentsrexesq
DSC07050_rev_03.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse.14 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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DSC07049_rev_02.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse.12 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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DSC07063_rev_09.JPG
01 - Julian II - Silver Siliqua - Vows - Reverse. BRIGHT.16 viewsRoman Empire
Emperor Julian II (355 - 363 AD, sole reign from 361 - 363 AD)
Silver Siliqua, Constantinople Mint, struck 361 - 363 AD.

obv: DN JULIANUS P F AUG - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front.
rev: VOTIS V MULTIS X within wreath, 'P CON' in exergue.

Size: 19 mm
Weight: 1.9 Grams
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Slightly off color photo; too much lighting.
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AS Augusto RIC 379~0.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)91 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
RIC_379_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-14 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.0 gr.
Legado Monetario C GALLIUS LUPERCUS

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVSTVS TRI
BV[NIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·GAL[LIVS C F LVPERCVS III V]IR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 16 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #379 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1679 Pag.330 - BMCRE #174 (=BMCRR #4510) - Cohen Vol.1 #436 Pag.124 - DVM #99a Pag.71 - CBN #428
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 386.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)56 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
RIC_386_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-15 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)27 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 8.4 gr.
Legado Monetario L SURDINUS

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[L] SVRDINVS [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #386 Pag.70 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1683 Pag.331 - BMCRE #144 (=BMCRR #4631) - Cohen Vol.1 #473 Pag.131 - DVM #99 var Pag.71 - CBN #483
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 379.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
RIC_389_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-17 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)23 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 x 29 mm 9.9 gr.
Legado Monetario C PLOTIUS RUFUS

Anv: "[CAESAR AVGVSTVS TRIBVNIC POTEST]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "C·PLOT[IVS·RVFVS·III VIR A·A·]A·F·F·" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 15 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #389 Pag.71 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1680 Pag.330 - BMCRE #153 (=BMCRR #4639) - Cohen Vol.1 #504 Pag.137 - DVM #99d Pag.71 - CBN #503/12
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 427.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)59 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
RIC_427_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-23 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)19 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 24 mm 8.3 gr.
Legado Monetario PLURIUS AGRIPPA

Anv: "[CA]ESAR AVGVS[T PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PLVRIVS AGRIPPA [III VIR A A A F F]" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #427 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1686 Pag.331 - BMCRE #209 - Cohen Vol.1 #445 Pag.126 - DVM #100a Pag.71 - CBN #623
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)74 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-24 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 28 mm 11.7 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST[PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 431_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)62 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
RIC_431_AS_Octavio_Augusto_1.jpg
01-25 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)22 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 25 mm 7.3 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "CAESAR AVGVST [PONT MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "M SALVIVS OTH[O III VI]R A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #431 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 Pag.331 - BMCRE #226 (=BMCRR #4693) - Cohen Vol.1 #515 Pag.139 - DVM #100b Pag.71 - CBN #687
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 432.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)107 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
RIC_432_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-26 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)25 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 27 mm 9.6 gr.
Legado Monetario M SALVIUS OTHO

Anv: "[CAE]SAR AVGVST PONT [MAX TRIBVNIC POT]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "M SALVI[VS OT]HO III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 7 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #432 Pag.75 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1685 var Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.1 #516 Pag.139 - DVM #100b var Pag.71 - CBN #708
mdelvalle
AS Augusto RIC 439.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 65 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
RIC_439_AS_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01-28 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 24 viewsAE AS (Serie de los Triunviros Monetales) 23 mm 7.9 gr.
Legado Monetario SEX NONIUS QUINCTILIAN

Anv: "CAESAR AVG[VST PONT MAX TRI]BVNIC POT" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SEX N]ONIVS QVINC[TIL]IAN III VIR A A A F F" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C".
"SENATUS CONSULTO" - Era potestad del Senado la promulgación de la acuñación de las emisiones de bronce (cobre) - Ley Julia (19-15 A.C.)

Acuñada 6 A.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #439 Pag.76 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1687 Pag.331 - BMCRE #237 (=BMCRR #4667) - Cohen Vol.1 #474 Pag.76 - CBN #725
mdelvalle
RPC_I_108_Augusto_IVLIA_TRADUCTA.jpg
01-60 - Julia Traducta - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)20 viewsAE AS 25 mm 13.3 gr.

Anv: "PERM CAES AVG" (Leyenda anti-horaria)- Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "IVLIA / TRAD" - Leyenda dentro de guirnalda.

Acuñada 15-04 A.C.
Ceca: Julia Traducta - Hispania

Referencias: RPC #108 - SNG Cop #459 - Sear GICTV #18 Pag.3 - Sear '88 #538 - Cohen Vol.1 #632 Pag.151 - Vives #164 Pag.13 - Heiss #2 Pag.336
mdelvalle
0112.jpg
0112 - Denarius Julia Domna 211-17 AC12 viewsObv/ Draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated l., extending r.h. and holding scepter in her l.

Ag, 19.2 mm, 3.15 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/26 – RIC IV.1/388c [C]
ex-VEA, auction 6, lot 75
dafnis
0114.jpg
0114 - Denarius Julia Domna 198-209 AC15 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis standing right, polos on head, stepping on to prow of ship before her, holding wreath in right hand and naked Horus in left; behind her, ship stern and rudder.

Ag, 18.4 mm, 2.63 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/75 – RIC IV.1/577 [C]
ex-Gitbud & Naumann, eBay may 2011 - art. #1605899480471
dafnis
0115.jpg
0115 - Denarius Julia Domna 198-209 AC8 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ PVDICITIA, Pudicitia veiled and draped, seated on stool., r.h. closing on breast, head front, resting l. elbow on throne.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.32 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/74 – RIC IV.1/576 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay june 2011 - art. #230623761581
dafnis
145197.jpg
011a. Julia Titi56 viewsJulia Flavia (17 September 64 - 91) was the only child to the Emperor Titus from his second marriage to the well-connected Marcia Furnilla. Titus divorced Furnilla after Julia's birth. Julia was born in Rome.

When growing up, Titus offered her in marriage to his brother Domitian, but he refused because of his infatuation with Domitia Longina. Later she married her second cousin Titus Flavius Sabinus, brother to consul Titus Flavius Clemens, who married her first cousin Flavia Domitilla. By then Domitian had seduced her.

When her father and husband died, she became Emperor Domitian’s mistress. He openly showed his love. Falling pregnant, Julia died of a forced abortion. Julia was deified and her ashes her mixed with Domitian by an old nurse secretly in the Temple of the Flavians.

AEOLIS, Temnus. Julia Titi. Augusta, AD 79-91. Æ 16mm (2.18 gm). Draped bust right / EPI AGNOU THMNIT, Athena standing left, holding palladium and scepter, shield resting on ground. RPC II 981. Near VF, dark green patina, small flan crack. Ex-CNG

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Group 51 (15 September 1999), lot 875; Marcel Burstein Collection.
ecoli
0123.jpg
0123 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC15 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS FELIX, Venus standing facing, head l., holding apple in r.h. and drawing drapery from shoulder.

Ag, 19.0 mm, 2.82 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/88 – RIC IV.1/580 [S]
ex-Roma Numismatics, jul 2011 – art. #12335
1 commentsdafnis
0131.jpg
0131 - Denarius Julia Mamaea 222-35 AC12 viewsObv/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust of J.M. r., wearing diadem.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet and scepter; shield at her l.

Ag, 20.2 mm, 3.10 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.2/358 [C]
ex-Áureo & Calicó, auction jul 2011, lot 108
dafnis
0137.jpg
0137 - Denarius Julia Mamaea 222-35 AC16 viewsObv/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed and draped bust of J.M. r.
Rev/ VENERI FELICI, Venus standing r., holding Cupid and scepter.

Ag, 19.7 mm, 2.82 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC IV.2/351 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #230637829841
dafnis
0138.jpg
0138 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRICI, Venus standing l., holding patera and scepter.

Ag, 18.2 mm, 3.35 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/84 – RIC IV.1/578 [S]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #300575544711
dafnis
0141.jpg
0141 - Denarius Julia 103 BC33 viewsObv/ Helmeted head of Mars r.; above, control mark C; behind, CAESAR.
Rev/ Venus in biga of Cupids l., holding sceptre and reins; above control mark C; below, lyre; L IVLI L F in ex.

Ag, 17.0 mm, 4.09 g
Mint: Roma.
Moneyer: L. Iulius Caesar.
RRC 320/1 [dies o/r: 92/92] - Syd. 593a - RSC Julia 4
ex-Artemide Aste, auction 9E, lot 9194
dafnis
0143.jpg
0143 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas veiled and draped, standing l., raising hands praying; to the l., burning altar decorated with garlands.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.00 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/69 – RIC IV.1/574 [S]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay julio 2011 - art. #300571645923
dafnis
0144.jpg
0144 - Antoninianus Julia Domna 211-17 AC17 viewsObv/ IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust of J.D. r., crescent below.
Rev/ VENVS GENETRIX, Venus draped, seated l., r.h. extended and l.h. holding scepter.

Ag, 23.0 mm, 4.58 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/23A – RIC IV.1/388a [S]
ex-J.B. González Redondo (denarios.org), jul 2011
dafnis
0151.jpg
0151 - Denarius Julia Domna 196-211 AC11 viewsObv/ IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust of J.D. r.
Rev/ VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing l., holding helmet on extended r.h. and palm on l.h., leaning arm on column; to the l., shield on the ground.

Ag, 20.0 mm, 3.34 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/90 – RIC IV.1/581 [C]
ex-Numismatik Lanz, eBay jul 2011 - art. #230650283511
dafnis
0155.jpg
0155 - Nummus Maxentius 308-10 AC8 viewsObv/ IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head of M. r.
Rev/ CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head l., holding globe in r.h., scepter in l., within hexastyle temple of Roma; wreath in pediment; RBQ in ex.

AE, 22.8 mm, 6.80 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC VI/210 [C2]
ex-A.Juliá Salas (denarios.org), aug 2011
dafnis
0171.jpg
0171 - Denarius Julia Soaemias16 viewsObv/ IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA, draped bust of Julia Soaemias r.
Rev/IVNO REGINA. Juno, veiled, standing r., holding long scepter in l.h. and palladium on extended r.h.

Ag, 19.1mm, 3.61g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IV.II/237 [C] - BMCRE V/42 - Cohen 3
ex-Auctiones, e-auction 11, lot #75
dafnis
0177.jpg
0177 - Denarius Julia Soaemias 218-22 AC18 viewsObv/ IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, togate bust of J.S. r.
Rev/ VENUS CAELESTIS, Venus togate, standing l., holding apple and long scepter; star on field r.

Ag, 20.5 mm, 3.24 g
Mint: Roma.
BMCRE V/45 - RIC IV.2/241 [C]
ex-Gitbud & Naumann, auction Pecunem 12, lot 636
dafnis
P1200525b-horz.jpg
02 - 02 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)21 viewsAR Denario 19 mm de 3,9 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a derecha.
Rev: Eneas (Aeneas) avanzando a izquierda cargando a su Padre Anquises (Anchises) sobre su hombro izq. y portando Palladium en mano der, CAESAR en campo derecho.

Acuñada durante los años 47 - 46 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas contra Metelo Escipión (Metellus Scipio) y Labieno (Labienus) probablemente en el Norte de África.

Referencias: Babelon Vol.2 Julia #10, Pag.11 - Sear CRI #55 - Craw. 458/1 - Syd. #1013 - BMCRR East #31 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #12 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1402 Pag.268 - Cohen Vol.I #12 Pag. 9 - Albert #1400 - Catalli #658, Pag.2001
mdelvalle
Craw_458_1_Denario_Julius_Caesar.jpg
02 - 02 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)28 viewsAR Denario 19 mm de 3,9 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a derecha.
Rev: Eneas (Aeneas) avanzando a izquierda cargando a su Padre Anquises (Anchises) sobre su hombro izq. y portando Palladium en mano der, CAESAR en campo derecho.

Acuñada durante los años 47 - 46 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas contra Metelo Escipión (Metellus Scipio) y Labieno (Labienus) probablemente en el Norte de África.

Referencias: Babelon Vol.2 Julia #10, Pag.11 - Sear CRI #55 - Craw. 458/1 - Syd. #1013 - BMCRR East #31 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #12 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1402 Pag.268 - Cohen Vol.I #12 Pag. 9 - Albert #1400 - Catalli #658, Pag.2001
mdelvalle
Denario_de_Julio_Cesar_TROFEO.jpg
02 - 03 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)63 viewsAR Denario 17 mm de 3,51 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a der. Cupido detrás de su hombro.
Rev: Dos cautivos sentados a los lados de un trofeo de armas Galo, con escudo ovalado y Carnix en cada brazo, CAESAR en exergo.

Acuñada durante los años 46 - 45 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas probablemente en la Galia, Italia y/o Hispania.

Referencias: Babelon Julia #11 - Sear CRI #58 - Craw. 468/1 - Syd. #1014 - BMCRR Spain #89 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #13 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1404 Pag.269 - Cohen Vol.I #13 Pag.10

mdelvalle
Craw_468_1_Denario_Julius_Caesar.jpg
02 - 03 - Julio Cesar (49 - 44 A.C.)32 viewsAR Denario 17 mm de 3,51 gr.

Anv: ANEPIGRAFA - Busto diademado de Venus a der. Cupido detrás de su hombro.
Rev: Dos cautivos sentados a los lados de un trofeo de armas Galo, con escudo ovalado y Carnix en cada brazo, CAESAR en exergo.

Acuñada durante los años 46 - 45 A.C.
Ceca: Movil legionaria durante sus campañas probablemente en la Galia, Italia y/o Hispania.

Referencias: Babelon Julia #11 - Sear CRI #58 - Craw. 468/1 - Syd. #1014 - BMCRR Spain #89 - RSC Vol.I Caesar #13 Pag.107 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #1404 Pag.269 - Cohen Vol.I #13 Pag.10
mdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_2.jpg
02 - Personalities of the Empire58 viewsCalígula, Claudius, Britannicus , Agrippina jr., Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Domitila, Titus, Domitia and Julia Titi1 commentsmdelvalle
02_Octavian_RIC_I_266.jpg
02 Octavian RIC I 26633 viewsOctavian. AR Denarius. Italian Mint, possibly Rome. Autumn 30- summer 29 B.C. (3.45g, 19.8mm, 2h). Obv: Bare head right. Rev: IMP CAESAR on architrave of the Roman Senate House (Curia Julia), with porch supported by four short columns, statue of Victory on globe surmounting apex of roof, and statues of standing figures at the extremities of the architrave. CRI 421; RIC I 266; RSC 122.. Ex Andrew McCabe.1 commentsLucas H
RIC_584_Julia_Domna.JPG
021. Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta.58 viewsAE Sestertius. Rome mint

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG

Rev. Juno standing peacock at feet IVNONEM SC.

Rome Mint, 211-217.

RIC 585. gVF
LordBest
23.jpg
023 Julia Titi. AR Denarius 3.2gm49 viewsobv: JVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVST IF drp. bust r.
rev: VENVS AVGVST Venus std. r. leaning on cippus,
holding helment and spear
"doughter of Titus, mistress of Domitian"
3 commentshill132
MaesaDen.JPG
023. Julia Maesa, grandmother of Elagabalus. AR Denarius.32 viewsAR Denarius. Eastern mint.

Obv. Draped bust right IVLIA MAESA AVG

Rev. Felicitas standing left holding long caduceus and sacrificing over altar SEACVLI FELCITAS, star in right field.

RIC271. CHEF, lustrous, weak strike, nicer than scan. Highest hair points on the obverse have lustre ruling out wear.


LordBest
RIC211Julia_PaulaConcordia.jpg
025. Julia Paula AR Denarius. Concordia.77 viewsObv. Draped bust right IVLIA PAVLA AVG
Rev. Concordia seated left, holding patera; star to left CONCORDIA

19mm, 3.28g, 6h. Rome mint. Struck AD 220. RIC 211 (Elagabalus); Thirion 455; RSC 6a

Extremely Fine.
1 commentsLordBest
Juliadomna_denar2.jpg
026 - Julia Domna (c 170-217 AD), denarius - RIC 39033 viewsObv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VESTA, Vesta standing left, palladium and scepter
Minted in Rome 211-217 AD under Caracalla.
1 commentspierre_p77
Juliadomna_denar.jpg
027 - Julia Domna (c 170-217AD), denarius - RIC 56431 viewsObv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: MATER DEVM, Cybele seated left, holding branch and scepter, lion on either side.
Minted in Rome 196-211 under Septimius Severus.
pierre_p77
augustus hisp as-.jpg
027 BC-14 AD - AUGUSTUS AE27 of Colonia Julia Traducta47 viewsobv: PERM.CAES.AVG (bare head of Augustus left)
rev: IVLIA.TRAD (in oak wreath)
ref: RPC99, C.151, S.0538, Burgos215
mint: Colonia Julia Traducta (Hispania)
10.77gms, 27mm

A rare coin from a colony of Hispania Baetica, Julia Traducta (today Algesiras)
berserker
RSC 5 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Fecunditas.28 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG.

Rev. Fecunditas standing left, stretching out right hand to little boy standing right stretching up arms towards her, she holds cornucopia FECVND AVGVSTAE.

RSC 5, RIC 331. gVF
LordBest
RSC 6 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Fecunditas.27 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Fecunditas seated left with hand outstretched to child at feet FECVND AVGVSTAE.

RSC 6. EF
LordBest
RSC 24 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Felicitas.27 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Felicitas seated left holding caduceus and cornucopia FELICITAS PVBLICA.

RSC 24, RIC 338. Fully lustrous, EF.
LordBest
RSC 17 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Felicitas.26 viewsAR Denarius.

Obv. Draped bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Felicitas leaning against column holding caduceus FELICITAS PVBLICA.

RSC 17, RIC 335. EF.
LordBest
RSC 35 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother or Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Juno.36 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Juno standing left holding staff and patera, peacock at feat IVNO CONSERVATRIX.

RSC 35, RIC 343. EF
LordBest
RSC 48 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother or Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Pietas.30 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped and diadememed bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Pietas standing left sacrificing over altar PIETAS AVGVSTAE.

RSC 48, RIC346. UNC

Not the best scan of a beautiful, fully lustrous coins.
LordBest
RSC 85 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother or Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Vesta.39 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA MAMARA AVG

Rev. Vesta standing left holding patera and transverse sceptre VESTA.

RSC 85, RIC362. EF
1 commentsLordBest
IMG_2573~0.JPG
03 Julian II32 viewsJulian II
Ae 15

DN IVLIANV-S NOB CAES, bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
TEMP-REP...
bearded, one braid, clutching
ANЄI ?
Antioch 189

new pic
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Juliadomna_denar3.jpg
030 - Julia Domna (c 170-217 AD), denarius - RIC 57216 viewsObv: JVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: PIETAS AVGG, Pietas standing left, veiled, sacrificing over altar and holding box of incense.

Minted in Rome under Septimius Severus.
pierre_p77
Juliadomna_denar4.jpg
031 - Julia Domna (c 170-217 AD), denarius - RIC 53647 viewsObv: IVLIA DOMNA AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, naked to waist and with legs crossed, leaning on column to left, holding palm and apple.

Minted in Rome under Spetimius Severus 194 AD.

[Sold]
pierre_p77
Julia_Pergamon_R694.jpg
039 BC - AD 014 - IVLIA8 viewsJulia

Julia the Elder, known to her contemporaries as Julia Caesaris filia or Julia Augusti filia was the daughter of Augustus, and his second wife, Scribonia.


for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
Personajes_Imperiales_4.jpg
04 - Personalities of the Empire55 viewsCommodus, Crispina, Pertinax, Didius Julianus, Manlia Scantilla, Didia Clara, Pescennius Níger, Clodius Albinus, Septimius Severus, Julia Domna, Caracalla, Plautilla, Geta and Macrinusmdelvalle
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-01- TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)34 viewsAR Denario 20 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_26_Denario_Tiberio_1.jpg
04-02 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)24 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-05 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 18.5 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_28_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-06 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)26 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberius_RIC_30_2_Fourree.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)45 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Forrado_Tiberio.jpg
04-09 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)21 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA,
Denario Forrado 19x18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.
Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.
Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol. I #42 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8a Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario Tiberio RIC 26.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)108 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Acuñada 14 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #5 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1
1 commentsmdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_anterior.jpg
04-10 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)69 viewsAnv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_26_1.jpg
04-11 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)70 viewsAR Denario 19x18 mm 3.3 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas sin ornamentos apoyadas en una plataforma (doble-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #26 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #34 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8 Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16 Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_29_2.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)86 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.7 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas en una plataforma (triple-linea), portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #28 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #45 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8b Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16b Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
RIC_30_Denario_Tiberio.jpg
04-12 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)21 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
mdelvalle
Denario_Tiberio_RIC_30_1.jpg
04-14 - TIBERIO (14 - 37 D.C.)91 viewsAR Denario 18x16 mm 3.6 gr.

Anv: "TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Julia Livia (Madre del Emperador personificando a la Paz) sentada a derecha en una silla con patas ornamentadas apoyadas directamente en el piso, portando un largo cetro en mano derecha y rama de olivo en izquierda, Livia descansa sus pies sobre una pequeña plataforma.

Este denario es el comúnmente llamado “el Penique del Tributo” de la muy conocida historia relatada en el Evangelio de San Mateo (22,17-21) del Nuevo Testamento.

Acuñada 16 - 37 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Hoy Lyon Francia
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #30 Pag.95 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1763 Pag.346 - BMCRE Vol.1 #48 - Cohen Vol.1 #16 Pag.191 - DVM #8c Pag.75 - CBN #16 - RSC Vol. II #16a Pag.1 - Hendin #916 Pag.418
1 commentsmdelvalle
c3947.JPG
040 Claudius39 viewsClaudius Æ As. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left / LIBERTAS AVGVSTA S-C, Libertas standing facing, with pileus and extending left hand. Cohen 47.




"Claudius was born at Lugdunum, in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on August 1st, 10 B.C., the very day when the first altar was dedicated there to Augustus the God; and he was given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. Subsequently he assumed the surname Germanicus after his brother had been admitted into the Julian House as Tiberius's adopted son."
Randygeki(h2)
43.jpg
043 Didius Julianus. AR Denarius61 viewsobv: IMP CAES M DID_IVLIAN AVG laur. head r.
rev: CONCORD MILIT Concordia std. l. holding legionary eagle and standard
2 commentshill132
47a.jpg
047a Julia Domna. AR Denarius25 viewsobv: IVLIA AGVSTA drp. bust r.
rev: PIETAS AVGG Pitas veiled std. l. dropping incense on alter
and holding box
"mother of Caracalla, wife of Sept. Severus"
hill132
47b.jpg
047b Julia Domna. AR Denarius39 viewsobv: IVLIA PIA FELEX AVG drp. bust r.
rev: VESTA Vesta std. l. holding palladium and scepter
1 commentshill132
47c.jpg
047c Julia Domna. AR Antoninianus36 viewsobv: IVIA PIA FELEX AVG dia. and drp. bust r. set in cresent
rev: VENVS GENETRIX Venus std. l. extending r. hand and holding sceptre
1 commentshill132
049_Sept__Sev__Moesia,_Markianopolis,_AE-26,_,_E,_Varb_865,_Q-001,_1h,_26-26,5mm,_11,53g-s~0.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., AE-26, Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left,115 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., AE-26, Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left,
avers:- AY K L CEPT CEYHΡOC IOVLIA DOMNA CEB, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Severus right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left.
revers:- Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left, holding patera, arm resting on the drum, lions at sides. Є in left field.
exe: Є/-//--, diameter: 26,0-26,5 mm, weight: 11,53 g, axis:1h,
mint: Moesia, Markianopolis, Magistrate Ulpianus (210-211 AD), date: 210-211 A.D., ref: Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., Varbanov 865,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Personajes_Imperiales_5.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire49 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian Imdelvalle
Personajes_Imperiales_5~0.jpg
05 - Personalities of the Empire60 viewsDiadumenian, Elagabalus, Julia Maesa, Julia Soaemias, Aquilia Severa, Annia Faustina, Severus Alexander, Julia Mamaea, Orbiana, Maximinus I, Paulina, Maximus and Gordian I1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_IV-I_536D_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_DO_MNA_AVG,_VENERI_VICTR,_Roma,_RSC-194,_BMCRE-49,_S-6608,_194_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_15,5-19mm,_2,74g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 536D, Roma, AR-Denarius, VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, #164 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 536D, Roma, AR-Denarius, VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, #1
avers: IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Bust draped right.
reverse: VENERI VICTR, Venus standing right, her back turned to the viewer, draped from the waist down and leaning on a short column with her left elbow; holding a palm branch with her left arm and an apple in her extended right hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:15,5-19,0mm, weight: 2,74g, axis: 0h,
mint: Roma, date: 194 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 536D, RSC 194, BMCRE 49, Sear 6608,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_546_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_CERERI_FRVGIF,_Rome,_RSC-14,_BMC-10,_200-AD,_Q-001,_2h,_18-18,8mm,_2,56g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 546, Rome, AR-Denarius, CERERI FRVGIF, Ceres seated left, Scarce! #161 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 546, Rome, AR-Denarius, CERERI FRVGIF, Ceres seated left, Scarce! #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: CERERI FRVGIF, Ceres seated left holding corn-ears and torch.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:18,0-18,8mm, weight: 2,56g, axis: 2h,
mint: Rome, date: 200 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 546, RSC 14, BMC 10,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_551,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_FELICITAS,_Roma,_RSC-47,_BMC-22,_Sear-6581,_206_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,5-19,5mm,_2,94g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 551, Rome, AR-Denarius, FELICITAS, Felicitas standing, head left, #163 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 551, Rome, AR-Denarius, FELICITAS, Felicitas standing, head left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: FELICITAS, Felicitas standing, head left, holding short caduceus and long scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,94g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 206 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 551, RSC 47, BMC 22, Sear-6581,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_553_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_FORTUNAE_FELICI,_Rome,_RSC-58,_BMC-27,_Sear-6584,_196-211_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_19-20mm,_3,67g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 553, Rome, AR-Denarius, FORTUNAE FELICI, Fortuna enthroned left, #166 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 553, Rome, AR-Denarius, FORTUNAE FELICI, Fortuna enthroned left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: FORTUNAE FELICI, Fortuna enthroned left holding cornucopiae and leaning on rudder set on globe.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:19,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,67g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 196-211 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 553, RSC 58, BMC 27, Sear-6584,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_556_Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_HIL_A_RITAS_Roma-RIC-IV-I-556_p-_RSC-_Sear-5686_198-202-AD_Q-001_0h_18,0-20,0mm_3,11g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 556, Rome, AR-Denarius, HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, #1132 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 556, Rome, AR-Denarius, HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, with long palm branch and cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 198-202 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 556, p-, Sear 5686, RSC-, BMC-, ,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_557,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_HILARITAS,_Roma,_RSC-79,_BMC-34,_Sear-6587,_196-211_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_19-21,3mm,_3,02g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 557, Rome, AR-Denarius, HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, two children at her feet, #160 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 557, Rome, AR-Denarius, HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, two children at her feet, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, holding palm in right hand, cornucopiae in left; two children at her feet.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:19,0-21,3mm, weight: 3,02g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 196-211 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 557, RSC 79, BMC 79, Sear 6587,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_IVNO_Roma-RIC-IV-I-559_p-168_RSC-82_BMC-38_200-AD_Q-001_6h_18mm_3,70ga-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #174 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,70g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_IVNO_Roma-RIC-IV-I-559_p-168_RSC-82_BMC-38_200-AD_Q-002_11h_18-19mm_2,49ga-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #276 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 2,49g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-002
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_559,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_IVNO,_Roma,_RSC-82,_BMC-38,_Sear-6588,_200_AD,_Q-003,_1h,_17,7-18,5mm,_3,42g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #369 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #3
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,7-18,5mm, weight: 3,42g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_---_Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_MATER-DEVM_Roma-RIC-IV-I---_p-_RSC-_Sear----_-AD_Q-001_h_18,0-20,0mm_-g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 564, Rome, AR-Denarius, MATER DEVM, Cybele, towered, enthroned left, Scarce, #1131 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 564, Rome, AR-Denarius, MATER DEVM, Cybele, towered, enthroned left, Scarce, #1
avers:- IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
revers:- MATER DEVM, Cybele, towered, enthroned left between two lions, leaning on drum and holding branch and scepter.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 2,88g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 198 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-564, p-169, RSC 123, BMC 51, Sear (2000-2002) 6593, Scarce,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_MATER-DEVM_Roma-RIC-565_C-126a_205-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17-18,5mm_2,17g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 565, Rome, AR-Denarius, MATER-DEVM, Cybele seated left between two lions, 65 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 565, Rome, AR-Denarius, MATER-DEVM, Cybele seated left between two lions,
avers:- IVLIA-AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
revers:- MATER-DEVM, Cybele seated left between two lions, resting elbow on drum and holding branch (no sceptre).
exe: , diameter: 17-18,5mm, weight: 2,17g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 205 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-565, p-, C-126a,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_572_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_PIETAS_AVG_G,_Rome,_RSC-150,_BMC-62,_203-AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,5-19mm,_3,29g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 572, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG G, Pietas standing left, veiled, #161 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 572, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS AVG G, Pietas standing left, veiled, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: PIETAS AVG G, Pietas standing left, veiled, sacrificing on altar left & holding incense box.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,29g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 200 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 572, p-170, RSC 150, BMC 62,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_574_Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_PIETAS-PVBLICA_Rome-RIC-IV-I-574_p-170_RSC-156_BMC-69_C-156_203-AD_Q-002_7h_17,7-18,8mm_3,50g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #183 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, raising both hands at the garlanded altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,7-18,8mm, weight: 3,50g, axis:7h,
mint: Rome, date: 203 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 574, p-170, RSC-156, BMC-69, Sear-6601,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_PIETAS-PVBLICA_Roma-RIC-IV-I-574_p-170_RSC-156_203-AD_Q-001_0h_18mm_2,95g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #2121 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, raising both hands at the garlanded altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 2,95g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 203 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 574, p-170, RSC-156, BMC-69, Sear-6601,
Q-002
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_574,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_PIETAS_PVBLICA,_Roma,_RSC-156,_BMC-69,_Sear-6601,_203_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_17,5-19,0mm,_3,39g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #381 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 574, Rome, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #3
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, raising both hands at the garlanded altar.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,39g, axis:0h,
mint: Rome, date: 203 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 574, p-170, RSC-156, BMC-69, Sear-6601,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_575,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_PVDICITIA,_Roma,_RSC-170,_BMC-72,_Sear-6603,_211_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,0-19,5mm,_3,42g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 575, Rome, AR-Denarius, PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, facing forward, #160 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 575, Rome, AR-Denarius, PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, facing forward, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: PVDICITIA, Pudicitia seated left, facing forward, right hand on breast, left hand holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,0-19,5mm, weight: 3,42g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 211 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 575, RSC 170, BMC 72, Sear 6603,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_SAECVLI-FELICITAS_Roma-RIC-577_RSC-174_200-AD_Q-001_0h_19,5mm_2,50g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 577, Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis standing right, #165 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 577, Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis standing right, #1
avers:- IVLIA-AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
revers:- SAECVLI-FELICITAS, Isis, wearing polos on head, standing right, left foot on prow, holding Horus; behind, rudder.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 2,50g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 200 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-577, p-,RSC-174, BMC 75,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_SAECVLI-FELICITAS_Roma-RIC-645_C-177_Q-001_18-19mm_3,01g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 577, Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis standing right, #299 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 577, Rome, AR-Denarius, SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis standing right, #2
avers:- IVLIA-AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
revers:- SAECVLI-FELICITAS, Isis, wearing peaked head-dress, standing right with left foot on prow, nursing infant Horus at her breast, altar at left against which rests a rudder.
exe: , diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 2,63g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 196-211 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-577, p-170, C-174,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_633_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_DO_MNA_AVG,_VENER_VICTOR,_Emesa(Homs),_RSC-189,_BMCRE-423,_194-195_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,0-17,5mm,_3,15g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 633, Emesa(Homs), AR-Denarius, VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, Scarce! #166 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 633, Emesa(Homs), AR-Denarius, VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, Scarce! #1
avers: IVLIA DO MNA AVG, Bust draped right.
reverse: VENER VICTOR, Venus standing right, her back turned to the viewer, draped from the waist down and leaning on a short column with her left elbow; holding a palm branch with her left arm and an apple in her extended right hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter:17,0-17,5mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Emesa(Homs), date: 194-195 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 633, RSC 189, BMCRE 423, Scarce!
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_PIETAS-PVBLICA_Laodicea-RIC-IV-I-643_p-170_RSC-156_203-AD_Q-001_0h_18,5-19,5mm_3,10g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 643, Laodicea, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #1223 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 643, Laodicea, AR-Denarius, PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, #1
avers:- IVLIA-AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
revers:- PIETAS-PVBLICA, Pietas standing front, head left, raising hands in prayer over lighted altar.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,10g, axis: 0h,
mint: Laodicea ad Mare, Syria, date: 203 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-643, p-
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-001,_0h,_18,0-20,0mm,_3,02gk-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #161 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-002,_7h,_18,5-19,0mm,_3,57gk-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #260 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,57g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-002
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_373A_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_PIA_FELIX_AVG,_DIANA_LVCIFERA,_Roma,_RSC-32,_BMC-1,_Sear-7100,_211-217-AD,_Q-003,1h,_18,0-18,5mm,_3,38g-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #360 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 373A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Denar, DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, #3
avers: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
reverse: DIANA LVCIFERA, Diana standing left, holding the long torch with both hands.
exergue:-/-//--, diameter: 18,0-18,5mm, weight: 3,38g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 211-217 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-373A (Caracalla), p-, RSC-32, (Caracalla), BMC-1, Sear-7100,
Q-003
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-388A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-001_0h_21,5-22mm_3,80g-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, 65 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left,
avers:- IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-388A (Caracalla), p-, C-211, BMCRE 22-23A (Caracalla),
Black toned coin like a "limes" coin .
Q-001
quadrans
RIC_388A(Car)_Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-388A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-001_0h_21,5-22mm_3,80ga-s.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, 108 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 388A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left,
avers:- IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, extending right hand and holding sceptre in left.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-388A (Caracalla), p-, C-211, BMCRE 22-23A (Caracalla),
Black toned coin like a "limes" coin .
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Antoninianvs_IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG_VENVS-GENETRIX_Roma-RIC-IV-389A(Caracalla)_C-211_Q-002_1h_21-22mm_4,51g.jpg
050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 389A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, Scarce!86 views050a Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 389A (Caracalla), Rome, AR-Antoninianus, VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left, Scarce!
avers: IVLIA-PIA-FELIX-AVG, Diademed and draped bust right on crescent.
revers: VENVS-GENETRIX, Venus seated left, holding sceptre and apple, Cupid standing right before.
exe:-/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 216 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-I-389A (Caracalla), p-274, C-204, (Caracalla), Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
049_Sept__Sev__Moesia,_Markianopolis,_AE-26,_,_E,_Varb_865,_Q-001,_1h,_26-26,5mm,_11,53g-s~1.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., AE-26, Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left,110 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., AE-26, Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left,
avers:- AY K L CEPT CEYHΡOC IOVLIA DOMNA CEB, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust of Severus right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left.
revers:- Y ΦΛ OYΛΠIANOY MAΡKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Kybele seated left, holding patera, arm resting on the drum, lions at sides. Є in left field.
exe: Є/-//--, diameter: 26,0-26,5 mm, weight: 11,53 g, axis:1h,
mint: Moesia, Markianopolis, Magistrate Ulpianus (210-211 AD), date: 210-211 A.D., ref: Hristova/Jekov (2014) 06.15.31.01., Varbanov 865,
Q-001
quadrans
050_Julia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_AE-24,_Nikaia_in_Bithynia,IOYLIA-A____CT_____-_-__N_Legionary_standards_Not_listed_Q-001_7h_24-25mm_7,73g-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, AE-24, Not Listed, ΝΙΚΑΙΕΩN, Legionary standards, Rare!106 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, AE-24, Not Listed, ΝΙΚΑΙΕΩN, Legionary standards, Rare!
avers:- IOYΛIA-AΥΓΟΥCT, Draped bust left.
revers:- ΝΙΚΑ-Ι-ΕΩN, To left, above and right of legionary eagle between two standards.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 24-25mm, weight: 7,73g, axis: 7h,
mint: Bithynia, Nikaia, date: 17` - 217 A.D., ref: RecGen -, Not listed, Rare!
Q-001
quadrans
Cappadocia,_Caesarea,_050p_Julia-Domna,_Syd_447var_,_AR-Drachm,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA_AVG,_MHTPO_KAICAP_NE,_ET-IH,_207-AD,_Q-001,_0h,_15-19mm,_2,87g-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Cappadocia, Caesarea, Syd-447var, AR-Drachm, MHTPO KAICAP NЄ, Mount Argaeus, #161 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Cappadocia, Caesarea, Syd-447var, AR-Drachm, MHTPO KAICAP NЄ, Mount Argaeus, #1
avers: IVΛIA AVΓVSTA AVΓ, Bust draped right.
reverse: MHTPO KAICAP NЄ, Mount Argaeus surmounted by a star, date below ЄT IH (year 18, 210 A.D.),
exergue: -/-//ЄT IH, diameter: 15,0-19,0mm, weight: 2,85g, axis:0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea, date: 210 A.D., ref: Syd-447var,
Q-001
quadrans
050_Iulia_Domna_(_170-217_A_D_),_AE-23,_Asklepiados,_Archon,_Lydia,_Bagis,_Hygeia_and_Asklepios_Q-001_h_22,5-23,5mm_5,69g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Bagis, Lindgen A716A., AE-23, Hygeia and Asklepios,68 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Bagis, Lindgen A716A., AE-23, Hygeia and Asklepios,
avers:- Draped bust right, ΙΟΥ ΔΟ ΜΝΑ CΕΒΑ,
revers:- ΕΠΙ ACKΛEΠIAΔOΥ ΑΡX A B /BAΓHNΩN, Hygeia, on left, standing right, holding serpent, facing Asklepios, on right, standing standing left, leaning on serpent-entwined staff.
exergo: -/-// HNΩN, diameter: 22,5-23,5 mm, weight: 5,69g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Bagis, date: A.D., ref: Lindgen A716A., BMC p. 37, 31 var. (legend), SNG KOP 27 49(1), Lindgren and Kovacs A716A (same dies),
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
050_Julia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_AE-15_IOVLIA_DOMNA_CEBACT_Q001_7h_14-15mm_1,72gx-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Hermokapelia, AE-15, 62 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Hermokapelia, AE-15,
avers:- IOVΛ(ΙΑ-ΔOΜΝΑ)-CEBACT_Draped bust right.
revers:- ΕΡΜΟΚΑΠΛΕΙΤ, .
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 14-15mm, weight: 1,72g, axis: 7h,
mint: Lydia, Hermokapelia, date: A.D., ref: ???,
Q-001
quadrans
050_Iulia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_Lydia,_Saitta,_AE-17,_IOY_#923;IA_CEBAC,_CAITTHNWN,_Leypold_I,_1163,_Lindgren_III_511_,_193-217AD,Q-001,_6h,_17,5mm,_2,71g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Saitta, AE-18, CAITTHNΩN, Tyche standing left,141 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Lydia, Saitta, AE-18, CAITTHNΩN, Tyche standing left,
avers: IOYΛIA CEBAC, Draped bust right.
reverse: CAITTHNΩN, Tyche standing left, kalathos on head, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,71g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Saitta, date: 193-217 A.D., ref: Leypold I, 1163, Lindgren III 511,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
050_Julia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_AE-23,_Macedonia,_Stobi,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_MVNI_STOB,_Nike_left,_Josifovski_180,_Varbanov_3872,_,Q-001,_7h,_22-22,5mm,_5,94g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Macedonia, Stobi, Josifovski 180, AE-23, MVNI STOB, Nike advancing left, #1285 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Macedonia, Stobi, Josifovski 180, AE-23, MVNI STOB, Nike advancing left, #1
avers:- IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
revers:- MVNI STOB, Nike advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0-22,5mm, weight: 5,94g, axis: 7h,
mint: Macedonia, Stobi, date:170-217 A.D., ref: Josifovski 180, Varbanov 3872,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
050_Iulia_Domna,_AE-17,_HHG_8_17_05_2,_,_Draped_bust_r_,,_Cista_m__snake,_R3,_214-AD,_Q-001,_8h,_15,5-18,2mm,_2,57g-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2012) 08.17.05.02., AE-17, Cista Mystica with a snake, #169 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2012) 08.17.05.02., AE-17, Cista Mystica with a snake, #1
avers: IOVΛ ΔO CEBACTH, Draped bust right.
reverse: NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTP, Cista Mystica with an open lid, snake emerging left.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-18,2mm, weight: 2,57g, axis: 8h,
mint: Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, date: 170-217 A.D.,
ref: Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov HrHJ (2012) 08.17.05.02., P.B. 1482, H.M. 1043,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
050_Iulia-Domna_AE-17_IOV_-_O-CEBACTH_Drapedd-bust-r__NIKO_O_IT-_POC-ICTPON_Basket-with-fruits_HHG-8-17-52-2_R3_-214-AD_Q-001_1h_16,5mm_3,35g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2012) 08.17.52.02., AE-17, NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPON, Basket with fruits, #162 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2012) 08.17.52.02., AE-17, NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPON, Basket with fruits, #1
avers: IOVΛ ΔO CEBACTH, Draped bust right.
reverse: NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPON, Basket with fruits.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 1h,
mint: Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, date: 170-217 A.D.,
ref: Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov HrHJ (2012) 08.17.52.02.,
Q-001
quadrans
050_Iulia_Domna_(_170-217_A_D_),_AE-21_Nikopolis_IVLIA-DOMNA-CEB__NIKOPOLIT-PROC-ICTRO_Athena-Snake_HHJ-8_17_3_3var_p-154_P_B_-1465-66_H_M-1026_Q-001_7h_20,5mm_4,69g-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2013) 08.17.04.04., AE-21, NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPO, Athena left, snake, #189 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, HrHJ (2013) 08.17.04.04., AE-21, NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPO, Athena left, snake, #1
avers: IOVΛIA ΔOMNA CEB, Draped bust right.
reverse: NIKOΠOΛIT ΠPOC ICTPO, Athena left, snake.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 4,69g, axis: 7h,
mint: Moesia, Nicopolis Ad Istrum, date: 170-217 A.D.,
ref: Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov HrHJ (2013) 8.17.04.04., p-154,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia_Domna,_Phrygia_Philomelion_Julia_Domna_Tyche_Q-001_6h,_5,30_g_,_22_mm-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Phrygia, Philomelion, BMC 14, AE-22, Tyche standing left,98 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Phrygia, Philomelion, BMC 14, AE-22, Tyche standing left,
avers:- IOVΛIA ΔOMNA CEB, Draped bust right .
revers:- ΦIΛOMHΛ EΠI AΔΡIANOY, Tyche standing left holding rudder and cornucopiae.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,30g, axis:6 h,
mint: Phrygia, Philomelion, date: 170-217 A.D., ref: BMC 14; Sear GIC 2416.
Q-001
quadrans
050p_Julia_Domna,_Pisidia,_Antioch,_AE-22,__Dr_bust_r_,_Genius-Antioch,_BMC_Lycia,_etc__pg__181,_35__Q-001,_6h,_22mm,_5,4g-s~0.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, BMC (Lycia) 35, AE-22, ANTIOCH ENI COL CAE, Genius of Antioch standing left,114 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Pisidia, Antioch, BMC (Lycia) 35, AE-22, ANTIOCH ENI COL CAE, Genius of Antioch standing left,
avers: IVLIA AV GVSTA, Draped bust of Julia Domna right.
reverse: ANTIOCH ENI COL CAE, Genius of Antioch standing front, head left, holding branch and cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 22,0mm, weight: 5,40g, axis: 6h,
mint: Pisidia, Antioch, date: 193-211 A.D., ref: BMC Lycia etc. pg 181, 35,
Q-001
quadrans
050_Iulia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_AE-23,_Serdica,_CEP__N,_Nemesis,_AE_IOV_IA-_OMNA-dot-CEBA__CEP__N_Varb-x_Serdica_Q-001_h_23-24mm_7,45g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Thrace, Serdica, AE-23, CEPΔΩN, Nemesis,62 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Thrace, Serdica, AE-23, CEPΔΩN, Nemesis,
avers:- IOVΛIA-ΔOMNA-dot-CEBA, Dr. bust right.
revers:- CEP-ΔΩN, Nemesis (??) holding scale and cornucopiae, wheel at feet.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 23-24mm, weight: 7,45g, axis: 7h,
mint: Thrace, Serdica, date: 170-217 A.D., ref: ??? Not listed ? !?
Q-001
quadrans
050_Iulia_Domna_(170-217_A_D_),_AE-20,_Thrace,_Serdica,_Altar,_Varbanov_1986,_Hristova___Jekov_12_17_47_2,_Q-001,_2h,18-20mm,_3,46g-s.jpg
050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Thrace, Serdica, Varbanov 1986, AE-20, CEPΔΩN, Serpent rising from altar,108 views050p Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), Thrace, Serdica, Varbanov 1986, AE-20, CEPΔΩN, Serpent rising from altar,
avers: IO ΔOM CEBAC, Draped bust right.
reverse: CEP ΔΩN, Serpent rising from altar, head right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-20,0mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 2h,
mint: Thrace, Serdica, date: 170-217 A.D., ref: Varbanov 1986., Hristova and Jekov 12.17.47.2,
Q-001
quadrans
54.jpg
054 Julia Paula. AR denarius25 viewsobv: IVLIA PAVLA AVG drp. bust r.
rev: CONCORDIA Concordia seated l. holding patera only. in field star
"1st wife of Elagabalus"
1 commentshill132
056_Elagabalus_(218-222_A_D_),_AE-16,_Markianopolis-Moesia-_VP-IOVL-ANT-CELEVKOV-MARKIANO_OLIT_N_H-J-6_28_3_3__Q-001_0h_27-28mm_13,24g-s~0.jpg
056p Elagabalus (218-222 A.D.), and Julia Maesa, Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova-Jekov 06.28.3.3., AE-28, VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOLITΩN, Zeus left,88 views056p Elagabalus (218-222 A.D.), and Julia Maesa, Moesia, Markianopolis, Hristova-Jekov 06.28.3.3., AE-28, VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOLITΩN, Zeus left,
avers: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNEINOC AVΓ IOVΛIA MAICA AVΓ, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Elagabalus facing diademed and draped bust of Julia Maesa
revers: VΠ IOVΛ ANT CEΛEVKOV MAPKIANOΠOLITΩN (AP and ΩN ligate), Zeus standing left with patera and sceptre, E to right.
exe: -/E//--, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: 13,24g, axis:0h,
mint: Moesia, Markianopolis, Magistrate:Iulius Antoninus Selevkus, date: 218-222 A.D.,
ref: Hristova/Jekov (2014) No. 06.28.3.3.,
Q-001
quadrans
57.jpg
057 Julia Soaemias. AR denarius9 viewsobv: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG drp. bust r.
rev: VENVS CAELESTIS Venus std. l. holding apple and scepter
fld: * in r.
"mother of Elagablus"
hill132
58.jpg
058 Julia Maesa. AR denarius14 viewsobv: IVLIA MAESA AVG drp. bust r.
rev: PVDICITIA Pudicitia seated l. raising veil and holding scepter
"grandmother of Elagabalus"
hill132
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAE-L-ESTIS_RIC-IV-241_C-8-Elagabal_Star-right-Q-002_h_17,5-19mm_2,86g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1114 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right,
reverse: VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus, diademed and standing left, holding apple and sceptre; in right field a star.
exergue: -/*//--, diameter: 17,5-19mm, weight: 2,86g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 218-222 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 241, p-48, C-8,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAE-L-ESTIS_RIC-IV-241_C--Elagabal_Star-left-Q-001_6h_17-19mm_2,58g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1119 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 241, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus standing left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right,
reverse: VENVS CAE L ESTIS, Venus, diademed and standing left, holding apple and sceptre; in left field a star.
exergue: */-//--, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 2,58g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 218-222 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 241, p-48, C-8,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CA-ELESTIS_RIC-243_C-14_Q-001_1h_18-19mm_2,80g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #172 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #1
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS CA ELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding patera (or apple?) and sceptre; at her feet a child reaching up to her.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 2,80g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 220 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 243, p-, C-14,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Soaemias_IVLIA-SOAEMIAS-AVG_VENVS-CAELESTIS_RIC-243_C-14_Q-002_6h_18,5-19,5mm_2,34g-s.jpg
060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #2207 views060 Iulia Soaemias (?-222 A.D.), RIC IV-II 355, Rome, AR-Denarius, VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated left, #2
Mother of Elagabalus.
avers: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Draped bust right.
reverse: VENVS CA ELESTIS, Venus seated left, holding patera (or apple?) and sceptre; at her feet a child reaching up to her.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,34g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 220 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 243, p-, C-14,
Q-002
quadrans
61.jpg
061 Julia Mamaea. AR denarius19 viewsobv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG dia. and drp. bust r.
rev: VESTA Vesta veiled std. l. holding palladium and upright scepter
"mother of s. Alexander"
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RI_064gt_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -33 viewsObv:–IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– BONI EVENTVS, Fides standing right holding basket of fruit and corn ears
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Ref:– BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -. (Not listed with Fides right)

2.72g. 17.10mm. 0o

Additional information from Curtis Clay “Not previously known for Septimius Severus but a reverse die match with a Julia Domna in Vienna”
maridvnvm
RI_064jh_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC -33 viewsObv:– IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG II C, laureate head right
Rev:– FORTVAE(sic) REDVCI, Moneta/Aequitas standing left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -. RSC -.

2.99g, 17.53mm, 180o

Additional comments from Curtis Clay - "This combination of the FORTVNAE REDVCI legend with a type of Aequitas is reported on a denarius of Pescennius Niger by Cohen 25 (in a private collection), but does not seem to have been attested before for either Septimius Severus or Julia Domna, at least I can't find any such coin in BMC or RSC."
maridvnvm
RI_064ne_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)29 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_064td_img.jpg
064 - Septimius Severus denarius - RIC - (unlisted mule with a Julia Domna reverse)11 viewsObv:- IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right
Rev:- VEN-ER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand; sceptre in left
Emesa mint. Struck 194-195 AD.
References:- RIC IV -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

This would appear to be a mule of a Septimius Severus obverse with a reverse of Julia Domna.
maridvnvm
064_Julia_Mamaea_(_-235_A_D_),_AE-19,_Nikomedeia_in_Bithynia,_NIKOMH___N-_IC-N__K,_Astakos_,_Not_listed__Q-001_7h_19mm_3,47g-s.jpg
064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,62 views064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
avers:- IOVΛIA-MAMAIA-AVG,
revers:- NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,47g, axis: 7h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: ??? A.D., ref: Not listed ???,
Q-001
quadrans
064_Julia_Mamaea_(_-235_A_D_),_AE-19,_Nikaiea_in_Bithynia_IOYLIA-MAMAIA-AYG_NI-K-AI-E_ON_BMC_105v_SNG_Cop_514,_SGI_3421_Q-001_7h_20-20,5mm_3,88ga-s~0.jpg
064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, BMC 105v., AE-19, NI-K-AI-E/ΩN, Three standards,65 views064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nikaia, BMC 105v., AE-19, NI-K-AI-E/ΩN, Three standards,
avers:- IOVΛIA-MAMAIA-AVΓ, Draped bust right.
revers:- NI-K-AI-E/ΩN, Between and beneath three standards, two badges on the middle standard.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20-20,5mm, weight: 3,88g, axis: 7h,
mint: Bithynia, Nikaia, date: 222-235 A.D., ref: BMC-105v, SNG-Cop-514, SGI-3421,
Q-001
quadrans
064_Julia_Mamaea_(190-235_A_D_),_Lydia,_Tabala,_AE-19,_IOY_MAMAIA_CE,,_TABA_#923;E_#937;N,_E_#929;MOC,_Waddington_5305,_222-235_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_19mm,3,72g-s.jpg
064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Lydia, Tabala, Waddington 5305, AE-19, TABAΛEΩN/EPMOC, River-god Hermos reclining left, #190 views064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Lydia, Tabala, Waddington 5305, AE-19, TABAΛEΩN/EPMOC, River-god Hermos reclining left, #1
avers: IOY MAMAIA CE, Draped bust right, wearing Stephane.
reverse: TABAΛEΩN around, EΡMOC below, River-god Hermos reclining left, holding reed and cornucopiae, resting left arm on overturned urn from which waters flow.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0mm, weight: 3,72g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Tabala, date: 222-235 A.D., ref: Waddington 5305, Paris 1384.
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RI_065bz_img.jpg
065 - Julia Doman Denarius - cf RIC 61932 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– FELECI[TAS] TEMPOR, Basket of grains and fruit.
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 - 195
Reference(s) – cf RIC IV 619; cf BMCRE 415;

The FELECI is clear but I am supposing the TAS based upon the spacing and what would appear to be the ghosting of the letter that have been lost through clogging.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065af_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna Ae As - RIC 84625 viewsAe As
Obv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus, naked to waist, standing right, holding apple and palm and resting on column.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193-196
Reference(s) – Cohen 196. RIC IV 846 (R)
Martin Griffiths
RI_065az_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna AE As- RIC 87747 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– HILARITAS S-C, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMCRE 786. Cohen 74. RIC IV 877.

8.89 g. 24.29 mm. 180 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065au_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna Antoninianus - RIC IV 381 [Caracalla]33 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped bust right, resting on a crescent
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left holding branch & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC IV 381 [Caracalla]. RSC 111.
maridvnvm
RI_065w_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna barbarous denarius - RIC -29 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– LIBE-RI AVG, Liberalitas seated left, holding accounting board and cornucopiae
Barbarous mint
Reference(s) – None. Appears to be Barbarous imitation of IV 627a.
Martin Griffiths
RI 065ag img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - 536 var66 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICRT (sic), Venus naked to waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm.
Minted in Rome A.D. 193 - 196
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC IV 536 var (VICRT instead of VICTR)
maridvnvm
RI 065ah img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - 53838 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta seated left, holding palladium in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 194-195
Ref:– BMCRE 56. RIC 538. RSC 221
maridvnvm
RI_065an_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - 607a23 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– AEQVITAS II, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Reference:– BMCRE Page 86. RIC IV 607a. RSC 3a.

BMCRE, RIC and RSC all refer to the same coin in Vienna which is queried as being plated.

Curtis provided this additional information however:-
"Bickford-Smith, Mint of Alexandria, unpublished typescript (1993), p. 91: four specimens known to him, in Vienna, Berlin, Basel, and Tbilisi.

BMC and RIC refer to the Vienna specimen, which they are wrong to classify as a plated hybrid: it is a regular, solid-silver coin."
maridvnvm
RI_065ae_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -32 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– FORT AVG, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-195
References:– BMCRE -, RIC -, RSC -
Martin Griffiths
RI_065ak_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -31 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– MONETAE AVG II COS, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194
Reference(s) – RIC -; BMCRE -; RSC -.

One of the rare dated reverse series. The third known example, others in Paris and Vienna. Die match to the Paris example.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065ao_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -25 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left, holding helmet and palm, resting elbow on column with cuirass right, Cupid holding shield at feet
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC -. RSC -. BMCRE -.

This reverse type not mentioned in any of the major references.
maridvnvm
RI_065bd_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -26 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria A.D. 197
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).

The most common Alexandrian type from this issue for Domna.
maridvnvm
RI_065be_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -30 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -, cf RIC 580 (Rome). RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065bj_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -32 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– FORTVN RE-DVC, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Syria.
Reference:– BMCRE-. RIC IV -. RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065bl_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -28 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).
maridvnvm
RI_065bn_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria A.D. 197
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).

The most common Alexandrian type from this issue for Domna.
maridvnvm
RI_065bv_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -19 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference(s) – BMCRE -. RIC -, cf RIC 580 (Rome). RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065bw_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC -17 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, raising robe with left hand
Minted in Alexandria.
Reference:– BMCRE -. Bickford-Smith pl. 1, 10. RIC IV -. cf RIC 580 (Rome).
maridvnvm
RI_065a_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 388c22 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left with scepter & right hand extended
Minted in Rome, A.D. 216
References:– VM 51a, RIC 388c, RCV02 7106, RSC 212

A reasonable example of the older bust.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065b_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 389 fouree16 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust facing right
Rev:– VENVS GENETRIX, Venus seated left with scepter & right hand extended, cupid at feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 217
References:– RIC 389 fouree
Martin Griffiths
RI_065bb_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 53626 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENER-I V-ICTR, Venus naked to waist, standing right, seen from behind, leaning on column, holding apple and palm.
Minted in Rome A.D. 193 - 196
Reference:– RIC IV 536
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 065m img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 55738 viewsObv– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, holding palm in right hand, cornucopiae in left; two children at her feet
Minted in Rome, A.D. 208
References:– BMCRE 34, RIC 557, RSC 79
maridvnvm
RI_065ba_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 56026 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev:– IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet left, peacock
Minted in Rome. A.D. 196-211
Reference:– RIC IV 560
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 065j img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 57162 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– P SEPT GETA CAES PONT, Bust of Geta right.
References:– RIC 571

A poor example but a rare type.
maridvnvm
RI_065h_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 57217 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIETAS AVGG, Pietas standing left , veiled and right hand dropping incense on altar left and holding box in right arm.
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC 572
Martin Griffiths
RI_065i_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 57413 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, veiled both hands raised, palm up, at left an altar.
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC 574
Martin Griffiths
RI 065g img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 57757 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– SAECVLI FELICITAS, Isis, wearing polos on head, standing right, left foot on prow, holding Horus; behind, rudder resting against altar.
Reverse Legend –
Minted in Rome
References:– RIC 577
maridvnvm
RI_065an_img~0.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 607a14 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– AEQVITAS II, Aequitas standing left holding scales and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Reference:– BMCRE Page 86. Queried. RIC IV 607a (This mint?) Rated R2. RSC 3a (Plated hybrid??)
maridvnvm
RI_065bm_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 60828 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, holding basket of fruit and corn-ears
Minted in Alexandria
Reference:– RIC IV 608. RSC 10
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 065al img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61020 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Ref:– BMCRE 329. RIC IV 610. RSC 144
maridvnvm
RI_065aj_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61022 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIE-TAS, Pietas seated left, on high backed throne, holding palladium
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Ref:– BMCRE 330. RIC IV 612. RSC 146c
Martin Griffiths
RI_065al_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61019 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 329. RIC IV 610 (Rated R2). RSC 144
maridvnvm
RI_065bk_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61019 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– MONETA AVG, Moneta standing left, scales and cornucopia
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 193-196
Reference(s) – BMCRE 329 (Lincoln 1927, appears to be a die pair match). RIC IV 610 (Rated R2, citing Cohen). Cohen 143.

A dark blue-black tone. Finder's spade mark on obverse.
maridvnvm
RI_065bs_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61018 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIE-TAS, Pietas seated left, on high backed throne, holding palladium
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Ref:– BMCRE 330. RIC IV 612. RSC 146c
maridvnvm
RI_065bx_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61016 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIE-TAS, Pietas seated left, on high backed throne, holding palladium
Minted in Alexandria. A.D. 194
Ref:– BMCRE 330. RIC IV 612. RSC 146c
maridvnvm
RI_065q_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61615 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– BONI EV-ENTVS (S modified from C), Fides standing left, holding plate of fruit in right hand, grain ears in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194-195
Reference(s) – RIC Emesa 616 (Rare); BMCRE 328B; RSC 10.

S modified from C not noted in references.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065bq_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 61620 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– BONI EV-ENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing left, holding plate of fruit in right hand, grain ears in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194-194
Reference:– RIC 616 (R) ; BMCRE 328B; RSC 10
maridvnvm
RI_065aa_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 616A16 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– CERER FRVG, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears in right hand, torch in left
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-195
References:– BMCRE pg. 102. RIC IV 616A, RSC 13a
Martin Griffiths
RI_065ab_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 62135 viewsObv:– IVLIA DO-MNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– FELECITAS TEMPOR, Grain ear between crossed cornucopiae.
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 195
Reference(s) – RIC IV 621 (Rare, Septimius confirmed, noted as doubtful by RIC but with FELICITAS)
Martin Griffiths
RI_065bi_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 62429 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– FORT-VN REDVC, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Syria.
Reference:– BMCRE p. 103 note citing Cohen 65 (Hamburger Coll.). RIC IV 624 (Rated scarce). RSC 65
maridvnvm
RI_065y_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 62773 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– LIBERAL . AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-195
References:– BMCRE pg. 102, RIC 627, RSC 103
1 commentsMartin Griffiths
RI_065ca_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 62713 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– LIBERAL AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-195
References:– BMCRE pg. 102, RIC 627, RSC 103
maridvnvm
RI_065z_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 628 var.21 viewsObv:– IVLA (sic) DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– MONETA AVG, Moneta, seated left, holding scales in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa, A.D. 194-195
References:– RIC 628 var (Not listed in RIC with this error in the obverse legend)
Martin Griffiths
RI_065ai_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63016 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
Martin Griffiths
RI_065l_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63019 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER-I VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a

Beautiful rainbow tone developing on the obverse.
1 commentsMartin Griffiths
RI_065bf_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63018 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in an Eastern mint - old-style, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
maridvnvm
RI_065bt_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63030 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENE-R VICT, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 195
References:– BMCRE 422, RIC 630, RSC 188a
maridvnvm
RI_065ap_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63228 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Emesa.
Reference:– BMCRE 424. RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194.
maridvnvm
RI_065bh_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63236 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Syria.
Reference:– RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194
maridvnvm
RI_065br_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63237 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI VICTR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 424. RIC IV 632 (Rated scarce). RSC 194
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065bo_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63324 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENER VICTOR, Venus standing left, holding apple in right hand, sceptre in left
Minted in Rome. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 423. RIC IV 633 (Rated scarce). RSC 189
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065s_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63613 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– CERERI F-RVGIF, Ceres seated left, holding grain ears in right hand, torch in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 202
References:– BMC S10-13. RIC 636. RSC 14.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065by_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 63636 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– CERERI FRVGIF, Ceres seated left, holding grain ears in right hand, torch in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 202
References:– BMC S10-13. RIC 636. RSC 14.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065r_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64117 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– LAETI-TIA, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath in right hand, anchor in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 196 - 202
References:– BMC 604. RIC 641. RSC 101.
Martin Griffiths
RI_065aw_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64311 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas, veiled, standing left, by altar, raising both hands
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 198-202
Reference:– BMCRE 612. RIC 643. RSC 156.
maridvnvm
RI_065n_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 643 (example 1)13 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas, veiled, standing left, by altar, raising both hands
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 198-202
References:– BMCRE 612, RIC 643, RSC 156

The two examples of this coin here have different reverse legend breaks
Martin Griffiths
RI_065o_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 643 (example 2)15 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas, veiled, standing left, by altar, raising both hands
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 198-202
References:– BMCRE 612, RIC 643, RSC 156

The two examples of this coin here have different reverse legend breaks
Martin Griffiths
RI_065k_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64412 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– PVDICITIA, Pudicitia veiled seated left, hand on breast
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare, A.D. 198 - 202
References:– BMCRE 614, RIC 644, RSC 168
Martin Griffiths
RI_065bp_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64618 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS FELIX, Venus standing facing, head left, apple in right, scepter in left
Minted in Laodicea ad Mare. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE 620. RIC IV 646, RSC III 197
maridvnvm
RI_065bu_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 64825 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– VESTAE SANCTAE, Vesta standing left, veiled, patera in right, sceptre in left
Minted in Laodicea-ad-Mare. A.D. 195-198
Reference:– BMCRE 622-624. RIC IV 648. RSC 246
maridvnvm
RI_065bc_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC IV [Caracalla] 39111 viewsObv:– IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta seated left, holding simpulum and scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– BMCRE 31. RIC IV [Caracalla] 391. RSC 226.
maridvnvm
RI_065as_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted56 viewsObv:– IVLA (sic) DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VENERI VICTI (sic), Venus, nude with drapery falling below hips, standing with back turned, head right, resting left arm on low column, holding an apple in extended right hand and palm, sloping upward to left in left hand: coil of drapery falls over column
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
RIC -, RSC -, BMCRE -.

2.25g. 17.65mm. 0o
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_065ar_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted17 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– FORTVN REDVCI, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 193-196
Reference:– BMCRE -. RIC IV -. RSC -.
maridvnvm
RI_065av_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted18 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– LIBER AVG, Liberalitas standing left, holding abacus in right hand, cornucopiae in left
Minted in Emesa. A.D. 194 195
Reference:– RIC IV -.
maridvnvm
RI 065x img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted mule48 viewsObv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VIRTVS AVG COS II, Roma, seated left on shield, holding Victory and spear
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– RIC - (Unlisted Hybrid with reverse from Sept. Sev. 350I (which is R2))

This is possibly the third recorded specimen.
maridvnvm
RI_065bg_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC unlisted mule52 viewsObv:– IVLA (sic) DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– VIRTVS AVG COS II, Roma, seated left on shield, holding Victory and spear
Minted in Alexandria, A.D. 194
References:– RIC - (Unlisted Hybrid with reverse from Sept. Sev. 350I (which is R2))

A rare coin type.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
GI_065c_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna drachm - Syd 44118 viewsAR Drachm
Obv:– IOVLIA DOMNA CE, Draped bust right, hair tied in bun behind
Rev:– MHTPOPO KAICAPIAC, Tyche standing left holding rudder & cornucopiae
Minted in Cappadocia, Caesarea. ET E in exe. Year 5 = A.D. 196/197
Reference:– Syd 441.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
GI 065a img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna, AE23, Antioch Pisidia, Men 29 viewsAE23
Obv:– IVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– ANTIOC-H MENCIS, Mên standing right, holding sceptre and Nike with trophy in left hand, sceptre in right; cock to left and bucranium at feet
Minted in Pisidia, Antioch
maridvnvm
RI 066al img.jpg
066 - Caracalla denarius - RIC 21421 viewsObv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate bust right
Rev:– INDVLG FECVNDAE, Julia Domna seated left, on curule chair, holding sceptre
Reference:– RIC 214. RSC 104
Small red staining on reverse.
maridvnvm
GI 066b img.jpg
066 - Caracalla, AE26, Markianopolis, Nemesis57 viewsAE26 (5 Assarion)
Obv:– ANTWNINOC AVGOVCTOC IOVLIA DOMNA, Confronted busts of Caracalla and Julia Domna
Rev: VP KVNTILIANOV MARKIANOPOLITWN, Nemesis standing left, holding scales and short torch (arshin), wheel at side. E in field
Minted in MARKIANOPOLIS (Moesia Inferior).

The following information comes courtesy of Patricia Lawrence:-

“...I can't just cite Pick. When she holds the scales as well as the goad and has the wheel, it is fair to call her Nemesis-Aequitas. But yours is a plain, straightforward Nemesis. No holding of the cloth of her dress, no griffin by her wheel (Pick 676), which I'd call fancy Nemesis, and no scales of Aequitas (Dikaiosyne) in outstretched right hand (Pick 677). Nor did I identify it in Varbanov's list. If he'd seen it in a regional collection or in a recent auction catalogue, it would be there......just cite "cf. AMNG I, 1, no. 677 (which also has scales)".”
2 commentsmaridvnvm
070.jpg
069 Julian II7 viewsEMPEROR: Julian II
DENOMINATION: AE3
OBVERSE: DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, helmeted, pearl-diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield
REVERSE: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within a wreath with a fancy bow
EXERGUE: BSIRM
DATE: 361-363 AD
MINT: Sirmium
WEIGHT:
RIC VIII Sirmium 108
Barnaba6
071.jpg
070 JULIAN II 15 viewsEMPEROR: Julian II
DENOMINATION:Siliqua
OBVERSE: FL CL IVLIA-NVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REVERSE: / VOTIS V MVLTIS X in four lines within wreath
EXERGUE: LVG
DATE:
MINT: Lugdunum
WEIGHT: 1.78 g
RIC VIII Lyons 218
Barnaba6
RI_072b_img.jpg
072 - Julia Paula denarius - RIC 21130 viewsObv:– IVLIA PAVLA AVG, Bare, draped head right
Rev:– CONCORDIA, Concordia seated left holding patera, elbow rests on arm of throne, star in left field.
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 211. RSC 6a.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 075b img.jpg
075 - Julia Soaemias denarius - RIC 243 (example 1)45 viewsDenarius,
Obv:- IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated lt., holding an apple and a sceptre, cupid stands before her.
References– RIC 243, RSC 14
maridvnvm
RI 075a img.jpg
075 - Julia Soaemias denarius - RIC 243 (example 2)40 viewsObv:- IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– VENVS CAELESTIS, Venus seated lt., holding an apple and a sceptre, cupid stands before her.
References– RIC 243, RSC 14
maridvnvm
IMG_8186.JPG
075. Julia Domna (Wife of Septimius Severus)25 viewsAv.: IVLIA DOMNA AVG
Rv.: VENERI VICTR

AR Denarius Ø15-19 / 2,1g
RIC 536 Rome, Cohen 194
Juancho
RI 076a img.jpg
076 - Julia Maesa denarius - RIC 25464 viewsObv:- IVLIA MAESA AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– IVNO, Juno veiled standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
References:- RIC 254, RSC 16
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_076e_img.jpg
076 - Julia Maesa denarius - RIC 26649 viewsDenarius
Obv:– IVLIA MAESA AVG Draped bust of Julia Maesa to right, her hair bound in a bun at the back
Rev:– PIETAS AVG Pietas standing facing, her head turned to left, raising both hands in prayer; at her feet to left, altar
Minted in Rome. A.D. 218-220
Reference– Cohen 34a. RIC 266

3.88g, 20.04mm, 180o
3 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_076d_img.jpg
076 - Julia Maesa denarius - RIC 27112 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAESA AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– SAECVLI FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left with long caduceus, sacrificing out of patera over lighted altar, star right
Minted in Rome.
Reference– RIC 271, RSC 45, BMC 79
maridvnvm
GI 077d img.jpg
077 - Severus Alexander and Julia Maesa, AE26, Markianopolis, Hera31 viewsAE26 (Pentassarion)
Obv:– AVT K M AVP CEVH AΛEΞANΔPOC KAI IOVΛIA MAICA, Confronted busts of Alexander and Maesa
Rev:– VΠ TIB IOVΛ ΦHCTOV MAPKIANOΠOΛITΩN, Hera standing with long dressing- gown, holding patera and scepter. E in right field
Minted in Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior
Reference:– Moushmov 732 ??
1 commentsmaridvnvm
J-Domna-RIC-564.jpg
077. Julia Domna.11 viewsDenarius, ca 198 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IVLIA AVGVSTA / Bust of Domna.
Reverse: MATER DEVM / Cybele, sitting on throne between two lions, holding branch and sceptre, arm resting on drum.
3.29 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #564; Sear #6593

The appearance of Cybele on the above coin shows Domna's interest in eastern religions. The various attributes of personifications and gods on the reverse of Roman coins were often associated with the person pictured on the obverse of the coin. In this case, the words MATER DEVM (Mother of the gods) applied to Domna is interesting since her sons were Caracalla and Geta.
Callimachus
RI 079d img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea AE Sestertius - RIC 70843 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, Diademed & draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA / S C, Vesta standing left, holding Palladium & scepter
References:– RIC 708
maridvnvm
RI 079a img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 33850 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG , Diademed and draped bust right
Rev:– FELICITAS PVBLICA, Felicity seated left, holding scepter and a cornucopiae
References:– RIC 338, RSC 24
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 079c img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 34329 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno, diademed, veiled, standing half-left, with patera & scepter & peacock at feet
References:– RIC 343, RSC 35
maridvnvm
RI_079i_img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 35121 viewsIVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right
Rev:– VENERI FELICI, Venus standing front, head right, holding Cupid & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 351, RSC 60, BMC 189
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 079e img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 35841 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed & draped bust right
Rev:– VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing front, head left, with helmet & scepter, shield at feet
References:– RIC 358, RSC 76
maridvnvm
RI_079h_img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 36021 viewsIVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Diademed, draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta standing half-left, holding palladium & scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– RIC 360, RSC 81, BMC 381
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 079b img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 36239 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta standing left holding patera and transverse scepter
References:– RIC 362, RSC 85
maridvnvm
RI_079g_img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 3629 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA, Vesta standing left holding patera and transverse scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference(s) – RSC 85. RIC 362
maridvnvm
RI_079f_img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea, Sestertius- RIC 70811 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA, Diademed & draped bust right
Rev:– VESTA / S C, Vesta standing left, holding Palladium and scepter
Minted in Rome.
Reference:– Cohen 83. RIC 708
 
20.78g, 31.50mm, 0o
maridvnvm
J-Domna-RIC-391.jpg
079. Julia Domna.12 viewsDenarius, ca 215 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG / Bust of Domna.
Reverse: VESTA / Vesta seated, holding simpulum and sceptre.
3.23 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #391; Sear #7109.

This coin of Domna was issued during the reign of her son Caracalla. The title PIA FELIX on the coins of Domna minted during her son's reign suggests that she played a definite part in the governing of the Empire.
Callimachus
AGRIPPINA.jpg
08-01 - AGRIPPINA MADRE (14 A.C. - 33 D.C.)91 viewsAE Sestercio 35 mm 25.6 gr.
Hija de Agrippa y Julia, nieta de Augusto, mujer de Germánico y madre de Calígula. Emisión póstuma acuñada por su cuñado Claudio.

Anv: "AGRIPPINA M F GERMANICI [CAESARIS]" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[TI CL]AVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 42 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #102 Pag.128 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1906 Pag.376 - BMCRE #219 - Cohen Vol.1 #3 Pag.231 - DVM #2 Pag.78 - CBN (Claudius) #236 - Von Kaenel #78, pl.49, 2063
1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_102_Sestercio_Agripina_Sr_.jpg
08-01 - AGRIPPINA MADRE (14 A.C. - 33 D.C.)14 viewsAE Sestercio 35 mm 25.6 gr.
Hija de Agrippa y Julia, nieta de Augusto, mujer de Germánico y madre de Calígula. Emisión póstuma acuñada por su cuñado Claudio.

Anv: "AGRIPPINA M F GERMANICI [CAESARIS]" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[TI CL]AVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 42 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #102 Pag.128 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1906 Pag.376 - BMCRE #219 - Cohen Vol.1 #3 Pag.231 - DVM #2 Pag.78 - CBN (Claudius) #236 - Von Kaenel #78, pl.49, 2063
mdelvalle
IMG_5280.JPG
082. Julia Maesa (grandmother of Elagabalus, sister of Julia Domna)13 viewsAv.: IVLIA MAESA AVG
Rv.: PVDICITIA

AR Denarius Ø19 / 1.9g
RIC IV 268 Rome, Cohen 36
Juancho
IMG_5293.JPG
083. Julia Soaemias (mother of Elagabalus)13 viewsAv.: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG
Rv.: VENVS CAELESTIS
Right: star

AR Denarius Ø18-20 / 2.1g
RIC IV 241 Rome, Cohen 8
Juancho
IMG_4073~0.jpg
088. Julia Mamaea (Mother of Severus Alexander)14 viewsAv.: IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA
Rv.: VENVS FELIX / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø30 / 20.4g
RIC IV 701 Rome, Cohen 69
Juancho
GI 077c img.jpg
092 - Severus Alexander and Julia Maesa, AE25, Markianopolis, Dikaiosyne26 viewsAE25
Obv:– AVT K M AVP CEVH ALEXANDROC KAI IOVLIA MAICA, Confronted busts of Alexander and Maesa
Rev:– VP TIB IOVL FHCTOV MARKIANOPOLEITWN, Dikaiosyne/Aequitas standing with scales and cornucopiae; on her arm – her article of clothing. E in right field.
Magistrate Tiberius Julius Festus
Minted in Markianopolis, Moesia Inferior

Ref??? Any help most welcome.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
LFarsuleiusDen.jpg
0b Italy Gets Roman Citizenship13 viewsL Farsuleius Mensor, moneyer
76-71 BC

Denarius

Diademed and draped head of Liberty, right, SC below, MENSOR before, cap of Liberty and number behind
Roma in biga helping togate figure mount, L FARSVLEI in ex.

Appears to allude to the Lex Julia of 90 BC, by which all of Italy gained Roman citizenship

Seaby, Farsuleia 1
Blindado
0001JUL.jpg
1) Julius Caesar159 viewsDenarius, Rome, Moneyer P. Sepullius Macer, 44 BC, 4.03g. Cr-480/11, Syd-1072; Sear, Imperators-107b. Obv: Wreathed head of Caesar r., CAESAR before, D[IC]T PERPETVO behind. Rx: Venus standing l., looking downwards, holding Victory and scepter resting on star, P SEPVLLIVS behind, MACER downwards before. Same dies as Alfoldi, Caesar in 44 v. Chr., pl. LIII, 6-8. Banker's mark behind Caesar's eye. Good portrait. Some areas of flat striking, otherwise EF

Ex HJB - purchased on the Ides of March, 2011

Gaius Julius Caesar (Classical Latin: [ˈɡaː.i.ʊs ˈjuː.lɪ.ʊs ˈkaj.sar], July 100 BC – 15 March 44 BC) was a Roman general, statesman, Consul and notable author of Latin prose. He played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. In 60 BC, Caesar, Crassus and Pompey formed a political alliance that was to dominate Roman politics for several years. Their attempts to amass power through populist tactics were opposed by the conservative elite within the Roman Senate, among them Cato the Younger with the frequent support of Cicero. Caesar's conquest of Gaul, completed by 51 BC, extended Rome's territory to the English Channel and the Rhine. Caesar became the first Roman general to cross both when he built a bridge across the Rhine and conducted the first invasion of Britain.

These achievements granted him unmatched military power and threatened to eclipse the standing of Pompey, who had realigned himself with the Senate after the death of Crassus in 53 BC. With the Gallic Wars concluded, the Senate ordered Caesar to lay down his military command and return to Rome. Caesar refused, and marked his defiance in 49 BC by crossing the Rubicon with a legion, leaving his province and illegally entering Roman territory under arms. Civil war resulted, from which he emerged as the unrivaled leader of Rome.

After assuming control of government, Caesar began a program of social and governmental reforms, including the creation of the Julian calendar. He centralised the bureaucracy of the Republic and was eventually proclaimed "dictator in perpetuity". But the underlying political conflicts had not been resolved, and on the Ides of March (15 March) 44 BC, Caesar was assassinated by a group of senators led by Marcus Junius Brutus. A new series of civil wars broke out, and the constitutional government of the Republic was never restored. Caesar's adopted heir Octavian, later known as Augustus, rose to sole power, and the era of the Roman Empire began.

Much of Caesar's life is known from his own accounts of his military campaigns, and from other contemporary sources, mainly the letters and speeches of Cicero and the historical writings of Sallust. The later biographies of Caesar by Suetonius and Plutarch are also major sources. Caesar is deemed to be one of the greatest military commanders of history. Source: wikipedia
RM0001
13 commentsSosius
Augusto_JULIA_TRADUCTA.jpg
1-3-4 - AUGUSTUS (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.)48 viewsColonia Julia Traducta
Hispania

AE AS 25 mm 13.3 gr

Anv: ”PERM CAES AVG” – Cabeza desnuda, viendo a izquierda.
Rev: ”IVLIA TRAD” – Leyenda en dos lineas, dentro de una corona de hojas de roble.

Acuñada: aproximadamente 15 A.C. - 14 D.C.

Referencias: RPC #108 – SNG Cop #459 - Sear GICV I #18, Pag.3 - Sear '88 #538 - Cohen #623, Pag.151 - Vives #164.13 - Heiss #2, Pag.336
mdelvalle
Julian_II_siliqua.jpg
10 Julian the Apostate24 viewsReduced AR Silqua, heavily clipped.

Bust right // VOTIS / V / MVLTIS / X inside wreath, mintmark clipped off.
Sosius
Denario_Claudio_I_y_Agripina_jr.jpg
10-01 - CLAUDIO (41 - 54 D.C.)71 viewsAR Denario 3.13 grs.

Anv: TI. CLAVD. CAESAR AVG. GERM. P. M. TRIB. POT. P. P.. Cabeza laureada de Claudio a derecha.
Rev: AGRIPPINAE AVGVSTAE. Busto de Agripina a derecha con corona de espigas.

Julia Vipsania Agripina , más conocida cómo Agripina la Menor para distinguirla de su madre, fue la hija mayor de Germánico y Agripina la Mayor, bisnieta por tanto de Marco Antonio y Octavia. Fue además Esposa de Ahenobarbo, hermana de Calígula, mujer y sobrina de Claudio I y madre de Nerón.

Acuñada 50 - 54 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #81 Pag.126 (Plate.16) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1886 Pag.371 - BMCRE Vol.1 #75 - Cohen Vol.1 (Agrippine et Claude) #4 Pag.274 - DVM #27 Pag.84 - CBN #82 - RSC Vol. II #4 Pag.11
3 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_81_Claudio_y_Agripina_Jr_.jpg
10-01 - CLAUDIO y AGRIPINA Jr. (41 - 54 D.C.)27 viewsAR Denario 20.0 mm 3.13 grs.

Anv: TI. CLAVD. CAESAR AVG. GERM. P. M. TRIB. POT. P. P.. Cabeza laureada de Claudio a derecha.
Rev: AGRIPPINAE AVGVSTAE. Busto de Agripina a derecha con corona de espigas.

Julia Vipsania Agripina , más conocida cómo Agripina la Menor para distinguirla de su madre, fue la hija mayor de Germánico y Agripina la Mayor, bisnieta por tanto de Marco Antonio y Octavia. Fue además Esposa de Ahenobarbo, hermana de Calígula, mujer y sobrina de Claudio I y madre de Nerón.

Acuñada 50 - 54 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #81 Pag.126 (Plate.16) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1886 Pag.371 - BMCRE Vol.1 #75 - Cohen Vol.1 (Agrippine et Claude) #4 Pag.274 - DVM #27 Pag.84 - CBN #82 - RSC Vol. II #4 Pag.11
1 commentsmdelvalle
L__Julius_L_f__Caesar_AR-Den_CAESAR_L-IVLI-L-F_Crawford-320-1_Julia-4_Sydenham-593_103_BC_Q-001_axis-7h_19mm_2,99g-s.jpg
103 B.C., L. Julius L.f. Caesar, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 320/1, Rome, Venus in biga of Cupids left,127 views103 B.C., L. Julius L.f. Caesar, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 320/1, Rome, Venus in biga of Cupids left,
avers: Helmeted head of Mars left, behind, CAESAR, above, control mark. The controlmark is retrograde Q which was heretofore unknown (by forarr).
reverse: Venus in biga of Cupids left, holding sceptre and reins, above, control mark, below, lyre, in exergue: L•IVLI•L•F•.
exergue: -/-//L•IVLI•L•F•, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 103 B.C., ref: Crawford 320/1, Sydenham 593a., Julia 4a.,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
image~1.jpg
108. Didius Julianus57 views193 A.D. - The Year of Five Emperors. On 1 January, the Senate selected Pertinax, against his will, to succeed the late Commodus as Emperor. The Praetorian Guard assassinated him on 28 March and auctioned the throne to the highest bidder, Didius Julianus, who offered 300 million sesterces. Outraged by the Praetorians, legions in Illyricum select Septimius Severus as emperor; in Britannia the legions select their governor Clodius Albinus, and in Syria the legions select their governor Pescennius Niger. On 1 June Septimius Severus entered the capital, put Julianus put to death and replaced the Praetorian Guard with his own troops. Clodius Albinus allied with Severus and accepted the title of Caesar. Pescennius Niger was defeated, killed and his head displayed in Rome.


SH67895. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC VI 14, BMCRE V 20, Cohen 3, Cayon III 1, SRCV II 6075, aF, weight 19.437 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, obverse IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right; reverse CONCORD MILIT, S - C, Concordia Militum standing half left, flanked by legionary eagle before in right and standard behind in left.

Ex-FORVM


1 commentsecoli
T1356LG.jpg
108a MANLIA SCANTILLA63 viewsAE sestertius. Rome mint.
MANL SCANTILLA AVG. Draped bust right / IVNO REGINA SC. Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at feet. RIC IV 18b (Didius Julianus). VERY RARE

Check
2 commentsecoli
Personajes_Imperiales_11.jpg
11 - Personalities of the Empire49 views
Magnentius, Decentius, Vetranius, Constantius Gallo, Julian II, Jovian, Valentinianus I, Valens, Procopius, Gratianus, Valentinianus II, Theodosius I, Aelia Flacilla and Magnus Maximus
mdelvalle
0010-060np_noir.jpg
1163 - D. Junius L.F. Silanus, As114 viewsAs minted in Rome, 91 BC
No legend, Head of Janus
D SILANVS L F, Prow of galley right
12.08 gr
Ref : RCV # 738

The following comment from : http://www.forumancientcoins.com/historia/historia.htm

"Decimus Junius Silanus was the son of M. Junius Silanus, who commanded the army that was defeated by the Germanic Cimbri in Transalpine Gaul.

Decimus was the stepfather of Marcus Brutus, the murderer of Caesar, having married his mother Servilia. He was elected consul in 63 for the following year ; and in consequence of his being consul designatus, he was first asked for his opinion by Cicero in the debate in the senate on the punishment of the Catilinarian conspirators. He was consul 62, with L. Licinius Morena, along with whom he proposed the Lex Licinia Julia".
Potator II
795_P_Hadrian_RPC.JPG
1259 LYDIA, Julia Gordus Pseudo-autonomous under Uncertain reign, 138-92 AD Mên standing20 viewsReference.
RPC IV, 1259; BMC 5

Obv. ΙƐΡΑ СΥΝΚΛΗΤοc
Draped bust of the Senate (youthful), right

Rev. ΓΟΡΔΗΝΩΝ ΙΟΥΛΙΕΩΝ
Mên standing, l., wearing Phrygian cap, holding patera and long sceptre; behind his shoulders, crescent

5.94 gr
20 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
014~1.JPG
13 Julian II112 viewsJulian II. AE3 355-360 AD. DN IVLIANVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier standing left, spearing fallen horseman who is wearing Phrygian helmet, reaching backwards, M in left field. Mintmark Delta SIS Zigzag. Siscia RIC VIII 370 Scarce1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2757.JPG
13 Julian II 75 viewsJulian II . D N IVLIA-NVS NOB C, draped and cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a Phrygian helmet, reaching backwards, M in left field, mintmark Delta SISL.
Siscia
RIC VIII 382
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
136a.jpg
136a Julian II. AE1 8.9gm25 viewsobv: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SECVRITAS REI PVB bull, head facing, std. r. above two stars
ex: CVZB
hill132
136c.jpg
136c Julian II. AE3 2.4gm18 viewsobv: DN FL CL IVLI_ANVS PF AVG dia. helm. drp. bust l. holding spear and shield
rev: VOT/X/MVLT/XX in laur. wreath
ex: ASIRM
hill132
antpius_RIC143d.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 158-159 AD64 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP (laureate head right)
rev: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII (octastyle temple [8 columns] in which the statues of Augustus and Livia reside)
ref: RIC III 143D (R), Cohen 809 (8frcs)
3.01 gms, 18mm,
Rare

History: The Temple of Divus Augustus was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design (see my Caligula sestertius). During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus.
It was restored again in the late 150s by Antoninus Pius, who was perhaps motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple was an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's origin-myth. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
1 commentsberserker
CTGDafne.jpg
1403c, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.49 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC VII 35, choice aEF, Constantinople mint, 3.336g, 20.0mm, 180o, 328 A.D.; Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: CONSTANTINI-ANA DAFNE, Victory seated left on cippus, head right, palm frond in each hand, trophy and captive before, CONS in exergue, B left; scarce. Ex FORVM.

"The information about Constantine's campaign across [the Danube] is obscure and untrustworthy. The question, therefore, of what he achieved by this enterprise was, and is, subject to contradictory interpretations. On the one hand, the Panegyrists claimed that he had repeated the triumphs of Trajan. On the other, his own nephew, Julian the Apostate, spoke for many when he expressed the view that this second 'conquest' of Dacia was incomplete and extremely brief . . . monetary commemoration was accorded to the building, at about the same time [AD 328], of the river frontier fortress of Constantiniana Dafne (Spantov, near Oltenita) . . ." (Grant, Michael. The Emperor Constantine. London: Phoenix, 1998. 58-9).

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
1 commentsCleisthenes
CrispusRIC17.jpg
1404a, Crispus, Caesar 317 - 326 A.D. 38 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 17, aEF, Cyzicus mint, 3.196g, 19.9mm, 315o, 321 - 324 A.D.; Obverse: D N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe in right and scepter in left, eagle with wreath in beak to left, X / IIG and captive right, SMKD in exergue; scarce (RIC R3). Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis;
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Crispus Caesar (317-326 A.D.)

Hans Pohlsander
SUNY Albany

Crispus was the oldest son of the emperor Constantine I and played a fairly important role in the political and military events of the early fourth century. The regular form of his full name is Flavius Iulius Crispus, although the forms Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus also occur. His mother was a woman named Minervina, with whom Constantine had a relationship, probably illegitimate, before he married Fausta in 307. When Minervina died or when Constantine put her aside we do not know. Nor do we know when she gave birth to Crispus; we may assume, of course, that it was before 307. Some modern authorities, on good grounds, think that it was in 305. Crispus' place of birth must have been somewhere in the East, and it is not known when he was brought to Gaul and when, where, or under what circumstances he was separated from his mother.

Constantine entrusted the education of his son to the distinguished Christian scholar Lactantius, thereby giving a clear sign of his commitment to Christianity. We are not told when Lactantius assumed his duties, but a date before 317 seems likely. Nor do we know how successful he was in instilling Christian beliefs and values in his imperial pupil. No later than January of 322 Crispus must have married a woman named Helena -- not to be confused with Constantine's mother or daughter by the same name- and this woman bore him a child in October of 322. Constantine, we learn, was pleased.

Crispus' official career began at an early age and is well documented. On March 1 of 317, at Serdica (modern Sofia), his father appointed him Caesar. The consulship was his three times, in 318, 321, and 324. While nominally in charge of Gaul, with a prefect at his side, he successfully undertook military operations against the Franks and Alamanni in 320 and 323.

In 324, during the second war between Constantine and Licinius, he excelled as commander of Constantine's fleet in the waters of the Hellespont, the Propontis, and the Bosporus, thus making a significant contribution to the outcome of that war. The high points of his career are amply reflected in the imperial coinage. In addition to coins, we have his portrait, with varying degrees of certainty, in a number of sculptures, mosaics, cameos, etc. Contemporary authors heap praises upon him. Thus the panegyrist Nazarius speaks of Crispus' "magnificent deeds," and Eusebius calls him "an emperor most dear to God and in all regards comparable to his father."

Crispus' end was as tragic as his career had been brilliant. His own father ordered him to be put to death. We know the year of this sad event, 326, from the Consularia Constantinopolitana, and the place, Pola in Istria, from Ammianus Marcellinus. The circumstances, however, are less clear. Zosimus (6th c.) and Zonaras (12th c.) both report that Crispus and his stepmother Fausta were involved in an illicit relationship. There may be as much gossip as fact in their reports, but it is certain that at some time during the same year the emperor ordered the death of his own wife as well, and the two cases must be considered together. That Crispus and Fausta plotted treason is reported by Gregory of Tours, but not very believable. We must resolutely reject the claim of Zosimus that it was Constantine's sense of guilt over these deeds which caused him to accept Christianity, as it alone promised him forgiveness for his sins. A similar claim had already been made by Julian the Apostate. We must also, I think, reject the suggestion of Guthrie that the emperor acted in the interest of "dynastic legitimacy," that is, that he removed his illegitimate first-born son in order to secure the succession for his three legitimate younger sons. But Crispus must have committed, or at least must have been suspected of having committed, some especially shocking offense to earn him a sentence of death from his own father. He also suffered damnatio memoriae, his honor was never restored, and history has not recorded the fate of his wife and his child (or children).

Copyright (C) 1997, Hans A. Pohlsander. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis;An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families:
http://www.roman-emperors.org/crispus.htm


What If?

St. Nectarios, in his book, The Ecumenical Synods, writes "Hellenism spread by Alexander paved the way for Christianity by Emperor Constantine the Great."

Constantine's upward gaze on his "Eyes to Heaven" coins recall the coin portraits of Alexander the Great (namely coins struck by the Diodochi), which served as prototypes for the divine ruler portraiture of much of the Hellenistic age. The diadem, of which this is the most elaborate type, was adopted by Constantine and the members of his house as a new symbol of sovereignty.

In the Greek Orthodox Church, Constantine the Great is revered as a Saint.

Is it just possible? Constantine, knowing what happened (or thinking that he does) to Phillip II of Macedon—assassinated on the eve of his greatness, in a plot that most likely involved his wife—and possibly his son. . . isn’t it just possible that Constantine is growing obsessively jealous of his ever more successful and adulated son? Imagine the Constantine who has proven time and again (think: Licinius) that he is a completely self-serving liar and a murderer, decides to murder again? Why "must we resolutely reject the claim of Zosimus that it was Constantine's sense of guilt over these deeds which caused him to accept Christianity, as it alone promised him forgiveness for his sins [?] (see: above). A similar claim had already been made by Julian the [Philosopher]."

Perhaps it is time to cease being apologists for the sometime megalomaniacal Constantine. As Michael Grant notes, "It is a mocking travesty of justice to call such a murderer Constantine the Great . . ." (Grant, Michael. The Emperor Constantine. London: Phoenix Press, 1998. 226).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
crispus_votV.jpg
1404b, Crispus, Caesar 317 - 326 A.D. (Thessalonica)35 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 118, VF, Thessalonica mint, 2.740g, 18.0mm, 180o, 320 - 321 A.D. Obverse: FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT V in wreath, TSDVI in exergue.

Flavius Julius Crispus was the son of Constantine I by his first wife. A brilliant soldier, Crispus was well loved by all until 326 A.D., when Constantine had him executed. It is said that Fausta, Crispus stepmother, anxious to secure the succession for her own sons falsely accused Crispus of raping her. Constantine, learning of Fausta`s treachery, had her executed too.


De Imperatoribus Romanis;
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Crispus Caesar (317-326 A.D.)

Hans Pohlsander
SUNY Albany

Crispus was the oldest son of the emperor Constantine I and played a fairly important role in the political and military events of the early fourth century. The regular form of his full name is Flavius Iulius Crispus, although the forms Flavius Claudius Crispus and Flavius Valerius Crispus also occur. His mother was a woman named Minervina, with whom Constantine had a relationship, probably illegitimate, before he married Fausta in 307. When Minervina died or when Constantine put her aside we do not know. Nor do we know when she gave birth to Crispus; we may assume, of course, that it was before 307. Some modern authorities, on good grounds, think that it was in 305. Crispus' place of birth must have been somewhere in the East, and it is not known when he was brought to Gaul and when, where, or under what circumstances he was separated from his mother.

Constantine entrusted the education of his son to the distinguished Christian scholar Lactantius, thereby giving a clear sign of his commitment to Christianity. We are not told when Lactantius assumed his duties, but a date before 317 seems likely. Nor do we know how successful he was in instilling Christian beliefs and values in his imperial pupil. No later than January of 322 Crispus must have married a woman named Helena -- not to be confused with Constantine's mother or daughter by the same name- and this woman bore him a child in October of 322. Constantine, we learn, was pleased.

Crispus' official career began at an early age and is well documented. On March 1 of 317, at Serdica (modern Sofia), his father appointed him Caesar. The consulship was his three times, in 318, 321, and 324. While nominally in charge of Gaul, with a prefect at his side, he successfully undertook military operations against the Franks and Alamanni in 320 and 323.

In 324, during the second war between Constantine and Licinius, he excelled as commander of Constantine's fleet in the waters of the Hellespont, the Propontis, and the Bosporus, thus making a significant contribution to the outcome of that war. The high points of his career are amply reflected in the imperial coinage. In addition to coins, we have his portrait, with varying degrees of certainty, in a number of sculptures, mosaics, cameos, etc. Contemporary authors heap praises upon him. Thus the panegyrist Nazarius speaks of Crispus' "magnificent deeds," and Eusebius calls him "an emperor most dear to God and in all regards comparable to his father."

Crispus' end was as tragic as his career had been brilliant. His own father ordered him to be put to death. We know the year of this sad event, 326, from the Consularia Constantinopolitana, and the place, Pola in Istria, from Ammianus Marcellinus. The circumstances, however, are less clear. Zosimus (6th c.) and Zonaras (12th c.) both report that Crispus and his stepmother Fausta were involved in an illicit relationship. There may be as much gossip as fact in their reports, but it is certain that at some time during the same year the emperor ordered the death of his own wife as well, and the two cases must be considered together. That Crispus and Fausta plotted treason is reported by Gregory of Tours, but not very believable. We must resolutely reject the claim of Zosimus that it was Constantine's sense of guilt over these deeds which caused him to accept Christianity, as it alone promised him forgiveness for his sins. A similar claim had already been made by Julian the Apostate. We must also, I think, reject the suggestion of Guthrie that the emperor acted in the interest of "dynastic legitimacy," that is, that he removed his illegitimate first-born son in order to secure the succession for his three legitimate younger sons. But Crispus must have committed, or at least must have been suspected of having committed, some especially shocking offense to earn him a sentence of death from his own father. He also suffered damnatio memoriae, his honor was never restored, and history has not recorded the fate of his wife and his child (or children).

Copyright (C) 1997, Hans A. Pohlsander. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis;An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families:
http://www.roman-emperors.org/crispus.htm


What If?

St. Nectarios, in his book, The Ecumenical Synods, writes "Hellenism spread by Alexander paved the way for Christianity by Emperor Constantine the Great."

Constantine's upward gaze on his "Eyes to Heaven" coins recall the coin portraits of Alexander the Great (namely coins struck by the Diodochi), which served as prototypes for the divine ruler portraiture of much of the Hellenistic age. The diadem, of which this is the most elaborate type, was adopted by Constantine and the members of his house as a new symbol of sovereignty.

In the Greek Orthodox Church, Constantine the Great is revered as a Saint.

Is it just possible? Constantine, knowing what happened (or thinking that he does) to Phillip II of Macedon—assassinated on the eve of his greatness, in a plot that most likely involved his wife—and possibly his son. . . isn’t it just possible that Constantine is growing obsessively jealous of his ever more successful and adulated son? Imagine the Constantine who has proven time and again (think: Licinius) that he is a completely self-serving liar and a murderer, decides to murder again? Why "must we resolutely reject the claim of Zosimus that it was Constantine's sense of guilt over these deeds which caused him to accept Christianity, as it alone promised him forgiveness for his sins [?] (see: above). A similar claim had already been made by Julian the [Philosopher]."

Perhaps it is time to cease being apologists for the sometime megalomaniacal Constantine. As Michael Grant notes, "It is a mocking travesty of justice to call such a murderer Constantine the Great . . ." (Grant, Michael. The Emperor Constantine. London: Phoenix Press, 1998. 226).


Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
U809F1JMXNTCBT.jpg
1407a, Constantius II, 337-361 A.D. (Antioch)51 viewsAE4, 337-361 A.D. Antioch, aVF/VF,Obv:– DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl and rosette diadem, head right/R: Wreath with VOT XX MVLT XXX, SMANB in exe.RIC VIII Antioch 113,Item ref: RI170b.

AE3, 2.80 grams, 330-333, Heraclea, aVF. Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. R: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards Exe: SMHB.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated his cousin, Julian, to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success led his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore, left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
Cnstntius2b.jpg
1407h, Constantius II, 337-361 A.D. (Heraclea)32 viewsConstantius II 337-361 A.D. AE3, 2.80 grams, 330-333, Heraclea, aVF. Obverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed; Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards; SMHB in exergue.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated his cousin, Julian, to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success led his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore, left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.
By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Constantius II.jpg
1407r, Constantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.39 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 272, aVF, 2.203g, 18.1mm, 0o, Rome mint, 352 - 355 A.D.; obverse D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman, RT in ex.

Constantius II was born in Illyricum in August AD 317, the son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, and was proclaimed Caesar in AD 323.

In AD 337, at the death of his father Constantine, he acceded to the throne together with his two brothers Constantine II and Constans. But this accession by the three brothers was tainted by the murder of their cousins Dalmatius and Hannibalianus, whom Constantine had also intended as joint heirs. These murders are believed to have been masterminded by Constantius II.

Eventually, Constantius II was left as the sole emperor of the Roman empire. Constantius elevated Julian to the rank of Caesar (junior emperor) and gave him his sister Helena in marriage. Julian was assigned the task of dealing with the Frankish leader, Silvanus, who had proclaimed himself emepror at Colonia Agrippina. Julian's success lead his men to declare him Augustus. Julian, while reluctant to take the throne, accepted.

Constantius II, therefore left the Mesopotamian frontier and marched his troops west, seeking to deal with the usurper. As he reached Cilicia in the winter of AD 361, he was overcome by a sudden fever and died at Mopsucrene. Julian, the Apostate, succeded him as Emperor.

Our chief source for Constantius' reign is the great historian Ammianus Marcellinus. He presents a mixed view of that emperor. In some ways a sound administrator and competent general, Constantius is also portrayed as easily influenced by those around him such as his wives, courtiers and the eunuchs of the court (Ammianus 21. 16. 16). Ammianus (21.16.18) also attacks Constantius' great interest in Church affairs--alleging that he bankrupted the courier service with calls for Church councils. Of course, imperial interest in Church affairs was a major policy of his father Constantine and it may be that Constantius was trying to emulate his model (if only with mixed success). Indeed, Constantius II (like his brothers Constantine II and Constans) was raised a Christian. Among his many laws is the famous CTh 16.10.2 of 341 which either prohibited or re-issued his father's prohibition of pagan sacrifices. Sympathetic to Arianism, he spent a great deal of his reign calling Church councils. One of the longest-reigned emperors in Roman history, Constantius is hard for the modern historian to fully understand both due to his own actions and due to the interests of the authors of primary sources for his reign.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University & Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.



Cleisthenes
Julian2VotXConstantinople.jpg
1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.143 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
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1410a, Jovian, 27 June 363 - 17 February 364 A.D.78 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 179, aVF, Constantinople, 3.126g, 21.6mm, 180o. Obverse: D N IOVIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left; Reverse: VOT V MVLT X within wreath, CONSPG in exergue; scarce.

Flavius Jovianuswas born in 331 at Singidunum, modern Belgrade. His distinguished father, Varronianus, had been a tribune of the legion Ioviani and a comes domesticorum, perhaps under Constantius II, who had retired to private life shortly before Jovian's elevation to the purple. Jovian married a daughter of Lucillianus, perhaps named Charito, and by her produced at least two children.

Jovian himself was a protector domesticus under Constantius II and Julian and, under Julian, primicerius domesticorum. Various Christian sources maintain that Jovian's Christianity led to his deposition by Julian, though most modern scholars dismiss this as ex post facto Christian apologetic. Jovian, recalled to the ranks if he had ever been dismissed, marched with Julian against Sapor in 363, and on 27 June, the day after that emperor's death, was acclaimed Augustus.

Ammianus and Zosimus, among others, detail the difficult straits of the Roman army during its withdrawal from Persian territory, Ammianus from the perspective of a proud soldier confident even in defeat of the superiority of Roman arms, Zosimus, in a much shorter and confused version, concentrating on the predicament of Jovian's troops and on the dire effects to the empire of the peace terms agreed to with Sapor. These terms entailed the cessation to Persia of Roman territory beyond the Tigris -- the cities of Singara and Nisibis, however, to be surrendered on the condition of the safe passage of their inhabitants -- and the guarantee of the neutrality of Rome's ally Arsaces, King of Armenia, in the event of future hostilities between Roman and Persia. Ammianus asserts that in agreeing to these terms Jovian misjudged his tactical strength and wasted an opportunity presented by negotiations with Sapor to move his forces closer to supplies at Corduena, and that Jovian acted on the advise of flatterers to preserve the fighting strength of his forces in the event of an attempt by Julian's relative Procopius to seize the throne. Others present the treaty terms as unavoidable given the Roman predicament.

Jovian appears to have treaded cautiously with regard to religious matters during the early months of his reign. Eunapius says that Jovian continued to honor Maximus and Priscus, the Neoplatonist advisors of Julian, and, upon reaching Tarsus, Jovian performed funeral rites for Julian. Nonetheless, various Christians, most notably Athanasius, took the initiative in an effort to gain Jovian's favor and support. An adherent of the Nicaean creed, Jovian did eventually recall various bishops of homoousian disposition and restore to their followers churches lost under earlier emperors. But in spite of such measures, unity among various Christian sects seems to have been the foremost concern of Jovian, whose ipsissima verba Socrates Scholasticus purports to give: "I abhor contentiousness, but love and honor those hurrying towards unanimity" (Hist. Eccl. 3.25).

Jovian died at the age of thirty-two on 17 February 364 at Dadastana on the boundary of Bithynia and Galatia. The cause of his death was most probably natural and is variously attributed to overeating, the consumption of poisonous mushrooms, or suffocation from fumes of charcoal or of the fresh paint on the room in which he was sleeping. Ammianus' comparison of the circumstances of Jovian's death to those of Scipio Aemilianus suggest the possibility of foul play, as does John of Antioch's reference to a poisoned rather than a poisonous mushroom, while John Chrysostom -- in a highly suspect literary context of consolatio-- asserts outright that the emperor was murdered. Eutropius records that he was enrolled among the gods, inter Divos relatus est. Zonaras says he was buried in the Church of the Holy Apostles and that his wife, Charito, was eventually laid to rest beside him.

Ancient authors agree that Jovian was of modest intellect but imposing physique and disposed to excessive eating and drinking.

By Thomas Banchich, Canisius College
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited By J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

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Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_xxONST-x_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-004_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 320, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #269 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 320, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #2
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above (D3).
exergue: -/-/SCONST•, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Arles, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 320, R!
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_TCONST-x_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-006_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 321, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 321, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVL IANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above (D3).
exergue: -/-/SCONST•, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Arles, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 321, R!
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_SCONST-x_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-001_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 322, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 322, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLIAN VS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above (D3).
exergue: -/-/SCONST•, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Arles, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 322, R!
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_S-CONST-dot_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-002_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 322, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #262 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 322, AE-1, -/-/SCONST•, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #2
avers: D N FL CL IVLIAN VS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above (D3).
exergue: -/-/SCONST•, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Arles, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 322, R!
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_x-CONST-A-dot_Constantinopolis-360-63_RIC-000_Q-007_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC VIII 161, AE-1, -/-//-/-//CONSPA, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Constantinopolis, RIC VIII 161, AE-1, -/-//-/-//CONSPA, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//CONSPA, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Constantinopolis, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-161, C
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_X-CYZ-delta_Cyzicus-360-63_RIC-000_Q-002_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Cyzicus, RIC VIII 127, AE-1, -/-//CYZΓ, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Cyzicus, RIC VIII 127, AE-1, -/-//CYZΓ, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//CYZΓ, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-127, C
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_X-CYZ-delta_Cyzicus-360-63_RIC-000_Q-001_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Cyzicus, RIC VIII 127, AE-1, -/-//CYZA, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Cyzicus, RIC VIII 127, AE-1, -/-//CYZA, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//CYZA, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Cyzicus, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-127, C
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II_RIC-VIII-104_5h_27mm_8,66g.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC VIII 104, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//•HERACL•B/•, Bull standing right, Scarce!, #171 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Heraclea, RIC VIII 104, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//•HERACL•B/•, Bull standing right, Scarce!, #1
avers:- D N FL CL IVLIAN VS P F AVG, bearded, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above, in right field.
exergo: -/-//•HERACL•B/•, diameter: 27mm, weight: 8,66g, axis: 5h,
mint: Heraclea, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-104,p-438, Scarce!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AR-Siliqua_FL-CL-IVLIA-NVS-PP-AVG_VOTIS_V_MVLTIS_X_LVG_Lugdunum_RIC-VIII-218_p-_RSC-163a_360-3-AD_Q-001_0h_mm_gx-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 218, AR-Siliqua, -/-//LVG, VOTIS/V/MVLTIS/X, in wreath, #1264 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 218, AR-Siliqua, -/-//LVG, VOTIS/V/MVLTIS/X, in wreath, #1
avers: FL CL IVLIA NVS P P AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: No legend, VOTIS/V/MVLTIS/X in four line, in wreath.
exergue: -/-//LVG, diameter: 17mm, weight: 2,03g, axis: 0h,
mint: Lugdunum, date: 360-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 218, p-,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_LVGDOFFx_Lyon-361-63_RIC-236_Q-001_7_67g.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #181 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//LUGDOFFP, diameter: 28mm, weight: 7,67g, axis: h,
mint: Lugdunum (Lyon), date: 360-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-236,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_LVGDOFFx_Lyon-361-63_-RIC-236_kjg-003_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #269 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #2
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//LUGDOFFP, diameter: 28mm, weight: 7,98g, axis: h,
mint: Lugdunum (Lyon), date: 360-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-236,
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_LVGDOFFx_Lyon-361-63_-RIC-236_Q-003_7_98g.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #365 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Lugdunum, RIC VIII 236, AE-1, -/-//LUGDOFFP, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #3
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//LUGDOFFP, diameter: 28mm, weight: 7,47g, axis: h,
mint: Lugdunum (Lyon), date: 360-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-236,
Q-003
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_x-NIKO-x_Nikomedia-360-63_RIC-216_Q-001_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 120, AE-1, -/-//NIKA * ??, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #167 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 120, AE-1, -/-//NIKA * ??, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Bearded, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right (D3).
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//NIKA * ??, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-120, R!
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_x-A-SIRM-x_Sirmium-360-63_RIC-000_Q-001_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 106, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*ASIRMwreath, Bull standing right, #1173 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 106, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*ASIRMwreath, Bull standing right, #1
avers:- D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
revers:- SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergo: -/-//*ASIRMwreath, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Sirmium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 106, C
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_A-SIRM_Sirmium-360-63_RIC-000_Q-001_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 107, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*ASIRMpalm, Bull standing right, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 107, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*ASIRMpalm, Bull standing right, #1
avers:- D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
revers:- SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergo: -/-//*ASIRMpalm, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Sirmium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 107, C
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_star-B-SIRM-palm_Sirmium-360-63_RIC-000_Q-002_0_0g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 107, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*BSIRMpalm, Bull standing right, #2218 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 107, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, -/-//*BSIRMpalm, Bull standing right, #2
avers:- D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right (D3).
revers:- SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergo: -/-//*BSIRMpalm, diameter: 28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Sirmium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 107, C
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_A-SIRM_Sirmium_RIC-VIII-108_p-393_361-3-AD_Q-002_6h_19mm_3,04g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//ASIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #162 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//ASIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//ASIRM, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,04g, axis: 6h,
mint: Simium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 108, p-393,
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_B-SIRM_Sirmium_RIC-VIII-108_p-393_361-3-AD_Q-001_6h_20,5mm_3,35g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #180 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//B-SIRM, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 6h,
mint: Simium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 108, p-393,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_B-SIRM_Sirmium_RIC-VIII-108_p-393_361-3-AD_Q-003_0h_20mm_3,10g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #265 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #2
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//BSIRM, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,10g, axis: 0h,
mint: Simium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 108, p-393,
Q-003
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_B-SIRM_Sirmium_RIC-VIII-108_p-393_361-3-AD_Q-004_7h_20,5-21,5mm_3,20g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #366 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #3
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//BSIRM, diameter: 20,5-1,5mm, weight: 3,20g, axis: 7h,
mint: Simium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 108, p-393,
Q-003
quadrans
Julian-II-proba-gif2b.gif
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, Nice animation !!!, 69 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium, RIC VIII 108, AE-3, -/-//BSIRM, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, Nice animation !!!,
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//B-SIRM, diameter: 20,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 6h,
mint: Simium, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 108, p-393,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-4-15_DN-IVLIANVS-NOB-CAES_FELTEMP-REPARATIO_A-SIS-FordZ_Siscia-361_RIC-VIII-363-p-377_Scarce_Q-001_axis-6h_18mm_1,91g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 363, AE-3, -/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #197 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 363, AE-3, -/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1
avers: D N IVLIANVS NOB CAES, JC10,D1, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing a fallen horseman.
exergue: -/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, diameter: 18mm, weight: 1,91g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 355 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 363, p-377, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
153_Julianus-II__Siscia,_RIC_VIII_371,_AE-16,_D_N_IVLIANVS_NOB_C,_FELTEMP_REPARATIO,_DeltaSISrevZ,_p-377,_361-67_AD,_S,Q-001,_0h,_16-17mm,_2,54g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 371, AE-3, -/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #170 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 371, AE-3, -/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1
avers: D N IVLIANVS NOB C, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing a fallen horseman.
exergue: M/-//ΔSIS(revers)Z, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,54g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 361-367 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 371, p-377, Scarce !,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-4-15_DN-IVLIAN-VS-NOB-CAES_FELTEMP-REPARATIO_M_A-SIS-D_Siscia-361-67_RIC-374_selten_Q-001_axis-0h_12-13mm_2,31g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 373, AE-3, -/-//ASISD, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1190 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 373, AE-3, -/-//ASISD, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1
avers: D N IVLIAN VS NOB CAES, JC10,D1, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, M or A or H behind the bust.
reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing a fallen horseman.
exergue: -/-//ASISD, diameter: 18mm, weight: 2,31g, axis: 0h,
mint: Siscia, date: 355-361 A.D., ref: RIC-373, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-4-15_DN-IVLIAN-VS-NOB-C_FELTEMP-REPARATIO_M_A-SIS-D_Siscia-361-67_RIC-374_selten_Q-001_15mm_2,49g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 374, AE-3, M/-//A or ΔSISD, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1143 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 374, AE-3, M/-//A or ΔSISD, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, #1
avers: D N IVLIAN VS NOB C, JC16,D1, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing a fallen horseman.
exergue: M/-//A or ΔSISD, diameter: 15mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, date: 355-361 A.D., ref: RIC-374, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
153_Julianus_II_,_Siscia_RIC_VIII_382,_AE-3,_D_N_IVLIANVS_NOB_C,_FEL_TEMP_REPARATIO,_M_DSISL,_355-61AD,S_Q-001,_6h,_17,5mm,_2,77g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 382, AE-3, M/-//ΔSISL, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, Scarce! #1113 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 382, AE-3, M/-//ΔSISL, FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Fallen horseman, Scarce! #1
avers: D N IVLIAN VS NOB C, JC16,D1, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, The Soldier spearing fallen horseman who is wearing a Phrygian helmet, reaching backward, M in left field.
exergue: M/-//ΔSISL, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,77g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 355-361 A.D., ref: RIC VIII 382, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_palmA-SISpalm_Siscia_RIC-VIII-415_p-380_361-3-AD_Q-001_6h_19mm_3,12gx-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 415, AE-3, -/-//palmASISpalm, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1135 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 415, AE-3, -/-//palmASISpalm, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//palmASISpalm, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,12g, axis: 6h,
mint: Siscia, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 415, p-380,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-3_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_VOT-X-MVLT-XX_palmASISCPalm_Siscia_RIC-VIII-422_p-380_361-3-AD_Q-001_0h_20-21mm_gx-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 422, AE-3, -/-//palmASISCpalm, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1141 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 422, AE-3, -/-//palmASISCpalm, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, J8/A3L, Helmeted, diademed, cuirassed bust left, holding spear and shield.
reverse: No legend, VOT/X/MVLT/XX in wreath.
exergue: -/-//palmASISCpalm, diameter: 20-21mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII 422, p-380,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-TES-A-palm_Thessalonica-360-63_RIC-216_Q-002b_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 225, AE-1, -/-//palmTESApalm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 225, AE-1, -/-//palmTESApalm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palmTESApalm, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 360-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-225, R!
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-TES-gamma-dot-palm_Thessalonica-360-63_RIC-216_Q-001a_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-226, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-TES-gamma-dot-palm_Thessalonica-360-63_RIC-216_Q-002_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #2163 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #2
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palm*TESΓ•palm, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-226, Scarce !,
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-P-F-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-star-TES-B-dot-palm_Thessalonica-361-3_RIC-226_Q-001_6h_26,5-27mm_8,55g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESB•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #1136 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII 226, AE-1, -/-//palm*TESB•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Scarce, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palm* TESB•palm, diameter: 26,5-27,0 mm, weight: 8,55g, axis: 0h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-226, Scarce !,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-dot-TES-gamma-dot-palm_Thessalonica-360-63_RIC-216_Q-003_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII Not in !, AE-1, -/-//palm•TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #175 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII Not in !, AE-1, -/-//palm•TESΓ•palm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palm•TESΓ•palm, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII Not in, Rare!,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_palm-TES-B-palm_Thessalonica-360-63_RIC-216_Q-001_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII Not in !, AE-1, -/-//palm•TESBpalm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #162 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Thessalonica, RIC VIII Not in !, AE-1, -/-//palm•TESBpalm, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Rare! #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//palm•TESBpalm, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Thessalonica, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII Not in, Rare!,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxzz_zzzz-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-001_7h_22-23mm_5,39g-s~0.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 320-322var ???, AE-1, -/-//???, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #1230 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Arles, RIC VIII 320-322var ???, AE-1, -/-//???, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #1
avers:- confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right
reverse:- confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above,
exergue: -/-//???, diameter: 22-23mm, weight: 5,39g, axis: 7h,
mint: Arles (Barbar), date: ???, ref: RIC VIII 320-322var ???,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_S-CONxx-xt_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-010_0_0g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0164 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #01
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_T-CONST-xx_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-009_0_0g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0266 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #02
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-002
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxxx_xxxx-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-004_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0364 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #03
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-003
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxxx_xxxx-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-002a_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0463 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #04
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-004
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxzz_yyzz-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-006_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0565 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #05
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-005
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxxx_yyzz-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-005_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0663 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #06
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-006
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxxx_yyyy-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-003_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0765 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #07
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-007
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_xxxx_xxxx-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-002_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0862 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #08
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-008
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_T-CONST-dot_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-007_0_0g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0962 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #09
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-009
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_x-SIRN-x_Sirmium-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-003_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #1065 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #10
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-010
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_T-CONST-dot_Arles-360-63_RIC-000_Q-008_0_0g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #1165 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Barbar, RIC VIII ???, AE-1, Confusing text, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #11
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue:-/-//-???-, diameter: mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Barbar, date: ??, ref: RIC VIII ???,
Q-011
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-30_BARBAR_x-SIRN-x_Sirmium-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-001_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0165 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #01
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above, ?-SIRN-? in exergue.
exergue:-/-//-SIRN-, diameter:30mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Sirmium (Barbar), date: ??, ref: RIC VIII 106-107 ???,
Q-001
quadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_x-SIRN-x_Sirmium-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-002_0_00g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0266 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #02
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above, ?-SIRN-? in exergue.
exergue:-/-//-SIRN-, diameter:25mm, weight: 0,0g, axis: h,
mint: Sirmium (Barbar), date: ??, ref: RIC VIII 106-107 ???,
Q-002
quadrans
153-Julianus-II_AE-1-23_-Barbar_-Imitation_AD_Q-051_1h_22,5-23,5mm_6_18g-s.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #0375 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Sirmium ???, RIC VIII 106-107 ???, AE-1, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, Barbarous Imitation, #03
avers: Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right
reverse: Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: /-//confusing text, diameter: 22,5-23,5mm, weight: 6,18g, axis: 1h,
mint: Sirmium (Barbar), date: ???, ref: RIC VIII 106-107 ???,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans
Julianus-II__AE-1-25_BARBAR_A-SIS-C_Siscia-361-63_RIC-418var_Q-001_6_93g.jpg
153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 418var., AE-1-25, -/-//ASISC, SECVRITAS REIPVB "BARBAROUS Imitation Siscia", Bull standing right, #185 views153b Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Siscia, RIC VIII 418var., AE-1-25, -/-//ASISC, SECVRITAS REIPVB "BARBAROUS Imitation Siscia", Bull standing right, #1
avers:- Confusing text, Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse:- Confusing text, Bull standing right, two stars above, A-SIS-C in exergue.
exergue: -/-//ASISC, diameter: 25mm, weight: 6,93g, axis: h,
mint: Siscia ???, date: ???, ref: RIC-VIII 418 var ??
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Denarius MENSOR.jpg
17-01 - LUCIUS FARSULEIUS MENSOR (75 A.C.)52 viewsAR Denarius 18 mm 2.6 gr ?
Anv: Busto con vestido, diadema, aro y collar de Libertas (Libertad) viendo a derecha - "S C" sobre "Pileus" (Gorro usado por los esclavos) detrás del busto.
Rev: Roma en biga avanzando a derecha, ayudando a un ciudadano con toga a subir al carruaje. Marca de control bajo los caballos. "L•FARSVLEI" en Exergo.
Esta moneda presumiblemente alude a la Lex Julia (90 A.C), que confería derechos de ciudadano a todos los italianos.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #329 Pag.134 - Craw RRC #392/1b - Syd CRR #789 -BMCRR #3293-3305 - RSC Vol.1 Farsuleia 2 Pag.47
mdelvalle
Craw_392_1b_Denario_Lucius_Farsuleius_Mensor.jpg
17-01 - LUCIUS FARSULEIUS MENSOR (75 A.C.)16 viewsAR Denarius 18 mm 2.6 gr ?

Anv: Busto con vestido, diadema, aro y collar de Libertas (Libertad) viendo a derecha - "S C" sobre "Pileus" (Gorro usado por los esclavos) detrás del busto.
Rev: Roma en biga avanzando a derecha, ayudando a un ciudadano con toga a subir al carruaje. Marca de control bajo los caballos. "L•FARSVLEI" en Exergo.
Esta moneda presumiblemente alude a la Lex Julia (90 A.C), que confería derechos de ciudadano a todos los italianos.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #329 Pag.134 - Craw RRC #392/1b - Syd CRR #789 -BMCRR #3293-3305 - RSC Vol.1 Farsuleia 2 Pag.47
mdelvalle
RI_176e_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Alexandria 85 29 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N IVLIANVS NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker
Minted in Alexandria (M | _ // ALED), 6th November A.D. 355 - 3rd November A.D. 361
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Alexandria 85 (S)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176m_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Antioch 18919 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N IVLIANVS- NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, clutching the neck of the horse
Minted in Antioch (// ANEI), 6th November A.D. 355 - 3rd November A.D. 361
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Antioch 189 (S)

15.92 mm. 2.06 gms. 180 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176j_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Arles 274 28 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN IVLIAN-VS NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker
Minted in Arles (M // TCON), 6th November A.D. 355 - Spring A.D. 360
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Arles 274 (R)

2.37 gms. 19.94 mm. 180 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176k_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 195 29 viewsAE3
Obv:– IMP IVLIANVS NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP - REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker; he wears a Phrygian cap
Minted in Lugdunum (// GSLG), 6th November A.D. 355 to Spring A.D. 360
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Lugdunum 195 (R)

2.18 gms. 18.35 mm. 0 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176d_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Lugdunum 239 22 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield
Rev:– VOT X MVLT XX, within wreath
Minted in Lugdunum (//PLVGD), Spring A.D. 360- A.D. 363
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 239 (S)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176f_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Rome 315 25 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CL IVL-IANVS N C, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker
Minted in Rome (// R dot M dot S),
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Rome 315 (S)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176i_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Sirmium 108 24 viewsAE3
Obv:– DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust left holding spear and shield
Rev:– VOT X MVLT XX, within wreath
Minted in Sirmium (//BSIRM), Spring A.D. 360- A.D. 363
Reference:– RIC VIII Sirmium 108 (C2)

20.80 mm. 3.41 gms. 180 degrees.

A nice strike from fresh dies.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_176h_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Siscia 385 18 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N IVLIANVS NOB C, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him.
Minted in Siscia (L | _ // DSIS)
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Siscia 385 (Rated S)
maridvnvm
RI_176g_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AE3 - RIC VIII Thessalonica 21218 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, clutching the neck of the horse
Minted in Thessalonica (M | _ // SMTSE)
Reference(s) – RIC VIII Thessalonica 212 (S)
maridvnvm
RI_176l_img.jpg
176 - Julian II - AR Reduced Siliqua - RIC VIII Lugdunum 22721 viewsAR Reduced Siliqua
Obv:– FL CL IVLIA-NVS P P AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– VOTIS V MVLTIS X, within wreath
Minted in Lugdunum (//SLVG), Spring A.D. 360 - 26th June A.D. 363
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 227

17.26 mm. 2.0 gms. 0 degrees

East Harptree Hoard, which was discovered near Bath in 1887. There were 36 coins of this type found in the hoard.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 176b img.jpg
176 - Julian II - RIC VIII Lugdunum 19967 viewsObv:– C L IVLIANVS NOB C, Bare headed draped and cuirassed bust right, M to left of bust
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spears a horseman on left, one hand holding the neck of the horse & the other back at his attacker
Minted in Lugdunum (//GSLG), 6th November A.D. 355 to Spring A.D. 360
Reference:– RIC VIII Lugdunum 199 (R)
maridvnvm
RI_176c_img.jpg
176 - Julian II, AE1, RIC VIII Constantinople 16335 viewsObv:– DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above
Minted in Constantinople (palm branch CONSPA palm branch), A.D. 360-363
Reference:– RIC VIII 163 (Rare)
maridvnvm
commodus_RIC218.jpg
177-192 AD - COMMODUS AR denarius - struck 191 AD37 viewsobv: M COMM ANT P FEL AVG BRIT P P (laureate head right)
rev: APOL PAL P M TR P XVI COS VI (Apollo attired in the stola, holding the plectrum in the right hand and resting his left on the lyre, which surmounts on a short column)
ref: RIC III 218 (S), C.24 (8frcs)
mint: Rome
2.7gms, 17mm
Scarce

Apollini Palatino – this coin has reference to the temple, which Emperor Augustus erected at Rome, in honour of his guardian divinity in the Palatium. This temple was destroyed by fire during the reign of Julian the Apostate.
berserker
Project1~1.jpg
181 Julia Domna60 views

Julia Domna Denarius. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / PIETAS PVBLICA, Pietas standing left, raising both hands at altar. RSC 156. RIC 574, RSC 156, BMC 69
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
1607059_625273620842886_1594459012_n.jpg
181 Julia Domna - Unlisted81 viewsIVLIA DOMNA AVG, Draped bust right; FORTVN REDVC, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Unlisted Syrian mint.

Traded :/ :)
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4322~0.jpg
185. Julian II Apostata (360-363 A.D.)24 viewsAv.: DN FL CL IVLIANVS PF AVG
Rv.: SECVRITAS REIPVB dot
Ex.: palm branch CONSPB palm branch

AE Double Maiorina Ø29 / 8.5g
RIC VIII 164 Constantinople
Scarce!
Juancho
9711a.jpg
193 AD Clodius Albinus Caesar, Sestertius RIC 50111 viewsClodius Albinus Caesar, Sestertius, Rome mint 193 AD
Obv.: D [C]LODIVS AL - BINVS CAES , Head, bare, r.
Rev.: PROVID - AVG COS / S - C , Providentia standing l., holding wand over globe and sceptre.
RIC IV, part I, p. 51, no. 50 ; C 59

Decimus Clodius Septimius Albinus was born in Hadrumetum (modern Sousse in Tunisia) and came from a prominent senatorial family. He held high office under Marcus Aurelius and continued under Commodus, becoming consul in 187 and governor of Britain in 191. After the murder of Pertinax and the purchase of the Empire by Didius Julianus, Albinus, joined by his rivals Pescennius Niger and Septimius Severus, made preparations to march on Rome. Severus got there first and, in order to free himself for battle in the East, had Albinus proclaimed Caesar and made him his heir. Needless to say, after his defeat of Niger, Severus turned on Albinus and had him declared a public enemy in 195. Albinus was hailed emperor in Lugdunum in either late 195 or early 196, and spent the next year raising troops: Severus moved into Gaul with his army in 196 and in a huge battle outside Lugdunum on 19 February, defeated Albinus who then committed suicide.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
jdomna_RIC632.jpg
193-196(?) AD - JULIA DOMNA AR denarius49 viewsobv: IVLIA DOMNA AVG (draped bust right, hair coiled and waved)
rev: VENERI VICTR (Venus half naked standing to r., holding an apple and a palm and leaning on a column)
ref: RIC IVi 632, C.194 (5frcs)
mint: Emesa and Laodicea (or probably Rome)
3.5gms, 18mm
Scarce

Julia Domna was the wife of Septimius Severus and mother of Caracalla and Geta. She was a great support for Severus in serving her family and the empire. A staunch opponent to Severus' praetorian prefect Plautianus, she attempted to turn his influence from the emperor. Her attempts to mitigate in the hatred between her two sons did not succeed. However, she seems to have prevented them from splitting the empire between them, fearing an all-out civil war. Perhaps this was one of the turning points of Roman history. If the empire had been divided at this time, future history may have become wholly different. Her greatest tragedy was probably the death of Geta in her arms from the murderers instigated by Caracalla. Nevertheless she continued serving the empire and Caracalla until, he too, was murdered. After bearing Caracalla's ashes to Rome, she starved herself to death.
2 commentsberserker
julia-den.jpg
193-217 AD - Julia Domna - Pietas28 viewsIVLIA AVGVSTA - Bareheaded bust right, draped.
PIETAS AVGG - Pietas standing left, veiled and right hand dropping incense on altar left, and holding box in right arm.

Wife of Septimus Severus
Rome mint: AD 204; RIC IVi 572; Cohen 149; 2.65 gms, 18 mm; 180 degrees
jimwho523
rjb_domna_04_06.jpg
193c17 viewsJulia Domna
AE sestertius
Obv "IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "IVNONEM SC"
Juno standing left, peacock to left
Rome mint
RIC 585b
mauseus
rjb_dom2_04_09.jpg
193c9 viewsWill add desc. shortlymauseus
rjb_dom_04_09.jpg
193c29 viewsJulia Domna
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA DOMNA AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "VENERI VICTR"
Venus standing right from the back, leaning on a column and holding a branch and apple
Emisa mint
RIC 632
1 commentsmauseus
rjb_2010_10_10a.jpg
193c12 viewsJulia Domna
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA AVGVSTA"
Draped bust right
Rev "SAECVLI FELICITAS"
Isis seated right on prow, infant Harpocrates in arms
Rome mint
RIC 577
mauseus
rjb_2010_10_11a.jpg
193c12 viewsJulia Domna
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA AVGVSTA"
Draped bust right
Rev "CERER FRVGIF"
Ceres seated left
Rome mint
RIC 546
mauseus
rjb_2011_03_01.jpg
193c13 viewsJulia Domna
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA AVGVSTA"
Draped bust right
Rev "FELICITAS"
Felicitas standing left holding caduceus and sceptre
Rome mint
RIC 551
mauseus
rjb_2011_03_01~0.jpg
193c24 viewsJulia Domna
AE as
Obv "IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG"
Diademed draped bust right
Rev "Vesta SC"
Sacrificial scene in front of circular temple of Vesta
Rome mint
RIC 607

mauseus
193_Didius_Julianus_Dupondius_RIC_12_1.jpg
193_Didius_Julianus_Dupondius_RIC_12_122 viewsDidius Julianus (March 28th – early June 193 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, March 28th – early June 193 AD
IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG;
Radiate head right
PM TR P COS, S-C;
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae
10,85 gr, 25 mm
RIC IVa, 12; BMC V, 17; C. 13; CMB I, 3
Ex Künker, Auction 193, lot 827
Ex Künker, Auction 236, lot 1111
1 commentsga77
193_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_844_1.jpg
193_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_844_117 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As, Rome, 193 – 196
IVLIA DOMNA AVG;
Draped bust right
FECVNDITAS, S-C;
Fecunditas seated right, with child at brest, second child standing before her
11,10 gr, 24 mm
RIC IVa, 844; BMC V, 494 var. (SC in ex.); cp. C 43 (obv. AVGVSTA – a slip?)
ga77
193_Julia_Domna_Dupondius_RIC_845_1.jpg
193_Julia_Domna_Dupondius_RIC_845_111 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, 193 – 196
IVLIA DOMNA AVG;
Draped bust right
IVNO REGINA, S-C;
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
11,05 gr, 25 mm
RIC IVa, 845; BMC V, 496 (Pl. 21, 6); cp. C. 100
Ex Auctiones GmbH, eAuction 29, lot 409
ga77
image1_(3).JPG
195 Julia Maesa 24 viewsJulia Maesa (218 - 225 A.D.)
AR Denarius
O: IVLIA MAESA AVG, Draped bust right.
R: IVNO, Juno standing facing, head left, holding scepter and patera.
Antioch mint., 218 - 220 A.D.
1.97g
20mm
RIC IV 256 var. (diademed); RSC 20a
ex Mat
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
jdomna sest.jpg
196 AD - JULIA DOMNA sestertius 34 viewsobv: IVLIA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: HILARITAS (Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm and cornucopiae), S-C in field
ref: RIC IVi 855 (SeptSev), C.73 (8frcs)
20.12gms, 28mm
Scarce
2 commentsberserker
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_872_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_872_117 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196 – 209
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Draped bust right
FECVNDITAS, SC in exergue;
Terra, reclining left, right hand on globe, cup in left, leaning on basket, in front, four seasons
8,84 gr, 25 mm
RIC IVa, 872; BMC V, 784 (Pl. 47, 7); C. 37
ga77
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_877var_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_877var_122 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Draped bust right
HILARITAS, S-C;
Hilaritas standing left holding palm branch and cornucopiae
13,73 gr, 26 mm
RIC IVa, 877 var. (hair); BMC V, 787 var. (hair); C. 74 var. (hair)
ga77
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_881_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_881_123 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196 – 209
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Draped bust right
MATER CASTRORVM, SC in exergue;
Julia, diademed and veiled, standing left, sacrificing out of patera over altar and holding caduceus, three standards in front
10,16 gr, 26 mm
RIC IVa, 881; BMC V, 789; C. 121
Ex Friedinger-Pranter Collection. Purchased of Oberstleutnant Voetter, 29.01.1913 for 6 crowns
ga77
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_883_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_883_117 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196 – 209
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Draped bust right
MATER DEVM, S-C;
Cybele, towered, seated left between two lions, holding branch and resting left arm on drum
10,95 gr, 24 mm
RIC IVa, 883; BMC V, 791; C. 127
ga77
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_886_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_886_119 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196 – 209
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Bust draped right, hair waved and coiled at back
PIETATI AVGVSTAE, SC in exergue;
Julia standing facing, between Geta and Caracalla, who hold a globe between them: Geta, togate, holds roll, Caracalla, laureate, in military dress, holds spear
14,09 gr, 26 mm
RIC IVa, 886; BMC V, 793; C. 159
Ex Roma, Auction IV, lot 2795
ga77
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_892a_1.jpg
196_Julia_Domna_As_RIC_892a_118 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, 196 – 209
IVLIA AVGVSTA;
Bust draped right, hair waved and coiled at back
VESTA MATER, SC in exergue;
Six Vestals sacrificing in front of temple of Vesta
10,68 gr, 27 mm
RIC IVa, 892a; BMC V, 796 note; C. 243
Ex iNumis, Mail Bid Sale 22, lot 209
ga77
jdomna den.jpg
198-211 AD - JULIA DOMNA fourée denarius38 viewsobv: IVLIA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: VESTA SANCTAE (Vesta standing left with patera & scepter)
ref: RIC IVi 587 (Sept.Sev.), Cohen 246, BMC 99
mint: Rome
3.29gms
Scarce
This issue is shown by the start of the third century AD, fourée coins had a thin layer of silver. Already his weight is suspicious...
berserker
AgrippaAsNeptune.jpg
1ah Marcus Agrippa36 viewsDied 12 BC
As, minted by Caligula.

Head left wearing rostral crownt, M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left, SC

RIC 58

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (c 63 BC–12 BC) was a close friend, and defence minister of the future emperor Augustus. He was responsible for many of his military victories, most notably Actium against the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII of Egypt. He was son-in-law to Augustus, maternal grandfather of the Emperor Caligula, father-in-law of the Emperors Tiberius and Claudius, and maternal great-grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He probably served in Caesar’s campaign of 46/45 BC against Pompey and Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to study at Apollonia. From then on Agrippa played a major part in Augustus’ career, as military commander and admiral, also undertaking major public works, and writing works on geography (following his survey of the Empire) and other subjects. He erected many fine buildings in Rome, including the original Pantheon on the Campus Martius (during his third consulship 27 BC). He married Claudia Marcella the Elder, daughter of Octavia the Younger in 28 BC, and Julia the Elder in 21 BC, with whom he had five children. His daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Younger the married Tiberius, and his daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Elder married Germanicus. His last campaign initiated the conquest of the upper Danube region, which would become the Roman province of Pannonia in 13 BC. Augustus had Agrippa’s remains placed in his own mausoleum. Ronald Syme offers a compelling case that Agrippa was much more co-ruler of the empire with Augustus than he was a subordinate.
Blindado
AugustusDenApollo.jpg
1ai Augustus25 views27 BC-14 AD

Denarius
Laureate head left, AVGVSTVS DIVI F
Apollo stg. Right, IMP XII

Van Meter notes that after about 15 BC, Augustus moved the production of gold and silver to Lugdunum and underscored the end of the moneyer issues by using "IMP" on the reverse.

RIC 180

Suetonius summarized Augusts' life in these words: He lost his father at the age of five (58BC). At twelve he delivered a funeral oration in honour of his grandmother Julia, Julius Caesar’s sister (51BC). At sixteen, having assumed the toga, he was decorated by Caesar during the African triumph (46BC) even though he had been too young to fight. When Caesar went to conquer Pompey’s sons in Spain (in 46BC), Augustus followed, despite still being weak from severe illness, and despite being shipwrecked on the way, with a minimal escort, over roads menaced by the enemy, so endearing himself greatly to Caesar, who quickly formed a high opinion of Augustus’ character, beyond merely his energetic pursuit of the journey.
After recovering the Spanish provinces, Caesar planned an expedition against the Dacians, to be followed by an attack on Parthia, and sent Augustus ahead (in 45BC) to Apollonia in Illyria, where he spent his time studying. When news came of Caesar’s assassination (in 44BC), and that the will named him as the main heir, Augustus considered seeking protection from the legions quartered there. However he decided it would be rash and premature, and chose to return to Rome, and enter on his inheritance, despite the doubts expressed by his mother, and strong opposition from his stepfather, the ex-consul Marcius Philippus.

Augustus went on to levy armies and rule the State; firstly for a twelve-year period (from 43BC to 30BC), initially with Mark Antony and Lepidus and then (from 33BC) with Antony alone; and later by himself for a further forty-four years (to his death in AD14).

In his youth he was betrothed to Servilia, the daughter of Publius Servilius Vatia Isauricus, but on his reconciliation with Mark Antony following their first dispute, the troops begged them to become allied by some tie of kinship, and he married (in 43BC) Claudia, Antony’s stepdaughter, born to Fulvia and Publius Clodius Pulcher, even though Claudia was barely of marriageable age. However he quarrelled with Fulvia, and divorced Claudia before the marriage had been consummated.

Not long afterwards (in 40BC), he married Scribonia, whose previous husbands had been ex-consuls, and to one of whom she had borne a child. He divorced her also ‘tired’, he wrote, ‘of her shrewish ways,’ and immediately took Livia Drusilla from her husband Tiberius Nero though she was pregnant at the time (38BC), loving and esteeming her alone to the end.
Blindado
DrususAsSC.jpg
1am Drusus22 viewsHeir to throne until assassination by Sejanus in 23

As

Bare head, left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER SC

RIC 45

Nero Claudius Drusus, later adopted as Drusus Julius Caesar (13BC - 23AD), called Drusus the Younger, was the only child of Tiberius and his first wife, Vipsania Agrippina. Tiberius and Drusus delivered the only two eulogies for Augustus in front of the temple to the god Julius. In 14, after the death of Augustus, Drusus suppressed a mutiny in Pannonia. In 15 he became consul. He governed Illyricum from 17 to 20. In 21 he was again consul, while in 22 he received tribunicia potestas (tribunician power), a distinction reserved solely for the emperor or his immediate successor. Drusus married his paternal cousin Livilla in 4. Their daughter Julia was born shortly after. Their son Tiberius Gemellus (his twin brother Germanicus Gemellus died in infancy) was born in 19. By 23 Drusus, who made no secret of his antipathy towards Sejanus, looked likely to succeed Tiberius as emperor. Sources concur that with Livilla as his accomplice Sejanous poisoned her husband Drusus.

Suetonius says, "He lacked affection not only for his adopted son Germanicus, but even for his own son Drusus the Younger, whose vices were inimical to him, Drusus indeed pursing loose and immoral ways. So inimical, that Tiberius seemed unaffected by his death (in 23AD), and quickly took up his usual routine after the funeral, cutting short the period of mourning. When a deputation from Troy offered him belated condolences, he smiled as if at a distant memory, and offered them like sympathy for the loss of their famous fellow-citizen Hector!"
Blindado
GermanicusAsSC.jpg
1an Germanicus36 viewsAdopted by Tiberius in 4 AD, died mysteriously in 19

As, struck by Caligula

Bare head, left, GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT SC

RIC 57

Germanicus Julius Caesar (c16 BC-AD 19) was was born in Lugdunum, Gaul (modern Lyon). At birth he was named either Nero Claudius Drusus after his father or Tiberius Claudius Nero after his uncle. He received the agnomen Germanicus, in 9 BC, when it was posthumously awarded to his father in honour of his victories in Germania. Germanicus was the grandson-in-law and great-nephew of the Emperor Augustus, nephew and adoptive son of the Emperor Tiberius, father of the Emperor Caligula, brother of the Emperor Claudius, and the maternal grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He married his maternal second cousin Agrippina the Elder, a granddaughter of Augustus, between 5 and 1 BC. The couple had nine children. Two died very young; another, Gaius Julius Caesar, died in early childhood. The remaining six were: Nero Caesar, Drusus Caesar, the Emperor Caligula, the Empress Agrippina the Younger, Julia Drusilla, and Julia Livilla.

According to Suetonius: Germanicus, who was the son of Drusus the Elder and Antonia the Younger, was adopted (in 4AD) by Germanicus’s paternal uncle, Tiberius. He served as quaestor (in7AD) five years before the legal age and became consul (in12AD) without holding the intermediate offices. On the death of Augustus (in AD14) he was appointed to command the army in Germany, where, his filial piety and determination vying for prominence, he held the legions to their oath, though they stubbornly opposed Tiberius’s succession, and wished him to take power for himself.

He followed this with victory in Germany, for which he celebrated a triumph (in 17 AD), and was chosen as consul for a second time (18 AD) though unable to take office as he was despatched to the East to restore order there. He defeated the forces of the King of Armenia, and reduced Cappadocia to provincial status, but then died at Antioch, at the age of only thirty-three (in AD 19), after a lingering illness, though there was also suspicion that he had been poisoned. For as well as the livid stains which covered his body, and the foam on his lips, the heart was found entire among the ashes after his cremation, its total resistance to flame being a characteristic of that organ, they say, when it is filled with poison.

All considered Germanicus exceptional in body and mind, to a quite outstanding degree. Remarkably brave and handsome; a master of Greek and Latin oratory and learning; singularly benevolent; he was possessed of a powerful desire and vast capacity for winning respect and inspiring affection.

His scrawny legs were less in keeping with the rest of his figure, but he gradually fleshed them out by assiduous exercise on horseback after meals. He often killed enemy warriors in hand-to-hand combat; still pleaded cases in the courts even after receiving his triumph; and left various Greek comedies behind amongst other fruits of his studies.

At home and abroad his manners were unassuming, such that he always entered free or allied towns without his lictors.

Whenever he passed the tombs of famous men, he always offered a sacrifice to their shades. And he was the first to initiate a personal search for the scattered remains of Varus’s fallen legionaries, and have them gathered together, so as to inter them in a single burial mound.

As for Germanicus, Tiberius appreciated him so little, that he dismissed his famous deeds as trivial, and his brilliant victories as ruinous to the Empire. He complained to the Senate when Germanicus left for Alexandria (AD19) without consulting him, on the occasion there of a terrible and swift-spreading famine. It was even believed that Tiberius arranged for his poisoning at the hands of Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, the Governor of Syria, and that Piso would have revealed the written instructions at his trial, had Tiberius not retrieved them during a private interview, before having Piso put to death. As a result, the words: ‘Give us back Germanicus!’ were posted on the walls, and shouted at night, all throughout Rome. The suspicion surrounding Germanicus’ death (19 AD) was deepened by Tiberius’s cruel treatment of Germanicus’s wife, Agrippina the Elder, and their children.
1 commentsBlindado
CaligulaAE27Caesonia.jpg
1ao2 Caesonia (?)19 viewsAE 27 of Carthago Nova, Spain

Laureate head of Caligula, right, C CAESAR AVG GERMANIS
Draped bust of Caesonia (as Salus) right, DN ATEL FLAC CN POM FLAC II VIR Q V I N C, SAL AVG across field

Generally held to portray the fourth wife of Caligula.

Sear 624

Caesonia, Milonia, (d41AD) was the fourth and last wife of Caligula. Her younger half-brother was the Consul Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo. Her niece, Domitia Longina, married Domitian. In 41, Caligula was assassinated and Caesonia and her daughter Julia Drusilla murdered.

Suetonius states: As for Caesonia, who was neither young nor beautiful, had three daughters by another man, and was wildly promiscuous and extravagant, he not only loved her more passionately for it, but also more faithfully, taking her out riding, and showing her to the soldiers, dressed in a cloak with helmet and shield: while he exhibited her to his friends stark naked. He did not honour her with the title of wife until she had given him a child, announcing his paternity and the marriage on the very same day. This child, whom he named Julia Drusilla, he carried round all the temples of the goddesses, before finally entrusting her to Minerva’s lap, calling on that goddess to nurture and educate his daughter. Nothing persuaded him more clearly that she was his own issue than her violent temper, which was so savage the infant would tear at the faces and eyes of her little playmates. . . .

And as [Caligula] kissed the neck of wife or sweetheart, he never failed to say: ‘This lovely thing will be slit whenever I say.’ Now and then he even threatened his dear Caesonia with torture, if that was the only way of discovering why he was so enamoured of her. . . . Some think that Caesonia his wife administered a love potion that had instead the effect of driving him mad.
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Caligula_Drusilla_AE20.jpg
1ao3 Julia Drusilla33 viewsAE 20 of Smyrna (Izmir, Turkey)
Laureate head of Caligula, right, ΓAION KAICAPA EΠI AOYIOΛA
Drusilla as Persephone seated left, poppies between two stalks of grain in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ∆POYCIΛΛAN ZMYPNAIΩN MHNOΦANHC

Caligula’s sister

Klose XXVIII, 27 (Vs4/Rs10); RPC I 2472; SNG Cop 1343; SNGvA 2202; BMC Ionia p. 269, 272

According to Suetonius’ salacious account: Germanicus had married Agrippina the Elder, daughter of Marcus Agrippa and Julia the Elder, and she had borne him nine children. Two died in infancy, another in early childhood. . . .

The other children survived their father: three girls, Agrippina the Younger, Drusilla and Livilla, born in successive years; and three boys, Nero, Drusus, and Gaius Caesar (Caligula). . . . [Caligula] habitually committed incest with each of his three sisters, seating them in turn below him at large banquets while his wife reclined above. It is believed that he violated Drusilla’s virginity while a minor, and been caught in bed with her by his grandmother Antonia, in whose household they were jointly raised. Later, when Drusilla was married to Lucius Cassius Longinus, an ex-consul, he took her from him and openly treated her as his lawful married wife. When he fell ill he made her heir to his estate and the throne.

When Drusilla died (in 38AD) he declared a period of public mourning during which it was a capital offense to laugh, or bathe, or to dine with parents, spouse or children. Caligula himself was so overcome with grief that he fled the City in the middle of the night, and travelled through Campania, and on to Syracuse, returning again with the same degree of haste, and without cutting his hair or shaving. From that time forwards whenever he took an important oath, even in public or in front of the army, he always swore by Drusilla’s divinity.
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As
Bare head, left, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Libertas, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA SC

RIC 97

According to Suetonius: Claudius was born at Lugdunum (Lyon) on the 1st of August 10BC in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on the day when the very first altar to Augustus was dedicated there, the child being given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. When his elder brother Germanicus was adopted into the Julian family (in 4 AD), he added the name Germanicus also. He lost his father when still an infant (in 9 BC), and throughout his childhood and youth was severely afflicted by various stubborn ailments so that his mind and body lacked vigour, and even when he attained his majority he was not considered capable of a public or private career.

Nevertheless, he applied himself to liberal studies from his earliest youth, and often published examples of his proficiency in each area, though even so he was excluded from public office and failed to inspire any brighter hopes for his future. His mother Antonia the Younger often condemned him as an unfinished freak of Nature, and when accusing someone of stupidity would say: ‘He’s a bigger fool than my son Claudius.’ His grandmother Augusta (Livia) always treated him with utter contempt, and rarely even spoke to him, admonishing him, when she chose to do so, in brief harsh missives, or via her messengers. When his sister Livilla heard the prophecy that he would be Emperor some day, she prayed openly and loudly that Rome might be spared so cruel and unmerited a fate.

Having spent the larger part of his life in such circumstances, he became emperor at the age of fifty (in AD41) by a remarkable stroke of fate. Caligula’s assassins had dispersed the crowd on the pretext that the Emperor wished for solitude, and Claudius, shut out with the rest, retired to a room called the Hermaeum, but shortly afterwards, terrified by news of the murder, crept off to a nearby balcony and hid behind the door-curtains. A Guard, who was wandering about the Palace at random, spotting a pair of feet beneath the curtain where Claudius was cowering, dragged the man out to identify him, and as Claudius fell to the ground in fear, recognised him, and acclaimed him Emperor.

Eutropius summarizes: His reign was of no striking character; he acted, in many respects, with gentleness and moderation, in some with cruelty and folly. He made war upon Britain, which no Roman since Julius Caesar had visited; and, having reduced it through the agency of Cnaeus Sentius and Aulus Plautius, illustrious and noble men, he celebrated a magnificent triumph. Certain islands also, called the Orcades, situated in the ocean, beyond Britain, he added to the Roman empire, and gave his son the name of Britannicus. . . . He lived to the age of sixty-four, and reigned fourteen years; and after his death was consecrated3 and deified.

This was the first "good" coin I ever bought and therefore marks the begiining of an addiction.
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1aq Agrippina junior31 viewsMarried Claudius 49 AD

Diobol of Alexandria

Draped bust right, wreathed with corn, hair bound in plait behind, AGRIPPEINA CЄBACTH
Draped bust of Euthenia right, wreathed with corn, holding ears of corn, ЄYQH-NIA across fields, L-IB below

Milne 124

Agrippina the Younger, Julia Agrippina, or Agrippinilla (Little Agrippina) after 50 AD known as Julia Augusta Agrippina (c16 AD –59) was sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius and the mother of Nero. In 28, Tiberius arranged for Agrippina to marry her paternal second cousin Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. Their only son was named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, after Domitius’s recently deceased father. This child would become the Emperor Nero. In 39, Agrippina and her sister Livilla, with their maternal cousin, Drusilla’s widower, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, were involved in a failed plot to murder Caligula, and make Lepidus emperor. Lepidus was executed. Agrippina and Livilla were exiled by their brother to the Pontine Islands.

Suetonius says, "But it was Agrippina the Younger, his brother Germanicus’s daughter, who ensnared him, assisted by a niece’s privilege of exchanging kisses and endearments. At the next Senate meeting, he primed a group of Senators to propose that he ought to marry Agrippina, as it was in the public interest, and that such marriages between uncle and niece should from then on be regarded as lawful, and no longer incestuous. He married her (AD 49) with barely a day’s delay, but only one freedman and one leading centurion married their respective nieces, to follow suit. Claudius himself, with Agrippina, attended the centurion’s wedding."

The Euthenia reverse reminds one of "euthanasia." which is what some suspect she did to Claudius to elevate her son Nero to the purple.
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1ax2 Julia Titi15 viewsDupondius

Draped bust right, hair in bun at back of head, IVLIA IMP T AVG F AVGVSTA
S-C either side of Vesta enthroned left holding Victory, VESTA in ex

RIC 398

The daughter of Titus and Marcia Furnilla, she lived with her uncle Domitian for a time as his wife. Suetonius records, "He had been offered marriage with his niece, Julia, Titus’s daughter, while she was still a young girl, but refused her repeatedly because of his infatuation with Domitia Longina, yet he seduced Julia shortly afterwards, while Titus was still alive, and when she was newly married to Flavius Sabinus. After the deaths of her father and husband, he loved her ardently and openly, and indeed caused her death by forcing her to abort a child by him." When Domitian died at the age of 44, his nurse cremated his body and "secretly carried [the ashes] to the Flavian Temple and there mingled them with those of his niece Julia, Titus’s daughter whom she had also nurtured."
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1bq Didius Julianus93 views193

Sestertius

Laureate head, right, IMP CAES M DID SEVER IVLIAN AVG
Concorde w/ standard, CONCORDIA MILIT SC

RIC 14

According to the Historia Augusta: Didius Julianus. . . was reared at the home of Domitia Lucilla, the mother of the Emperor Marcus. . . . [T]hrough the support of Marcus he attained to the office of aedile [and] praetor. After his praetorship he commanded the XXII Legion, the Primigenia, in Germany, and following that he ruled Belgium long and well. Here, with auxiliaries hastily levied from the provinces, he held out against the Chauci as they attempted to burst through the border; and for these services, on the recommendation of the Emperor, he was deemed worthy of the consulship. He also gained a crushing victory over the Chatti. Next he took charge of Dalmatia and cleared it of the hostile tribes on its borders. Then he governed Lower Germany. . . .

His consulship he served with Pertinax; in the proconsulship of Africa, moreover, he succeeded him. Pertinax always spoke of him as his colleague and successor. After [Pertinax'] death, when Sulpicianus was making plans to be hailed emperor in the camp, Julianus, together with his son-in-law, . . . discovered two tribunes, Publius Florianus and Vectius Aper, who immediately began urging him to seize the throne; and. . . conducted him to the praetorian camp. When they arrived at the camp, however, Sulpicianus, the prefect of the city and the father-in-law of Pertinax, was holding an assembly and claiming the empire himself, and no one would let Julianus inside, despite the huge promises he made from outside the wall. Julianus then . . . wrote on placards that he would restore the good name of Commodus; so he was admitted and proclaimed emperor. . . .

Julianus had no fear of either the British or the Illyrian army; but being chiefly afraid of the Syrian army, he despatched a centurion of the first rank with orders to murder Niger. Consequently Pescennius Niger in Syria and Septimius Severus in Illyricum, together with the armies which they commanded, revolted from Julianus. But when he received the news of the revolt of Severus, whom he had not suspected, then he was greatly troubled and came to the senate and prevailed upon them to declare Severus a public enemy. . . . Severus was approaching the city with a hostile army. . . and the populace hated and laughed at him more and more every day.

In a short time Julianus was deserted by all and left alone in the Palace with one of his prefects, Genialis, and with Repentinus, his son-in-law. Finally, it was propose'd that the imperial power be taken away from Julianus by order of the senate. This was done, and Severus was forthwith acclaimed emperor, while it was given out that Julianus had taken poison. Nevertheless, the senate despatched a delegation and through their efforts Julianus was slain in the Palace by a common soldier. . . .
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1br Clodius Albinus38 views195-197

Denarius

Bare head, right, D CL SEPT ALBIN CAES
Roma seated on shield holding Palladium and scepter, ROMAE AETERNAE

RIC 11

According to the Historia Augusta, which in the case of Albinus is thought to be of dubious veracity: After the death of Pertinax, who was slain at Albinus' advice, various men were hailed emperor at about one and the same time by the senate Julianus at Rome, and by the armies, Septimius Severus in Illyricum, Pescennius Niger in the East, and Clodius Albinus in Gaul. According to Herodian, Clodius had been named Caesar by Severus. But as time went on, each chafed at the other's rule, and the armies of Gaul and Germany demanded an emperor of their own naming, and so all parts of the empire were thrown into an uproar. . . .

It is an undeniable fact, moreover, and Marius Maximus also relates it, that Severus at first intended to name Pescennius Niger and Clodius Albinus as his successors, in case aught befell him. Later, as it happened, in the interest of his growing sons, and through envy of the affection in which Albinus was held, and most of all becau-e of his wires entreaties, he changed his purpose and crushed both of them in war. But he did name Albinus consul, and this he never would have done had not Aibinus been a worthy man, since he was ever most careful in his choice of magistrate. . . .

As soon as he came of age he entered military service, and by the aid of Lollius Serenus, Baebius Maecianus and Ceionius Postumianus, all his kinsmen, he gained the notice of the Antonines. In the capacity of a tribune he commanded a troop of Dalmatian horse: he also commanded soldiers of the I and the IV legions. At the time of Avidius' revolt he loyally held the Bithynian army to its allegiance. Next, Commodus transferred him to Gaul; and here he routed the tribes from over the Rhine and made his name illustrious among both Romans and barbarians. This aroused Commodus' interest, and he offered Albinus the name of Caesar and the privilege, too, of giving the soldiers a present and wearing the scarlet cloak. But all these offers Albinus wisely refused, for Commodus, he said, was only looking for a man who would perish with him, or whom he could reasonably put to death. . . .

[A]fter a decisive engagement, where countless of his soldiers fell, and very many fled, and many, too, surrendered, Albinus also fled away and, according to some, stabbed himself, according to others, was stabbed by a slave. At any rate, he was brought to Severus only half alive. . . . Albinus' head was cut off and paraded on a pike, and finally sent to Rome.
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1bs Septimius Severus87 views193-211

Denarius

Laureate head, right, SEVERVS PIVS AVG
Septimius, togate and veiled, standing left holding olive branch, FVNDATOR PACIS

RIC 265

According to the Historia Augusta: After the murder of Didius Julianus, Severus, a native of Africa, gained the empire. His home town was Lepcis Magna, his father was Geta and his ancestors had been Roman knights before citizenship had been given to all. . . . He himself was born on the third day before the Ides of April, when Erucius Clarus, for the second time, and Severus were the consuls [11 April A.D.146]. . . .

After his departure to Germany he conducted himself in such a way in his governorship as to increase his reputation, which had already become noteworthy. Up to this point his military activity was as a private citizen. But then, after it had been learned that Commodus had been murdered and, moreover, that Julianus held the empire amid universal hatred, he was proclaimed emperor by the German legions at Carnuntum, on the Ides of August, although he did put up some resistance to the many who urged him on. He gave the soldiers . . . sesterces each. Then, after strengthening the provinces which he was leaving in his rear, he marched on Rome. All yielded to him wherever he went, while the armies of Illyricum and Gaul, under the pressure of their generals, had already sworn allegiance to him - for he was received by everyone as the avenger of Pertinax. At the same time, on the instigation of Julianus, Septimius Severus was declared a public enemy, and envoys were sent to the army who were to order the soldiers to desert him, on the instructions of the Senate. At first, when Severus heard that the envoys had been sent by authority of a senatorial decree, he was very frightened. Afterwards, by bribing the envoys, he ensured that they spoke in his favour before the army and crossed to his side. Having learned this, Julianus caused a decree ofthe Senate to be passed regarding his sharing of the empire with Severus. It is uncertain whether or not he did this as a trick, since he had already, before this, dispatched certain men, well known for their assassinations of generals, who were to kill Severus. Similarly he had sent men to assassinate Pescennius Niger, who had also assumed the position of emperor in opposition to him, on the instigation of the Syrian armies. But Severus escaped the hands of those that Julianus had sent to murder him and sent a letter to the praetorian guard, giving them the signal either to desertJulianus or to kill him. He was obeyed at once; Julianus was killed in the palace and Severus was invited to Rome. Thus Severus became the victor merely at will - something that had never happened to anyone - and hastened to Rome under arms. . . .

The same emperor, although implacable towards offences, likewise displayed singular judiciousness in encouraging all hard-working persons. He was quite interested in philosophy and the practice of rhetoric, and enthusiastic about learning in general. He took some measures against brigands everywhere. He composed a convincing autobiography dealing with both his private and his public life, making excuses only for the vice of cruelty. With regard to this, the Senate pronounced that either he ought not to have been born or that he ought not to die, since he appeared to be both excessively cruel and excessively useful to the republic. . . . . He died at Eboracum [York] in Britain, having subdued the tribes which appeared hostile to Britain, in the eighteeneh year of his reign, stricken by a very grave illness, now an old man. . . .

This emperor wore such meagre clothing that even his tunic scarcely had any purple, while he covered his shoulders with a shaggy cloak. He ate sparingly, being very addicted to his native vegetable, sometimes fond of wine, often abstaining from meat. His person was handsome, he was of huge size,(Dio Cassius, who knew Severus personally, says that he was small) with a long beard and curly white hair. His face inspired reverence, his voice was resonant but with a trace of an African accent right up to his old age. He was equally beloved after his death, when envy, or the fear of his cruelty, had disappeared.
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1bt Julia Domna14 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA AVGVSTA
Venus with bare bottom, VENERI VICTR

RIC 536

According to the Historia Augusta, "Next [Septimius Severus] was appointed legate of Lugdunensis. When he wished to marry a second time, after losing his wife, he investigated the horoscopes of potential brides, being very skilled in astrology himself, and since he had heard that there was a certain woman in Syria whose horoscope forecast that she would marry a king, he sought her hand. It was of courseJulia, and he gained her as his bride through the mediation offriends. She at once made him a father! . . . [A]s concerns his family he was less careful, retaining his wife Julia who was notorious for her adulteries and was also guilty of conspiracy."
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1bz Elagabalus_217 views218-222

Denarius

Laureate, horned & draped bust rightt, IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left, SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG

RIC 146

The Historia Augusta, in the life of Caracalla, notes: Bassianus lived for forty-three years and ruled for six. . . . He left a son, who afterward received, like his father, the name Antoninus Marcus Antoninus Elagabalus; for such a hold had the name of the Antonines that it could not be removed from the thoughts of the people, because it had taken root in the hearts of all, even as had the name of Augustus.

In the life of Macrinus is recorded: Now there was a certain woman of the city of Emesa, called [Julia] Maesa or Varia; she was the sister of Julia, the wife of [Septimius] Severus Pertinax the African, and after the death of Antoninus Bassianus she had been expelled from her home in the palace through the arrogance of Macrinus. . . . This woman had two daughters, [Julia Soaemias] and [Julia] Mamaea, the elder of whom was the mother of Elagabalus; he assumed the names Bassianus and Antoninus, for the Phoenicians give the name Elagabalus to the Sun. Elagabalus, moreover, was notable for his beauty and stature and for the priesthood which he held, and he was well known to all who frequented the temple, and particularly to the soldiers. To these, Maesa, or Varia as she was also called, declared that this Bassianus was the son of Antoninus, and this was gradually made known to all the soldiers. Maesa herself, furthermore, was very rich (whence also Elagabalus was most wasteful of money), and through her promises to the soldiers the legions were persuaded to desert Macrinus. . . .

Finally, when he received the imperial power, he took the name Antoninus and was the last of the Antonines to rule the Roman Empire. . . . He was wholly under the control of his mother [Soaemias], so much so, in fact, that he did no public business without her consent, although she lived like a harlot and practised all manner of lewdness in the palace. For that matter, her amour with Antoninus Caracalla was so notorious that Varius, or rather Elagabalus, was commonly supposed to be his son. . . . In short, when Elagabalus' message was read in the senate, at once good wishes were uttered for Antoninus and curses on Macrinus and his son, and, in accordance with the general wish and the eager belief of all in his paternity, Antoninus was hailed as emperor. . . .

After he had spent the winter in Nicomedia, [218-219] living in a depraved manner and indulging in unnatural vice with men, the soldiers soon began to regret that they had conspired against Macrinus to make this man emperor, and they turned their thoughts toward his cousin Alexander, who on the murder of Macrinus had been hailed by the senate as Caesar. . . . Among the base actions of his life of depravity he gave orders that Alexander, whom he had formally adopted, be removed from his presence, saying that he regretted the adoption. Then he commanded the senate to take away from Alexander the name of Caesar. But when this was announced to the senate, there was a profound silence. For Alexander was an excellent youth, as was afterwards shown by the character of his rule, even though, because he was chaste, he was displeasing to his adoptive father he was also, as some declare, his cousin. Besides, he was loved by the soldiers and acceptable to the senate and the equestrian order. Yet the Emperor's madness went the length of an attempt to carry out the basest design; for he despatched assassins to kill Alexander. . . . The soldiers, however, and particularly the members of the guard, either because they knew what evils were in store for Elagabalus, or because they foresaw his hatred for themselves, formed a conspiracy to set the state free. First they attacked the accomplices in his plan of murdering Alexander. . . . Next they fell upon Elagabalus himself and slew him in a latrine in which he had taken refuge.
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1ca Julia Paula13 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA PAVLA AVG

Concord seated left, CONCORDIA

The first wife of Elagabalus, married in 219 and dumped a year later.

RIC 211
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1cc Julia Soaemias11 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVG

Venus std, VENVS CAELESTIS

The mother of Elegabalus, she died at the same time as her son.

RIC 243
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1cd Julia Maesa14 viewsDenarius

Draped bust, right, IVLIA MAESA AVG

Pudicitia std, PVDICITIA

Sister of Julia Domna and grandmother of Elagabalus and Severus Alexander, this tough lady organized the rebellion that toppled Macrinus. She died about 235.

RIC 268
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1ce Severus Alexander27 views222-235

Denarius

Laureate draped bust, right, IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG
Sev. Alex in armor, P M TR P III COS P P

RIC 74

Herodian recorded: [The soldiers] were more favorably disposed toward Alexander, for they expected great things of a lad so properly and modestly reared. They kept continual watch upon the youth when they saw that Elagabalus was plotting against him. His mother Mamaea did not allow her son to touch any food or drink sent by the emperor, nor did Alexander use the cupbearers or cooks employed in the palace or those who happened to be in their mutual service; only those chosen by his mother, those who seemed most trustworthy, were allowed to handle Alexander's food.

Mamaea secretly distributed money to the praetorians to win their good will for her son; it was to gold that the praetorians were particularly devoted. . . . . Maesa, the grandmother of them both, foiled all his schemes; she was astute in every way and had spent much of her life in the imperial palace. As the sister of Severus' wife Julia, Maesa had always lived with the empress at the court. . . .

When Alexander received the empire, the appearance and the title of emperor were allowed him, but the management and control of imperial affairs were in the hands of his women, and they undertook a more moderate and more equitable administration. . . . At any rate, he entered the fourteenth year of his reign without bloodshed, and no one could say that the emperor had been responsible for anyone's murder. Even though men were convicted of serious crimes, he nevertheless granted them pardons to avoid putting them to death, and not readily did any emperor of our time, after the reign of Marcus, act in this way or display so much concern for human life.

In the fourteenth year, however, unexpected dispatches from the governors of Syria and Mesopotamia revealed that Artaxerxes, the Persian king, had conquered the Parthians and seized their Eastern empire, killing Artabanus [IV], who was formerly called the Great King and wore the double diadem. Artaxerxes then subdued all the barbarians on his borders and forced them to pay tribute. He did not remain quiet, however, nor stay on his side of the Tigris River, but, after scaling its banks and crossing the borders of the Roman empire, he overran Mesopotamia and threatened Syria.

Traveling rapidly, he came to Antioch, after visiting the provinces and the garrison camps in Illyricum; from that region he collected a huge force of troops. While in Antioch he continued his preparations for the war, giving the soldiers military training under field conditions. . . . The Romans suffered a staggering disaster; it is not easy to recall another like it, one in which a great army was destroyed, an army inferior in strength and determination to none of the armies of old.

Now unexpected messages and dispatches upset Alexander and caused him even greater anxiety: the governors in Illyria reported that the Germans [the Alamans] had crossed the Rhine and the Danube rivers, were plundering the Roman empire. . . . Although he loathed the idea, Alexander glumly announced his departure for Illyria. . . . Alexander undertook to buy a truce rather than risk the hazards of war. . . .

The soldiers, however, were not pleased by his action, for the time was passing without profit to them, and Alexander was doing nothing courageous or energetic about the war; on the contrary, when it was essential that he march out and punish the Germans for their insults, he spent the time in chariot racing and luxurious living. . . . They plotted now to kill Alexander and proclaim Maximinus emperor and Augustus. . . . Alexander's troops deserted him for Maximinus, who was then proclaimed emperor by all. . . . Maximinus sent a tribune and several centurions to kill Alexander and his mother, together with any of his followers who opposed them.
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1cg Julia Mamaea17 viewsDenarius

Diademed, draped bust, right, IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Vesta stg., VESTA

Severus Alexander's mother was the power behind the throne.

RIC 360
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1ed Fausta12 viewsAE 3

Draped bust with pearl necklace, right, FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG
Fausta Constantine II and Constantius II, FAVSTAE NOBILISSIMAE FEMINAE, mintmark: ΓSIS wreath

RIC 197

Zonaras records: When he had succeeded to his father’s realm, [Constantine] ruled Britain and the Alps, and in addition Gaul, still leaning toward the religion of the Hellenes and opposing the Christians, enticed by his wife Fausta toward ardor in the worship of the idols. Fausta was the daughter of Maximianus. . . . From Fausta, the daughter of Maximianus, the sovereign produced three sons—Constantine, Constantius, and Constans—and a daughter Helen, who later married Julian. . . . Fausta, being erotically obsessed with [her stepson Crispus], since she did not find him compliant, denounced him to his father as being in love with her and as having often attempted to use force against her. Hence, Crispus was condemned to death by his father, who had been persuaded by his spouse. When the emperor later realized the truth, he chastened his wife both because of her unchasteness and on account of the murder of his son. For after she had been led into an exceedingly hot bath, there she violently ended her life.
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1ej Constantius II16 views337-361

Centenionalis

RIC 210?

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust, right, CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Soldier spearing fallen horseman who is kneeling forwards on ground on hands and knees. Star in right field, FEL TEMP REPARATIO. Mintmark BSIS?

Constantius II got the East when the empire was divided after Constantine the Great's death. Zosimus recorded, "The empire being thus divided, Constantius who appeared to take pains not to fall short of his father in impiety, began by shedding the blood of his nearest relations. He first caused Constantius, his father's brother, to be murdered by the soldiers; next to whom he treated Dalmatius in the same manner, as also Optatus whom Constantine had raised to the rank of a Nobilissimate. Constantine indeed first introduced that order, and made a law, that every Nobilissimate should have precedence over of the prefects of the court. At that time, Ablabius prefect of the court was also put to death; and fate was just in his punishment, because he had concerted the murder of Sopatrus the philosopher, from envy of his familiarity with Constantine. Being unnatural towards all his relations, he included Hanniballianus with the rest, suborning the solders to cry out, that they would have no governors but the children of Constantine. Such were the exploits of Constantius." He defeated the usurper Magnentius in 351-353. He died of fever while marching to confront Julian the Apostate, who had been declared emperor in Paris.
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1ek Magnentius18 views350-353

Centenionalis

Bare-headed, draped & cuirassed bust, right, D N MAGNEN-TIVS P F AVG
Two victories, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES

RIC 173

Zosimus recorded: Magnentius thus gained the empire, and possessed himself all the nations beyond the Alps, and the whole of Italy. Vetranio, general of the Pannonian army, upon hearing of the good fortune of Magnentius, was himself inflamed with the same desire, and was declared emperor by the legions that were with him, at Mursa, a city of Pannonia. While affairs were thus situated, the Persians plundered the eastern countries, particularly Mesopotamia. But Constantine, though he was defeated by the Persians, yet resolved to subdue the factions of Magnentius and Vetranio. . . . Constantius advanced from the east against Magnentius, but deemed it best first to win over Vetranio to his interest, as it was difficult to oppose two rebels at once. On the other hand, Magnentius used great endeavours to make Vetranio his friend, and thus to put an end to the war against Constantius. Both therefore sent agents to Vetranio, who chose to adopt the friendship of Constantius rather than that of Magnentius. The ambassadors of Magnentius returned without effecting their purpose. Constantius desired that both armies might join, to undertake the war against Magnentius. To which proposal Vetranio readily assented. . . . When the soldiers heard this, having been previously corrupted by valuable presents, they cried out, that they would have no mock emperors, and immediately began to strip the purple from Vetranio, and pulled him from the throne with the determination to reduce him to a private station. . . . Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia. . . .

Constantius now gaining the victory, by the army of Magnentius taking to flight, a terrible slaughter ensued. Magnentius, therefore being deprived ofall hope, and apprehensive lest the remnant of his army should deliver him to Constantius, deemed it best to retire from Pannonia, and to enter Italy, in order to raise an army there for another attempt. But when he heard that the people of Rome were in favour of Constantius, either from hatred to himself, or because they had heard of the event of the battle, he resolved to cross the Alps, and .seek for himself a refuge among the nations on that side. Hearing however that Constantius had likewise engaged the Barbarians near the Rhine against him, and that |65 he could not enter Gaul, as some officers had obstructed his passage thither in order to make their court to Constantius, nor through Spain into Mauritania, on account of the Roman allies there who studied to please Constantius. In these circumstances he preferred a voluntary death to a dishonourable life, and chose rather to die by his own hand than by that of his enemy.

Thus died Magnentius, having been emperor three years and six months. He was of Barbarian extraction, but lived among the Leti, a people of Gaul. He understood Latin, was bold when favoured by fortune, but cowardly in adversity, ingenious in concealing his natural evil disposition, and deemed by those who did not know him to be a man of candour and goodness. I have thought it just to make these observations concerning Magnentius, that the world may be acquainted With his true character, since it has been the opinion of some that he performed much good, who never in his life did any thing with a good intention.
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1em Constantius Gallus23 viewsCaesar 351-354

Centenionalis

Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind head, D N CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C
Emperor, diademed and in military dress, standing facing, head left, holding standard with chi-rho banner in each hand. Star above. Left field: III. CONCORDIA MILITVM. Mintmark: star SIRM.

RIC 22

Zosimus noted: Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia; either in order that he might oppose the Persians, or as seems more probable, that he might have an opportunity of taking him off. He and his brothers were the only remaining persons of the family whom Constantius had not put to death, as I have related. When he had clothed Gallus with the Caesarean robe, and appointed Lucilianus general in the Persian war, he marched towards Magnentius with his own troops and those of Vetranio in one body. Constantius II had him tried and put to death for misrule of the East as Caesar. . . . The state-informers, with which such men are usually surrounded, and which are designed for the ruin of those that are in prosperity, were augmented. These sycophants, when they attempted to effect the downfal of a noble in hopes of sharing his wealth or honours, contrived some false accusation against him. This was the practice in the time of Constantius. Spies of this description, who made the eunuchs of the court their accomplices, flocked about Constantius, and persuaded him that his cousin german Gallus, who was a Caesar, was not satisfied with that honour, but wished to be emperor. They so far convinced him of the truth of this charge, that they made him resolve upon the destruction of Gallus. The contrivers of this design were Dynamius and Picentius, men of obscure condition, who endeavoured to raise themselves by such evil practises. Lampadius also, the Prefect of the court, was in the conspiracy, being a person who wished to engross more of the emperor's favour than any other. Constantius listened to those false insinuations, and Gallus was sent for, knowing nothing of what was intended against him. As soon as he arrived, Constantius first degraded him from the dignity of Caesar, and, having reduced him to private station, delivered him to the public executioners to be put to death.
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1en Julian II "Apostate"26 views360-363

AE3

Pearl-diademed, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding shield & spear, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath, palm branch-BSIS-palm branch in ex [?].

RIC 415

According to Zosimus: Constantius, having so well succeeded in his design against Vetranio, marched against Magnentius, having first conferred the title of Caesar on Gallus, the son of his uncle, and brother to Julian who was afterwards emperor, and given him in marriage his sister Constantia. . . . CONSTANTIUS, after having acted towards Gallus Caesar in the manner I have related, left Pannonia to proceed into Italy. . . . He scarcely thought himself capable of managing affairs at this critical period. He was unwilling, however, to associate any one with himself in the government, because he so much desired to rule alone, and could esteem no man his friend. Under these circumstances he was at a loss how to act. It happened, however, that when the empire was in the greatest danger, Eusebia, the wife of Constantius, who was a woman of extraordinary learning, and of greater wisdom than her sex is usually endowed with, advised him to confer the government of the nations beyond the Alps on Julianus Caesar, who was brother to Gallus, and grandson to Constantius. As she knew that the emperor was suspicious of all his kindred, she thus circumvented him. She observed to him, that Julian was a young man unacquainted with the intrigues of state, having devoted himself totally to his studies; and that he was wholly inexperienced in worldly business. That on this account he would be more fit for his purpose than any other person. That either he would be fortunate, and his success would be attributed to the emperor's conduct, or that he would fail and perish; and that thus Constantius would have none of the imperial family to succeed to him.

Constantius, having approved her advice, sent for Julian from Athens, where he lived among the philosophers, and excelled all his masters in every kind of learning. Accordingly, Julian returning from Greece into Italy, Constantius declared him Caesar, gave him in marriage his sister Helena, and sent him beyond the Alps. . . .

Constantius, having thus disposed of Julian, marched himself into Pannonia and Moesia, and having there suppressed the Quadi and the Sarmatians, proceeded to the east, and was provoked to war by the inroads of the Persians. Julian by this time had arrived beyond the Alps into the Gallic nations which he was to rule. Perceiving that the Barbarians continued committing the same violence, Eusebia, for the same reasons as before, persuaded Constantius to place the entire management of those countries into the hands of Julian. . . . Julian finding the military affairs of Gallia Celtica in a very ruinous state, and that the Barbarians pased the Rhine without any resistance, even almost as far as the sea-port towns, he took a survey of the remaining parts of the enemy. And understanding that the people of those parts were terrified at the very name of the Barbarians, while those whom Constantius had sent along with him, who were not more than three hundred and sixty, knew nothing more, as he used to say, than how to say their prayers, he enlisted as many more as he could and took in a great number of volunteers. He also provided arms, and finding a quantity of old weapons in some town he fitted them up, and distributed them among the soldiers. The scouts bringing him intelligence, that an immense number of Barbarians had crossed the river near the city of Argentoratum (Strasburg) which stands on the Rhine, he no sooner heard of it, than he led forth his army with the greatest speed, and engaging with the enemy gained such a victory as exceeds all description.

After these events he raised a great army to make war on the whole German nation; He was opposed however by the Barbarians in vast numbers. Caesar therefore would not wait while they came up to him, but crossed the Rhine, preferring that their country should be the seat of war, and not that of the Romans, as by that means the cities would escape being again pillaged by the Barbarians. A most furious battle therefore took place; a great number of the Barbarians being slain on the field of battle, while the rest fled, and were pursued by Caesar into the Hercynian forest, and many of them killed. . . .

But while Julian was at Parisium, a small town in Germany, the soldiers, being ready to march, continued at supper till midnight in a place near the palace, which they so called there. They were as yet ignorant of any design against Caesar [by Constantius], when some tribunes, who began to suspect the contrivance against him, privately distributed a number of anonymous billets among the soldiers, in which they represented to them, that Caesar, by his judicious conduct had so managed affairs, that almost all of them had erected trophies over the Barbarians ; that he had always fought like a private soldier, and was now in extreme danger from the emperor, who would shortly deprive him of his whole army, unless they prevented it. Some of the soldiers having read these billets, and published the intrigue to the whole army, all were highly enraged. They suddenly rose from their seats in great commotion, and with the cups yet in their hands went to the palace. Breaking open the doors without ceremony, they brought out Caesar, and lifting him on a shield declared him emperor and Augustus. They then, without attending to his reluctance, placed a diadem upon his head. . . .

Arriving at Naisus, he consulted the soothsayers what measures to pursue. As the entrails signified that he must stay there for some time, he obeyed, observing likewise the time that was mentioned in his dream. When this, according to the motion of the planets, was arrived, a party of horsemen arrived from Constantinople at Naisus, with intelligence that Constantius was dead, and that the armies desired Julian to be emperor. Upon this he accepted what the gods had bestowed upon him, and proceeded on his journey. On his arrival at. Byzantium, he was received with joyful acclamations. . . .

[After slashing through Persia and crossing the Tigris,] they perceived the Persian army, with which they engaged, and having considerably the advantage, they killed a great number of Persians. Upon the following day, about noon, the Persians drew up in a large body, and once more attacked the rear of the Roman army. The Romans, being at that time out of their ranks, were surprised and alarmed at the suddenness of the attack, yet made a stout and spirited defence. The emperor, according to his custom, went round the army, encouraging them to fight with ardour. When by this means all were engaged, the emperor, who sometimes rode to the commanders and tribunes, and was at other times among the private soldiers, received a wound in the heat of the engagement, and was borne on a shield to his tent. He survived only till midnight. He then expired, after having nearly subverted the Persian empire.

Note: Julian favored the pagan faith over Christianity and was tarred by the church as "the apostate."
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JovianIIAE3VotMult.jpg
1eo Jovian85 views363-364

AE 3, Heraclea

Diademed bust left, draped & cuirassed, D N IOVIANVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X in wreath, Mintmark HERACA

RIC 110A

Zosimus recorded: A meeting of the officers and soldiers was afterwards convened, in order to appoint a successor to the empire : since it would be impossible for them without a ruler to avoid the dangers to which they were exposed in the midst of an enemy's country. The general voice was in favour of Jovianus, the son of Varronianus, tribune of the domestic forces. When Jovian had assumed the purple and the diadem, he directed his course homewards with all possible speed. . . . They then marched forward four days, continually harassed by the enemy, who followed them when they were proceeding, but fled when the Romans offered any resistance. At length, having gained some distance of the enemy, they resolved to crops the Tigris. For this purpose they fastened skins together, and floated over. When the greater part had gained the opposite bank, the commanders crossed over in safety with the remainder. The Persians, however, still accompanied them, and followed them with a large army so assiduously, that the Romans were in perpetual danger, both from the unfavourable circumstances in which they were placed, and from the want, of provisions. Although the Roman army was in this condition, the Persians were willing to treat for peace, and for that purpose sent Surenas with other |90 officers to the Roman camp. Jovian, upon hearing this, sent to them Sallustius, prefect of the court, together with Aristaeus, who, after some discussion, agreed on a truce for thirty years. The conditions were, that the Romans should give up to the Persians the country of the Rabdiceni, and that of the Candueni, Rhemeni, and Zaleni, besides fifteen castles in those provinces, with the inhabitants, lands, cattle, and all their property ; that Nisibis should be surrendered without its inhabitants, who were to be transplanted into whatever colony the Remans pleased. The Persians also deprived the Romans of great part of Armenia, leaving them but a very small part of it. The truce having been concluded on these conditions, and ratified on both sides, the Romans had an opportunity of returning home unmolested, neither party offering or sustaining any injury, either by open force; or secret machination.

Jovian marched through all the towns in great speed, because they were so filled with grief [because they were being given over to Persian rule], that the inhabitants could not look patiently on him; such being the custom and disposition of those countries. Taking with him the imperial guard, he proceeded to Antioch. . . . Jovian now turning his attention to the affairs of government, made various arrangements, and sent Lucilianus his father-in-law, Procopius, and Valentinian, who was afterwards emperor, to the armic.s in Pannoriia, to inform them of the death of Julian, and of his being chosen emperor. The Bavarians who were at Sirmium, and were left there for its protection, as soon as they received the news, put to death Lucilianus who brought such unwelcome intelligence, without regard to his relationship to the emperor. Such was the respect they had to Jovian's relations, that Valentinian himself only escaped from the death they intended to inflict on him. Jovianus proceeding from Antioch towards Constantinople, suddenly fell sick at Dadostana in Bithynia, and died after a reign of eight months, in which short time he had not been able to render the public any essential service.
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ValentinianAE3GlorRom.jpg
1ep Valentinian22 views364-375

AE3

Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right , D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG
Emperor in military dress, advancing right, head left, holding labarum, dragging captive behind him. No fieldmarks. Mintmark: dot GSISC, GLORIA ROMANORVM

RIC 5a

According to Zosimus: Several discussions were held among the soldiers and their officers, and various persons were nominated. At length Sallustius, the prefect of the court, was unanimously elected. He excused himself on the pretext of his advanced age, which disabled him from being of service in the present critical circumstances. They then desired that his son might be emperor in lieu of himself. But his son he told them was too young, and from that as well as other causes unable to sustain the weight of an imperial diadem. They thus failed in their wish to appoint so distinguished a person, who was the most worthy of the age. They therefore elected Valentinian, a native of Cibalis in Pannonia. He was an excellent soldier, but extremely illiterate. They sent for him, he being then at some distance: and the state was not long without a ruler. Upon his arrival at the army, at Nicaea in Bithynia, he assumed the imperial authority, and proceeded forward. . . .

I have now to state, that while Valentinian was on his journey towards Constantinople, he was seized with a distemper, which increased his natural choleric temper to a degree of cruelty, and even to madness, so that he falsely suspected his sickness to proceed from some charm or poison which Julian's friends had prepared for him through malice. Accusations to that effect were drawn up against some distinguished persons, which were set aside by the discretion of Sallustius, who still was prefect of the court. After his distemper abated, he proceeded from Nicaea to Constantinople. The army and his friends in that city advised him to choose an associate in the empire, that if occasion should require, he might have some one to assist him, and prevent their again suffering as at the death of Julian. He complied with their advice, and after consideration, selected his brother Valens, whom he thought most likely to prove faithful to him. He declared him associate in the empire. . . . Affairs being thus disposed, Valentinian deemed it most prudent to place the east as far as Egypt, Bithynia, and Thrace, under the care of his brother, and to take charge of Illyricum himself. From thence he designed to proceed to Italy, and to retain in his own possession all the cities in that country, and the countries beyond the Alps, with Spain, Britain, and Africa. The empire being thus divided, Valentinian began to govern more rigorously, correcting the faults of the magistrates. He was very severe in the collection of the imposts, and particularly in observing that the soldiers were duly paid. . . .

Meantime the Barbarians beyond the Rhine, who while Julian lived held the Roman name in terror, and were contented to remain quiet in their own territories, as soon as they heard of his death, immediately marched out of their own country, and prepared for a war with the Romans. Valentinian. on bring informed of this, made a proper disposition of his forces, and placed suitable garrisons in all the towns along the Rhine. Valentinian was enabled to make these arrangements by his experience in military affairs. . . . [T] he emperor Valentinian, having favourably disposed the affairs of Germany, made provisions for the future security of the Celtic nations. . . . Valentinian was now attacked by a disease which nearly cost him his life. Upon his recovery the countries requested him to appoint a successor, lest at his decease the commonwealth should be in danger. To this the emperor consented, and declared his son Gratian emperor and his associate in the government, although he was then very young, and not yet capable of the management of affairs. . . .

Valentinian, thinking he had sufficiently secured himself from a German war, acted towards his subjects with great severity, exacting from them exorbitant tributes, such as they had never before paid; under pretence that the military expenditure compelled him to have recourse to the public. Having thus acquired universal hatred, he became still more severe; nor would he enquire into the conduct of the magistrates, but was envious of all whe had the reputation of leading a blameless life. . . . For this cause, the Africans, who could not endure the excessive avarice of the person who held the military command in Mauritania, gave the purple robe to Firmus, and proclaimed him emperor. This doubtless gave much uneasiness to Valentinian, who immediately commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi, who had long entertained a hatred for Celestius, the governor of those countries, availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . .

Valentinian, roused by the intelligence of these events, marched from Celtica into Illyricum, for the purpose of opposing the Quadi and the Sarmatians, and consigned the command of his forces to Merobaudes, who was a person of the greatest military experience. The winter continuing unusually late, the Quadi sent ambassadors to him with insolent and unbecoming messages. These so exasperated the emperor, that through the violence of his rage, the blood flowed from his head into his mouth, and suffocated him. He thus died after having resided in Illyricum nearly nine months, and after a reign of twelve years.
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ProcopiusAEChiRo.jpg
1er Procopius18 views365-366

AE3

Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust left, D N PROCOPIVS P F AVG
Procopius standing facing, head right, holding labarum in right hand, left resting on shield set on the ground; Chi-rho in upper right field & unidentified object in left at foot; mintmark CONS Gamma.

RIC 17a

Zosimus tells us: On [Valens'] departure from Constantinople, the rebellion of Procopius commenced. This person had been intrusted by Julian, being one of his relations, with a part of his forces, and had been charged to march with Sebastianus through Adiabene, and to meet Julian, who took another route. Permission, moreover, was given him to wear a purple robe, for a reason which no other person was acquainted with. But the deity being pleased to ordain it otherwise, and Jovian having succeeded to the imperial dignity, Procopius immediately delivered up the imperial robe which he had received from Julian, confessing why it had been given to him, and entreating the emperor to absolve him from his military oath, and to allow him to live in retirement, and to attend to agriculture and his own private affairs. Having obtained this, he went with his wife and children to Caesarea in Cappadocia, intending to reside in that place, where he possessed a valuable estate. During his abode there, Valentinian and Valens being made emperors, and being suspicious of him, sent persons to take him into custody. In that they found no difficulty, for he surrendered himself voluntarily; and desired them to carry him wherever they pleased, if they would suffer him first to see his children. To this they consented, and he prepared an entertainment for them. When he perceived them to be intoxicated, he and his family fled towards the Taurica Chersonesus. Having remained there for some time, he found the inhabitants to he a faithless race, and was apprehensive lest they should deliver him to his persecutors. He, therefore, put himself and his family on board a trading vessel, and arrived in the night at Constantinople. He there resided in the house of an old acquaintance, and making observations on the state of the city after the departure of the emperor, he attempted to raise himself to the empire, and formed his design on the following incident.

A eunuch, named Eugenius, had not long before been discharged from the court, who entertained but little friendship for the emperors. Procopius therefore won this man to his interest. . . . Their first attempt was to bribe the court guards, which consisted of two legions. Then arming the slaves, and collecting with ease a considerable multitude, chiefly volunteers, they sent them in the night into the city, and occasioned a general commotion; the people issuing from their houses, and gazing on Procopiusas on a king made in a theatre. But the city being in general confusion, and no person being sufficiently collected in mind by reason of the surprise to know how to act, Procopius imagined his design to be still undiscovered, and that he might secure the empire if the enterprise were no further revealed. Having then seized on Cesarius, whom the emperors had made prefect of the city, and on Nebridius, who was appointed to succeed Sallustius in tbe prefecture of the court, he compelled them to write to the subjects of the empire whatever he wished. He also kept them separate, that they might not consult with each other. Having formed these projects, he proceeded in a splendid manner towards the palace. Ascending a tribunal before the gate, he gave the people great hopes and promises. He then entered the palace to provide for the remainder of his affairs.

The new emperors having divided the army between them, Procopius determined to send persons to the soldiers, who were as yet in confusion, and went by the command of the emperors from place to place without any order. He thus hoped to seduce some of them to his party. Nor did he fail of accomplishing his purpose with ease by distributing money amongst the soldiers and their officers; by which means he collected a considerable force, and prepared to make an open attack on the enemy. Procopius then sent Marcellus into Bithynia with an army against Serenianus and the imperial cavalry that was under his command, in hope of cutting them to pieces. This force having fled to Cyzicus, Marcellus, whose army was superior to theirs both by sea and land, took possession of that town; and having taken Serenianus, who fled into Lydia, put him to death. Procopius was so elevated by this fortunate commencement, that his forces considerably augmented, many being of opinion that he was able to contend with the emperors. Both the Roman legions and the Barbarian troops now flocked to his standard. Besides the reputation of being related to Julian, and of having accompanied him in all the wars he had ever been engaged in, attracted many partizans. He likewise sent ambassadors to the chief of Scythia beyond the Ister, who sent to his assistance ten thousand men. The other Barbarian nations likewise sent auxiliaries to share in the expedition. Procopius however considered that it would be imprudent in him to engage with both emperors together, and therefore thought it best to advance against him who was nearest, and afterwards deliberate on what course to pursue.

Thus was Procopius employed; while the emperor Valens, who heard of this insurrection at Galatia in Phrygia, was filled with consternation at the news. Arbitrio having encouraged him not to despair, he prepared the troops that were with him for war, and sent to his brother to inform him of the designs of Procopius. Valentinian however was little disposed for sending auxiliaries to one who was incapable of defending the empire committed to his charge. Valens was therefore under the necessity of. preparing for war, and appointed Arbitrio to the command of his army. When the armies were ready to engage, Arbitrio circumvented Procopius by a stratagem, and thereby seduced from him a great number of his men, from whom he received previous information of the designs of Procopius. On the advance of the emperor and Procopius towards each other, the two armies met near Thyatira. Procopius at first appeared to have the advantage, by which he would have gained the supreme authority, Hormisdas in the engagement having overpowered the enemy. But Gomarius, another of the commanders of Procopius, imparting his intention to all the soldiers of Procopius who were attached to the emperor, in the midst of the battle cried out Augustus, and gave a signal for them to imitate his example. Thus the most of the troops of Procopius went over to Valens.

After having obtained this victory, Valens marched to Sardes, and from thence into Phrygia, where he found Procopius in a town called Nacolia. Affairs having been ordered for the advantage of the emperor by Naplo, an officer of Procopius, Valens again prevailed, and took him prisoner, and soon afterwards Marcellus, both of whom he put to death.
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JulianIIAE1Bull.jpg
1i Last Bid to Revitalize Pagan Religion8 viewsJulian II
360-363

AE1

Portrait, right, D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG
Bull, eagle, and two stars, SECVRITAS REIPVB, PCONST in ex.

Julian "the Apostate" issued this coin with the symbols of Jupiter on the reverse as part of his campaign to breath life back into pagan faith.

RIC 318
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1__Julia_Domna.jpg
2. JULIA DOMNA, wife of Septimus Severus17 viewsAR Denarius, Mint:Rome, Date:196-211 AD
Ref: RIC IV 575
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA-draped bust right.
Rev: PVDICITIA -veiled,seated left,head facing,right hand on breast,scepter in left.
Size: 3.240gm; 19.0mm


2 commentsbrian l
Didius.jpg
20 Didius Julianus73 viewsDenarius. 193 AD. IMP CAES M DID IVLIAN AVG, laureate head right / CONCORD MILIT, Concordia standing left holding legionary eagle & standard. RIC 1, RSC 2, BMC 2. Weight 2.68 g. Die Axis 6 hr. Max Dia 17.1 mm.



1 commentsmix_val
Titi_denario_VENVS_AVGVST.jpg
20-01 - JULIA TITI (79 - 81 D.C.)28 viewsHija de Tito
AR Denario 20 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F" - Busto vestido y con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS AVGVST" - Venus semi-desnuda, viendo a derecha, apoyada en Cippus (columna corta), portando Yelmo en mano der. y jabalina en izq.

Acuñada 79 - 80 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Titus) #56 Pag.122 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2612 Pag.480 - BMCRE Titus #141 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #3 Pag.108 - CBN Titus #106 - RSC Vol. II #14 Pag.60
mdelvalle
RIC_56_Denario_Julia_Titi.jpg
20-01 - JULIA TITI (79 - 81 D.C.)13 viewsHija de Tito
AR Denario 20 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA TITI AVGVSTI F" - Busto vestido y con diadema viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS AVGVST" - Venus semi-desnuda, viendo a derecha, apoyada en Cippus (columna corta), portando Yelmo en mano der. y jabalina en izq.

Acuñada 79 - 80 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: R

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Titus) #56 Pag.122 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2612 Pag.480 - BMCRE Titus #141 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #3 Pag.108 - CBN Titus #106 - RSC Vol. II #14 Pag.60
mdelvalle
J-Maesa-RIC-264.jpg
20. J. Maesa antoninianus.14 viewsAntoninianus, 218 - 219 AD, Branch mint.
Obverse: IVLIA MAESA AVG / Bust of Julia Maesa on crescent.
Reverse: PIETAS AVG / Pietas standing, holding incense box and raising hand over lighted altar.
4.80 gm., 22 mm.
RIC #264; S #7748.

The coinage of Julia Maesa is fairly extensive. Coins with her portrait were minted at Antioch (and/or other Eastern mints) from the beginning of Elagabalus' reign until that mint was closed in 220. The mint at Rome minted her coins for the entire four year period of his reign, and possibly even into the reign of Severus Alexander as well.

There is only one type of antoninianus listed for Julia Maesa, and this is it. This coin was minted early in the reign of Elagabalus, before the denomination was discontinued. Although RIC lists this coin as being minted in Rome, it may well have been minted by a mint that traveled with Elagabalus on his journey to Rome 218 - 219 AD.
Callimachus
0030-405.jpg
2000 - Octavian & Agrippa, AE Dupondius 81 viewsArausio mint (Orange), 30-29 BC (Colonia Firma Julia Secundanorum Arausio)
IMP DIVI F (IMPerator DIVI Filii), bare heads of Augustus (right) and Agrippa (left), back to back
Prow of galley right, ram's head (?) enclosed in a medaillion above
17.61 gr - 28 mm.
Ref : RPC # 533
Ex. CNG e-auction #181/28, from the Patrick Villemur collection

Following comment taken from http://www.asdenimes.com/ :

Un très bel exemplaire du dupondius d'Orange. Têtes adossées d'Agrippa (à gauche) et Octave (à droite). Très beaux reliefs.
L’as (ou dupondius) d’Orange est très rare et nombre d'exemplaires connus (quelques dizaines) sont souvent de médiocre conservation. Le dupondius d'Orange préfigure le dupondius de Nîmes frappé à partir de 28/27 av. J.-C. et qui reprendra l’avers quasiment à l’identique (y compris les légendes), avec les profils d’Octave devenu Auguste et d’Agrippa. Le revers sera interprété de façon parodique sur l’as de Nîmes, puisque la galère sera remplacée par le crocodile qui garde à peu près la forme générale du vaisseau et dont l’oeil prophylactique (pas visible sur cet exemplaire : voir les as de Vienne page suivante) deviendra l’oeil du crocodile. On y ajoutera la palme pour former le mat et quelques autres accessoires tout aussi symboliques.
La tête de bélier représentée dans le médaillon du revers serait l’emblème des vétérans de la légio II Gallica qui a fondé la colonie d’Arausio vers 35 av. J.-C.
On distingue 2 types de dupondius d'Orange : ceux dont les portraits occupent la plus grande partie de l'avers et ceux qui montrent des têtes plutôt petites.
1 commentsPotator II
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201 Julia Mamaea27 views
Julia Mamaea Denarius. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right / FELICITAS PVBLIC
RIC 335, RSC 17, BMC 483
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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201342 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
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RIC_0391[carac]a.jpg
201a. JULIA DOMNA139 viewsJULIA DOMNA, mother of Caracalla.

When Septimius Severus claimed the empire after Didius Julianus had succeeded Pertinax in 193, two serious rivals challenged him, Pescennius Niger in the East and Clodius Albinus in the West. Julia accompanied her husband in the campaign against Pescennius, having been honored with the title mater castrorum. After this successful campaign, there was another campaign in the East, against the Parthians, in 197. Afterwards, she was with Severus on a journey to Egypt and other parts of the empire. She was widely honored with inscriptions throughout this period, and numerous coin issues emphasized her imperial position.

She opposed Plautianus, the praetorian prefect and father-in-law of Caracalla, and was partially responsible for his downfall and his daughter Plautilla's disgrace. She was often accused of adultery; nonetheless, the emperor chose to ignore these charges, if true, and the marriage continued. Among her passions were literature and philosophy; she gathered writers and philosophers in a kind of salon, and urged Philostratus to write the life of Apollonius of Tyana.

In 212, Caracalla murdered Geta while he sought succor in his mother's arms; covered with his blood, she was forbidden by Caracalla to grieve. Her relationship with Caracalla during the six years of his reign was mixed. She had some public duties but largely devoted herself to philosophy. She accompanied Caracalla to the east on campaign against the Parthians in 217; when she learned, in Antioch, that he had been assassinated, she resolved upon death, which followed her refusal to take food.

AR Denarius
(19mm, 2.86 gm). IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, draped
bust right / VESTA, Vesta, veiled, seated left,
holding simpulum and sceptre. RIC IV 391 (Caracalla); BMCRE 31 (same); RSC 226. EF. Ex-CNG
1 commentsecoli73