Classical Numismatics Discussion Members' Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register.

Members' Gallery Home | Member Collections | Last Added | Last Comments | Most Viewed | Top Rated | My Favorities | Search Galleries
Search results - "Drusus"
NeroDrususCaesars1.jpg
165 viewsStruck under Caligula. Nero and Drusus Caesars riding right, cloaks flying, NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES / C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around S-C. Rome mint, c. AD 37-38. RIC I 34 (pg. 110).2 commentssocalcoins
Drusus_As.jpg
3.5 Drusus21 viewsDRUSUS CAESAR
Æ As. Struck under Tiberius, 21-22 AD.

DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C.

Cohen 2, RIC 45 (Tiberius), Cohen 2, BMC 99 VG/aF
RI0034
Sosius
Drusus_As_2.jpg
2.5 Drusus13 viewsAE AsSosius
fc12.jpg
Drusus. Caesar, AD 19-23. Æ As (28mm, 10.63 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23. Bare head left / Legend around large S · C. RIC I 4525 viewsJoe Geranio Collection (anyone may use as long as credit is given) Drusus. Caesar, AD 19-23. Æ As (28mm, 10.63 g, 12h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23. Bare head left / Legend around large S · C. RIC I 45 (Tiberius).1 commentsJoe Geranio
FC20.jpg
Nero & Drusus Caesar. Died AD 31 and 33, respectively. Æ Dupondius (28mm, 16.30 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Gaius (Caligula), AD 37-38. Nero and Drusus on horseback21 viewsJoe Geranio Collection- (Anyone may use as long as credit is given-(Joe Geranio JCIA) Nero & Drusus Caesar. Died AD 31 and 33, respectively. Æ Dupondius (28mm, 16.30 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Gaius (Caligula), AD 37-38. Nero and Drusus on horsebackJoe Geranio
tiberius_nero_drusus_resb.jpg
(03) TIBERIUS20 views14 - 37 AD
AE 28.5 mm; 11.46 g
O: His bare head left
R: Confronted heads of Caesars Nero and Drusus
Spain (Hispania Tarraconensis), Carthago Nova mint
cf RPC 179, SNG Cop 500 Scarce
laney
Denarius91BC.jpg
(501i) Roman Republic, D. Junius L.f. Silanus, 91 B.C.58 viewsSilver denarius, Syd 646a, RSC Junia 16, S 225 var, Cr 337/3 var, VF, 3.718g, 18.6mm, 0o, Rome mint, 91 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, X (control letter) behind; reverse Victory in a biga right holding reins in both hands, V (control numeral) above, D•SILANVS / ROMA in ex; mint luster in recesses. Ex FORVM.

Although the coin itself does not commemorate the event, the date this coin was struck is historically significant.

MARCUS Livius DRUSUS (his father was the colleague of Gaius Gracchus in the tribuneship, 122 B.C.), became tribune of the people in 91 B.C. He was a thoroughgoing conservative, wealthy and generous, and a man of high integrity. With some of the more intelligent members of his party (such as Marcus Scaurus and L. Licinius Crassus the orator) he recognized the need of reform. At that time an agitation was going on for the transfer of the judicial functions from the equites to the senate; Drusus proposed as a compromise a measure which restored to the senate the office of judices, while its numbers were doubled by the admission of 300 equites. Further, a special commission was to be appointed to try and sentence all judices guilty of taking bribes.

The senate was hesitant; and the equites, whose occupation was threatened, offered the most violent opposition. In order, therefore, to catch the popular votes, Drusus proposed the establishment of colonies in Italy and Sicily, and an increased distribution of corn at a reduced rate. By help of these riders the bill was carried.

Drusus now sought a closer alliance with the Italians, promising them the long coveted boon of the Roman franchise. The senate broke out into open opposition. His laws were abrogated as informal, and each party armed its adherents for the civil struggle which was now inevitable. Drusus was stabbed one evening as he was returning home. His assassin was never discovered (http://62.1911encyclopedia.org/D/DR/DRUSUS_MARCUS_LIVIUS.htm).

The ensuing "Social War" (91-88 B.C.) would set the stage for the "Civil Wars" (88-87 & 82-81 B.C.) featuring, notably, Marius & Sulla; two men who would make significant impressions on the mind of a young Julius Caesar. Caesar would cross the Rubicon not thirty years later.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
3363LG.jpg
003a. Drusus136 viewsDrusus

Tiberius' son, Drusus Caesar, d. 23, called Drusus Junior, served in the provinces Pannonia ( 15) and in Illyricum ( 17? 20). In 22 he was made tribune. Meanwhile, Sejanus, Tiberius' minister, had become jealous of Drusus' power and tried to turn Tiberius against him. Drusus may have been poisoned by Sejanus or by his wife under Sejanus' influence.

As. Sear 2594, restitution issue by Titus. 10.0 g, 26x27 mm. Glossy dark green patina with slight roughness. OBV.: Drusus left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N. REV.: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST around SC.
1 commentsecoli73
coin189.JPG
003b. Nero & Drusus Caesars33 viewsNero & Drusus Caesars, brothers of Caligula.

There father Germanicus was Heir Apparent to his own adoptive father Emperor Tiberius, but Germanicus predeceased the Emperor in 19. He was replaced as heir by Julius Caesar Drusus, son of Tiberius and his first wife Vipsania Agrippina. But he too predeceased the Emperor on July 1, 23.

Nero and his younger brother Drusus were the oldest adoptive grandsons of Tiberius. They jointly became Heirs Apparent. However, both were accused of treason along with their mother in AD 32. Nero was exiled to an island and Drusus in a prison where they either starved to death or was murdered by order of the emperor in AD 33.

Dupondius. Rome mint, struck under Caligula, 37-38 AD. NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES, Nero & Drusus on horseback riding right / C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large S C.
Cohen 1. RIC 34

Check
ecoli
2090325.jpg
005d. Nero Claudius Drusus31 viewsNero Claudius Drusus. Died 9 BC. Æ Sestertius (35mm, 27.77 g, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Claudius, circa AD 50-54. Bare head of Nero Claudius left / Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding branch and roll; around chair, weapons and armor to either side of globe. RIC I 109 (Claudius). Fine, rough reddish-brown surfaces.

Ex-CNG sale 209, lot 325 128/100

Check

ecoli
8.jpg
008 Drusus. AE as 11.4gm34 viewsobv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N bare head l.
rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTESTITER/SC in center
"son of tiberus and Vispania"
1 commentshill132
9.jpg
009 Nero Claudius Drusus. AE sest. 39 viewsobv: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICUS IMP bare head l.
rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP Claudius seated l. on curule chair,
weapons and armer lying around
"brother of Tiberius"
1 commentshill132
Personajes_Imperiales_1.jpg
01 - Personalities of the Empire86 viewsPompey, Brutus, Julius Caesar, Marc Antony, Augustus, Livia, Caius & Lucius, Agrippa, Nero Claudius Drusus, Germanicus, Agrippina Sr., Tiberius, Drusus and Antonia1 commentsmdelvalle
10a.jpg
010a Antonia. AE dupondus 14.4gm31 viewsrev: ANTONIA AVGVSTA drp. bust r.
rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P Imp. Claudius veiled and togate std. l.,
r. holding simpulem/ SC
"doughter of M. Antony, wife of N.C Drusus"
hill132
11a.jpg
011a Germanicus. AE As 10.96gm39 viewsobv: GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N bare head l.
rev: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG PM TR P IIII PP/SC
"son of N.C.Drusus and Antonia"
1 commentshill132
IMG_8168~0.JPG
016. Germanicus, son of Drusus, adopted by Tiberius (15 B.C.–19 A.D.) 19 viewsAv.: GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Rv.: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG PM TR P III PP / S-C

AE As Ø27 / 11.6g
RIC 43 Rome, BMC 60, BN 106
Juancho
IMG_7130.JPG
018. Drusus, son of Tiberius (Died 23 A.D.)26 viewsAv.: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Rv.: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER / S-C

AE As Ø29 / 10.8g
RIC 45 Rome, Cohen 2
Juancho
024~2.JPG
021 Drusus15 viewsDrusus Caesar Æ As. Struck under Tiberius, 21-22 AD. DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C.
RIC 45 (Tiberius), Cohen 2, BMC 99
Randygeki(h2)
c3947.JPG
040 Claudius39 viewsClaudius Æ As. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head left / LIBERTAS AVGVSTA S-C, Libertas standing facing, with pileus and extending left hand. Cohen 47.




"Claudius was born at Lugdunum, in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on August 1st, 10 B.C., the very day when the first altar was dedicated there to Augustus the God; and he was given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. Subsequently he assumed the surname Germanicus after his brother had been admitted into the Julian House as Tiberius's adopted son."
Randygeki(h2)
007~1.JPG
041 Germanicus 18 viewsGermanicus Æ As struck under Claudius. GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head right / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERM P M TR P IMP P P around S-C



"Germanicus, Father of Gaius Caesar(Caligula), son of Drusus and Antonia the Younger, was adopted by Tiberius, his paternal uncle."
Randygeki(h2)
cd3961.JPG
042 Nero Claudius Drusus26 viewsNero Claudius Drusus AE Sestertius. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head left / TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius, togate, seated left on curule chair, holding branch; arms lying around; SC in ex.




"When, three months after her marriage to Augustus, Livia gave birth to Decimus (later Nero) Drusus - the father of the future Emperor Claudius - people naturally suspected that he was the product of adultry with his stepfather."
Randygeki(h2)
Druso_AS.jpg
05 - 10 - DRUSO (20 - 23 D.C.)135 viewsAE AS 28.65 mm 10.05 gr.
Emisión póstuma restituida por su padre Tiberio

Anv: "DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 23 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 (Tiberio) #45 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1794 - BMCRE #99 - Cohen Vol.1 #2
1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_45_AS_Druso_Cesar.jpg
05 - 10 - DRUSO (20 - 23 D.C.)15 viewsAE AS 28.65 mm 10.05 gr.
Emisión póstuma restituida por su padre Tiberio

Anv: "DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N" - Busto a cabeza desnuda viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER" - Leyenda alrededor de gran "S C ".

Acuñada 23 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.I (Tiberio) #45 Pag.97 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #1794 Pag.354 - BMCRE (Tiberius) #99 - Cohen Vol.1 #2 Pag.217 - CBN (Tiberius) #78
mdelvalle
RPC_71_Semis_Druso_ITALICA.jpg
05 - 40 - Cnia. Itálica - DRUSO (20 - 23 D.C.)29 viewsAE Semis 23 mm 4.95 gr.

Anv: "DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F" (Leyenda anti-horaria), Cabeza desnuda viendo a derecha.
Rev: Aquila (Águila Legionaria) y Vexillum (Estandarte) entre dos Signa (Insignias militares), "MUNIC ITALIC" (Leyenda anti-horaria), "PE-R / AV-G" en campo centro.

Acuñada 20 - 23 D.C.
Ceca: Cnia. Municipium Itálica, Hispania (Hoy Saltiponce, Sevilla, España)

Referencias: RPC #71, SNG Cop #419, ACIP #3340, Vives Pl.CLXVIII #12, ABH #1596, FAB #1685 P.205, Sear GICV #338 P.31, RAH #2012-20 Pag. 259/60 - DC y P #3 Pag.215, Cohen I #9 Pag.218, Heiss #10 Pag.380
mdelvalle
RIC_92_Dupondio_Antonia.jpg
12-01 - ANTONIA (36 A.C. - 37 D.C.)22 viewsAE Dupondio 27 mm 10.2 gr. (IMITACIÓN PROVINCIAL)
Hija de Marco Antonio y Octavia, nieta de Augusto, esposa de Nero Claudius Drusus y madre de Germánico y Claudio. Emisión póstuma acuñada por su hijo Claudio

Anv: "ANTONIA [AVG]VSTA" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM [TR P] IMP - S C" - Claudio de pié a izquierda, vistiendo toga y velo, portando Simpulum en mano derecha extendida y pergamino enrollado en izquierda.

Acuñada 41 - 42 D.C.
Ceca: Inicialmente acreditada por mí a Roma, pero finalmente corregida esta acreditación por el Sr. Curtis Clay como una imitación Provincial.

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #92 Pag.127 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 (Claudius) #1902 Pag.375 - BMCRE #166 - Cohen Vol.1 #6 Pag.223 - DVM #3 Pag.77 - CBN (Claudius) #143 - Von Kaenel Tipo 15 #292 (V216/R262)
mdelvalle
Dupondio ANTONIA RIC 92.jpg
12-1 - ANTONIA (36 A.C. - 37 D.C.)70 viewsAE Dupondio 27 mm 10.2 gr. (IMITACIÓN PROVINCIAL)
Hija de Marco Antonio y Octavia, nieta de Augusto, esposa de Nero Claudius Drusus y madre de Germánico y Claudio. Emisión póstuma acuñada por su hijo Claudio

Anv: "ANTONIA [AVG]VSTA" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM [TR P] IMP - S C" - Claudio de pié a izquierda, vistiendo toga y velo, portando Simpulum en mano derecha extendida y pergamino enrollado en izquierda.

Acuñada 41 - 42 D.C.
Ceca: Inicialmente acreditada por mí a Roma, pero finalmente corregida esta acreditación por el Sr. Curtis Clay como una imitación Provincial.

Referencias: RIC Vol.1 #92 Pag.127 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 (Claudius) #1902 Pag.375 - BMCRE #166 - Cohen Vol.1 #6 Pag.223 - DVM #3 Pag.77 - CBN (Claudius) #143 - Von Kaenel Tipo 15 #292 (V216/R262)
mdelvalle
drusus as.jpg
14-37 AD - DRUSUS memorial AE As - struck under Tiberius (23 AD)50 viewsobv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N (bare head left)
rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S-C
ref: RIC I 45 (Tiberius), C.2 (2frcs)
10.14gms, 29mm

Drusus (also called Drusus Junior or Drusus the Younger), the only son of Tiberius, became heir to the throne after the death of Germanicus. One of his famous act connected to the mutiny in Pannonia, what broke out when the death of Augustus (19 August 14) was made known. Drusus left Rome to deal with the mutiny before the session of the Senate on the 17 September, when Tiberius was formally adopted him as princeps. He have reached the military camp in Pannonia in the time for the eclipse of the moon in the early hours of the 27 September wich so daunted the mutineers. He was also governor of Illyricum from 17 to 20 AD. Ancient sources concur that Livilla, his wife poisoned him.
berserker
DrususAsSC.jpg
1am Drusus22 viewsHeir to throne until assassination by Sejanus in 23

As

Bare head, left, DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER SC

RIC 45

Nero Claudius Drusus, later adopted as Drusus Julius Caesar (13BC - 23AD), called Drusus the Younger, was the only child of Tiberius and his first wife, Vipsania Agrippina. Tiberius and Drusus delivered the only two eulogies for Augustus in front of the temple to the god Julius. In 14, after the death of Augustus, Drusus suppressed a mutiny in Pannonia. In 15 he became consul. He governed Illyricum from 17 to 20. In 21 he was again consul, while in 22 he received tribunicia potestas (tribunician power), a distinction reserved solely for the emperor or his immediate successor. Drusus married his paternal cousin Livilla in 4. Their daughter Julia was born shortly after. Their son Tiberius Gemellus (his twin brother Germanicus Gemellus died in infancy) was born in 19. By 23 Drusus, who made no secret of his antipathy towards Sejanus, looked likely to succeed Tiberius as emperor. Sources concur that with Livilla as his accomplice Sejanous poisoned her husband Drusus.

Suetonius says, "He lacked affection not only for his adopted son Germanicus, but even for his own son Drusus the Younger, whose vices were inimical to him, Drusus indeed pursing loose and immoral ways. So inimical, that Tiberius seemed unaffected by his death (in 23AD), and quickly took up his usual routine after the funeral, cutting short the period of mourning. When a deputation from Troy offered him belated condolences, he smiled as if at a distant memory, and offered them like sympathy for the loss of their famous fellow-citizen Hector!"
Blindado
GermanicusAsSC.jpg
1an Germanicus37 viewsAdopted by Tiberius in 4 AD, died mysteriously in 19

As, struck by Caligula

Bare head, left, GERMANICVS CAESAR TI AVGVST F DIVI AVG N
C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT SC

RIC 57

Germanicus Julius Caesar (c16 BC-AD 19) was was born in Lugdunum, Gaul (modern Lyon). At birth he was named either Nero Claudius Drusus after his father or Tiberius Claudius Nero after his uncle. He received the agnomen Germanicus, in 9 BC, when it was posthumously awarded to his father in honour of his victories in Germania. Germanicus was the grandson-in-law and great-nephew of the Emperor Augustus, nephew and adoptive son of the Emperor Tiberius, father of the Emperor Caligula, brother of the Emperor Claudius, and the maternal grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He married his maternal second cousin Agrippina the Elder, a granddaughter of Augustus, between 5 and 1 BC. The couple had nine children. Two died very young; another, Gaius Julius Caesar, died in early childhood. The remaining six were: Nero Caesar, Drusus Caesar, the Emperor Caligula, the Empress Agrippina the Younger, Julia Drusilla, and Julia Livilla.

According to Suetonius: Germanicus, who was the son of Drusus the Elder and Antonia the Younger, was adopted (in 4AD) by Germanicus’s paternal uncle, Tiberius. He served as quaestor (in7AD) five years before the legal age and became consul (in12AD) without holding the intermediate offices. On the death of Augustus (in AD14) he was appointed to command the army in Germany, where, his filial piety and determination vying for prominence, he held the legions to their oath, though they stubbornly opposed Tiberius’s succession, and wished him to take power for himself.

He followed this with victory in Germany, for which he celebrated a triumph (in 17 AD), and was chosen as consul for a second time (18 AD) though unable to take office as he was despatched to the East to restore order there. He defeated the forces of the King of Armenia, and reduced Cappadocia to provincial status, but then died at Antioch, at the age of only thirty-three (in AD 19), after a lingering illness, though there was also suspicion that he had been poisoned. For as well as the livid stains which covered his body, and the foam on his lips, the heart was found entire among the ashes after his cremation, its total resistance to flame being a characteristic of that organ, they say, when it is filled with poison.

All considered Germanicus exceptional in body and mind, to a quite outstanding degree. Remarkably brave and handsome; a master of Greek and Latin oratory and learning; singularly benevolent; he was possessed of a powerful desire and vast capacity for winning respect and inspiring affection.

His scrawny legs were less in keeping with the rest of his figure, but he gradually fleshed them out by assiduous exercise on horseback after meals. He often killed enemy warriors in hand-to-hand combat; still pleaded cases in the courts even after receiving his triumph; and left various Greek comedies behind amongst other fruits of his studies.

At home and abroad his manners were unassuming, such that he always entered free or allied towns without his lictors.

Whenever he passed the tombs of famous men, he always offered a sacrifice to their shades. And he was the first to initiate a personal search for the scattered remains of Varus’s fallen legionaries, and have them gathered together, so as to inter them in a single burial mound.

As for Germanicus, Tiberius appreciated him so little, that he dismissed his famous deeds as trivial, and his brilliant victories as ruinous to the Empire. He complained to the Senate when Germanicus left for Alexandria (AD19) without consulting him, on the occasion there of a terrible and swift-spreading famine. It was even believed that Tiberius arranged for his poisoning at the hands of Gnaeus Calpurnius Piso, the Governor of Syria, and that Piso would have revealed the written instructions at his trial, had Tiberius not retrieved them during a private interview, before having Piso put to death. As a result, the words: ‘Give us back Germanicus!’ were posted on the walls, and shouted at night, all throughout Rome. The suspicion surrounding Germanicus’ death (19 AD) was deepened by Tiberius’s cruel treatment of Germanicus’s wife, Agrippina the Elder, and their children.
1 commentsBlindado
Caligula_Drusilla_AE20.jpg
1ao3 Julia Drusilla33 viewsAE 20 of Smyrna (Izmir, Turkey)
Laureate head of Caligula, right, ΓAION KAICAPA EΠI AOYIOΛA
Drusilla as Persephone seated left, poppies between two stalks of grain in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, ∆POYCIΛΛAN ZMYPNAIΩN MHNOΦANHC

Caligula’s sister

Klose XXVIII, 27 (Vs4/Rs10); RPC I 2472; SNG Cop 1343; SNGvA 2202; BMC Ionia p. 269, 272

According to Suetonius’ salacious account: Germanicus had married Agrippina the Elder, daughter of Marcus Agrippa and Julia the Elder, and she had borne him nine children. Two died in infancy, another in early childhood. . . .

The other children survived their father: three girls, Agrippina the Younger, Drusilla and Livilla, born in successive years; and three boys, Nero, Drusus, and Gaius Caesar (Caligula). . . . [Caligula] habitually committed incest with each of his three sisters, seating them in turn below him at large banquets while his wife reclined above. It is believed that he violated Drusilla’s virginity while a minor, and been caught in bed with her by his grandmother Antonia, in whose household they were jointly raised. Later, when Drusilla was married to Lucius Cassius Longinus, an ex-consul, he took her from him and openly treated her as his lawful married wife. When he fell ill he made her heir to his estate and the throne.

When Drusilla died (in 38AD) he declared a period of public mourning during which it was a capital offense to laugh, or bathe, or to dine with parents, spouse or children. Caligula himself was so overcome with grief that he fled the City in the middle of the night, and travelled through Campania, and on to Syracuse, returning again with the same degree of haste, and without cutting his hair or shaving. From that time forwards whenever he took an important oath, even in public or in front of the army, he always swore by Drusilla’s divinity.
Blindado
ClaudiusAsLibertas.jpg
1ap Claudius29 views41-54

As
Bare head, left, TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Libertas, LIBERTAS AVGVSTA SC

RIC 97

According to Suetonius: Claudius was born at Lugdunum (Lyon) on the 1st of August 10BC in the consulship of Iullus Antonius and Fabius Africanus, on the day when the very first altar to Augustus was dedicated there, the child being given the name Tiberius Claudius Drusus. When his elder brother Germanicus was adopted into the Julian family (in 4 AD), he added the name Germanicus also. He lost his father when still an infant (in 9 BC), and throughout his childhood and youth was severely afflicted by various stubborn ailments so that his mind and body lacked vigour, and even when he attained his majority he was not considered capable of a public or private career.

Nevertheless, he applied himself to liberal studies from his earliest youth, and often published examples of his proficiency in each area, though even so he was excluded from public office and failed to inspire any brighter hopes for his future. His mother Antonia the Younger often condemned him as an unfinished freak of Nature, and when accusing someone of stupidity would say: ‘He’s a bigger fool than my son Claudius.’ His grandmother Augusta (Livia) always treated him with utter contempt, and rarely even spoke to him, admonishing him, when she chose to do so, in brief harsh missives, or via her messengers. When his sister Livilla heard the prophecy that he would be Emperor some day, she prayed openly and loudly that Rome might be spared so cruel and unmerited a fate.

Having spent the larger part of his life in such circumstances, he became emperor at the age of fifty (in AD41) by a remarkable stroke of fate. Caligula’s assassins had dispersed the crowd on the pretext that the Emperor wished for solitude, and Claudius, shut out with the rest, retired to a room called the Hermaeum, but shortly afterwards, terrified by news of the murder, crept off to a nearby balcony and hid behind the door-curtains. A Guard, who was wandering about the Palace at random, spotting a pair of feet beneath the curtain where Claudius was cowering, dragged the man out to identify him, and as Claudius fell to the ground in fear, recognised him, and acclaimed him Emperor.

Eutropius summarizes: His reign was of no striking character; he acted, in many respects, with gentleness and moderation, in some with cruelty and folly. He made war upon Britain, which no Roman since Julius Caesar had visited; and, having reduced it through the agency of Cnaeus Sentius and Aulus Plautius, illustrious and noble men, he celebrated a magnificent triumph. Certain islands also, called the Orcades, situated in the ocean, beyond Britain, he added to the Roman empire, and gave his son the name of Britannicus. . . . He lived to the age of sixty-four, and reigned fourteen years; and after his death was consecrated3 and deified.

This was the first "good" coin I ever bought and therefore marks the begiining of an addiction.
Blindado
ClaudiusMessalinaAE20.jpg
1ap_2 Messalina37 viewsThird wife of Claudius, married in 38 (?)

AE 20, Knossos mint

Bare head of Claudius left, CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS

Draped bust of Messalina right, VALERIA MESSALINA [CAPITONE CYTHERONTE IIVIR] or [CYTHERO CAPITONE] (end of legend off flan)

According to Suetonius: [Claudius] was betrothed twice at an early age: to Aemilia Lepida, great-granddaughter of Augustus, and to Livia Medullina, who also had the surname of Camilla and was descended from the ancient family of Camillus the dictator. He put away the former before their marriage, because her parents had offended Augustus; the latter was taken ill and died on the very day which had been set for the wedding. He then married Plautia Urgulanilla, whose father had been honoured with a triumph, and later Aelia Paetina, daughter of an ex-consul. He divorced both these, Paetina for trivial offences, but Urgulanilla because of scandalous lewdness and the suspicion of murder. Then he married Valeria Messalina, daughter of his cousin Messala Barbatus. But when he learned that besides other shameful and wicked deeds she had actually married Gaius Silius, and that a formal contract had been signed in the presence of witnesses, he put her to death and declared before the assembled praetorian guard that inasmuch as his marriages did not turn out well, he would remain a widower, and if he did not keep his word, he would not refuse death at their hands. . . . [He later married Agrippina Jr.]

He had children by three of his wives: by Urgulanilla, Drusus and Claudia; by Paetina, Antonia; by Messalina, Octavia and a son, at first called Germanicus and later Britannicus. . . .

But it is beyond all belief, that at the marriage which Messalina had contracted with her paramour Silius he signed the contract for the dowry with his own hand, being induced to do so on the ground that the marriage was a feigned one, designed to avert and turn upon another a danger which was inferred from certain portents to threaten the emperor himself. . . .

He was so terror-stricken by unfounded reports of conspiracies that he had tried to abdicate. When, as I have mentioned before, a man with a dagger was caught near him as he was sacrificing, he summoned the senate in haste by criers and loudly and tearfully bewailed his lot, saying that there was no safety for him anywhere; and for a long time he would not appear in public. His ardent love for Messalina too was cooled, not so much by her unseemly and insulting conduct, as through fear of danger, since he believed that her paramour Silius aspired to the throne. . . .

Appius Silanus met his downfall. When Messalina and Narcissus had put their heads together to destroy him, they agreed on their parts and the latter rushed into his patron's bed-chamber before daybreak in pretended consternation, declaring that he had dreamed that Appius had made an attack on the emperor. Then Messalina, with assumed surprise, declared that she had had the same dream for several successive nights. A little later, as had been arranged, Appius, who had received orders the day before to come at that time, was reported to be forcing his way in, and as if were proof positive of the truth of the dream, his immediate accusation and death were ordered. . . .


1 commentsBlindado
VitelliusDenVesta.jpg
1av Vitellius42 views69

Denarius
Portrait, right, A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P
Vesta std., PONT MAX

RIC 107

According to Suetonius: Lucius’s son Aulus, the future emperor, was born on the 24th of September 15AD, or according to some authorities on the 7th, during the consulship of Drusus Caesar and Norbanus Flaccus. . . . His boyhood and early youth were spent on Capreae (Capri) among Tiberius’s creatures, he himself being marked by the nickname of ‘Spintria’ (sex-token) throughout his life, and suspected of having secured his father’s first promotion to office by surrendering his own chastity. As he grew older, though contaminated by every kind of vice, Vitellius gained and kept a prominent place at court, winning Caligula’s friendship by his devotion to chariot-racing and Claudius’s by his love of dice. With Nero he was even closer. . . .

Honoured, as these emperors’ favourite, with high office in the priesthood, as well as political power, he governed Africa (under Nero, in 60/61AD) as proconsul, and was then Curator of Public Works (in 63AD), employing a contrasting approach, and with a contrasting effect on his reputation. In his province he acted with outstanding integrity over two successive years, since he served as deputy also to his brother who succeeded him (61/62AD) yet during his administration of the City he was said to have stolen various temple offerings and ornaments, and substituted brass and tin for the gold and silver in others. . . .

Contrary to all expectations, Galba appointed Vitellius to Lower Germany (in 68AD). Some think it was brought about by Titus Vinius, whose influence was powerful at that time, and whose friendship Vitellius had previously won through their mutual support for the ‘Blues’ in the Circus. But it is clear to everyone that Galba chose him as an act of contempt rather than favour, commenting that gluttons were among those least to be feared, and Vitellius’s endless appetite would now be able to sate itself on a province. . . .

He entered Rome to the sound of trumpets, surrounded by standards and banners, wearing a general’s cape, sword at his side, his officers in their military cloaks also, and the men with naked blades. With increasing disregard for the law, human or divine, he then assumed the office of High Priest on the anniversary of the Allia (18th July), arranged the elections for the next ten years, and made himself consul for life. . . .

Vitellius’s worst vices were cruelty and gluttony. . . . By the eighth month of his reign (November 69AD) the legions in Moesia and Pannonia had repudiated Vitellius, and sworn allegiance to Vespasian despite his absence, following those of Syria and Judaea who had done so in Vespasian’s presence. . . .

The vanguard of Vespasian’s army had now forced its way into the Palace, unopposed, and the soldiers were ransacking the rooms, in their usual manner. They hauled Vitellius, unrecognised, from his hiding place, asked his name and where the Emperor might be. He gave some lying answer, but was soon identified, so he begged for safe custody, even if that meant imprisonment, claiming he had important information for Vespasian regarding his security. However his arms were bound behind him and a noose flung over his head, and he was dragged along the Sacred Way to the Forum, amid a hail of mockery and abuse, half-naked, with his clothes in tatters. His head was held back by the hair, like a common criminal and, with a sword-point under his chin so that he was forced to look up and reveal his face, he was pelted with filth and dung, denounced as arsonist and glutton, and taunted with his bodily defects by the crowd. For, Vitellius was exceptionally tall, and his face was usually flushed from some drinking bout. He had a huge belly, too, and one thigh crippled by a blow from a four-horse chariot which struck him when he was in attendance on Caligula who was driving. At last, after being tormented by a host of cuts from the soldiers’ swords, he was killed on the Gemonian Stairs, and his body dragged with a hook to the Tiber.
1 commentsBlindado
antonia_AE17_RPC1582.jpg
41-54 AD - ANTONIA AE16 of Thessalonica - struck under Claudius 30 viewsobv: ANTWNIA (draped bust right, hair tied in queue down neck)
rev: TECCALO-NEIKEWN (Nike on globe left, holding wreath and palm)
ref: RPC 1582, SNG ANS 840
mint: Thessalonica, Macedonia
4.74 gms, 16 mm
Very rare - original green patina

Antonia was daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, wife of Nero Claudius Drusus, sister-in-law of Tiberius, mother of Claudius, and grandmother of Caligula.
berserker
Nero Claudius Drusus sest - R.jpg
41-54 AD - NERO CLAUDIUS DRUSUS AE Sestertius - struck under Claudius (42-43 AD)38 viewsobv: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP (bare head of Drusus left)
rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P (Claudius, togate, holding laurel branch and roll, seated left on curule chair set on globe, resting both feet on cuirass on ground, several shields, spears, and a helmet are also scattered around him, a sword rests against the globe beneath the curule chair), S-C in ex.
ref: RIC I 109 [Claudius], Cohen 8 (10 frcs), BMCRE 208
26.36gms, 34mm, orichalcum
Rare

Nero Claudius Drusus Germanicus, son of Livia, brother of Tiberius and father of Claudius was the governor of Gaul in 13 BC, initiated a series of successful campaigns against the Germans. Died in a fall from his horse in 9 BC.
berserker
Scipio.jpg
47-46 BC Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio68 viewsQ METEL SCIPIO IMP
head of Africa right, laur. and clad in elephant's skin, corn-ear before, plough below

EPPIVS LEG F C

Naked Hercules standing facing right, hand on hip resting on club set on rock

North Africa
47-46 BC

Sear 1380/1

Born Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was adopted by his uncle by marriage and father's second cousin Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius. He married Aemilia Lepida, daughter of Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus Livianus (son of the Censor Marcus Livius Drusus and wife Cornelia Scipio and adopted by Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus) and wife Claudia (sister of Appius Claudius Pulcher (Senior)), and was the father in law of Pompey the Great, married to his daughter Cornelia Metella, called Quinta Pompeia for being his fifth wife.

He was Tribune in 59 BC and became Consul with Pompey the Great in 52 BC. During Caesar's civil war, he served the party of Pompey and fought against Caesar and Marcus Antonius. In 49 BC he was sent as Proconsul to Syria and the following year he took part in the Battle of Pharsalus, where he commanded the center of the Republican battleline. After Pharsalus he fled to Africa were he commanded an army with Cato the Younger, losing in the Battle of Thapsus. After the defeat he tried to escape but was cornered by the fleet of Publius Sittius when he wrecked the ship as he tried to escape to the Iberian Peninsula, to continue to fight from there. He committed suicide by stabbing himself so he would not fall at the hands of his enemies.

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
coin448.JPG
501. Constantine I Lyons Sol14 viewsLyons

Originally, the important city in this area was that of Vienne, at a crossroads of Celtic trails, and port for the Greek trade. They had been largly Hellanised during the 2nd - 1st centuries BCE, then caught up in the conflicts involving Rome and Athens. Roman traders had settled there and competition started a revolt, driving the Romans to the north. At the present site of Lyons, they sought and received refuge from the Gallic tribe called Segusiavi. At that time, Lyons was just a tribe of Celts occupying the top of a hill, later to be called Fourviere. A Roman settlement was begun, and then later used by Julius Caesar to launch his campaigns against the Helvetii in 58 BCE.

The site of Lyons, being on a crossroads as well as a connection to the Mediterranean, was early recognised as being strategically important. In 43 BCE, the city of Lugdunum became an official Roman colony recognised by the Roman senate, founded by the governor of Gallia Comata (province of Comata), Lucius Munatius Plancus. Later, in 27 BCE, then Emperor Augustus divided Gallia Comata into three provinces, and Lugdunum became the capital of Gallia Lugdunensis. [The third province was Gallia Aquitania.]

Lyons became the financial center for taxation purposes of Aquitania and Lugdunum provinces, and an official mint was established there. Also, the state cult honoring Augustus [or the present Emperor] was established at Lyons, drawing many pilgrims and supplicants. Drusus, the father of Claudius, (born 10 BCE) was stationed at Lyons, being in charge of Gallia Comata. Also, a cohort of Roman policemen were stationed at lyons, to protect the mint. A bronze inscription found at Lyons records the speech given to the Roman Senate in 48 CE by Emperor Claudius, arguing for the acceptance of admission of senators from Gallia Comata.

Through Lyons [and Vienne] passed the great roads leading to the different regions of Gaul and towards Italy. Trade with Gaul, Britain and Germany passed through Lyons, mostly supplying Roman colonies on the the frontier. Later, these routes were paved by the Romans to facilitate trade and troop movement. Lyons became an important trade and military center. However, intercity rivalry with Vienne to the south never died, and indeed Vienne became jealous over time.

Lyons was burnt to the ground in 65 CE but quickly rebuilt. It prospered until 197 when it was sacked in a civil war. The city of Lyons had backed the unfortunate loser in a battle between two Roman generals. Cities to the south [Arles, Vienne, and to the north, Trier] took over the economic functions of Lyons; and the city of Lyons was again plundered 269. Lyons fought back, and the trade wars raged on, until early in the 4th century when the aqueducts of Lyons were destroyed. Without water, the hillsite of Lyons [the Fourviere Hill] became untenable. The merchants moved down to the city below, or out of the city entirely. The protection of Lyons was thus much more difficult. And the decline of the Roman Empire also spelled the decline of many of its cities.

RIC VII Lyons 34 C3

ecoli
Nero AE Sestertius.jpg
706a, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.74 views6, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. AE setertius, Date: 66 AD; RIC I 516, 36.71 mm; 25.5 grams; aVF. Obverse: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT PP, Laureate bust right; Reverse: S C, ROMA, Roma seated left, exceptional portrait and full obverse legends. Ex Ancient Imports.

NERO (54-68 A.D.)

It is difficult for the modern student of history to realize just how popular Nero actually was, at least at the beginning of his reign. Rome looked upon her new Emperor with hope. He was the student of Seneca, and he had a sensitive nature. He loved art, music, literature, and theatre. He was also devoted to horses and horse racing—a devotion shared by many of his subjects. The plebs loved their new Emperor. As Professor of Classics Judith P. Hallett (University of Maryland, College Park) says, “It is not clear to me that Nero ever changed or that Nero ever grew-up, and that was both his strength and his weakness. Nero was an extraordinarily popular Emperor: he was like Elvis” (The Roman Empire in the First Century, III. Dir. Margaret Koval and Lyn Goldfarb. 2001. DVD. PBS/Warner Bros. 2003).

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
The five Julio-Claudian emperors are very different one from the other. Augustus dominates in prestige and achievement from the enormous impact he had upon the Roman state and his long service to Rome, during which he attained unrivaled auctoritas. Tiberius was clearly the only possible successor when Augustus died in AD 14, but, upon his death twenty-three years later, the next three were a peculiar mix of viciousness, arrogance, and inexperience. Gaius, better known as Caligula, is generally styled a monster, whose brief tenure did Rome no service. His successor Claudius, his uncle, was a capable man who served Rome well, but was condemned for being subject to his wives and freedmen. The last of the dynasty, Nero, reigned more than three times as long as Gaius, and the damage for which he was responsible to the state was correspondingly greater. An emperor who is well described by statements such as these, "But above all he was carried away by a craze for popularity and he was jealous of all who in any way stirred the feeling of the mob." and "What an artist the world is losing!" and who is above all remembered for crimes against his mother and the Christians was indeed a sad falling-off from the levels of Augustus and Tiberius. Few will argue that Nero does not rank as one of the worst emperors of all.

The prime sources for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus' Annales 12-16, Suetonius' Life of Nero, and Dio Cassius' Roman History 61-63, written in the early third century. Additional valuable material comes from inscriptions, coinage, papyri, and archaeology.


Early Life
He was born on December 15, 37, at Antium, the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbusand Agrippina. Domitius was a member of an ancient noble family, consul in 32; Agrippina was the daughter of the popular Germanicus, who had died in 19, and Agrippina, daughter of Agrippa, Augustus' closest associate, and Julia, the emperor's daughter, and thus in direct descent from the first princeps. When the child was born, his uncle Gaius had only recently become emperor. The relationship between mother and uncle was difficult, and Agrippina suffered occasional humiliation. But the family survived the short reign of the "crazy" emperor, and when he was assassinated, it chanced that Agrippina's uncle, Claudius, was the chosen of the praetorian guard, although there may have been a conspiracy to accomplish this.

Ahenobarbus had died in 40, so the son was now the responsibility of Agrippina alone. She lived as a private citizen for much of the decade, until the death of Messalina, the emperor's wife, in 48 made competition among several likely candidates to become the new empress inevitable. Although Roman law forbade marriage between uncle and niece, an eloquent speech in the senate by Lucius Vitellius, Claudius' closest advisor in the senatorial order, persuaded his audience that the public good required their union. The marriage took place in 49, and soon thereafter the philosopher Seneca [[PIR2 A617]] was recalled from exile to become the young Domitius' tutor, a relationship which endured for some dozen years.

His advance was thereafter rapid. He was adopted by Claudius the following year and took the name Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar or Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was preferred to Claudius' natural son, Britannicus, who was about three years younger, was betrothed to the emperor's daughter Octavia, and was, in the eyes of the people, the clear successor to the emperor. In 54, Claudius died, having eaten some poisoned mushrooms, responsibility for which was believed to be Agrippina's, and the young Nero, not yet seventeen years old, was hailed on October 13 as emperor by the praetorian guard.


The First Years of Rule
The first five years of Nero's rule are customarily called the quinquennium, a period of good government under the influence, not always coinciding, of three people, his mother, Seneca, and Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect. The latter two were allies in their "education" of the emperor. Seneca continued his philosophical and rhetorical training, Burrus was more involved in advising on the actualities of government. They often combined their influence against Agrippina, who, having made her son emperor, never let him forget the debt he owed his mother, until finally, and fatally, he moved against her.

Nero's betrothal to Octavia was a significant step in his ultimate accession to the throne, as it were, but she was too quiet, too shy, too modest for his taste. He was early attracted to Poppaea Sabina, the wife of Otho, and she continually goaded him to break from Octavia and to show himself an adult by opposing his mother. In his private life, Nero honed the musical and artistic tastes which were his chief interest, but, at this stage, they were kept private, at the instigation of Seneca and Burrus.

As the year 59 began, Nero had just celebrated his twenty-first birthday and now felt the need to employ the powers which he possessed as emperor as he wished, without the limits imposed by others. Poppaea's urgings had their effect, first of all, at the very onset of the year, with Nero's murder of his mother in the Bay of Naples.

Agrippina had tried desperately to retain her influence with her son, going so far as to have intercourse with him. But the break between them proved irrevocable, and Nero undertook various devices to eliminate his mother without the appearance of guilt on his part. The choice was a splendid vessel which would collapse while she was on board. As this happened, she swam ashore and, when her attendant, having cried out that she was Agrippina, was clubbed to death, Agrippina knew what was going on. She sent Nero a message that she was well; his response was to send a detachment of sailors to finish the job. When she was struck across the head, she bared her womb and said, "Strike here, Anicetus, strike here, for this bore Nero," and she was brutally murdered.

Nero was petrified with fear when he learned that the deed had been done, yet his popularity with the plebs of Rome was not impaired. This matricide, however, proved a turning point in his life and principate. It appeared that all shackles were now removed. The influence of Seneca and Burrus began to wane, and when Burrus died in 62, Seneca realized that his powers of persuasion were at an end and soon went into retirement. Britannicus had died as early as 55; now Octavia was to follow, and Nero became free to marry Poppaea. It may be that it had been Burrus rather than Agrippina who had continually urged that Nero's position depended in large part upon his marriage to Octavia. Burrus' successor as commander of the praetorian guard, although now with a colleague, was Ofonius Tigellinus, quite the opposite of Burrus in character and outlook. Tigellinus became Nero's "evil twin," urging and assisting in the performance of crimes and the satisfaction of lusts.


Administrative and Foreign Policy
With Seneca and Burrus in charge of administration at home, the first half-dozen years of Nero's principate ran smoothly. He himself devoted his attention to his artistic, literary, and physical bents, with music, poetry, and chariot racing to the fore. But his advisors were able to keep these performances and displays private, with small, select audiences on hand. Yet there was a gradual trend toward public performance, with the establishment of games. Further, he spent many nights roaming the city in disguise, with numerous companions, who terrorized the streets and attacked individuals. Those who dared to defend themselves often faced death afterward, because they had shown disrespect for the emperor. The die was being cast for the last phases of Nero's reign.


The Great Fire at Rome and The Punishment
of the Christians
The year 64 was the most significant of Nero's principate up to this point. His mother and wife were dead, as was Burrus, and Seneca, unable to maintain his influence over Nero without his colleague's support, had withdrawn into private life. The abysmal Tigellinus was now the foremost advisor of the still young emperor, a man whose origin was from the lowest levels of society and who can accurately be described as criminal in outlook and action. Yet Nero must have considered that he was happier than he had ever been in his life. Those who had constrained his enjoyment of his (seemingly) limitless power were gone, he was married to Poppaea, a woman with all advantages save for a bad character the empire was essentially at peace, and the people of Rome enjoyed a full measure of panem et circenses. But then occurred one of the greatest disasters that the city of Rome, in its long history, had ever endured.

The fire began in the southeastern angle of the Circus Maximus, spreading through the shops which clustered there, and raged for the better part of a week. There was brief success in controlling the blaze, but then it burst forth once more, so that many people claimed that the fires were deliberately set. After about a fortnight, the fire burned itself out, having consumed ten of the fourteen Augustan regions into which the city had been divided.

Nero was in Antium through much of the disaster, but his efforts at relief were substantial. Yet many believed that he had been responsible, so that he could perform his own work comparing the current fate of Rome to the downfall of Troy. All his efforts to assist the stricken city could not remove the suspicion that "the emperor had fiddled while Rome burned." He lost favor even among the plebs who had been enthusiastic supporters, particularly when his plans for the rebuilding of the city revealed that a very large part of the center was to become his new home.

As his popularity waned, Nero and Tigellinus realized that individuals were needed who could be charged with the disaster. It so happened that there was such a group ready at hand, Christians, who had made themselves unpopular because of their refusal to worship the emperor, their way of life, and their secret meetings. Further, at this time two of their most significant "teachers" were in Rome, Peter and Paul. They were ideal scapegoats, individuals whom most Romans loathed, and who had continually sung of the forthcoming end of the world.

Their destruction was planned with the utmost precision and cruelty, for the entertainment of the populace. The venue was Nero's circus near the Mons Vaticanus. Christians were exposed to wild animals and were set ablaze, smeared with pitch, to illuminate the night. The executions were so grisly that even the populace displayed sympathy for the victims. Separately, Peter was crucified upside down on the Vatican hill and Paul was beheaded along the Via Ostiensis. But Nero's attempt, and hope, to shift all suspicion of arson to others failed. His popularity even among the lower classes was irrevocably impaired.

[For a detailed and interesting discussion of Nero’s reign please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/nero.htm]

The End - Nero's Death and its Aftermath
Nero's and Tigellinus' response to the conspiracy was immediate and long-lasting. The senatorial order was decimated, as one leading member after another was put to death or compelled to commit suicide. The year 66 saw the suicides of perhaps the most distinguished victims of the "reign of terror," Caius Petronius and Thrasea Paetus. Petronius, long a favorite of Nero because of his aesthetic taste, had been an able public servant before he turned to a life of ease and indolence. He was recognized as the arbiter elegantiae of Nero's circle, and may be the author of the Satyricon. At his death, he left for Nero a document which itemized many of the latter's crimes. Thrasea, a staunch Stoic who had been for some years an outspoken opponent of Nero's policies, committed suicide in the Socratic manner. This scene is the last episode in the surviving books of Tacitus' Annals.

In the year 68, revolt began in the provinces. . . the end of Nero's reign became inevitable. Galba claimed the throne and began his march from Spain. Nero panicked and was rapidly abandoned by his supporters. He finally committed suicide with assistance, on June 9, 68, and his body was tended and buried by three women who had been close to him in his younger days, chief of whom was Acte. His death scene is marked above all by the statement, "Qualis artifex pereo," (What an artist dies in me.) Even at the end he was more concerned with his private life than with the affairs of state.

The aftermath of Nero's death was cataclysmic. Galba was the first of four emperors who revealed the new secret of empire, that an emperor could be made elsewhere than in Rome. Civil war ensued, which was only ended by the victory of the fourth claimant, Vespasian, who established the brief dynasty of the Flavians. The dynasty of the Julio-Claudians was at an end.

Nero's popularity among the lower classes remained even after his death.

. . . .

It is not excessive to say that he was one of the worst of Rome's emperors in the first two centuries and more of the empire. Whatever talents he had, whatever good he may have done, all is overwhelmed by three events, the murder of his mother, the fire at Rome, and his savage treatment of the Christians.

Precisely these qualities are the reasons that he has remained so well known and has been the subject of many writers and opera composers in modern times. These works of fiction particularly merit mention: Henryk Sienkiewicz's Quo Vadis, one of the finest works of the 1907 Nobel Laureate in Literature, and John Hersey's The Conspiracy. Nero unquestionably will always be with us.

Copyright (C) 2006, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
claudius_ae_as_minerva_spain.JPG
AE AS OF CLAUDIUS RV/MINERVA 54 viewsWEIGHT: 11.6GR, DIAMETER: 27MM
Tiberius Claudius Caesar Augustus Germanicus (1 August 10 BC – 13 October AD 54), born Tiberius Claudius Drusus, then Tiberius Claudius Nero Germanicus until his accession, was Roman Emperor from 41 to 54 AD.

1 commentsAntonivs Protti
0035-510np_noir.jpg
Agrippa, As - *326 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather (died 12 BC)
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection

The following commentary is a (quick) translation from CGB about a similar coin :

"Although Augustus associated his close friend Agrippa in his coinage, he didn't for him alone. Gaius honoured the memory of his grandfather, recalling he had been COS III in 27 BC while Augustus was COS VII at the same time.
Gaius, however, as the new emperor would like us to remember his double filiation : Through his father, Germanicus, he's descended from Nero Drusus and Antonia, thus from Tiberius ; through his mother Agrippina the elder, he tells us Agrippa and Julia are his grand parents and he's a grand grand son of Augustus. Agrippa remained prestigious all along the first century CE, although he had died 12 BC. Titus then Domitian will also strike this type, seemingly very succesfull towards population (see RCV 2589 and 2894)"
6 commentsPotator II
Antonia~0.jpg
Antonia Augusta 66 viewsANTONIA AVGVSTA

Rev. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP SC
Cladius veiled and togate stg left holding simpulum

Sear 1902

Antonia was the younger daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia and was born on January 31st 36B.C. She was married at age 20 to Tiberius' younger brother Nero Claudius Drusus and had two sons, the great Germanicus and the future emperor Claudius. She was widowed in 9 BC and refused to marry again and devoted her life to her families interests. Her wealth and status made her very influencial during Tiberius' reign and it was she who brought about the downfall of Sejanus.

On the accession of her grandson Caligula in 37 AD she received many honours but died later that year at the age of 73. She did not receive postumous honours until the reign of her son Claudius in 41 AD and all of the coinage in Antonia's name was issued by Claudius.

SOLD
Titus Pullo
Antonia~1.jpg
Antonia Augusta72 viewsANTONIA AVGVSTA
Head of Antonia right

TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP SC
Claudius veiled and togate standing left holding simpulum

11.47g

Sear 1902

Antonia was the younger daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia and was born on January 31st 36B.C. She was married at age 20 to Tiberius' younger brother Nero Claudius Drusus and had two sons, the great Germanicus and the future emperor Claudius. She was widowed in 9 BC and refused to marry again and devoted her life to her families interests. Her wealth and status made her very influencial during Tiberius' reign and it was she who brought about the downfall of Sejanus.

On the accession of her grandson Caligula in 37 AD she received many honours but died later that year at the age of 73. She did not receive postumous honours until the reign of her son Claudius in 41 AD and all of the coinage in Antonia's name was issued by Claudius.
Jay GT4
ANTONIA-1.jpg
Antonia, daughter of Marc Antony and Octavia, wife of Nero Claudius Drusus, mother of Claudius. Augusta, 37 and 41 AD.219 viewsÆ Dupondius under son, Claudius.
Obv: ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust, right.
Rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, S-C across field, Claudius, togate, standing left, holding simpulum.
RIC 92 [Claudius]; Cohen 6; BMC 166; Sear 1902.
EmpressCollector
Augustus.jpg
Augustus32 viewsRoman Empire
Augustus
(Reign as 1st Emperor of the Roman Empire 27 BC-14 AD)
(b. 63 BC, d. 14 AD)


Obverse: CAESAR PONT MAX, Laureate head of Augustus facing right

Reverse: ROM ET AVG, Altar of the Sanctuary of the Three Gauls, Victory on each pedestal





Bronze As
Minted in Lugdunum 15-10 BC


Translations:

CAESAR PONT MAX=Caesar Augustus, Greatest Priest

ROM ET AVG=To Rome and Augustus

Lugdunum=Lyons, France

The Sanctuary of the Three Gauls was founded by Drusus (stepson of Augustus) to federalize and Romanize this area as an Imperial province under Augustus following the Gallic wars of his predecessor Julius Caesar


References:
RIC I 230
ERIC II 632
1 commentsSphinx357
137c.jpg
Augustus Denarius - Butting Bull (RIC 167a)53 viewsAR Denarius
Lugdunum, 15-13 BC
3.77g

Obv: Bare head of Augustus (R)
AVGVSTVS DIVI F

Rev: Bull butting (R)
IMP X in exergue

RIC 167a BMC 451

In 15 BC Augustus was acclaimed Imperator for the tenth time on behalf of Drusus and Tiberius' victories in Raetia.

Ex. Baldwin's Auction 65, 4 May 2010, lot 1166
Ex. Alfred Franklin Collection
Ex. Baldwin's Auction 99. 6 May 2016, lot 276
5 commentsKained but Able
RT_001_carteia.jpg
Carteia, Spain, 9 B.C.32 viewsUnder Germanicus and Drusus. Head of city goddess / "CART CAESARSUS" around rudder. RPC 123jimmynmu
RIC_Claudius_RIC_113.JPG
Claudius (Tiberius Claudius Drusus Germanicus) (41-54 A.D.)14 viewsRIC I (Claudius) 113

AE as (28 mm). Rome mint, struck ca. 50-54 A.D.

Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P, bare head, left.

Rev: LIBERTAS AVGVSTA, S-C in fields. Libertas draped, standing facing, head right, holding pileus (pointed cap) in right hand, left hand extended.

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
RIC_Claudius_RIC_I_94.JPG
Claudius (Tiberius Claudius Drusus Germanicus) (41-54 A.D.)26 viewsRIC I (Claudius) 94

AE dupondius (27-28 mm). Rome mint, struck ca. 41-50 A.D.

Obv: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, bare head, left.

Rev: CERES AVGVSTA, SC in exergue, Ceres veiled and draped, seated left on ornamental throne, holding two grain ears and a long torch.

Note: Issued in response to bread riots in Rome, as part of an ongoing publicity campaign to reassure Romans of the adequacy and stability of the grain supply from North Africa. Ceres (=Demeter) was the goddess of grain, and was primarily worshipped by plebeians, and in rural areas.

RIC rarity C

From an uncleaned coin lot.
Stkp
Claudius_Arch.jpg
Claudius Sestertius, Triumphal arch RIC 9839 viewsClaudius AE Sestertius. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P, laureate head right / NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMAN IMP SC, triumphal arch surmounted by equestrian statue of Nero Claudius Drusus galloping right. Ref RIC 98, Cohen 48, BMC 121, RCV 1851mattpat
clause08-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 93, for Nero Claudius Drusus, Sestertius of AD 41-4240 viewsÆ sestertius (28.8g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 41-42.
Obv.: NERO·CLAVDIVS·DRVSVS·GERMANICVS·IMP, bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus facing left.
Rev.: TI·CLAVDIVS·CAESAR·AVG·P·M·TR·P·IMP [/] S C, Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding a branch; weapons lying around.
RIC (Claudius) 93 (C); Cohen 8; BMC 157; Sear (RCV 2K) 1896
Charles S
clause08-3.jpg
Claudius, RIC 93, for Nero Claudius Drusus, Sestertius of AD 41-4251 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.8g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 41-42.
Obv.: NERO·CLAVDIVS·DRVSVS·GERMANICVS·IMP, bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus facing left.
Rev.: TI·CLAVDIVS·CAESAR·AVG·P·M·TR·P·IMP [/] S C, Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding a branch; weapons lying around.
RIC (Claudius) 93 (C); Cohen 8; BMC 157; Sear (RCV 2K) 1896
Charles S
clause01-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 98, Sestertius of AD 4239 viewsÆ sestertius (27.5g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 42.
Obv.: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, laureate head of Claudius facing right.
Rev.: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMAN IMP (around) S C (in field), Triumphal arch surmounted by equestrial statue right, between two trophies.
RIC 98 (S); Cohen 48; Sear 2000 (RCV) 1851; Foss (RHC) 63:9

This issue honours Nero Claudius Drusus, the father of Claudius
Charles S
clause07-2.jpg
Claudius, RIC 109, for Nero Claudius Drusus, Sestertius of AD 50-5424 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.2g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 50-54.
Obv.: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus facing left.
Rev.: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P / S C, Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding branch; weapons lying around.
RIC (Claudius) 109 (S); BMC 208; Sear (RCV 2000) 1897
Charles S
clause07-2~0.jpg
Claudius, RIC 109, for Nero Claudius Drusus, Sestertius of AD 50-54 50 viewsÆ Sestertius (24.2g, Ø34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 50-54.
Obv.: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head of Nero Claudius Drusus facing left.
Rev.: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P / S C, Claudius seated left on curule chair, holding branch; weapons lying around.
RIC (Claudius) 109 (S); BMC 208; Sear (RCV 2000) 1897
Charles S
agrippa.jpg
Corinth AE, Unknown Imperator.28 viewsCORINTHI, Bare headed bust right.

C MUSSIO PRISCO IIVIR C HEIO POLLIONE ITER, in a wreath of parsley.

The identity of the obverse bust remains a mystery. I submitted it for identifcation on the boards with both archivium and Curtis Clay responding. They also were unable to attribute the bust to either Augustus, Tiberius, Agrippa Postumus or Drusus!

http://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=55882.0

On Curtis's advice I contacted Dr. Michael Amandry, who completed a significant work on the subject of Romano-Corinthian coinage titled "LE MONNAYAGE DES DUOVIRS CORINTHIENS."

Dr. Amandry's reply stated that the die on my coin was similar to other dies of Augustus or Drusus, but was unable to differentiate further. The identity of the bust must therefore remain partly solved until I can collect further examples of this coin for comparison.
Will Hooton
cyenaica_drusus.jpg
CYRENAICA, Cyrene. Drusus, with Tiberius and Germanicus Gemellus54 viewsObverse: Laureate head of Drusus right
Reverse: Bare heads of Tiberius and Germanicus, vis-à-vis
Mint : Cyrene
Date : Struck circa AD 23
Reference : RPC 947; Lindgren III 1589 (this coin)
Grade : VF
Weight : 9.23 g
Denom : As
Metal : AE
Dealer : CNG
Acquired: 14/05/08
Comments : Black-green patina. From the Patrick Villemur Collection. Ex Henry Clay Lindgren Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 37, 20 March 1996), lot 1223.
Bolayi
00025-drusus.jpg
Drusus21 viewsDrusus AS
25 mm 10.59 gm
O: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Bare head left
R: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST
Large S C
Koffy
drusus_3.jpg
DRUSUS14 viewsd. 23 AD
POSTUMOUS, STRUCK UNDER TIBERIUS CA. 23 AD
AE 29.5 mm 9.42 g
O: DRVSVS CAESA TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
BARE HEAD L
R: LEGEND AROUND LARGE SC
ROME
laney
drusus_2.jpg
DRUSUS13 viewsd. 23 AD
POSTUMOUR
RESTORATION UNDER TITUS, STRUCK 81 - 82 AD
AE 26.5 mm 8.65 g
O: [CAE}SAR TI AVG F DIVI []
BARE HEAD L
R: [CA]ESAR AVG REST[]
LEGEND AROUND LARGE SC
laney
drusus_1.jpg
DRUSUS10 viewsd. 23 AD
POSTHUMOUS
AE 26.5 mm 7.54 g
O: BARE HEAD L
R: LARGE SC
laney
00680.jpg
Drusus (RIC 45, Coin #680)26 viewsRIC 45 (C), Copper AS, Rome, 23 AD.
OBV: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N; Bare head left.
REV: PONTF TRIBVN POTEST ITER; Legend around SC.
SIZE: 27.2mm 10.58g
1 commentsMaynardGee
00711.jpg
Drusus (RIC 93, Coin #711)7 viewsRIC 93 (C), AE Sestertius, minted under Claudius, Rome, 50 - 54 AD.
OBV: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP; Bare head left.
REV: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP S C; Claudius, bare-headed and togate, seated left on curule chair, holding out branch with right, miscellaneous weapons and amour lying around.
SIZE: 31.9mm, 14.68g
MaynardGee
druso_PONTIFTRIBVNPOTESTITER_as_(Tiberio)_Ric45.jpg
Drusus - as7 viewsPONTIFTRIBVNPOTESTITER
Tiberius Ric 45
antvwala
drusus-caesar-sc.jpg
Drusus - Senatus Consultum19 viewsRoman Imperial, Drusus Caesar AE As. Struck under Tiberius, (21-22 AD), 27.5mm, 9.3g

Obverse: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, Bare head left.

Reverse: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C.

Reference: RIC 45 (Tiberius), Sear RCV 1794, Cohen 2.

Ex: Incitiatus Coins +photo
Gil-galad
drusus.jpg
Drusus AE As32 viewsOBV: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
bare head left
REV: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER
around large S
Date: 21~22 A.D. Rome Mint
10.28g. 29mm
RIC I 45, BMC 99
1 commentsmiffy
Drusus_1_opt.jpg
DRUSUS AE As RIC 216, Senatus Consulto11 viewsOBV: DRVSVSCAESARTIAVGFDIVIAVGN - Bare head left
REV: IMPTCAESDIVIVESPFAVGREST - Legend around large S C in center
9.4g, 24mm

Minted at Rome, 80 AD
Legatus
__57Drusus.jpg
Drusus AE AS. Large SC.29 viewsDrusus AE As. Rome, 23 A.D. DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left. / PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER, Legend around large SC. Sear 1794 Antonivs Protti
007Drusus.jpg
Drusus As22 viewsCopper As
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N bare hd. of Drusus l.
Rev:PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S C
RIC Tiberius 45
Tanit
Drusus.jpg
Drusus As20 viewsAE As
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N ; bare hd. l.
Rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER; legend around large S C in field.

Cohen 2
Tanit
drusus-reshoot.jpg
Drusus Caesar AE As. Struck under Tiberius, (21-22 AD)13 viewsRoman Imperial, Drusus Caesar AE As. Struck under Tiberius, (21-22 AD), 27.5mm, 9.3g

Obverse: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, Bare head left.

Reverse: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C.

Reference: RIC 45 (Tiberius), Sear RCV 1794, Cohen 2.

Ex: Incitiatus Coins
Gil-galad
drusus_titus_rest_k.jpg
Drusus Caesar, Restoration Issue Under Titus20 viewsÆ as, 28mm, 7.2g, 6h; Rome mint, 80-81.
Obv.: DRVSVS CAESAR T AVG F DIVI AVG N; bare head left.
Rev.: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST; large SC in center.
Reference: RIC II Titus 216, p. 144, Rare.
Notes: Aleg
1 commentsJohn Anthony
CollageMaker_20180531_122851719.jpg
Drusus Junior9 viewsAE As, Rome Mint, Struck 22-23 AD.
Obverse: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left.
Reverse: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large SC.
References: RIC I 45 (Tiberius), BMCRE 99, Cohen 2, RCV 1794
Justin L
DrususRest.jpg
Drusus Restitution by Titus109 viewsDrusus AE As, struck under Titus.

DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Bare head of Drusus left

IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VIII RESTITVIT
in two lines around large SC.

Rome 80 AD
11.03g

Cohen 7, RIC(2) 415

Very rare

Ex-Londinium Coins

Sold to Calgary Coin February 2017
Jay GT4
Drusus_RIC_45.JPG
Drusus RIC 4532 viewsDrusus AE As, 22 - 23 AD, RIC 45 (Tiberius), Cohen 2, BMC 99, SEAR 1794,
OBV: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left
REV: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C

SCARCE
Romanorvm
Drusus_RIC126_(Titus).JPG
Drusus RIC126 (Titus)17 viewsDRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIV [I AVG N]
Bare head left
[IMP T CAES] DIVI VESP F [AVG REST] around large SC
AE as, 28mm
novacystis
gemellus.jpg
Drusus with Tiberius and Germanicus Gemellus. AE Sestertius24 viewsDrusus, with Tiberius and Germanicus Gemellus. AE Sestertius, Rome, 22-23 A.D. Struck under Tiberius. Crossed cornuacopiae, each surmounted by bare-headed bust of a boy facing one another, winged caduceus between. / DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N PONT TR POT II, Legend around large S C. RIC 42. Ex. GoldbergHolding_History
Drusus_(Titus_Rest)_RIC_437.JPG
Drusus, son of Tiberius, Restoration Coinage of Emperor Titus18 viewsObv: (DRVS)VS CAESAR TI AVG F DIV AVG N, bare head of Drusus facing left.

Rev: IMP T CAES DIVI VESP F AVG RES around edge, large SC in center.

Copper As, Rome mint, 80 - 81 AD

7.9 grams, 25.8 mm, 180°

RIC IIi Titus 437 (new edition), RIC II Titus 216, S2594, VM 3
SPQR Matt
Drusus.jpg
Drusus, Son of Tiberius. AE As51 viewsDrusus Æ As. Struck under Tiberius, 21-22 AD. DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C. RIC 45 (Tiberius),Cohen 2, BMC 99.ancientone
DRVSVS.JPG
DRVSVS As7 viewsDrusus, † 23. As, Rome A.D. 23. Drusus Memorial AE As, RIC 45 (Tiberius), Cohen 2, BMC 99, Sear RCV 1794 - Drusus Caesar Æ As. Struck under Tiberius, 21-22 AD. DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left / PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around large S•C. Podiceps
EB0378_scaled.JPG
EB0378 Drusus Caesar30 viewsDrusus Caesar AE As. Struck under Tiberius, 21-22 AD.
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N, bare head left.
Rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST [ITER] around large S•C.
References: Cohen 2; RIC 45[tib]; sear5 1794.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 10.107 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0379_scaled.JPG
EB0379 Nero and Drusus galloping right7 viewsNero and Drusus Caesars, AE Dupondius, Struck under Caligula, 37-38 AD.
Obv: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES, Nero & Drusus on horseback galloping right.
Rev: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large S C.
References: RIC I 34.
Diameter: 29.5 mm, Weight: 15.619 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0686_scaled.JPG
EB0686 Tiberius / Nero and Drusus7 viewsTiberius, 14-37, Spain, Carthago Nova, AE 27.
Obverse: TI CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI F AVGVSTVS P M, bare head of Tiberius left.
Reverse: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES QVINQ C V I N C, confronting heads of Nero & Drusus.
References: RPC 179, Sear'88 #586, SGI 335, RPC 179, SNGCop 500.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 19.47g.
EB
EB0903_scaled.JPG
EB0903 Nero Claudius Drusus / Claudius3 viewsNero Claudius Drusus, father of Claudius, AE Sestertius, Struck by Claudius, Rome mint 41-42 AD.
Obverse: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head of Nero Drusus left; counterstamp NCAPR (possibly for Nero Ceasar Augustus Populi Romani).
Reverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius, togate, seated left on curule chair, holding branch; arms lying around; SC in ex.
References: RIC I 93 [Claudius], Cohen 8, BMC 157.
Diameter: 36mm, Weight: 24.03g.
EB
CALIDU03-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 34, for Nero & Drusus, Dupondius of AD 37-3812 viewsÆ Dupondius (13.2g, Ø28.5mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck AD 37-38.
Obv.: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES, Nero and Drusus riding right, cloaks flying.
Rev.: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT round large S·C.
RIC 34 BMCRE 44; Cohen 1; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 61:10b

This type celebrates the memory of Caligula's family: bringing back the ashes of his brothers Nero and Drusus.
Charles S
CaliDu02-2.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 49, for Nero & Drusus, Dupondius of AD 40-4197 viewsÆ Dupondius (16.0g, Ø 31mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 40-41.
Obv.: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES, Nero and Drusus riding right, cloaks flying.
Rev.: C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P P EX round large S·C.
RIC 49 (R2) var. (see note below); BMCRE 70 var (idem); Cohen 2 var (idem); Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 61:10b

This type celebrates the memory of Caligula's family: bringing back the ashes of his brothers Nero and Drusus.

Note: The legend on this coin is unusual, because it ends with TR P IIII P P P EX instead of just TR P IIII P P. A coin with the same rev. die was auctioned through CNG eAuction 280 lot 131. Also note that RIC 49 gives the erratic reverse legend ending with TR POT IIII P P instead of TR P IIII P P, compare Cohen 2 where it is correct.
5 commentsCharles S
Germanicus.jpg
Germanicus54 viewsGERMANICUS, father of Caligula, Died AD 19. Æ Dupondius (29mm, 12.8g). Struck under Gaius (Caligula), AD 37-41. GERMANICVS CAESAR, Germanicus in triumphal quadriga right. / SIGNIS - RECEPT / DEVICTIS - GERM / S-C , Germanicus standing left, holding eagle-tipped scepter. (mint of Rome). RIC I, pg 112, #57 (Gaius)
Son of Drusus, adopted by Tiberius, Father of Caligula, Germanicus Caesar was (by accounts) loved by his legions and the people of Rome. Germanicus carried out punitive actions against the Germans for their part in the Varus ambush, in which the 17th, 18th, and 19th legions were almost decimated to a man. Germanicus's campaign recovered 2 of the 3 lost Eagle stantards from the lost legions. This coin depicts the triumph given to Germanicus and celebrates the recovery of the lost eagle standards.
3 commentsSoxfan
Germanicus_Drusus_Sardes~0.jpg
Germanicus and Drusus - Sardis12 viewsstruck by Tiberius
c. 14-17 AD
head of Germanicus right
ΓEPMANIKOΣ // KAIΣAPEΩN
head of Drusus right
ΔPOYΣOΣ // ΣAPΔIANΩN
RPC I 2992
2,8g 15-13mm
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Drusus-Sesterz-2cornucopiae-RIC[Tib]42.jpg
II-TIBERIUS-a - 005 Sestertius RIC I/4257 viewsAv) No legend
Confronting heads of two little boys on crossed cornucopiae, with winged caduceus in between

Rv) DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N PONT TR POT II around large SC

Weight: 24,88g; Ø:34mm; Reference: RIC I [TIB]/42, ROME mint; struck 22 A.D. - 23A.D.
3 commentssulcipius
Germanicus-Drusus-AE28-LYDIA-SARDIS-SEAR365.jpg
III-GAIUS-b - 001 AE28 SARDIS RPC I/299551 viewsAv) ΔPOYΣOΣ KAI ГERMANIKOΣ KAIΣAPEΣ NEOI ΘEOI ΘIΛAΔEΛΦOI
Germanicus and Drusus seated left, side by side on curule chairs

Rv) Г AIΩ AΣINNIΩ ΠΩΛΛIΩNI ANΘYΠATΩ around wreath
KOINOY AΣIAΣ within wreath

Weight:11,7g; Ø: 28mm; Reference: RPC I 2995; BMC Lydia pg. 252, 106;
SNG Copenhagen 518; SEAR/ 365
Mint: LYDIA // SARDIS; struck gepr.:37--41
This coin was re/over-strucked only with a new legend by the proconsule ASINIUS POLLIO; Because of this overstruck the central image appears like a cameo.
1 commentssulcipius
Drusus Italica.jpg
Italica (Spain) - Drusus Jr.23 views[DRVSV]S CAESAR TI. [AVG. F.] , bare head of Drusus right.
[MVNIC.] ITALIC. / PER. AVG. , Legionary eagle with vexillum between 2 standards.
Ginolerhino
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum 1.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- The Forum 163 viewsThe Forum
ENTRANCE TO THE FORUM Forum of Pompeii After 80 B.C. One of the two arches originally covered with marble which flank the Temple of Jupiter and are the main entrances to the forum. The temple was built under the Samnites in the second century B.C.
FORUM OF POMPEII After 80 B.C. The Forum of Pompeii has a central rectangular space, 466 feet long by 124 feet wide, surrounded by the most important public buildings in the city. Like other forums, it is set up on an axial plan. A colonnade lines three sides. In the center of the fourth side, visible in the distance, is the Temple of Jupiter, known as the Capitolium. The forum was paved with travertine stone and only pedestrians were permitted in its precinct. Situated on an old site, it was largely rebuilt after 80 B.C. when Pompeii became a Roman colony. The forum was again in the process of rebuilding after the earthquake of 62 AD. It was buried under the eruption of Vesuvius seen in the distance in 79.

FORUM (VII,8)
The first monumental arrangement dates from the 2nd cent. BC, with a few buildings and the porticos with their double row of tufa columns, replaced with white limestone in the imperial age, when the site was repaved and buildings added on the east side where shops had previously stood. Located at the intersection between the two main streets of the original urban center, the Forum was the city's main square, where cart traffic was forbidden: it was surrounded on all sides by religious, political, and business buildings. In the 1st cent. AD the Forum highlighted the celebratory intention of the imperial house, where the monumental bases for commemorative statues were placed on the south side, in front of the city's administrative buildings, while those of illustrious citizens stood along the porticos : the sculptures have not been found, perhaps because they were removed by the people of Pompeii who returned after the eruption to take whatever they could. In the center of the western side stands an orators' tribune.
MEMORIAL ARCHES
In opus latericium, at one time covered with marble, these elegantly enclose the Forum to the north, in celebration of the imperial family. Of the two built on either side of the Temple of Jupiter, the one to the west is attributed to Augustus, the east to Nero, perhaps demolished following the death (68 AD) and sentencing of the emperor, or simply to avoid blocking the view of the other arch behind it, at the north entrance to the Forum. This has two niches on one side that once held statues of Nero and Drusus, on the other side two fountains; an equestrian statue (perhaps of the emperor Tiberius) topped this arch. The other arch, in the back at the start of Via di Mercurio, is called the Caligula Arch because an equestrian statue was found nearby, that may have depicted the emperor Caligula and probably stood on the arch.
John Schou
Livia_40.jpg
Livia Dupondius (UNIFACE PLASTER CAST)42 viewsAE dupondius issued by Drusus under Tiberius
Obv:- Diademed, draped, and veiled bust of a woman (Livia?), right, PIETAS in exe.
A.D. 23

UNIFACE PLASTER CAST
1 commentsmaridvnvm
LIVIA-1.jpg
Livilla??, Wife of Drusus, c. 13 BC-AD 31.690 viewsÆ Dupondius under Tiberius (28 mm, 14.23 gm). Struck circa 22/3 AD.
Obv: PIETAS, veiled, diademed and draped bust of Livilla as Pietas right.
Rev: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER around large S C.
RIC I 43 (Tiberius); BMCRE 98; BN 74; Cohen 1; Sear 1741; Vagi 477.

The identity of this female portrait remains controversial, and has been identified as Livia (RIC, Sear), Livilla (Vagi) and Vipsania (Jasper Burns).
4 commentsEmpressCollector
5~0.jpg
Lydia, Characa. Drusus AE18. Amphora countermark 26 viewsDrusus Caesar (Son of Germanicus, Brother of Caligula and Nero Caesar)
Obv. DPOVSOS KAISAP, Juvenile head of Drusus.
Rev. MENOFANTOY KAPAKI..., Caduceus.
18mm., 4.2gm.
Sylloge of Ancient Unedited Coins of Greek Cities and Kings, 1837, p. 79
Howgego 369.
1 commentsancientone
PhilidelphiaCaligula.JPG
Lydia, Philadelphia. Caligula AE18. Dioscuri40 viewsObv: ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAΡ, bare head right, star behind
Rev: ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN ..., laureate and jugate busts of the Dioscuri right.

Older references identify imperial family members on the reverse but RPC identifies them as Dioscuri. RPC notes, "That the jugate busts probably do not represent Germanicus and Agrippina I, Germanicus and Agrippina as Apollo and Artemis, or Apollo and Artemis (see BMC; Imhoof-Blumer, LS, pp. 116-117; Trillmich, Familienpropaganda der Kaiser und Claudius, pp. 130-131) since the further figure can sometimes be seen to be laureate (e.g. 2023/1 = BMC 53). It must therefore be male, and the two interpreted as the Dioscuri, who had previously appeared on the coinage of Philadelphia." The Dioscuri are also found on the imperial coinage of Caligula. In addition, since the magistrate named on the reverse is a priest, religious symbolism would be appropriate. The facial features of the reverse busts do, however, resemble members of the family of Caligula. Perhaps the they are Nero and Drusus Caesars as the brothers Castor and Pollux.
-FORVM ANCIENT COINS
ancientone
IMG_9318.JPG
Lydia, Sardes; Germanicus and Drusus26 viewsLYDIA, Sardes. Germanicus and Drusus, Caesares. 28-29 AD(?), by Asinius Pollio, Proconsul. Togate figures of Drusus and Germanicus seated left on curule chairs, DROUSOS KAI GERMANIKOS KAISARES NEOI QEOI FILADELFOI around (overstruck on original legend) / KOINOU ASIAS in two lines within wreath; GAIW ASINNIW POLLIWNI ANQUPATW around (overstruck on original legend). RPC I 2995; Weber 6905.

This interesting coin appears to be an original issue, but in actuality, it is an earlier issue that is restruck with two intricate 'countermarks.' These 'countermarks' were ring-shaped punch restrikings of the legends that surround the obverse and reverse designs. While the obverse 'countermark-legend' is the same as that which appeared on the original striking, the reverse legend, originally EPI ARCIEPEWS ALEXANDROU KLEWNOS SAPDIANOU, has been totally replaced by a new 'countermark-legend.'
1 commentsecoli
fc18.jpg
LYDIA, Sardis. Germanicus, with Drusus. Caesar, 15 BC-AD 19. Æ (16mm, 3.12 g, 12h). Bare head of Germanicus right / Bare head of Drusus right21 viewsJoe Geranio Collection- (anyone may use as long as credit is given)LYDIA, Sardis. Germanicus, with Drusus. Caesar, 15 BC-AD 19. Æ (16mm, 3.12 g, 12h). Bare head of Germanicus right / Bare head of Drusus right. RPC I 2992; BMC 110-2; SNG Copenhagen -.Joe Geranio
GermanicusDrususBlackBackground.jpg
LYDIA. Sardes. Germanicus, with Drusus (Caesar, 15 BC-AD 19). Ae (Restruck circa AD 28/9)65 viewsAsinius Pollio, proconsul

This coin was originally struck with the reverse legend EPI ARXIEREWS ALEXANDROU KLEWNOS SARDIANOU but using an elaborate set of ring shaped countermark dies the obverse and reverse legends were restruck, the reverse indicating the new magistrate.

Obverse Legend : deltaΡΟΥΣΟΣ KAI gammaΕΡMANIKOΣ KAIΣΑΡΕΣ NEOI ΘEOI ΦΙΛΑdeltaΕΛΦOI
Obverse Description : Togate figures of Drusus and Germanicus seated left on curule chairs, one figure holding a lituus
Reverse Legend : gammaΑΙΩ AΣΙΝΝΙΩ ΠΟΛΛΙΩΝI ANΘΥΠΑΤΩ KOINOΥ AΣΙΑΣ
Reverse Description : KOINOY AΣΙΑΣ in two lines within wreath; legend around
Weight: 15.5 gm
Diameter: 29 mm

RPC 2995

Supposedly there is an article about this coin in the November 1994 issue of The Celator. I'm trying to locate a copy of that article-- no luck finding it online so I'll have to find and buy a copy of that issue. The piece by Thomas McKenna is titled "The case of the curious coin of Caligula: A provincial bronze restruck with legend-only dies".
3 commentsTIF
Nero_and_Druses_Caesar.jpg
NERO AND DRUSUS CAESAR Ae Dupondius RIC 34, Senatus Consulto13 viewsOBV: NERO ET DRVSVS CAESARES, Nero & Drusus on horseback riding right
REV: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT around large S C
11.56g, 27mm
Minted at Rome under Caligula, 37-38 AD
Nero & Drusus Caesars, brothers of Caligula
Legatus
Nero_Caludius_Drusus_2.jpg
Nero Claudius Drusus AE Sestertius RIC 109 [Claudius]23 viewsOBV: NERO CLAVDIUS DRUSUS GERMANICUS IMP, bare head left
REV: TI CLAUDIUS CAESAR AUG P M TR P IMP P P S-C, Claudius seated left on curule chair amidst arms
28.6g, 35mm

Minted at Rome, 41-2 AD
Legatus
Nero Claudius Drusus Sestertius.JPG
Nero Claudius Drusus Sestertius18 viewsAE Sestertius.
Obverse: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, bare head left
Reverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP, Claudius, togate, seated left on curule chair, holding branch; arms lying around; SC in ex.
RIC 93 [Claudius], Cohen 8, BMC 157
33mm, 20.5gm
Jerome Holderman
NCD.jpg
Nero Claudius Drusus Sestertius23 viewsOBV: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
bare head left
REV: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P S-C
Claudius seated left on curule chair amidst arms
23.9g, 34mm
RIC 109, RCV 1897
miffy
Nero_Claudius_Drusus_Sestertius_RIC_93.JPG
Nero Claudius Drusus Sestertius RIC 9374 viewsAE Sestertius
Nero Claudius Drusus, Rome Mint, 41-42 AD
Obverse: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, Bare head right
Reverse: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TRP IMP-SC, Claudius seated in curule chair holding branch, surrounded by pile of arms.
RIC 93; Cohen 8; BMC 157
33mm, 22.1gms.
1 commentsJerome Holderman
nero_claudius_drusus_93.jpg
Nero Claudius Drusus, RIC I, 93154 viewsNero Claudius Drusus, died 9 BC, father of Claudius I
AE - Sestertius, 35mm, 29.17g
Rome, AD 42/43(?)
obv. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
Bare head, l.
rev. TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TRP IMP - SC in ex.
Claudius, bare-headed, togate, std. l. on sella curulis, which stands on globus
and at which a sword is leaning; his l. foot resting on a cuirass; at his feet
and under the chair several shields, spears and a helmet are spread; he is
holding a branch in his r. hand and his l. hand rests on his knee.
RIC I, (Claudius) 93; C.8; BMC 157; CBN128; Kaenel 57
about VF, brown patina, some old scratches in the fields

This type has been struck in 3 different mints:
(1) Spanish mint, region of Tarraco/eastern Spain
(2) Spanish mint, region of Astorga/north-western Spain
(3) Gallic mint, recognizable by its fine style
This coin (without PP) is from the Pobla de Mafumet hoard, so probably struck in Tarraco (Curtis Clay)

2 commentsJochen
AGRIPPA~1.jpg
Prutah, Herod Agrippa I59 viewsAΓΡI ΠA BACIΛEWC
King Agrippa umbrella canopy with fringes

Three ears of barley between two leaves flanked by date L - ς
(year 6).

Jerusalem Mint 41-42 AD
Bronze Prutah

Hendin 1244

Ex-Zurgieh


Herod Agrippa I was a son of Aristobulus and grandson of Herod the Great by Mariamne I, granddaughter of High Priest Hyrcanus II. His father Aristobulus had been put to death by Herod the Great. Named after Augustus best friend and genreal Marcus Agrippa, Herod Agrippa was the last of the Herods to become king of all Palestine, as his grandfather had been. Agrippa was educated in Rome with the Emperor Tiberius’ son Drusus and his nephew Claudius and he became a familiar figure in important circles in Rome.

An injudicious statement got Agrippa into trouble with Emperor Tiberius. In an unguarded moment he expressed the wish to Gaius (Caligula) that he, Gaius, might soon be emperor. Overheard by Agrippa’s servant, his remarks came to the ears of Tiberius, who cast Agrippa into prison. His life was in the balance for several months. Fortunately for Agrippa, Tiberius died and Caligula became emperor. He released Agrippa and elevated him to the position of king over the territories that his late uncle Philip had governed.

When Caligula was assassinated Agrippa was in Rome. He was able to act as liaison between the Senate and his friend, the new Emperor Claudius. Claudius expressed his appreciation by awarding him the territory of Judea and Samaria as well as the kingdom of Lysanias. Agrippa now became ruler of about the same dominion that his grandfather Herod the Great had held.


1 commentsJay GT4
Antonia_03.jpg
RIC 1, p.124, 66 - Antonia, CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI20 viewsAntonia
Daughter of Mark Antony, Wife of Nero Drusus, Mother of Claudius, Grandmother of Caligula
AR Denarius, Rome mint, AD 41-42
Obv: ANTONIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing barley wreath
Rev: CONSTANTIAE AVGVSTI (consistency of the emperor), Antonia standing facing, draped as Constantia, long torch in right, cornucopia in left
Ag, 3.717g, maximum diameter 18.9mm, die axis 225deg
Ref.: RIC 66, BMCRE I Claudius 111, Cohen 2, SRCV I 1900, CRE 1 [R2]
Ex H.D. Rauch, Auction 64, December 1999, Lot 122
Ex Jyrki Muona Collection
Ex FORVM
shanxi
drusus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - DRUSUS24 viewsTiberius honoring DRUSUS AE As. Tiberius AD 14-37 AE As. Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N - Drusus head left, bare. Rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around S - C Rome mint: AD 21-22 = RIC I, p. 97, 45; BMC 99, 10.30 g. dpaul7
cal-dup.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, CALIGULA, Nero and Drusus Caesars, Dupondius 40-41 A.D.83 viewsObv:
NERO ET DRVSVS CAESAR
Nero and Drusus on horseback, galloping r.
Rev:
C CAESAR DIVI AVG PRON AVG P M TR P IIII P P S C
RIC 49 Sear 1828
30mm 15.0g
1 commentsTRPOT
DRUSUS-1-MOY.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, DRUSUS CAESAR27 viewsDenom: AE As
Obv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Bare head left
Rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER S C
PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER around SC
Mint: Rome
RIC –I-45; Cohen-2; BMCRE-99
Dia. 27.7 mm
10.56 gm
Drusus
MYoung
Drusus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Drusus, AE As, Struck under Titus20 viewsIMP_T_CAES_DIVI_VESP_F_AVG_REST1 commentsNumis-Student
bpJ1F9Drusus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Drusus, As, 22-23 AD.71 viewsObv: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
Bare head, left.
Rev: PONTIF TRIBVN POTEST ITER
Large S C within inscription.
As 10.7 gm 27.8 mm RIC 45
Comment: Issued by Tiberius
3 commentsMassanutten
011.jpg
Roman Empire, Drusus, son of Tiberius.42 viewsDrusus, son of Tiberius.
AR Drachm, Caesarea in Cappadocia mint, AD 33-34.
Obv. TI CAES AVG P M TR P XXXV, laureate head of Tiberius right.
Rev. DRVSVS CAES TI AVG COS II TR P, bare head of Drusus left.
RIC 87 (I, 100); RSC 2 (II, 2).
3,77g, 18mm.

Provenance: Meister and Sonntag, Auction 6, lot 267.
apyatygin
Tg94rYy3ac2DK5Nq6dpXZ8wGyE4kH7.jpg
Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Drusus d. 9 BC, Sestertius6 viewsHead of Nero Claudius Drusus left "NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICUS IMP"
Claudius seated left holding a branch his feet on a cuirass. Around the chair are shileds, a spear and helmet. "TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP SC"
RIC 109
25.54g
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
N8z26Wsdko7YE3jFeD4fy9rJYwH58j_(1).jpg
Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Drusus d. 9BC, Sestertius11 views23.02g
Head of Nero Claudius Drusus left (Father of Germanicus and Claudius) "NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICUS IMP"
Claudius, togate seated left on a curule chair and holding a branch. Weapons and armor below the chair "TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG PM TR P IMP PP"
RIC I 109 (Claudius)
Struck 50-54 AD under Claudius.
Antonivs Protti
014.jpg
Roman Empire, Nero Claudius Drusus, Father of Claudius.72 viewsNero Claudius Drusus, father of Claudius.
AR Denarius, Lugdunum mint, struck under Claudius, AD 41-42.
Obv. NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP, laureate head left.
Rev. DE GERMANIS on architrave of wide single-span triumphal arch, surmounted by equestrian statue left between two trophies.
RIC 72 (I, 125); RSC 4 (II, 2), Hill 77.
3,57g, 18mm.
Provenance: Classical Numismatic Group, Auction 75, lot 985.
1 commentsapyatygin
bpJ1E2NeroClaudDrus2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Nero Claudius Drusus, Provincial Imitation118 viewsObv: NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMANICVS IMP
Bare head, left.
Rev: TI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP
Either Claudius or Drusus holding branch and seated, left, on curule chair amid an assortment of arms.
Sestertius 15 gm 32.7 mm (RIC 93)
Comment: The official issue was minted by Claudius in 41-42. Drusus was a son of Livia and the younger brother of Tiberius; husband of Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony); father of Germanicus, Claudius and Lavilla. Died of injuries sustained from a horse fall while on campaign in Germany.
Massanutten
Drusussestertius~0.jpg
Roman, Nero Claudius Drusus Sestertius292 viewsIssued by Claudius to honor his father Drusus, RIC 93. Blueish-Black Patina.1 commentsLollia
Colonia_Romula,_Sevilla,_Ae_As_-_28_mm_,_13,63_grams___.jpg
Spain - Colonia Romula, Sevilla, Ae As 21 views- 28 mm / 13.63 gr. RPC 74, Burgos (1992) 1588.
Tiberius AE As, 28mm of Colonia Romula (Seville), Spain. PERM DIVI AVG COL ROM, laureate head of Tiberius left / GERMANICVS CAESAR DRVSVS CAESAR, confronted heads of Germanicus and Drusus.
Antonivs Protti
IMG_9926.JPG
Spain, Carteia6 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. Tiberius. AD 14-37. Æ Germanicus and Drusus, Caesars, among the quattorviri. Turreted head of Fortuna right / Rudder. Chaves 1629-788; RPC I 123. dark brown patina.ecoli
IMG_9925.JPG
Spain, Carteia8 viewsSPAIN, Carteia. Tiberius. AD 14-37. Æ Germanicus and Drusus, Caesars and honorary quattorvirs. Turreted and draped bust of Fortuna right / Rudder. ACIP 3306; RPC I 123. ecoli
drus.jpg
Tiberius & Drusus ( 14 - 37 A.D.)51 viewsAR Drachm
CAPPADOCIA, Caesarea-Eusebia
O: [TI C]AES AVG PM TRP XXXV, Laureate head of Tiberius right.
R: DRVSVS CAES TI] AVG F COS II R P, Head of Drusus left.
Caesarea in Cappadocia mint 33- 34 A.D.
3.47g
19mm
RIC I 87; RPC I 3622. Syd 46
5 commentsMat
drusus_(titus)216.JPG
Tiberius Drusus RIC II, (Titus) 216167 viewsTiberius Drusus, 14 BC - AD 22, son of Tiberius
AE - As, 10.78g, 27.38mm
Rome AD 80-81, struck under Titus
obv. DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N
bare head l.
rev. IMP CAES DIVI VESP F AVG REST
around big SC
RIC II, (Titus) 216; C.6; BMC 286
R1; good VF, nice green patina

Tiberius Drusus, sole son of Tiberius, was poisoned by his own wife Livilla, caused by her lover Sejan who wants to become emperor.
The coin belongs to Titus' restitution series.
2 commentsJochen
Tiberius_Germ_Drus.jpg
Tiberius with Germanicus and Drusus76 viewsCOL ROM PERM DIVI AVG

laureate head of Tiberius left

GERMANICVS CAESAR DRVSVS CAESAR

Confronted heads of Germanicus and Drusus

Spain, Colonia Romula (Seville).

10.28g

RPC 74; Burgos 1588.
Rare

SOLD!
Jay GT4
tiberio-nero-drusus.jpg
Tiberius, Nero and Drusus RPC 18115 viewsTiberius, Nero and Drusus,
Carthago Nova, Spain,
TI CAESAR DIVI AVGVSTI F AVGVSTVS P M, bare head of Tiberius left
NE[RO ET DRVSVS C]AESARES QVINQ C V I N C,
confronted bare-headed and draped busts of Nero and Drusus.
RPC 179; Burgos 460.
xokleng
tibese05-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 42, sestertius of AD 22-23 (Twins in cornucopiae)46 viewsÆ sestertius (27.1g, Ø34mm, 6h) Rome mint, struck AD 22-23.
Obv.: Children's heads on crossed cornucopiae with caduceus in the centre.
Rev.: DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N PONT TR POT II around large S C
RIC 42 (S); BMC 95; Sear (RCV 2K) 1793
ex CNG (2000)

This issue celebrates the birth of the twins Germanicus Gemellus and Tiberius Gemellus, sons of Drusus and Livilla. This coin bears the title of Drusus. The only other coins with Drusus' titles are the Drusus As and the Justitia Dupondius.
1 commentsCharles S
LIVIDU02-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 43, for Livilla, dupondius of AD 22-23 (Pietas)35 viewsÆ dupondius (12.7g, Ø31mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck under Tiberius, AD 22-23.
PIETAS, veiled bust of Livilla as Pietas, facing right
DRVSVS CAESAR T AVGVSTI F TR POT ITER [around large] S C around large S C
RIC (Tiberius) 43 (scarce); Cohen (Livia) 1

Vagi argues that this is not Livia, wife of Caesar but Livilla, sister of Germanicus, wife of Drusus. This is supported by the fact that the title AVGVSTA is absent on the obverse and the titles of Drusus appear on the reverse. Together with the Drusus as and the twin's heads sestertius these types form the family bronzes of Drusus.
1 commentsCharles S
drusas02-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 45, for Drusus Junior, As of AD 22 (large S C)24 viewsÆ As (10.7g, Ø29mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 22.
TObv.: DRVSVS CAESAR TI·AVG·F·DIVI·AVG·N, bare head of Drusus facing left
Rev,: PONTIF·TRIBVN·POTEST·ITER around large S·C.
RIC (Tiberius) 45; Cohen 2; Foss (RHC) 58:22

On this type, the titles of Drusus appear on the obverse. His titles also appear on the reverse of the Pietas dupondius and on the sestertius with the twins heads on crossed cornucopiae. Drusus died in A.D. 23, poisoned by his wife, Livilla. The reverse of this coin refers to Tiberius' award of the tribunician power in A.D. 22.
Charles S
5.jpg
Uncertain city, Drusus AE18. Amphora countermark 45 viewsObv. DPOVSOS KAISAP, Juvenile head of Drusus.
Rev. MENOFANTOY KAPAKI..., Caduceus.
18mm and 4.2gm.

"This coin, evidently of Asia Minor, but particularly of that part situated about the Maeander and Hermus, is probably of a place called Characa, mentioned by Strabo as situated on the road from Tralles to Nysa, and at equall distances. Stephanus speaks also of a city of Charax in Lydia, which he identifies with Tralles." J. Millingen, Sylloge of Ancient Unedited Coins of Greek Cities and Kings ... 1837, p. 79 (pl. 4, 56 (*).
Howgego 369, amphora countermark.
1 commentsancientone
tiberius.jpg
Utica Tiberius66 viewsZEUGITANA, Utica. Tiberius.14-37 AD. Æ 29mm (10.81 gm, 9h). Vibius Marsus Proconsul, Drusus Quaestor, T.G. Rufus Praetor, 27-28 AD. Bare head left; c/m: uncertain within incuse rectangle / C VIB MARSO PR COS DR CAE Q PR T G RVFVS F C, D-D/P-P across fields, veiled figure of Livia seated right, holding sceptre and patera. RPC I 733; MAA 115b; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, slight scrape, green patina.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection. Ex. CNG
1 commentsBolayi
     
129 files on 1 page(s)