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Dover.jpg
England, County of Kent, Dover: Roman Lighthouse97 viewsA visit to Dover on 20 March 2016, the Roman Lighthouse still stands within Dover Castle, which is still an important port of Britain by the English Channel. The upper 1/3 is a mix of Medieval (when it was used as a Bell Tower) and 19th century restoration (when the Church of Saint Mary, next to it, was also restored). The Lighthouse stands on the "eastern heights". There was another on the "western heights", they both guarded the entrance into the Roman harbour of Dubris (Dover) which was also an important base for the "Classis Britannica".Masis
Scheuch-1878i.jpg
Germany, Third Reich: 1941 Meissen Porcelain Medal (Scheuch-1878i)17 viewsObv: ES KANN HIER NUR EINER SIEGEN UND DAS SIND WIR! (There can be only one Victor and it is us!), Luftwaffe above Schnellboot and Unterseeboot heading for Dover
Rev: EIN GLAUBE, EIN WILLE, EIN ZIEL, SIEG! (One Faith, One Will, One Goal, Victory!) around Nazi German arms, border and laurel in green, swastika in black enamel
Quant.Geek
RS062-Roman-AE_sestertius,_Lucius_Verus_(ca_161-169_AD).jpg
LUCIUS VERUS (161-169 AD), AE sestertius, Victory, struck ca. 164 AD43 viewsObverse- L AVREL VERVS AVG ARMENIACVS, laureate head right.
Reverse- TR P IIII IMP II COS II S-C, Victory standing right, placing a shield inscribed VIC/AVG in two lines on palm.
RIC 1396, 33.79 mm, 23 g.
Ex-Ancient Imports, May 2007, through VCoins store.
Comments: This bronze sestertius is well worn and the legends are a bit weak in places, but it is impressively large and thick and has a nice clear portrait, even if the emperor does look a bit stern. This is a holdover from my first Roman Imperial collection and was one of the first coins I bought as a novice; certainly the first sestertius I ever owned.
1 commentslordmarcovan
vitese03a~1.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Vitellius, sestertius, RIC 141204 viewsÆ sestertius (25.02g, 36mm, 6h). Rome, AD 69.
Obv.: A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP AVG P M TR P, laureate draped bust right.
Rev.: S C, Mars, helmeted, naked, cloak over left shoulder, advancing right with spear and legionary standard.
RIC 141 (R); BMC 58; Cohen 79 (80 fr.); RCV 2208
Ex Edgar L. Owen, Andover, NJ, 1997
8 commentsCharles S
aelfwald-ii-cutheard-1.jpg
S.859 Ælfwald II (Cutheard)50 viewsSceat of Ælfwald II, king of Northumbria 806-808
Moneyer: Cutheard
Mint: York (presumably)
S. 859
Phase Ia
Abramson 79-10
O: +FΓEVAΓDVS
R: CVDhEART
Motif: 1/1

This rare coin, in the name of "Ælfwald" (with the Æ runic) most likely belongs to the short and poorly documented reign of Ælfwald II, who gets a short passage in Roger of Wendover's "Flores Historiarum" and a few other semi-contemporary pieces. He succeeded Eardwulf, and only reigned 2 years. Eardwulf may have had a second reign following this, or the throne may have passed to Eardwulf's son Eanred.

There has been some debate as to whether this rare issue belongs to the first (779-788) or second king (806-808) named Ælfwald. The most conclusive evidence seems to be the style of the name of the moneyer Cutheard. Cutheard coined for Æthelred I, Eardwulf, and Eanred. On coins of Æthelred, his name is spelled "CVDHEARD", on Eardwulf it is spelled "CVDHEARD" or "CVDhEART", and on Eanred it is spelled "CVDHARD". On all coins of Ælfwald, the name is spelled "CVDhEART". This supports that the coins are more likely to be semi-contemporary to coins of Eardwulf, during whose reign the spelling seems to have changed. This fits better with an assignment to the second Ælfwald. For more info, see Blackburn & Gillis, "A second coin of Eardwulf and the attribution of the moneyer coins of King Ælfwald" in BNJ 67.

Coins of Ælfwald II are very rare, with 11 documented on the Early Medieval Corpus, and a handful of others which have not been listed, such as this one. Besides Cutheard, there are 2 coins of Ælfwald by the moneyer Cuthgils, who also coined for Æthelred I, although these are probably more appropriately assigned to the earlier Ælfwald I.

Ex- Silbury Coins
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