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Search results - "Delphi"
FC2.jpg
LYDIA, Philadelphia. Gaius (Caligula). AD 37-41. Æ (17mm, 3.83 g, 12h). Epikrates, magistrate. Bare head of Caligula right / Jugate laureate busts of the Dioscuri right.20 viewsJoe Geranio Collection- LYDIA, Philadelphia. Gaius (Caligula). AD 37-41. Æ (17mm, 3.83 g, 12h). Epikrates, magistrate. Bare head of Caligula right / Jugate laureate busts of the Dioscuri right. RPC I 3022. Anyone May Use as Long as Credit is Given.Joe Geranio
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Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos)19 viewsSELEUKID EMPIRE. Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos). 225/4-222 BC. Æ . Antioch on the Orontes mint. Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder / Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, testing arrow, resting hand on bow; Cf. SC 922; HGC 9, 421.2 commentsecoli
philadelphiaClaudius.jpg
#Lydia, Philadelphia. Claudius AE1824 viewsObv: T KLAYDIOS GERMANIKOS KAISAR. Laureate bust r.
Rev: P'ILADELP'EWN NEOKAISAREWN C'ONDROS. Four grain-ears bundled together.
ancientone
00057x00.jpg
32 viewsPHILIPPINES, Insular Government. 1901-1935.
Proof CU Half Centavo (18mm, 2.63 g, 6h)
Philadelphia mint. Dated 1903.
· UNITED STATES OF AMERICA · 1903
Eagle standing facing atop shield, head left, with wings spread, clutching a palm branch and bundle of arrows
HALF CENTAVO FILIPINAS
Male figure seated against anvil, resting hammer; in distance, Mt. Mayon
Allen 1.01; cf. Basso 110 (for business strike)

Ex Cookie Jar Collectibles MBS X (31 July 2007), lot 270
1 commentsArdatirion
nero_hekate_b.jpg
(06) NERO16 views54-68 AD
AE 16.5 mm; 3.88 g
O:Draped bust right.
R: Hekate standing facing, wearing polos and holding long torch in each hand.
Lydia, Philadelphia; RPC 3041.
laney
025_Domitia,_Lydia,_Philadelphia,__SNG_Cop__378,__RPC_1340,_BMC-63_,Q-001_18mm,_5,61g-s.jpg
025p Domitia (82-96 A.D. Augusta), Lydia, Philadelphia, RPC 1340, AE-18, ΦIΛA/ΔЄΛ/ΦЄω/N, in wreath, 125 views025p Domitia (82-96 A.D. Augusta), Lydia, Philadelphia, RPC 1340, AE-18, ΦIΛA/ΔЄΛ/ΦЄω/N, in wreath,
avers: ΔOMITIA AYΓOYCTA, draped bust right.
reverse: ΦIΛA ΔЄΛ ΦЄω N, in four lines within laurel-wreath.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 5,61g, axis: h,
mint: Lydia, Philadelphia, date: 82-96 A.D., ref: SNG Cop. 378, RPC 1340, SNG von Aulock 3075, BMC 63,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
LouisXVIMarieAntoinetteBirthofDauphin1781.JPG
1781. Louis XVI & Marie Antoinette, Birth of the Dauphin.161 viewsObv. Conjoined busts of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette LUDOVICO XVI ET M ANT AUSTR FR ET NAV REGI ET REGINAE LUTETIA signed DUVIVIER.
Rev. King and Queen between a kneeling Paris, holding a shield, and Trade (Abundance), holding a cornucopia and Hermes’ staff. SOLEMNIA DELPHINI NATALITIA REGE ET REGINA URBEM INVISENTIBUS XXI. JANU. MDCCLXXXII signed DV.

Commemorates the birth of Louis-Joseph Xavier Francois, Dauphin of France from 1781 to his death in 1789.
1 commentsLordBest
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1868 Sheild Nickel - aG./G.26 viewsUnited States of America
1868 - Philadelphia Mint - 5 Cents (Sheild Nickel)
rexesq
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1897 - Barber Dime8 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1897 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
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rexesq
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1907 - Barber Dime25 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1907 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
*Again, both photos slightly off-color due to camera troubles.
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rexesq
dime_1907_obv_06_rev_05.JPG
1907 - Barber Dime9 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1907 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
*Again, both photos slightly off-color due to camera troubles.
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rexesq
dime_1907_obv_05_rev_02.JPG
1907 - Barber Dime8 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1907 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
*Again, both photos slightly off-color due to camera troubles.
--
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rexesq
dime_1907_obv_02_rev_02.JPG
1907 - Barber Dime8 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1907 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
*Again, reverse photo slightly off-color due to camera troubles.
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rexesq
dime_1907_obv_01_rev_01.JPG
1907 - Barber Dime29 views-
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USA - ' Barber Dime ' 1907 - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
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1 commentsrexesq
US_dime_1916_NGC-AG-3_o_02_DSC08641.JPG
1916 Dime - NGC Certified & Graded47 views~
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US 1916 'Mercury Dime' Struck at the Philadelphia Mint.
Certified and Graded: NGC AG 3
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4 commentsrexesq
US_dime_1916_NGC-AG-3_o_01_DSC08639_r_01_DSC08643_50%.JPG
1916 Dime - NGC Certified & Graded18 views~
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US 1916 'Mercury Dime' Struck at the Philadelphia Mint.
Certified and Graded: NGC AG 3
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rexesq
dime_1929_dr-martin_obv_03_rev_02.JPG
1929 Dime - Dark Toning7 views~
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USA, 1929 'Mercury Dime'. Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
A gift from an elderly man I worked for who collected coins and was a professor of the classics at Princeton University. You can see quite a bit of good detail on this coin remaining, the dark toning kinda makes it less noticeable, but I really like this little guy!
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rexesq
dime_1929_dr-martin_obv_02_rev_01_a.JPG
1929 Dime - Dark Toning5 views~
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USA, 1929 'Mercury Dime'. Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in Pennsylvania.
A gift from an elderly man I worked for who collected coins and was a professor of the classics at Princeton University. You can see quite a bit of good detail on this coin remaining, the dark toning kinda makes it less noticeable, but I really like this little guy!
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rexesq
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1945-P Silver Wartime Nickel - Jefferson Nickel11 viewsUnited States of America
35% Silver Wartime Alloy 5 Cent Piece. The mintmark, in this case a 'P' for Philadelphia, is put above the dome of Monticello on the reverse to show that these are 'Wartime Alloy Nickels' and not regular Nickel Nickels.
rexesq
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1964 - PROOF Roosevelt Dime - NGC PR 68 DCAM ( Deep Cameo )22 views~
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US Roosevelt Dime 1964 - PROOF Roosevelt Dime - Philadelphia Mint.
Graded by PCGS; PCGS PR 68 DCAM ( Deep Cameo )
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rexesq
Plotina.jpg
1bd Plotina21 viewsWife of Trajan. Died 129

AE 19, Philadelphia, Lydia

Diademed and draped bust, right, PLWTEINA CEBACTH
Worn, FI-LADE-LFE-WN in four lines within wreath

Plotina is credited with having influenced Trajan to select Hadrian as his successor.

BMC 70
Blindado
SNG_Cop_379_AE_Lydia_DOMICIA.jpg
22-20 - Philadelphia en Lydia - DOMICIA (81 - 96 D.C.)13 viewsAE15 - 1/2 Assarión (Provincial)
14 mm 2,86 gr 0 hr.

Anv: Busto a derecha
Rev: EΠI ΛAΓETA ΦIΛAΔEΛΦ,-[EWN], Racimo de uvas.

Domicia Longina (siglo I) fue una emperatriz romana, esposa del emperador Domiciano a quien dio en 73 D.C. su primer hijo Vespasiano, muere joven.
El emperador la repudia al enterarse de que mantenía relaciones con un comediógrafo de nombre Paris, pero sin embargo años más tarde la vuelve a llamar a su lado y tienen un segundo hijo, en el 90 D.C., al que también llaman Vespasiano, lamentablemente muere muy tempranamente, a los cinco años de edad.
Tras la muerte de este segundo hijo, Domicia encabezó la conjura que acabó con la vida de su marido y llevó al poder a Nerva. Domicia murió en tiempos de Trajano. (Fuente Wikipedia)

Acuñada 82 - 96 D.C.
Ceca: Philadelphia en Lydia - Lagetas Magistrado

Referencias: RPC II #1336; SNG München -; SNG Copenhagen # 379; BMC Lydia # 64 pag. 198,
mdelvalle
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4096 DECAPOLIS Philadelphia. Hadrian Demeter19 viewsReference.
RPC III, 4096; Spijkerman 15; SNG ANS 1384; Rosenberger 16; Sofaer 17.

Obv: ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟC CEBACTOC.
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.

Rev: ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΕΩΝ.
Veiled and draped bust of Demeter right, holding grain ears.

7.05 gr.
20 mm.

Note.
Philadelphia is now Amman (Jordan)
okidoki
Lincoln_Peace_Medal.jpg
Abraham Lincoln 1862 Indian Peace Medal68 viewsObv: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Abraham Lincoln (16th President) facing right, 1862 below.

Rev: In the center, within a circle is a village scene including children playing baseball in front of a school and a church steeple; in the foreground an Indian, wearing full chief's feathered head-dress, operates a horse-drawn plough; in the outer ring, an Indian pulls the hair of a foe, preparing to scalp him with a knife; below and to the left is a quiver of arrows, on the right is a crossed bow and a peace pipe; below center is the head of an Indian princess with eyes closed.

Engravers: Salathiel Ellis (obverse), Joseph Willson (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1862 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
1 commentsMatt Inglima
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Abraham Lincoln 1862 Indian Peace Medal55 viewsObv: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Abraham Lincoln (16th President) facing right, 1862 below.

Rev: In the center, within a circle is a village scene including children playing baseball in front of a school and a church steeple; in the foreground an Indian, wearing full chief's feathered head-dress, operates a horse-drawn plough; in the outer ring, an Indian pulls the hair of a foe, preparing to scalp him with a knife; below and to the left is a quiver of arrows, on the right is a crossed bow and a peace pipe; below center is the head of an Indian princess with eyes closed.

Engravers: Salathiel Ellis (obverse), Joseph Willson (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1862 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Lincoln_Emancipation_Medal.JPG
Abraham Lincoln Emancipation Medal29 viewsObv: ABRAHAM LINCOLN PRESIDENT UNITED STATES, bust of Lincoln facing right.

Rev: A circle of tulips with the inscription: "MARCH 4, 1861 TO APRIL 15, 1865. - EMANCIPATION PROCLAIMED JAN. 1, 1863 - MEDAL SERIES OF THE U. S. MINT - J. POLLOCK DIRECTOR 1871."

Engraver: William Barber

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1871 (20th Century restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 45 mm
Matt Inglima
Lincoln_Presidential_Medal.JPG
Abraham Lincoln Presidential Medal33 viewsObv: ABRAHAM LINCOLN, bust of the 16th President facing right.

Rev: A wreath of oak and laurel with a pearled border with the inscription: "INAUGURATED PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES MARCH 4, 1861. SECOND TERM MARCH 4, 1865. ASSASSINATED APRIL 14, 1865." Within the wreath is a spray of pine and cedar, circled by a serpent with its tail in its mouth – the Egyptian symbol of eternity and immortality.

Engraver: George T. Morgan

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1886 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
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Andrew Jackson, 1829 Indian Peace Medal31 viewsObv: ANDREW JACKSON PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Andrew Jackson (7th President) facing right, A.D. 1829 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Mortiz Furst (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1829 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Andrew_Johnson_Peace_Medal.jpg
Andrew Johnson, 1865 Indian Peace Medal40 viewsObv: ANDREW JOHNSON, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, bust of Andrew Johnson (17th President) facing right, 1865 below.

Rev: Columbia, holding an American flag, clasping hands with an Indian Chief, before a tomb surmounted by a bust of George Washington. At the feet of the Indian are the attributes of native life, and behind him is a buffalo hunt; at the feet of Columbia and behind her are the emblems of maritime and industrial progress.

Engraver: Anthony Paquet

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1865 (20th Century restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
soter.jpg
Antiochos I Soter, AE 15, Apollo on omphalos19 viewsAntiochos I Soter - Apollo on omphalos. Antioch Mint, 280-261 BCE. Size and weight: 15mm, 3.86g. 
Obverse: Head of Antiochos I right with elderly features. 
Reverse: Nude Apollo seated left on omphalos, holding arrows in left hand, resting right hand on bow. Monograms to left and right. 
BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY 
Reference: Sear GCV 6878. A coin of the Seleukid kingdom with a black patina. On the reverse, Apollo is seated on the Omphalos, a mystical stone said to be at the navel of the world, in his famous shrine at Delphi. Apollo was famed for his skill with his silver bow and, among other attributes, was a god of archery. Ex MoremothPodiceps
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Antiochos I Soter (281 - 261 B.C.)34 viewsSELEUKID EMPIRE
AR Tetradrachm
O: Diademed head right
R: Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos; monograms to outer left and right. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY within.
Seleukeia on the Tigris mint
29mm
16.78g
SC 379
2 commentsMat
AntiochosII.jpg
Antiochos II Theos79 views261-246 BC. AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 16.17 g, 7h). Seleukeia on the Tigris mint. Diademed head of Antiochos I right / BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, testing bow in his right hand, left hand resting on omphalos; monograms to outer left and right. SC 587.1c; ESM 180; HGC 9, 236g.
From the RJM Collection. Ex Classical Numismatic Group 60 (22 May 2002), lot 891.

My first coin from Seleukeia-on-the-Tigris
2 commentsThatParthianGuy
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Antiochos II Theos37 viewsAR Tetradrachm (28mm, 16.90 g, 1h). Lysimacheia mint. Diademed head right / Apollo Delphios, testing arrow and placing hand on grounded bow, seated left on omphalos; monograms to outer left and in exergue. SC 483.7; Le Rider, Lysimachie, Group 2, dies D1/R4; HGC 9, 236a; CSE 660 (same dies).ThatParthianGuy
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Antiochos III Megas50 viewsAR Tetradrachm (28mm, 17.04 g, 12h). ΔI mint, in Southern or Eastern Syria. Struck circa 197-187 BC. Diademed head right / Apollo Delphios, testing arrow and placing hand on grounded bow, seated left on omphalos; ΔI in exergue. SC 1112; HGC 9, 447y. 1 commentsThatParthianGuy
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Antiochus I (Soter) * Apollo, 280-261 BC65 views
Antiochus I * Apollo,* 280-261 BC
Æ hemidrachm (?)

Obv: Diademed head of Antiochus right
Rev: Apollo seated on omphalos (Delphi), holding arrow in right hand, leaning on strung bow with his left hand, left-facing.
BASILEOS to the right, [A]NTIOXOY to the left. Monograms to left and right, omitted by strike from the right, effaced by wear from the left.

Weight: ca. 4.0 grams
Die axis: 190 degs.

Patina: Quite lovely 'desert-patina.'

Sear, GCATV * (SG) Number 6866v (This example appears to be bronze, not silver: I have been unable to date to find any reference to an Æ variant of SG #6866).
BMC, 4.9, 10


This coin bears portrait of the middle-aged Antiochus I 'Soter,' from the time of his sole reign (280-261 BC.), following the death of his father, Seleukos I.
The reverse depicts Delphian Apollo holding a single arrow, as opposed to the two arrows as seen on the coins dating from his joint-reign with his father.

* Olympian

Tiathena
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Antoninus Pius, RIC 598b, Sestertius of AD 140-143 (Apollo)63 viewsÆ Sestertius (26.1g, Ø33mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-143.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III, laureate and draped bust of Antoninus Pius facing right, wearing paludamentum.
Rev.: APOLLINI AVGVSTO (around) S C (in field), Apollo, standing left, holding a lyre and a patera.
RIC 598b; Cohen 63; BMCRE IV 1231; Strack 822 (5 coll.); Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 35 (2 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins & Their Values II) 4149
ex Alex Kalman (Philadelphia, 2003)
Charles S
Apollo_Delphios.jpg
Apollo Delphios213 viewsApollo seated on the omphalos (Apollo Delphios) was the patron god of the Seleukids from the time of Antiochos I Soter who established this reverse coin image, which was to become emblematic of the early Seleukid dynasty.

This coin was issued by Antiochos II Theos 261-241 BC and is a previously undocumented emission of Antioch on the Orontes

Further background and attribution http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-62107
1 commentsLloyd T
philadelphiaSyria.jpg
Arabia Petraea, Philadelphia. Hadrian AE2230 viewsObv: Laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind.
Rev: Bust of Herakles right, lion's skin tied around neck.
Spij 11
1 commentsancientone
Domitia_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Philadelphia, Domitia10 viewsDomitia
Lydia, Philadelphia
Obv.: ΔOMITIA AYΓΟΥCΤΑ Draped bust right
Rev.: EΠΙ ΛΑΓΕT ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΕωN, Bunch of grapes
AE, 3.14g, 15.1mm
Ref.: SNG München 1336
shanxi
Plotina_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Philadelphia, Plotina13 viewsPlotina
Lydia, Philadelphia
AE 19
Obv.: ΠΛΩΤΕΙΝΑ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ, draped bust of Plotina right
Rev.: ΦI/ΛAΔE/ΛΦE/ΩN within wreath
AE, 4.71 g, 19 mm
Ref.: BMC 70, SNG Cop. 382, BMC 68, SNG München 421
Ex Helios Numismatik
shanxi
seleukia_antiochosI_SC379_6a.jpg
Babylonia, Seleukeia ad Tigris, Antiochos I, SC 379, 6a48 viewsAntiochos I. Soter, 281-261 BC
AR - tetradrachm, 16.92g, 29.04mm, 315°
struck 264-263 BC
obv. Head of Antiochos I., diademed, r.
rev. BASILEWS - ANTIOXOV
Apollo Delphios, nude, std. r. on omphalos, holding with l. hand bow set on ground behind and checking
arrow in extended r. hand; chlamys over omphalos covered with agrenon and r. thigh
in outer l. and r. field monogram
ref. Newell ESM 166, pl. XV, 2; SC 379, 6a
VF
1 commentsJochen
DecapolisCM.jpg
Bearded male head194 views8895. Bronze AE 18, Spijkerman 1a, VF, Decapolis, Philadelphia mint, 7.45g, 18.0mm, 315o, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse FILADELFEWN, diademed, draped and veiled bust of Demeter left, countermarked with a bearded male head; reverse G - M / L- P ( = Year 143 = 80 / 81 A.D. ), five ears of corn, leaf on either side; $70.00. Forum catalog.
whitetd49
Franklin_Medal_small.jpg
Benjamin Franklin22 viewsObv: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN above a bust of Benjamin Franklin facing right; 1706 1790 with crossing branches underneath.

Rev: PHILOSOPHY - LITERATURE - SCIENCE - PATRIOTISM, a depiction of four muses standing, placing olive branches on a memorial inscribed "BENJAMIN FRANKLIN."

Engraver: John R. Sinnock

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1932 (or later restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
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Benjamin Harrison, 1889 Indian Peace Medal34 viewsObv: BENJAMIN HARRISON PRESIDENT, bearded bust of Benjamin Harrison (23rd President) facing left; U.S.A. 1889 below.

Rev: PEACE within a sunburst, above; scene of a farmer showing a Native American chief the benefit of civilization; in exergue: crossed peace pipe and tomahawk, encircled by laurel wreath.

Engravers: Charles E. Barber (obverse), George Morgan (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1889 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59 x 76 mm
Matt Inglima
105034.jpg
BOEOTIA, Thebes171 viewsIn the late 6th century BC the Thebans were brought for the first time into hostile contact with the Athenians, who helped the small village of Plataea to maintain its independence against them, and in 506 repelled an inroad into Attica. The aversion to Athens best serves to explain the unpatriotic attitude which Thebes displayed during the Persian invasion of Greece (480–479 BC). Though a contingent of 700 was sent to Thermopylae and remained there with Leonidas until just before the last stand when they surrendered to the Persians[1], the governing aristocracy soon after joined King Xerxes I of Persia with great readiness and fought zealously on his behalf at the battle of Plataea in 479 BC. The victorious Greeks subsequently punished Thebes by depriving it of the presidency of the Boeotian League, and an attempt by the Spartans to expel it from the Delphic amphictyony was only frustrated by the intercession of Athens.

In 457 Sparta, needing a counterpoise against Athens in central Greece, reversed her policy and reinstated Thebes as the dominant power in Boeotia. The great citadel of Cadmea served this purpose well by holding out as a base of resistance when the Athenians overran and occupied the rest of the country (457–447). In the Peloponnesian War the Thebans, embittered by the support which Athens gave to the smaller Boeotian towns, and especially to Plataea, which they vainly attempted to reduce in 431, were firm allies of Sparta, which in turn helped them to besiege Plataea and allowed them to destroy the town after its capture in 427 BC. In 424 at the head of the Boeotian levy they inflicted a severe defeat upon an invading force of Athenians at the Battle of Delium, and for the first time displayed the effects of that firm military organization which eventually raised them to predominant power in Greece.

After the downfall of Athens at the end of the Peloponnesian War the Thebans, finding that Sparta intended to protect the states which they desired to annex, broke off the alliance. In 404 they had urged the complete destruction of Athens, yet in 403 they secretly supported the restoration of its democracy in order to find in it a counterpoise against Sparta. A few years later, influenced perhaps in part by Persian gold, they formed the nucleus of the league against Sparta. At the battles of Haliartus (395) and Coronea (394) they again proved their rising military capacity by standing their ground against the Spartans. The result of the war was especially disastrous to Thebes, as the general settlement of 387 stipulated the complete autonomy of all Greek towns and so withdrew the other Boeotians from its political control. Its power was further curtailed in 382, when a Spartan force occupied the citadel by a treacherous coup-de-main. Three years later the Spartan garrison was expelled, and a democratic constitution definitely set up in place of the traditional oligarchy. In the consequent wars with Sparta the Theban army, trained and led by Epaminondas and Pelopidas, proved itself the best in Greece. Some years of desultory fighting, in which Thebes established its control over all Boeotia, culminated in 371 in a remarkable victory over the pick of the Spartans at Leuctra. The winners were hailed throughout Greece as champions of the oppressed. They carried their arms into Peloponnesus and at the head of a large coalition permanently crippled the power of Sparta. Similar expeditions were sent to Thessaly and Macedon to regulate the affairs of those regions.

However the predominance of Thebes was short-lived; the states which she protected refused to subject themselves permanently to her control, and the renewed rivalry of Athens, which had joined with Thebes in 395 in a common fear of Sparta, but since 387 had endeavoured to maintain the balance of power against her ally, prevented the formation of a Theban empire. With the death of Epaminondas at Mantinea in 362 the city sank again to the position of a secondary power. In a war with the neighbouring state of Phocis (356–346) it could not even maintain its predominance in central Greece, and by inviting Philip II of Macedon to crush the Phocians it extended that monarch's power within dangerous proximity to its frontiers. A revulsion of feeling was completed in 338 by the orator Demosthenes, who persuaded Thebes to join Athens in a final attempt to bar Philip's advance upon Attica. The Theban contingent lost the decisive battle of Chaeronea and along with it every hope of reassuming control over Greece. Philip was content to deprive Thebes of her dominion over Boeotia; but an unsuccessful revolt in 335 against his son Alexander was punished by Macedon and other Greek states by the severe sacking of the city, except, according to tradition, the house of the poet Pindar.

BOEOTIA, Thebes. Circa 395-338 BC. AR Stater (21mm, 11.98 gm). Boeotian shield / Amphora; magistrate AM-FI. Hepworth, "The 4th Century BC Magistrate Coinage of the Boiotian Confederacy," in Nomismatika Xronika (1998), 2; BMC Central Greece -. Fine.

Ex-Cng eAuction 105, Lot: 34 225/200

2 commentsecoli
Kraus-10110_Rear.jpg
Brandon, Mississippi: Mississippi & Alabama Rail Road Company $5 Jan. 2, 1837 (Kraus-10110)3 viewsPayable at the Girard Bank In Philadelphia, some 1100 miles distant from Brandon, this note appropriately enough bears two portraits of Stephen Girard as well as a vignette of Moneta that would eventually appear on T14 $50 Confederate Treasury Notes nearly 25 years later. SpongeBob
Kraus-10110_Front.jpg
Brandon, Mississippi: Mississippi & Alabama Rail Road Company $5 Jan. 2, 1837 (Kraus-10110)4 viewsPayable at the Girard Bank In Philadelphia, some 1100 miles distant from Brandon, this note appropriately enough bears two portraits of Stephen Girard as well as a vignette of Moneta that would eventually appear on T14 $50 Confederate Treasury Notes nearly 25 years later.SpongeBob
Kroton.jpg
Bruttium, Kroton (Circa 425-350 BC)25 viewsAR Stater

7.73 g

Obverse: Eagle standing left, head right, on stag’s head

Reverse: Tripod; ivy leaf to left, QPO to right.

HN Italy 2146; SNG ANS 351-2

Obeying a directive of the oracle of Delphi, A group of Achaean settlers founded Kroton around 710 BC. Like its neighbor to the north, Sybaris, it soon became a city of power and wealth. Kroton was especially celebrated for its successes in the Olympic Games from 588 BC onward (Milo of Kroton being the most famous of its athletes).

The philosopher Pythagoras established himself there about 530 BC and formed a society of 300 disciples who were sympathetic toward aristocratic government. In 510 BC Kroton was strong enough to defeat the Sybarites and raze their city to the ground. However, shortly after the sack of Sybaris the disciples of Pythagoras were driven out, and a democracy established.

The obverse was comparable with similar types on probably contemporary coins from Elis (which put on the Olympic games at the nearby sanctuary of Olympia) The coins of both cities were thus likely issued for athletic festivals in honor of Zeus. In Kroton’s case the coins probably commemorated its citizens’ Olympic victories with the eagle representing Zeus who presided over Olympia and the games themselves. The tripod (reverse) represented the divine sanction for the town's founding from the Oracle of Delphi (who sat on a three legged stool when producing her oracles).
2 commentsNathan P
Kroton~0.jpg
Bruttium, Kroton (Circa 530-500 BC)29 viewsAR Nomos

28 mm, 7.82 g

Obverse: Tripod, legs surmounted by wreaths and terminating in lion's feet, two serpents rising from the bowl, set on basis of three lines, the center dotted, koppa-P-O (KRO - short for Kroton) to left

Reverse: Incuse tripod as obverse, but wreaths and serpents in outline.

HN Italy 2075; SNG ANS 231; Bement 272.

The importance of the Delphic oracle to the founding of Kroton was celebrated on its coinage from the earliest days. Despite later myths ascribing the founding of Kroton to Herakles, the city's historical oikist is recorded as Myskellos of Rhypai who, on consulting the Delphic oracle about his lack of children was given the response that Apollo would grant children, but that first Myskellos should found the city of Kroton 'among fair fields'. After being given directions on how to locate the site, Myskellos travelled to southern Italy to explore the land that he had been assigned, but seeing the territory of the Sybarites and thinking it superior, he returned once more to the oracle to ask whether he would be allowed to change. The answer came back that he should accept the gifts that the god gave him. A further element of the story is that Myskellos was accompanied on his expedition by Archias of Corinth; the Delphic oracle gave the pair the choice between health and wealth. Archias elected wealth, and was assigned the site of Syracuse, while Myskellos chose health: the favourable climate of Kroton, the eminent skill of its physicians and the prowess of its athletes later earned its citizens this reputation for good health.
1 commentsNathan P
Bruttium_Kroton_SNG-ANS308.jpg
Bruttium, Kroton.16 viewsBruttium, Kroton. 480-430 BC. AR Stater (7.80 gm). Delphic tripod; to l. & r.: stork stdg r. & ϘPO Ex: strung bow. / Tripod incuse, sunken border. VF. CNG EA 1999. ex-CNG XXII (1992-09-02). SNG ANS 308; HN Italy 2104; HGC 1 1449; SNG Cop 1762; SNG München 1430.Christian T
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Bruttium, Kroton.20 viewsBruttium, Kroton. 500-450 BC. AR Stater (6.78 gm) w/ medium flan. Delphic tripod with three lion's foot legs, ϘPO-TOИ to l. & r. (retrograde). / Incuse eagle flying r. Good VF. Pegasi VI #87. SNG ANS 286; Dewing 499v (retrograde legend); HGC 1 1447; HN Italy 2095; SNG Cop 1766; SNG Fitzwilliam 757.Christian T
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Bruttium, Kroton.16 viewsBruttium, Kroton. 425-380 BC. AR Stater (7.68 gm). Eagle standing r. on olive branch, wings spread, BOI to l. (Boiskos magistrate). / Delphic tripod adorned with fillet, laurel branch behind. ϘPOTΩ to l. VF/ gVF. Pegasi 122, #41. SNG ANS 346 (same dies); SNG Fitzwilliam 775 (same); HN Italy 2151; HGC 1460.Christian T
HN_Italy_2497.jpg
Bruttium, Rhegion, 415-387 B.C., Drachm 25 views14mm, 3.89 grams
Reference: Sear 502; B.M.C.1.38
Lion's scalp facing.
PHΓINON, Laureate head of Apollo right, olive-sprig behind.

"Dionysios I, after concluding a peace with the Carthaginians, went about securing his power in the island of Sicily. His troops, however, rebelled against him and sought help from, among others, the city of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 14.8.2). In the ensuing campaigns, Dionyios I proceeded to enslave the citizens of Naxos and Katane, with whom the Rhegians shared a common history and identity (Diod. Sic. 14.40.1). This association was a source of anger and fear for the inhabitants of Rhegion. The Syracusan exiles living there also encouraged the Rhegians to go to war with Syracuse (Diod. Sic. 14.40.3). The overarching strategy of Dionysios I included extending his power into Italy by using Rhegion as a stepping stone to the rest of the peninsula. In 387 BC, after a siege that lasted eleven months, the Rhegians, on the brink of starvation, surrendered to Dionysus. Indeed, we are told that by the end of the siege, a medimnos of wheat cost about five minai (Diod. Sic. 14.111.2). Strabo remarks that, following Dionysios' capture of the city, the Syracusan “destroyed the illustrious city” (Strabo 6.1.6).

The next decade or so of the history of Rhegion is unclear, but sometime during his reign, Dionysios II, who succeeded his father in 367 BC, rebuilt the city, giving it the new name of Phoibia (Strabo 6.1.6). Herzfelder argues that this issue was struck by Dionysios II of Syracuse after he rebuilt the city, and dates it to the period that Dionysios II is thought to have lived in the city. Due to civil strife at Syracuse, Dionysios II was forced to garrison Region, but was ejected from the city by two of his rivals circa 351 BC (Diod. Sic. 16.45.9).

The coin types of Rhegion, founded as a colony of Chalcis, are related to its founding mythology. Some of the earliest tetradrachms of the city, from the mid-5th century BC, depict a lion’s head on the obverse, and a seated figure on the reverse. J.P. Six (in NC 1898, pp. 281-5) identified the figure as Iokastos, the oikistes (founder) of Rhegion (Diod. Sic. 5.8.1; Callimachus fr. 202). Head (in HN), suggested Aristaios, son of Apollo. Iokastos was one of six sons of Aiolos, ruler of the Aeolian Islands. All of the sons of Aiolos secured their own realms in Italy and Sicily, with Iokastos taking the region around Rhegion. Aristaios, born in Libya, discovered the silphium plant, and was the patron of beekeepers (mentioned by Virgil), shepherds, vintners, and olive growers. He also protected Dionysos as a child, and was the lover of Eurydike. The replacement of the seated figure type with the head of Apollo circa 420 BC also suggests the figure could be Aristaios. An anecdote from the first-century BC geographer Strabo (6.1.6 and 6.1.9), which connects Rhegion’s founding to the orders of the Delphic Oracle and Apollo, as the reason for the advent of the new type could be simply serendipitous.

Different theories exist for the lion’s head on the coins of Rhegion. The lion’s head (or mask as it is sometimes described) first appeared on the coinage of Rhegion at the start of the reign of Anaxilas, in about 494 BC. E.S.G. Robinson, in his article “Rhegion, Zankle-Messana and the Samians” (JHS vol. 66, 1946) argues that the lion was a symbol of Apollo. He makes a comparison to the coinage of the nearby city of Kaulonia, “At Kaulonia Apollo’s animal was the deer; if at Rhegion it was the lion, the early appearance and persistence of that type is explained. The lion is a certain, though infrequent, associate of Apollo at all periods.” The link, he suggests, is that the lion was associated with the sun, as was Apollo himself.

The lion’s head could also relate to the exploits of Herakles, who had some significance for the city. The extant sources tell us that Herakles stopped at southern Italy near Rhegion on his return with the cattle of Geryon (Diod. Sic. 4.22.5). It was here that supposedly a bull broke away from the rest of the herd and swam to Sicily (Apollod. 2.5.10). Though but a passing reference in Apollodorus, it is very possible that the Rhegians venerated Herakles. Indeed, Herakles was a very important figure throughout the entire area. Dionysios of Halicarnassus says that “in many other places also in Italy [besides Rome] precincts are dedicated to this god [Herakles] and altars erected to him, both in cities and along highways; and one could scarcely find any place in Italy in which the god is not honoured” (I.40.6). As the skin of the Nemean Lion was one of the main attributes of Herakles, the lion’s head may refer to him through metonymic association."
1 commentsLeo
Calabria_Italy_Taras_on_Dolphin.jpg
Calabria Italy Taras on Dolphin21 viewsTaras, Calabria, Italy, c. 272 - 240 B.C., Silver nomos, Unpublished(?); Vlasto 932 var. (different controls), SNG ANS 1239 var. (same), HN Italy 1044 var. (same), SNG Cop -, BMC Italy -, VF, 6.520g, 19.7mm, die axis 180°,
OBV: Nude warrior wearing crested helmet on horse standing left, holding shield on left arm, horse raising right foreleg, ET (control) before horse, API-ΣTΩN below divided by horse's left foreleg;
REV: Taras on dolphin left, kantharos in extended right hand, trident nearly vertical in left, ΓY (control) behind upper right, TAPAΣ below;

Very Rare variant. EX: Forum Ancient Coins

Taras, the only Spartan colony, was founded in 706 B.C. The founders were Partheniae ("sons of virgins"), sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta).
These out-of-wedlock unions were permitted to increase the prospective number of soldiers (only the citizens could be soldiers) during the bloody Messenian wars. Later, however, when they were no longer
needed, their citizenship was retroactively nullified and the sons were obliged to leave Greece forever. Their leader, Phalanthus, consulted the oracle at Delphi and was told to make the harbor of Taranto
their home. They named the city Taras after the son of Poseidon, and of a local nymph, Satyrion. The reverse depicts Taras being saved from a shipwreck by a dolphin sent to him by Poseidon.
This symbol of the ancient Greek city is still the symbol of modern Taranto today.

SRukke
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CALABRIA, Taras. Circa 510-500 BC. AR Incuse Nomos11 views8,03 g; 24 mm; 11 h
Phalanthos riding dolphin right, extending left arm, holding dolphin with right hand; crowning Nike to left; shell below
Rv. Incuse of obverse, but ethnic in relief.
HNItaly 826; Vlasto 68. The first issue of Tarentine coinage. Very rare. Lightly toned and in fine archaic style, extremely fine.

I got this great piece from an auction last fall and it was the most important acquisition for me.
Taras incuse stater is more compact and thicker than Kaulonia and Sybaris incuse stater. It was dibble (or triple) striked and the details were hard to detect. We can found slight trace on the Taras’s head and his left hand. I believe this is the reason that the pattern looks very sharp while the high points (such as dolphin’s eyes and tail ) are flat.

Dating from the late sixth century, this nomos shows Phalantus naked, riding a dolphin, expressing a motif destined for popular success in the coins of Taras: the dolphin brings Phalantus safe and sound across the sea (also evidenced by the presence of a pecten in the lower field of the coin), and conveys him to Italy, according to the dictate of the Delphic oracle. We learn from the Periegesis of Greece of Pausania (II cent. A.D.) that statues of Taras, Phalantus, and Phalantus’ dolphin (cf. Paus. X 13) were among the votive offerings (anathemata) presented to Delphi by the Tarantines with a fifth of the spoils taken from the Peucetii and the Iapygians. The reverse has the same representation as the obverse, in incuse, using a well-known technique of early coinage that was deployed at many other Southern Italian cities besides Taras
Leo
103002.jpg
CALABRIA, Tarentum183 viewsTaranto was founded in 706 BC by Dorian immigrants as the only Spartan colony, and its origin is peculiar: the founders were Partheniae, sons of unmarried Spartan women and perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta); these unions were decreed by the Spartans to increase the number of soldiers (only the citizens of Sparta could become soldiers) during the bloody Messenian Wars, but later they were nullified, and the sons were forced to leave. According to the legend Phalanthus, the Parthenian leader, went to Delphi to consult the oracle and received the puzzling answer that he should found a city where rain fell from a clear sky. After all attempts to capture a suitable place to found a colony failed, he became despondent, convinced that the oracle had told him something that was impossible, and was consoled by his wife. She laid his head in her lap and herself became disconsolate. When Phalanthus felt her tears splash onto his forehead he at last grasped the meaning of the oracle, for his wife's name meant clear sky. The harbour of Taranto in Apulia was nearby and he decided this must be the new home for the exiles. The Partheniae arrived and founded the city, naming it Taras after the son of the Greek sea god, Poseidon, and the local nymph Satyrion. A variation says Taras was founded in 707 BC by some Spartans, who, the sons of free women and enslaved fathers, were born during the Messenian War. According to other sources, Heracles founded the city. Another tradition indicates Taras himself as the founder of the city; the symbol of the Greek city (as well as of the modern city) is Taras riding a dolphin. Taranto increased its power, becoming a commercial power and a sovereign city of Magna Graecia, ruling over the Greek colonies in southern Italy.

In its beginning, Taranto was a monarchy, probably modelled on the one ruling over Sparta; according to Herodotus (iii 136), around 492 BC king Aristophilides ruled over the city. The expansion of Taranto was limited to the coast because of the resistance of the populations of inner Apulia. In 472 BC, Taranto signed an alliance with Rhegion, to counter the Messapii, Peuceti, and Lucanians (see Iapygian-Tarentine Wars), but the joint armies of the Tarentines and Rhegines were defeated near Kailìa (modern Ceglie), in what Herodotus claims to be the greatest slaughter of Greeks in his knowledge, with 3,000 Reggians and uncountable Tarentines killed. In 466 BC, Taranto was again defeated by the Iapyges; according to Aristotle, who praises its government, there were so many aristocrats killed that the democratic party was able to get the power, to remove the monarchy, inaugurate a democracy, and expel the Pythagoreans. Like Sparta, Tarentum was an aristocratic republic, but became democratic when the ancient nobility dwindled.

However, the rise of the democratic party did not weaken the bonds of Taranto and her mother-city Sparta. In fact, Taranto supported the Peloponnesian side against Athens in the Peloponnesian War, refused anchorage and water to Athens in 415 BC, and even sent ships to help the Peloponnesians, after the Athenian disaster in Sicily. On the other side, Athens supported the Messapians, in order to counter Taranto's power.

In 432 BC, after several years of war, Taranto signed a peace treaty with the Greek colony of Thurii; both cities contributed to the foundation of the colony of Heraclea, which rapidly fell under Taranto's control. In 367 BC Carthage and the Etruscans signed a pact to counter Taranto's power in southern Italy.

Under the rule of its greatest statesman, strategist and army commander-in-chief, the philosopher and mathematician Archytas, Taranto reached its peak power and wealth; it was the most important city of the Magna Graecia, the main commercial port of southern Italy, it produced and exported goods to and from motherland Greece and it had the biggest army and the largest fleet in southern Italy. However, with the death of Archytas in 347 BC, the city started a slow, but ineluctable decline; the first sign of the city's decreased power was its inability to field an army, since the Tarentines preferred to use their large wealth to hire mercenaries, rather than leave their lucrative trades.

In 343 BC Taranto appealed for aid against the barbarians to its mother city Sparta, in the face of aggression by the Brutian League. In 342 BC, Archidamus III, king of Sparta, arrived in Italy with an army and a fleet to fight the Lucanians and their allies. In 338 BC, during the Battle of Manduria, the Spartan and Tarentine armies were defeated in front of the walls of Manduria (nowadays in province of Taranto), and Archidamus was killed.

In 333 BC, still troubled by their Italic neighbours, the Tarentines called the Epirotic king Alexander Molossus to fight the Bruttii, Samnites, and Lucanians, but he was later (331 BC) defeated and killed in the battle of Pandosia (near Cosenza). In 320 BC, a peace treaty was signed between Taranto and the Samnites. In 304 BC, Taranto was attacked by the Lucanians and asked for the help of Agathocles tyrant of Syracuse, king of Sicily. Agathocles arrived in southern Italy and took control of Bruttium (present-day Calabria), but was later called back to Syracuse. In 303 BC-302 BC Cleonymus of Sparta established an alliance with Taranto against the Lucanians, and fought against them.

Arnold J. Toynbee, a classical scholar who taught at Oxford and other prestigious English universities and who did original and definitive work on Sparta (e.g. The Journal of Hellenic Studies, vol. xxxiii 1913 p. 246-275) seemed to have some doubts about Tarentum (Taranto) being of Spartan origin.

In his book The Study of History vol. iii p. 52 he wrote: "...Tarentum, which claimed a Spartan origin; but, even if this claim was in accordance with historical fact..." The tentative phrasing seems to imply that the evidence is neither conclusive or even establishes a high degree of probability of the truth that Tarentum (Taranto) was a Spartan colony.

CALABRIA, Tarentum. Circa 302-281 BC. AR Drachm (17mm, 2.91 gm). Helmeted head of Athena right, helmet decorated with Skylla hurling a stone / Owl standing right head facing, on olive branch; Vlasto 1058; SNG ANS 1312; HN Italy 1015. VF.

Ex-Cng eAuction 103 Lot 2 190/150
2 commentsecoli
caligula_k.jpg
Caligula AD 37-416 viewsAE17, 3.6g, 12h; Philadelphia, Lydia. Magistrate Moschion Moschionos.
Obv. ΓAIOY KAICAP; bare head right.
Rev. ΦIΛOKAICAP ΦIΛOΔЄΛΦЄWN MOCXIWN MOCXIWNOC; Capricorn left.
Reference: RPC I, 3027.
John Anthony
Charles_Lindbergh_Congressional_Medal.JPG
Charles A. Lindbergh, 1928 Medal of Congress18 viewsObv: LINDBERGH above, bust of Charles Lindbergh, wearing a flier's helmet, facing right; MEDAL OF THE CONGRESS in field, ACT MAY 4 1928, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA below.

Rev: A lone eagle flying above a horizon with a rising sun, clouds and stars in the sky.

Sculptor: Laura Gardin Fraser, Mint: Philadelphia

Bronze, 69.33 mm
Matt Inglima
21_Chester_Arthur_Peace_Medal.JPG
Chester A. Arthur, 1881 Indian Peace Medal30 viewsObv: CHESTER A. ARTHUR - PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 1881, bust of Chester Arthur (21st President) facing left.

Rev: PEACE within a sunburst, above; scene of a farmer showing a Native American chief the benefit of civilization; in exergue: crossed peace pipe and tomahawk, encircled by laurel wreath.

Engravers: Charles E. Barber (obverse), George Morgan (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1881 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59 x 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Coropissos_maximinusI_SNGfrance770.jpg
Cilicia, Coropissos, Maximinus I SNG Paris 77091 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 32, 15.62g
obv. AVT KG IOVH - MAXIMEINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, r.
rev. KOROPICCEWN THC KHTWN MHTROPOLEW
Perseus, nude except chlamys, stg. l., holding harpe and head of Medusa in his
l. hand, clasping hands with Andromeda, stg. r. in long chiton, holding with her
l. hand fold of her garment under her chin; below the sea-monster Ketos.
SNG Levant 590; SNG Levante Supp. 157 (this ex.); SNG Paris 770; this obv. die was used in Philadelphia too, see SNG Levante 580
rare, about VF, brown-green patina

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
4 commentsJochen
valerianI_mallus_snglev1298.jpg
Cilicia, Mallos, Valerian I SNG Lev. 1298107 viewsValerian I AD 252-260
AE 31, 19.89g
obv. IMP C LIC VALERIANVS PI FE AVG (lat.)
bust, cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. MALLO COLONIA (lat.)
Amphilochos, naked except chlamys, stg. l., holding laurel branch, boar below. Behind him tripod on podium with globe above, snake winding around.
S C in exergue
SNG Levante 1298 (same obv. die); SNG Paris 1933 (same obv. die); BMC 13; SGIC 4498
Rare (only 13 coins of Valerian's time known!), about VF, light roughness, small casting spots (from making)
added to www.wildwinds.com

MALLOS was one of the oldest cities in Cilicia. The hero AMPHILOCHOS is said to be the founder. He was fighting before in Thebes and Troy. He and his brother Mopsus were the most famous seers in Greece. They decided to rule Mallos alternately. Mopsus was first. But when he should give the rule to Amphilochos it came to a deadly duel where both were killed. After their death their souls got along peacefully and temples were built to celebrate them. The oracle of Mallos was said to be more real than that of Delphi!
Under Severus Alexander Mallos became a Roman Colonia. Therefore the Latin inscriptions.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
2 commentsJochen
CSA-Paper_Front.jpg
Confederate States of America: CSA Watermarked Paper - Single Block (Unattributed)9 viewsOn April 27, 1862 the Confederate blockade runner Bermuda was captured by the USS Mercedita and taken to Philadelphia. Her cargo, which included a shipment of banknote paper bound for the Confederacy, was ordered sold by the Federal Courts. The Treasury Department purchased most of the CSA watermarked banknote paper and used it for a number of purposes, including Fractional Currency Specimen Notes of the second and third issues. Graded PCGS-66PPQ.SpongeBob
CSA-Paper_Rear.jpg
Confederate States of America: CSA Watermarked Paper - Single Block (Unattributed)7 viewsOn April 27, 1862 the Confederate blockade runner Bermuda was captured by the USS Mercedita and taken to Philadelphia. Her cargo, which included a shipment of banknote paper bound for the Confederacy, was ordered sold by the Federal Courts. The Treasury Department purchased most of the CSA watermarked banknote paper and used it for a number of purposes, including Fractional Currency Specimen Notes of the second and third issues. Graded PCGS-66PPQ.SpongeBob
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Divo 001. 1638, La naissance de Louis XIV.212 viewsObv. Bust of Louis XIII right. LUDOVICUS XIII FR ET NAV REX
Rev. Angel delivering child to seated crowned figure COELI MUNUS LUDOVICUS DELPHINUS V SEPT MDCXXXVIII
Divo 1.
LordBest
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Domitia42 viewsLYDIA, Philadelphia.

AE 19.

ΔOMITIA AYΓOYCTA, laureate head of Domitia (queue) right / ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEWN, legend in four lines in laurel wreath.

RPC II, 1340; BMC, 063; SNG Cop, 378.
socalcoins
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Eastern Europe. Imitation of Philip II of Macedon (Circa 200-0 BC)116 viewsTetradrachm (Kugelwange or "ball cheek" type)

20 mm, 11.46 g

Obverse: Stylized laureate head of Zeus right

Reverse: Stylized horse prancing left, pellet-in-annulet above, pelleted cross below.

Lanz 468-9; OTA 193/9.

Around the end of the 3rd century B.C., the Celtic Scordisci tribe started issuing their own local coinages imitating the types of Philip II of Macedon. These coinages had a limited volume of production and a restricted area of circulation, so their finds are not numerous and occur mostly in their own territory and in the neighboring territories of other Celtic or Celticized tribes. The Scordisci were originally formed after the Celtic invasion of Macedonia and Northern Greece (280-279 BC) which culminated in a great victory against the Greeks at Thermopylae and the sacking of Delphi, the center of the Greek world. The Celts then retreated back to the north of the Balkans (suffering many casualties along the way) and settled on the mouth of the Sava River calling themselves the Scordisci after the nearby Scordus (now Sar) mountains. The Scordisci, since they dominated the important Sava valley, the only route to Italy, in the second half of the 3rd century BC, gradually became the most powerful tribe in the central Balkans.

From 141 BC, the Scordisci were constantly involved in battles against Roman held Macedonia. They were defeated in 135 BC by Cosconius in Thrace. In 118 BC, according to a memorial stone discovered near Thessalonica, Sextus Pompeius, probably the grandfather of the triumvir, was slain fighting against them near Stobi. In 114 BC, they surprised and destroyed the army of Gaius Porcius Cato in the western mountains of Serbia, but were defeated by Minucius Rufus in 107 BC.

From time to time they still gave trouble to the Roman governors of Macedonia, whose territory they invaded, even advancing as far as Delphi for a second time and once again plundering the temple; but Lucius Cornelius Scipio Asiaticus finally overcame them in 88 BC and drove them back across the Danube. After this, the power of the Scordisci declined rapidly. This decline was more a result of the political situation in their surrounding territories rather than the effects of Roman campaigns, as their client tribes, especially the Pannonians, became more powerful and politically independent. Between 56 and 50 BC, the Scordisci were defeated by Burebista's Dacians (a Thracian king of the Getae and Dacian tribes), and became subject to him.
5 commentsNathan P
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EB0013 Tripod / Incuse Tripod5 viewsKroton, BRUTTIUM, AR Stater, ca. 480-430 BC.
Obverse: Delphic tripod, legs terminating in lion's feet, retrograde P in legend; in left field, a stork standing right.
Reverse: Incuse tripod, incuse border of radiating lines.
References: S-257; cf.SNGCop-267, BMC 18.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 8.079g.
Ex: Numismatic Fine Arts.
EB
ephilOR.jpg
Elagabalus, BMC Galatia, Cappadocia and Syria, p. 306 #39 viewsBMC Galatia, Cappadocia and Syria lists one Elagabalus of this type at Philadelphia; reverse legend is not complete in the book however: [....] KOI CVPIA.
It is #3 on page 306. Maybe ΦIΛ [KOI C]VPIAC, Philadelpheia (Decapolis); Asteria head reverse.
casata137ec
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Elis, Olympia191 viewsOlympia (Greek: Ολυμπία Olympí'a or Ολύμπια Olýmpia, older transliterations, Olimpia, Olimbia), a sanctuary of ancient Greece in Elis, is known for having been the site of the Olympic Games in classical times, comparable in importance to the Pythian Games held in Delphi. Both games were held every olympiad (i.e. every four years), the Olympic Games dating back possibly further than 776 BC. In 394 emperor Theodosius I, or possibly his grandson Theodosius II in 435, abolished them because they were reminiscent of paganism.

The sanctuary itself consists of an unordered arrangement of various buildings. To the north of the sanctuary can be found the prytaneion and the Philippeion, as well as the array of treasuries representing the various city states. The metroon lies to the south of these treasuries, with the Echo Stoa to the East. To the south of the sanctuary is the South Stoa and the Bouleuterion, whereas the West side houses the palaistra, the workshop of Pheidias, the Gymnasion and the Leonidaion. Enclosed within the temenos are the temples of Hera and Zeus, the Pelopion and the area of the altar, where the sacrifices were made. The hippodrome and later stadium were also to the East.

Olympia is also known for the gigantic ivory and gold statue of Zeus that used to stand there, sculpted by Pheidias, which was named one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World by Antipater of Sidon. Very close to the temple of Zeus (see photo of ruins below) which housed this statue, the studio of Pheidias was excavated in the 1950s. Evidence found there such as sculptor's tools, corroborates this opinion.

Excavation of the Olympia temple district and its surroundings began with a French expedition in 1829. German archaeologists continued the work in the latter part of the 19th century. The latter group uncovered, intact, the Hermes of Praxiteles statue, among other artifacts. In the middle of the 20th Century, the stadium where the running contests took place was excavated.

The Olympic flame of the modern-day Olympic Games is lit by reflection of sunlight in a parabolic mirror at the restored Olympia stadium and then transported by a torch to the place where the games are held.

When the modern Olympics came to Athens in 2004, the men's and women's shot put competition was held at the restored stadium.

The ancient ruins sits north of the Alfeios River and lies next to Cronius or Kronios hill (the hill of Kronos, or Saturn). Kladeos, a tributary of Alfeios, flows around the area.

The town has a school and a square (plateia). Tourism is popular throughout the late-20th century. The city has a train station and is the easternmost terminus of the line of Olympia-Pyrgos (Ilia). The train station which the freight yard is west of it is about 300 m east of the town centre.

It is linked by GR-74 and the new road was opened in the 1980s, the next stretch N and NE of Olympia will open in around 2005. Distance from Pyrgos is 20 km E(old: 21 km), about 50 km SW of Lampeia, W of Tripoli and Arcadia and 4 km north of Krestena and N of Kyparissia and Messenia. The highway passed north of the ancient ruins.

A reservoir is located 2 km southwest damming up the Alfeios river and has a road from Olympia and Krestena which in the late-1990s has been closed.

The area is hilly and mountainous, most of the area within Olympia is forested.

Elis, Olympia. After ca. 340/30-late 3rd century B.C. Æ unit (20 mm, 5.99 g). Laureate head of Zeus right / FA above, horse trotting right; [L]U below. BCD 339.3 (this coin). Near VF, dark brown patina.
Ex BCD Collection. Ex-John C Lavender G18
ecoli73
FH-G-031_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03117 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos); Antioch 225-223 BC; AE17

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
– Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow

3.92gm / 17.32mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes:
Very nice bust, well centered on tight flan. Rev control marks off flan. Pairs nicely with my FH-G-032. - compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-033_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03210 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III; 225-223 BC; AE16

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow; Monogram below.

3.71gm / 16.08mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes: Dec 7, 15 - Ruler- Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos)
Off centered and small flan is very common with this type. Reverse is nicer than most in that it is mostly legible and shows monogram control mark. Pairs nicely with my FH-G-031
- compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-033_(0s)~0.jpg
FH-G-0335 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Seleukos III; 225-223 BC; AE15

- Draped bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder; round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ
- BASILEWS / SELEYKOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.07gm / 15.52mm / Axis: 0

References:
SC 922

Notes: Dec 7, 15 - Ruler- Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos)
Off centered and small flan is very common with this type.
- compare to coin listed here: https://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=166953 From the J.S. Wagner Collection.
Jonathan P
FH-G-034_(0s).jpg
FH-G-03411 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus (?); AR Drachm

- Draped bust right.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.40gm / 15.52mm / Axis: 315

Notes: Dec 8, 15 - The reverse legend of this crude little silver points to any one of the Antiochos', kings of the Seleukid Kingdom. Yet, to date, I can not find an example of such coin with a similar Obv. Bust (which I am assuming to be bust of Apollo or Artemis).
Jonathan P
FH-G-035_(0s).jpg
FH-G-0353 viewsSyria, Seleukid Kingdom; Antiochus I Soter; 281-261 BC; AE15

- Elderly diademed head of Antiochus, right. Round dot border.

- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
- BASILEWS / ANTIOXOY
- Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow & resting on bow.

3.41gm / 15.67mm / Axis:135

References:
SC 351
SNG Spaer 209
Houghton 30

Notes: Dec 8, 15 - Although pitted on all surfaces, major features of this coin are recognizable, and the deep, diamond shaped eye-sockets of the elderly Antiochus are unique clues to allow a full attribution.
Jonathan P
14_Franklin_Pierce.JPG
Franklin Pierce, 1853 Indian Peace Medal30 viewsObv: FRANKLIN PIERCE, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, bare head of Franklin Pierce (14th President) facing left; 1853 below.

Rev: A settler and a Native American standing, facing each other before an American flag; "LABOR," "VIRTUE," and "HONOR" inscribed above within three oval-shaped links of chain-like scroll; field landscape in background.

Engravers: Salathiel Ellis (obverse), Joseph Willson (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1853 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Washington_1797_Medal.JPG
George Washington 1797 Medal32 viewsObv: G. WASHINGTON PRES. UNIT. STA. bust of George Washington facing right.

Rev: COMMISS. RESIGNED : PRESIDENCY RELINQ., a banner, sword, fasces, and laurel branch laid upon an altar decorated with a shield, 1797 in exergue.

Designer: John Reich

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1805 (20th Century restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 39.7 mm
Matt Inglima
01_Washington_Peace_Medal.JPG
George Washington, 1789 Indian Peace Medal31 viewsObv: GEORGE WASHINGTON PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, bust of Washington (1st President) facing right, 1789 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Note: Despite the fact that this medal uses a portrait of George Washington made in the 1780's by French engraver Pierre Duvivier, no peace medals of this type were distributed during his administration. This medal, with the Reich "Peace" reverse, was most likely produced in the 1820's as part of the U.S. Mint's Presidential series.

Engravers: Pierre Simon Duvivier (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1789 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Washington_1860_Medal_Collection.JPG
George Washington, U.S. Mint Cabinet of Medals19 viewsObv: GEORGE WASHINGTON above, BORN FEB. 22 1732 * DIED DEC. 14, 1799 below; bust of George Washington facing right, within a circle.

Rev: WASHINGTON CABINET OF MEDALS, U. S. MINT above, INAUGURATED FEB. 22 1860 below; a pyramid shaped display of Washington medals surmounted with a bust, all within a circle.

Engraver: Anthony C. Paquet

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1860 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59.7 mm
Matt Inglima
13678513.jpg
Greece, Delphi - Ionian column and treasure of Athens284 viewsJohny SYSEL
Delphi_overlooking_the_Temple_of_Apollo.jpg
Greece, Delphi - overlooking the Temple of Apollo280 views1 commentsLloyd T
Profile_of_the_Charioteer_of_Delphi.jpg
Greece, Delphi - Profile of the Charioteer of Delphi320 viewsDating from the early fifth century BC, this is one of the most hauntingly beautiful works of art. It still speaks after 2,500 years.2 commentsLloyd T
13678398.jpg
Greece, Delphi - temple of Apollo370 views1 commentsJohny SYSEL
DSC00767.jpg
Greece, Delphi - The Charioteer of Delphi281 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.

The beauty of this work is breathtaking.
1 commentsLloyd T
Charioteer_of_Delphi_resized.JPG
Greece, Delphi - The Charioteer of Delphi213 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.
Lloyd T
Head_of_the_Charioteer_of_Delphi_resized.JPG
Greece, Delphi - The Head of the Charioteer of Delphi240 viewsThe life-size statue of a chariot driver was found in 1896 at the Sanctuary of Apollo in Delphi. It is now in the Delphi Archaeological Museum.

The statue was erected at Delphi in 474 BC, to commemorate the victory of a chariot team in the Pythian Games, which were held at Delphi every four years in honor of Pythean Apollo.
Lloyd T
The_Stadium_at_Delphi.jpg
Greece, Delphi - The Stadium at Delphi227 viewsLooking from the marker at the farthest end from the starting line.Lloyd T
DSC00710.jpg
Greece, Delphi - The Temple of Apollo at Delphi231 viewsLloyd T
DSC00718.jpg
Greece, Delphi - The Theatre at Delphi overlooking the Temple of Apollo with the Treasury of the Athenians in the background228 viewsLloyd T
13678389.jpg
Greece, Delphi - theatre375 views1 commentsJohny SYSEL
13678394.jpg
Greece, Delphi - tholos333 views1 commentsJohny SYSEL
istros.jpg
GREEK, MOESIA, ISTROS AR DRACHM104 viewsMoesia, Istros AR Drachm.
4th Century BC.
Facing male heads, the left inverted / ISTPIH, sea-eagle left grasping dolphin with talons, AG monogram below dolphin.
BMC 246; SNG Munich 236; SNG Copenhagen 192; Pick AMNG 417.
20mm, 5.02g.

Ex Roma Numismatics LTD

The reverse shows a dolphin in the talons of Zeus’s eagle. This reverse type
is particularly significant, as the dolphin, long a symbol of the cult of Apollo
Delphinios ( Apollo was associated with dominion over colonists, and as
the patron defender of herds and flocks ), whose leaders were members
of the oligarchy, was now depicted under the influence of Zeus, whose
cult was ascendant under the democratic government, when he was
known as Zeus Eleutherios (Freedom).
So what we are seeing is the ousting of the ruling elite and the
beginnings of democracy in Istros.

1 commentsCurtis H
unpubl..jpg
Greek, Phliadelphia AE 27295 viewsPhiladelphia in Lydia AE 27, struck about 200 AD.
Obv: ΔHMOC, bust of Demos right.
Rev: ΦΛ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΕΩΝ ΝΕΩΚΟΡΩΝ, turreted Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia.
Ø 24-27 mm, 6.96 g.
SNG München-, SNG Tübingen-, SNG Copenhagen-, SNG von Aulock-, SNG Österreich-, SNG Helsinki II-, Sear-, Lindgren-, Lindgren III-, Hunterian Collection-, BMC- (SNG München 409 and BMC 48: same obverse die).
1 commentsPscipio
antiochusI.jpg
GREEK, Seleukids Antiochus I23 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Antiochos I Soter. 281-261 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 17.27 g, 6h). Ekbatana mint. Diademed head right / Apollo Delphios seated left; monograms to inner left; at feet, forepart of horse grazing left. SC 409.2c; HGC 9, 128h.arash p
22-24_Grover_Cleveland_Peace_Medal.JPG
Grover Cleveland, 1885 Indian Peace Medal32 viewsObv: GROVER CLEVELAND PRESIDENT, bust of Grover Cleveland (22nd and 24th President) facing right; U. S. A. 1885 below.

Rev: PEACE within a sunburst, above; scene of a farmer showing a Native American chief the benefit of civilization; in exergue: crossed peace pipe and tomahawk, encircled by laurel wreath.

Engravers: Charles E. Barber (obverse), George Morgan (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1885 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59 x 76 mm
Matt Inglima
hadrian_phil_k.jpg
Hadrian, AD 117-1386 viewsHadrian, AD 117-138
Æ25, 14g, 12h. ARABIA PETRAEA, Philadelphia.
Obv.: ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑ AΔΡIANOC CEBACTOC; Laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind.
Rev.: ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN ΚΟΙΛΗC CYPIAC; Bust of Herakles right, lion's skin tied around neck.
Reference: Spijkerman 11; Rosenberger 15 var. (seen from front); SNG ANS 1385 var. (same).
John Anthony
181.jpg
Herakles (bearded head right)112 viewsSYRIA: DECAPOLIS. Philadelphia. Titus. Æ 23. A.D. 80/81 (year 143). Obv: (AYTOKPATΩP-TITOCKAICAP). Laureate head right; countermark below chin. Rev: (ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN-LГMP). Laureate head of Herakles (Domitian) right. Ref: RPC 2106; BMC 4; Spijkerman 9; Rosenberger 7. Axis: 330°. Weight: 9.31 g. CM: Bearded head of Herakles right, in circular punch, 7 mm. Howgego 17 (20 pcs). Note: Likely countermarked in connection with next issue of city under Hadrian. Collection Automan.Automan
TitusPhiladelph.jpg
Herakles, bearded head right168 viewsTitus, 24 Jun 79 - 13 Sep 81 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis, Syria
6540. Bronze AE 23, RPC 2106, BMC 4, Spijkerman 9 , Rosenberger 7, aVF, small flan, 11.31g, 21.7mm, 180o, Philadelphia mint, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPATWP TITOC KAICAP, laureate head of Titus right, countermark bearded head of Herakles right; reverse FILADELFEWN L GMR (Philadelphia year 143), laureate head of Herakles right; $65.00
whitetd49
TitusPhiladelph2.jpg
Herakles, bearded head right163 viewsTitus, 24 Jun 79 - 13 Sep 81 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis, Syria
9664. Bronze AE 23, RPC 2106, BMC 4, Spijkerman 9 , Rosenberger 7, F, Philadelphia mint, 11.25g, 23.1mm, 0o, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse AYTOKPATWP TITOC KAICAP, laureate head of Titus right, countermark bearded head of Herakles right; reverse FILADELFEWN L GMR (Philadelphia year 143), laureate head of Herakles right; nice red patina; $115.00
whitetd49
DomitianCM.jpg
Herakles, bearded head right179 viewsDomitian, 13 Sep 81 - 18 Sep 96 A.D., Philadelphia, Decapolis, Syria
11606. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman 10 var (countermark), F, Philadelphia mint, 11.84g, 23.3mm, 0o, as Caesar, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DOMITIANOC KAICAP, laureate head of Domitian right, countermark bearded head of Herakles right; reverse FILADELFEWN L GMR (Philadelphia year 143), turreted and veiled head of Tyche right; nice green patina and choice countermark; $30.00. Forum catalog.
whitetd49
CBdime.jpg
Hoard dime119 viewsUnited States, Philadelphia mint, AR dime or tenth-dollar, aVF, 1943 AD
Found in dig of a hoard 2005 amongst a variety of ancient coins.
Finding the coin in a cache of ancient coins led to the following speculations:
-This may prove that some Corinthian and Macedonian issues were minted 1943 AD or later.
-A tourist lost a coin and it sunk through a few meters of earth to rest alongside ancient coins which got there in a similar manner.
-A WWII soldier (Allies landed in 1943) accumulated the hoard by putting the ancient coins in his pockets, and later burying them, along with this dime, never to return.
2 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
01007AB.jpg
IONIA, MAGNESIA, 202-133 BC85 viewsTetradrachm, 33mm, 16.84g

O. Diad. draped bust of Artemis r, bow & quiver at shoulder
R. Apollo Delphios stg l., elbow resting on tall tripod behind, holding filleted branch; below, meander pattern; all within laurel wreath

Ex Washington Numismatic Gallery
3 commentsAZRobbo
Italy- Pompeii- House with nice delphin mosaic.jpg
Italy- Pompeii- House with nice delphin mosaic47 viewsJohn Schou
20_James_Garfield_Peace_Medal.JPG
James A. Garfield 1881 Indian Peace Medal28 viewsObv: JAMES A. GARFIELD PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES 1881, bust of President Garfield (20th President) facing left.

Rev: PEACE within a sunburst, above; scene of a farmer showing a Native American chief the benefit of civilization; in exergue: crossed peace pipe and tomahawk, encircled by laurel wreath.

Engravers: Charles E. Barber (obverse), George Morgan (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1881 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59 x 76 mm
Matt Inglima
15_James_Buchanan_Peace_Medal.JPG
James Buchanan, 1857 Indian Peace Medal36 viewsObv: JAMES BUCHANAN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, bust of James Buchanan (15th President) facing right, 1857 below.

Rev: A settler and a Native American standing, facing each other before an American flag; "LABOR," "VIRTUE," and "HONOR" inscribed above within three oval-shaped links of chain-like scroll; field landscape in background.

Engravers: Salathiel Ellis (obverse), Joseph Willson (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1857 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
11_James_Polk_Peace_Medal.JPG
James K. Polk, 1845 Indian Peace Medal27 viewsObv: JAMES K POLK PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Polk (11th President) facing left, 1845 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: John Chapman (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1845 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
04_James_Madison.JPG
James Madison, 1809 Indian Peace Medal27 viewsObv: JAMES MADISON PRESIDENT OF THE U.S. A.D. 1809, draped bust of James Madison (4th President), facing left.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Designer: John Reich

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1809 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
05_James_Monroe.JPG
James Monroe, 1817 Indian Peace Medal28 viewsObv: JAMES MONROE PRESIDENT OF THE U.S. A.D. 1817, draped bust of James Monroe (5th President) facing right.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Mortiz Furst (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1817 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
02_John_Adams_Peace_Medal.JPG
John Adams, 1797 Indian Peace Medal32 viewsObv: JOHN ADAMS PRESIDENT OF THE U. S., bust of John Adams (2nd President) facing right, A. D. 1797 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Note: The John Adams medal was likely produced in the 1820's as part of the Mint's Presidential series. Even though it used the "Peace" reverse, it was never issued for that purpose.

Engravers: Mortiz Furst (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1797 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
06_John_Q_Adams.JPG
John Quincy Adams, 1825 Indian Peace Medal29 viewsObv: JOHN QUINCY ADAMS PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of John Q. Adams (6th President), facing right; 1825 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Mortiz Furst (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1825 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
John_Tyler_Peace_Medal.JPG
John Tyler, 1841 Indian Peace Medal22 viewsObv: JOHN TYLER, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of John Tyler (10th President) facing left, 1841 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Ferdinand Pettrich (obverse), John Reich (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1841 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
PET070_Amman_Acropolis.JPG
Jordan, Amman - Acropolis284 viewsAmman in Jordan was ancient Philadelphia, a Decapolis town. Not much remains of the (second-century CE) Temple of Heracles which once dominated the city's acropolis, but the surviving columns are impressively large. Heracles also features prominently on Philadelphia's coinage.Abu Galyon
Hawaii.jpg
Kingdom of Hawaii104 viewsKM # 3

AR dime/umi keneta (± 90% AR, ±10% AE), struck 1883-1884 at the San Francisco mint. Designed by Charles E. Barber, 249,921 circulation strikes (250,000 were minted, but 79 were melted), ±2.5 grams, ±17.9 mm. 180°

Obv: KALAKAUA I KING OF HAWAII, bust of King Kalakaua, • 1883 • below.

Rev: UA MAU KE EA O KA AINA I KA PONO [= the life of the land is in righteousness] / • UMI KENETA [= One Dime] • around rim. ONE / DIME surrounded by wreath, crown above.

Edge: Reeded

In 1880, Hawaii's monarch, King Kalakaua, authorized a new coinage that more closely followed United States coinage. His associate Klaus Spreckels contracted the United States Mint to produce silver coins for the islands: 700,000 half-dollars, 500,000 each of quarters and silver dollars and 250,000 dimes. The total was $1 million worth of Hawaiian coins. The Hawaiian Dime was a substitute for the 12-1/2 Cent (Hapawalu) denomination specified in the original application to the U.S. government. The Hapawalu would have required specially made blanks, whereas the Dime denomination was already a standard in the American series. Six Proof Dimes were made in September 1883 at the Philadelphia Mint for inclusion in four-piece sets containing the 10c, 25c, 50c, and $1.00 denominations. 250,000 circulation strikes were struck at the San Francisco Mint (without mintmark) from November 17, 1883 through June 1884. An additional 20 Proof Dimes were made at the Philadelphia Mint in 1884, this time for inclusion in five-piece sets containing the aforementioned denominations, plus the 12-1/2c coin. On June 14, 1900 Hawaii became a territory of the United States, and Congress ordered that a majority of the Hawaiian coins be withdrawn and melted.

Souvenir from my son amd daughter-in-law's honeymoon in Hawaii
1 commentsStkp
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Tyre,_Alexander_III_tetradrachm.jpg
Kings of Macedonia, Alexander III The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Tyre 332/1 BC 19 viewsHead of young Herakles right in lion-skin headdress, paws tied at neck.
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, M under throne.

Price 3240 (b) (Ake) same dies; Newell Ake Series I, 3 (plate V, 13 same dies IV/δ).
An early emission of Alexander’s coinage from the mint of Tyre 332-330 BC. For the reattribution of the Alexander series of Ake to the mint of Tyre, see A. Lemaire, “Le monnayage de Tyr et celui dit d’Akko dans la deuxième moitié du IV siècle avant J.-C.,” RN 1976, and G. Le Rider, Alexander the Great: Coinage, Finances, and Policy (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2007), pp. 125-34. Tyre mint 332/1 BC.

(23 mm, 17.15 g, 6h).
Harlan J Berk Buy or Bid Sale 175, May 2011, Lot 114 (incorrectly attributed to Babylon).

This is amongst the first coins issued from Tyre after the siege. It was probably struck in the months immediately following the fall of the city to Alexander. The people who handled it were probably participants in the bloody, protracted siege of Tyre and may then have accompanied Alexander on his expedition to Egypt before going on to fight at Gaugamela. Few Alexander tetradrachms can be so closely associated with the location and movements of the man.
n.igma
croton1.JPG
Kroton Stater57 viewsBruttium, Kroton 530-500 BC Statère 6,43g
A/ QPO. Trépied delphien ; grènetis circulaire.
R/ même type incus à g. dans un cercle strillé
HN Italy 2075, SNG ANS 231 (same obv. die)
ex Dr. W Schink Collection and Ars Classica XV (2 July 1930), lot 230
2 commentsBrennos
croton2.JPG
Kroton Stater48 viewsBruttium, Kroton 530-500 BC Statère 8,16g
A/ QPO - TON. Trépied delphien ; grènetis circulaire.
R/ même type incus dans un cercle strillé
HN Italy 2075, SNG ANS 237 (same obv. die)
Brennos
Crotone.jpg
Kroton Stater27 viewsBruttium, Kroton 530-500 BC Statère 7,18g
A/ QPO - TON. Trépied delphien ; grènetis circulaire.
R/ même type incus dans un cercle strillé
HN Italy 2075, SNG ANS 235 (same obv. die)
Brennos
1658840l.jpg
Lesbos Mytilene EL Hekte58 viewsVeiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Kithara with fillet to right within linear square. Bodenstedt 97; HGC 6, 1023. 2.52g, 9mm, 7h. Demeter's head is very close in style to the federal coinage of Delphi; I don't know who copied from the other :-)

Possibly the 4th known, Bodenstedt lists one in a public collection in Karlsruhe, the other two were sold recently http://www.cngcoins.com/Coin.aspx?CoinID=256293 and http://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=2139192
1 commentspaparoupa
Lincoln_Mourning_Medal.JPG
Lincoln Mourning Medal28 viewsObv: Bust of Abraham Lincoln facing right.

Rev: A scroll, before a broken column that is flanked by two American flags.

Engravers: Anthony C. Paquet and William Barber (whose initial "B" is visible on the truncation of Lincoln's neck).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: c. 1865 (20th Century restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 18.36 mm
Matt Inglima
IMG_4674.JPG
Lincoln Mourning Medal11 viewsObv: Bust of Abraham Lincoln facing right.

Rev: A scroll, before a broken column that is flanked by two American flags.

Engravers: Anthony C. Paquet and William Barber (whose initial "B" is visible on the truncation of Lincoln's neck).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: c. 1865 (20th Century restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 18.36 mm
Matt Inglima
LUCANIA_THOURIOI.jpg
Lucania Thourioi Stater 385 - 360 BC.83 viewsObv ; Helmeted head of Athena, helmet decorated with Skylla holding trident.
Rev ; QOURIWN, bull butting; fish in exergue.
G/aVF , 20.8 mm, 7.44 gr.

EX THE COLIN E. PITCHFORK COLLECTION.
EX CNG.

Thourioi, was a city of Magna Graecia on the Gulf of Tarentum, near the site of the older Sybaris. It owed its origin to an attempt made in 452 BC by Sybarite exiles and their descendants to re-people their old home. The new settlement was crushed by Croton, but the Athenians lent aid to the fugitives and in 443 BC Pericles sent out to Thourioi a mixed body of colonists from various parts of Greece, among whom were Herodotus and the orator Lysias.
The pretensions of the Sybarite colonists led to dissensions and ultimately to their expulsion; peace was made with Croton, and also, after a period of war, with Tarentum, and Thourioi rose rapidly in power and drew settlers from all parts of Greece, especially from Peloponnesus, so that the tie to Athens was not always acknowledged. The oracle of Delphi determined that the city had no founder but Apollo, and in the Athenian Expedition in Sicily Thourioi was at first neutral, though it finally helped the Athenians.

Thourioi had a democratic constitution and good laws, and, though we hear little of its history till in 390 BC it received a severe defeat from the rising power of the Lucanians. Many beautiful coins testify to the wealth and splendor of its days of prosperity.

In the 4th century BC it continued to decline, and at length called in the help of the Romans against the Lucanians, and then in 282 BC against Tarentum. Thenceforward its position was dependent, and in the Second Punic War, after several vicissitudes, it was depopulated and plundered by Hannibal in 204 BC.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
3 commentsSam
00013v00.jpg
Lucania, Metapontion (400-340 BC)24 viewsAR Nomos

19mm, 7.48g

Obverse: Head of Leucippus with Corinthian helmet, behind grape

Reverse: Barley ear with side leaf and META to right.

Johnston A4.3 (av., Stgl.), HN Italy 1553.

Metapontion traced its founding to the 7th century BC, when an Achaean adventurer named Leucippus and his followers put down roots on a fertile plain on the instep of the Italian boot. The city so flourished that its people were said to have dedicated a "golden harvest," probably a golden sheaf of barley, at the great temple of Delphi.

Metapontion was among the first cities of Magna Graecia to issue coinage, and indeed long preceded its later rival Tarentum in this respect. The choice of the barley ear as the civic emblem is unusual in that the other cities of Magna Graecia all struck coinage displaying types relating to their foundation myths or principal cults. Metapontion's choice may well reflect a significant economic reliance on its major export.
Nathan P
Lycia_Masekytes_RPC1_3303.jpg
Lycian League, Masikytes25 viewsLycian League, Masikytes. c. 40-35 BC. AR Hemidrachm (1.70 gm). Laureate head of Apollo r. / Kithara (lyre), M-A across fields, serpent coiled around omphalos to l., all within incuse square.  EF.  CNG EA 447 #118. Ex-Dr. Erik Miller Coll. RPC I #3303; Troxell, Lycian, Period IV, Series 3 #97; McClean 8875.
In Greek myths, Apollo slayed the great serpent Python so that he could establish his oracular temple at Delphi. An omphalos marked the spot where he slayed Python and is depicted on ancient coins as an omphalos stone with a serpent wound around it.
2 commentsChristian T
SHIELD_THUNDERBOLT_2RESIZED.jpg
LYDIA PHILADELPHIA32 viewsAE 15 mm 4.12 g
1st CENTURY BCE (100 - 14 BCE)
OBV: MACEDONIAN SHIELD
REV: THUNDERBOLT WITHIN LAUREL WREATH

PHILADELPHIA LYDIA
SNG Cop. 342 (Isegrim)
laney
shield_thunderbolt.jpg
LYDIA PHILADELPHIA SHIELD/THUNDERBOLT53 viewsAE 14mm 3.89 g
1st CENTURY BCE (100 - 14 BCE)
OBV: MACEDONIAN SHIELD
REV: THUNDERBOLT WITHIN LAUREL WREATH
ERMIP/POS/FILADEL ABOVE THUNDERBOLT IN 3 LINES, FEWN BELOW
PHILADELPHIA LYDIA
SNG Cop. 342 (Isegrim)
2 commentslaney
lydia_phil_shield_thunderbolt_b.jpg
LYDIA, PHILADELPHIA18 viewsAE 14 mm; 3.28 g
1st CENTURY BCE (100 - 14 BCE)
O: MACEDONIAN SHIELD
R: THUNDERBOLT WITHIN LAUREL WREATH
Lydia, Philadelphia
cf. SNG Cop. 342 (Isegrim)
laney
Phil_shield_k.jpg
LYDIA, Philadelphia4 viewsÆ18 6.7g; 1st century BC - 1st century AD
Obv: Macedonian shield with star on boss.
Rev: ΦIΛAΔEΛ-ΦEΩN in two lines within wreath.
Reference: SNG Cop 343-7 / 16-383-65
John Anthony
AAEQb_small.png
Lydia, Philadelphia Æ1817 viewsLydia, Philadelphia

c. 1st century BC

18mm., 6.18g.

Diademed head of Zeus right

Lyre; ivy leaf above; all within wreath

References:

AAEQ
RL
025_Domitia,_Lydia,_Philadelphia,__SNG_Cop__378,__RPC_1340,_BMC-63_,Q-001_18mm,_5,61g-s~0.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, 025p Domitia (82-96 A.D. Augusta), RPC 1340, AE-18, ΦIΛA/ΔЄΛ/ΦЄω/N, in wreath, 112 viewsLydia, Philadelphia, 025p Domitia (82-96 A.D. Augusta), RPC 1340, AE-18, ΦIΛA/ΔЄΛ/ΦЄω/N, in wreath,
avers: ΔOMITIA AYΓOYCTA, draped bust right.
reverse: ΦIΛA ΔЄΛ ΦЄω N, in four lines within laurel-wreath.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 5,61g, axis: h,
mint: Lydia, Philadelphia, date: 82-96 A.D., ref: SNG Cop. 378, RPC 1340, SNG von Aulock 3075, BMC 63,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Lydia,_Philadelphia,_AE14,_100_BC-40AD,_Macedonian_shield,__I_A_E_-_E_N,_thunderbolt_in_wreath,__MEmonogram-BMC-2-3,_Q-001,_0h,_15mm,_4,75g-s.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, Autonomous issue (100 B.C.-40 A.D.), BMC 2-3, AE-15, ΦIΛAΔEΛ-ΦEΩN, Winged thunderbolt within wreath, 114 viewsLydia, Philadelphia, Autonomous issue (100 B.C.-40 A.D.), BMC 2-3, AE-15, ΦIΛAΔEΛ-ΦEΩN, Winged thunderbolt within wreath,
avers:- Macedonian shield, star in centre.
revers:- ΦIΛAΔEΛ-ΦEΩN above and beneath winged thunderbolt, ΡΠME monogram above, all within wreath.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 15,0-15,5mm, weight: 4,75g, axis: h,
mint: Lydia, Philadelphia, date: after 100 B.C.-40 A.D., ref: BMC 2-3, SNG Tuebingen 3738,
Q-001
quadrans
Philadelphia_Demos_Artemis_AE23_4_48g.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, Demos / Artemis, AE2366 viewsAE23, 4.48g
3rd century AD
obv: ΔHMOC, bust of Demos wearing Tainia right, drapery on left shoulder.
rev: ΦΛ ΦIΛAΔЄΛΦЄΩN NЄIKOPΩN, Artemis hurrying right with dog at side, holding bow left and drawing arrow from quiver

SNG Aulock 3070; SNG Leypold 1105 (same dies)

ex R&W
1 commentsareich
Philadelphia_Homonoia_Smyrna_AE25_6_04g.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, Homonoia with Smyrna, AE2540 viewsAE25, 6.04g
obv: DHMOC ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN NEOK; head of Demos, wearing taenia right
rev: K CMYP Γ NEΩ OMO; Kybele on throne left, holding patera and scepter
cf. SNG von Aulock 3068 (same obverse die, same reverse with longer legend); SNG Leypold -; SNG Righetti -; Lindgren -; Lydische Stadtmünzen -
areich
pseudo-autonomous_Philadelphia_Tyche_Apollo_AE20_4_3g.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, Tyche / Apollo69 viewstime of Septimius Severus
AE20, 4.3g
obv: FILADELFEWN; turreted bust of Tyche right
rev: Apollo standing left, holding lyre, branch
BMC Lydia, p.191, #32; SNG Leypold 1109 (same dies)
areich
Philadelphia.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia, Tyche/Nike, AE2132 views21mm, 4.33g
obv: ΦΛ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN, turreted and draped bust of Tyche right
rev: NEΩKOPΩN; Nike standing right, holding fillet
areich
PhilidelphiaCaligula.JPG
Lydia, Philadelphia. Caligula AE18. Dioscuri39 viewsObv: ΓAIOΣ KAIΣAΡ, bare head right, star behind
Rev: ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN ..., laureate and jugate busts of the Dioscuri right.

Older references identify imperial family members on the reverse but RPC identifies them as Dioscuri. RPC notes, "That the jugate busts probably do not represent Germanicus and Agrippina I, Germanicus and Agrippina as Apollo and Artemis, or Apollo and Artemis (see BMC; Imhoof-Blumer, LS, pp. 116-117; Trillmich, Familienpropaganda der Kaiser und Claudius, pp. 130-131) since the further figure can sometimes be seen to be laureate (e.g. 2023/1 = BMC 53). It must therefore be male, and the two interpreted as the Dioscuri, who had previously appeared on the coinage of Philadelphia." The Dioscuri are also found on the imperial coinage of Caligula. In addition, since the magistrate named on the reverse is a priest, religious symbolism would be appropriate. The facial features of the reverse busts do, however, resemble members of the family of Caligula. Perhaps the they are Nero and Drusus Caesars as the brothers Castor and Pollux.
-FORVM ANCIENT COINS
ancientone
philidelphiadokimos.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia. Pseudo-autonomus AE22. Magistrate DOKIMOS91 viewsTyche bust right. Dionysos standing left, holding cantharus and thyrsus; panther at his feet. Time of Septimius Severus.

PRO: LYDIA
PO : PHILADELPHEIA
PZ : Between 193 and 211
BNG: DOKIMOY
BTG: A
Obverse
VSG: P'ILADELP'IA
VT : HEAD WOMAN R / TYCHE
VA : TURRETED
Reverse
RSG: EPI DOKIMOY A
RT : MAN STANDING HL(1) / DIONYSOS(1) / ANIMAL LE / PANTHER
RA : NUDE / KANTHAROS(1) / THYRSOS(1)
Technical details
M : AE
GR : 21.59(1)
Bibliographical references
ZIT: BMC 16 S192,33(1)
Additional remarks
FR : VS: P'ILADELP'IA RS: EPI DOKIMOY A
ancientone
philadelphia.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia. AE14. Dionysos/Thyrsus29 views1st century BC. AE14. Wreathed head of young Dionysos right / ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛ-ΦΕΩΝ , thyrsos. VF. SNG Cop. 341, BMC 17ancientone
philadelphia.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia. Circa 3rd-2nd Century BC. Æ 17mm 36 views(4.26 gm)
Macedonian shield
FILADEL-FION, thunderbolt within wreath. Monogram above.
SNG Copenhagen 343. VF, glossy black patina.
CGPCGP
PhiladelphiaStag2.jpg
Lydia, Philadelphia. Pseudo-autonomous AE18 49 views
Obv: CYNKL-HTOC Young male bust of Senate r., draped.
Rev: FILADE-LFEW Stag standing r.
BMC 28 var. or SNG Aulock 3063 var.
ancientone
403_Greek.jpg
LYDIA. Philadelphia. Ae (Early-mid 2nd century BC). 8 viewsReference.
SNG von Aulock 3061 var. (monogram); SNG Copenhagen 348-50 var. (same); BMC 5-7 var. (same).

Obv:
Head of Zeus right, wearing taenia.

Rev: ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΕΩΝ.
Kithara; monogram above; all within wreath.

5.39 gr.
19 mm.
okidoki
GRK_Macedonian_Kingdom_Philip_II_Sear_6696-8.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II (359-336 B.C.)30 viewsSear 6696-6698 var.; SNG ANS 850-851.

AE unit, 6.25 g., 18.16 min. max., 0°

Obv.: Diademed head of Apollo right.

Rev.: Youth on horseback riding right, ΦIΛIΠΠOY above, spearhead below.

The obverse features the head of Apollo, who became the tutelary deity of Philip in 353 B.C. during the Third Sacred War. Vowing he would fight on behalf of the god, whose sacred Treasury at Delphi had been stolen, precipitating the conflict, he used the war as an opportunity to expand his control in Greece. The rider on the reverse, similar to the reverse of his tetradrachms, ostensibly extols his victory in the horse race at the Olympic Games in 356 B.C. However, the reverse also recalls the earlier Macedonian royal types, possibly an attempt to emphasize his Macedonian ancestry.
2 commentsStkp
GRK_Macedonian_Kingdom_Philip_II_Sear_6697-9_rider_left.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom. Philip II (359-336 B.C.)27 viewsSear 6697-6699 var.; SNG ANS 841 ff., SNG Copenhagen 581 ff.

AE unit, uncertain Macedonian mint, 7.12 g., 16.45 min. max., 0°

Obv.: Diademed head of Apollo right.

Rev.: Youth on horseback riding left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY above, symbol below.

The obverse features the head of Apollo, who became the tutelary deity of Philip in 353 B.C. during the Third Sacred War. Vowing he would fight on behalf of the god, whose sacred treasury at Delphi had been stolen, precipitating the conflict, he used the war as an opportunity to expand his control in Greece. The rider on the reverse, similar to the reverse of his tetradrachms, ostensibly extols his victory in the horse race at the Olympic Games in 356 B.C. However, the reverse also recalls the earlier Macedonian royal types, possibly an attempt to emphasize his Macedonian ancestry.
2 commentsStkp
Alex.JPG
MACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC)11 viewsMACEDONIAN KINGDOM. Alexander III the Great (336-323 BC). AR tetradrachm (27mm, 16.92 gm, 3h). NGC Choice XF 5/5 - 4/5. Early posthumous issue of Tyre, under Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, dated Regnal Year 35 of Azemilkos (315/4 BC). Head of Heracles right, wearing lion skin headdress, paws tied before neck / AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left on backless throne, right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, scepter in left; ?O (Phoenician for Azemilkos) to right of ||||| - // (date) in left field. Price 3291 (Ake).

For the reattribution of the Alexander series of Ake (Price) to Tyre, see A. Lemaire, "Le monnayage de Tyr et celui dit d'Akko dans la deuxième moitié du IV siècle avant J.-C.," RN 1976, and G. Le Rider, Alexander the Great: Coinage, Finances, and Policy (Philadelphia: American Philosophical Society, 2007), pp. 125-34.
Mark R1
08_Martin_Van_Buren_Peace_Medal.jpg
Martin Van Buren, 1837 Indian Peace Medal23 viewsObv: MARTIN VAN BUREN, PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Martin Van Buren (8th President) facing right, A.D. 1837 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Mortiz Furst (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1837 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
Metapontum_Diobol.JPG
Metapontum, Lucania37 views470-440 BC
AR Diobol (11mm, 0.82g).
O: Ear of barley with six grains.
R: Incuse barley grain; annulet to left.
Noe 304; HN Italy 1488 
ex Agora Auctions; ex Artifact Man

Metapontum was located on the Gulf of Taras between the rivers Bradanus and Casuentus.
This ideal location, lying on a richly fertile plain, would provide the Metapontines with the abundant grain harvests from which they became both wealthy and influential. By the fifth century Metapontum had grown so prosperous that she paid an annual tribute to Delphi in the form of a "golden harvest" (Strabo), thought to be a sheaf of grain fashioned from gold.
1 commentsEnodia
Millard_Fillmore_Peace_Medal.JPG
Millard Fillmore, 1850 Indian Peace Medal26 viewsObv: MILLARD FILLMORE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, bust of Millard Fillmore (13th President) facing right, 1850 below.

Rev: A settler and a Native American standing, facing each other before an American flag; "LABOR," "VIRTUE," and "HONOR" inscribed above within three oval-shaped links of chain-like scroll; field landscape in background.

Engravers: Salathiel Ellis (obverse), Joseph Willson (reverse).

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1850 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
0057.jpg
Mn. Cordius Rufus, denarius13 viewsRRC 463/3
46 b.c.

Venus on obverse showing the attachment of the moneyer to the Ceasareans just as on the reverse of the 'jugate Dioscury' type he issued in parallel. Reverse with a cupid on a dolphin as a common attribute of Venus.

Ex HD Rauch 89, LOT 1333, 5-8.12.2011
described as:
Mn. Cordius Rufus
Denarius (3,76g), Roma, 46 v.Chr. Av.: RVFVS S-C, Kopf der Venus mit Diadem n.r. Rv.: MN CORDIVS (teilweise in Ligatur), Cupido auf Delphin n.r. -- Prägeschwächen. Cr 463 3, Albert 1430. s.sch.-vzgl.
Norbert
5_cents_USA_1867_.jpg
MODERN MILLED (up to 19th Century), USA, 1867, Five Cents27 views- 5 Cents USA bouclier variété sans rayons entre les étoiles 1867 Philadelphiebgaut
DSC00337_DSC00343_US_1889__1_Morgan.JPG
Morgan Dollar - 188927 viewsUS Morgan Dollar, 1889 Philadelphia Mint.
~~~~~~

This one was given to my father by a neighbor when he was a young boy growing up, he gave it to me for my Birthday this year. My first and only Morgan Dollar in my collection. I have never been a big fan of them, always preferred Peace Dollars.
~
~~
~
*NOTE: The fingerprint on the reverse seems to have been made a long time ago, it also seems to have become part of the toning, and won't just come off with a wipe, unless one were to clean the coin with some solution I imagine, which I would never do to such a coin..... The print was probably made back, long before my father recieved these coins in the 1950s..... since they have sat in a safe deposit box since then.
~~
~
2 commentsrexesq
DSC00345_US_1889__1_Morgan_r_cut-eagle.JPG
Morgan Dollar - 1889 - cut.5 viewsUS Morgan Dollar, 1889 Philadelphia Mint.
~~~~~~

This one was given to my father by a neighbor when he was a young boy growing up, he gave it to me for my Birthday this year. My first and only Morgan Dollar in my collection. I have never been a big fan of them, always preferred Peace Dollars.
~~~
~
rexesq
crepereiaIIII.jpg
Neptune and Amphytrite151 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphytrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.

Amphytrite daughter of Nereid and Doris was courted by Neptune. But she fled from his advances to Atlas, at the farthest ends of the sea. There the dolphin of Neptune sought her through the islands of the sea, and finding her, spoke persuasively on behalf of Poseidon. As Hyginus writes he was rewarded by being placed among the stars as the constellation Delphinus.












1 commentsbenito
Nero_Tet_3.jpg
Nero8 viewsNero
BI Tetradrachm, 54-68 A.D.
Egypt, Alexandria,
Radiate bust of Nero / Bust of Apollo Pythius, commemorating Nero's participation in the Phythian Games at Delphi.
Milne 272
Sosius
netherlands-indies_1941-P_1-4th-gulden_02_obv_02_rev_02.JPG
Netherlands East Indies 1941 - P - Silver 1/4 Gulden31 viewsDutch East Indies
Silver One Quarter of a Gulden
1941 - P - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the USA during the Second World War.
---
-
4 commentsrexesq
netherlands-indies_1942-P_1-cent_obv_03_rev_01_95%.JPG
Netherlands East Indies 1942 - P - One Cent16 viewsDutch East Indies
One Cent
1942 - P - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the USA during the Second World War.
---
-
rexesq
netherlands-indies_1942-P_1-cent_rev_04.JPG
Netherlands East Indies 1942 - P - One Cent.9 viewsDutch East Indies
One Cent
1942 - P - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the USA during the Second World War.
---
-
rexesq
netherlands-indies_1945-P_1-cent_unc_rev_03.JPG
Netherlands East Indies 1945 - P - One Cent.9 viewsDutch East Indies
One Cent
1945 - P - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the USA during the Second World War.
---
-
*High Grade example.
~~~
~
rexesq
netherlands-indies_1945-P_1-cent_unc_obv_02_rev_02.JPG
Netherlands East Indies 1945 - P - One Cent.17 viewsDutch East Indies
One Cent
1945 - P - Struck at the Philadelphia Mint in the USA during the Second World War.
---
-
*High Grade example.
~~~
~
2 commentsrexesq
peace-dollar_1925_obv_03_rev_03_cut.JPG
Peace Dollar - 192543 viewsUS 1925 Peace Dollar, Philadelphia Mint.
3 commentsrexesq
coins70.JPG
Pergamon, Mysia33 viewsPergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, 39°7′N 27°11′E) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, northwestern Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea, located on a promontory on the north side of the river Caicus (modern day Bakırçay), that became an important kingdom during the Hellenistic period, under the Attalid dynasty, 282-129 BC. G34

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. The Great Altar of Pergamon is in the Pergamon Museum of Berlin.

Pergamon had the second best library in the ancient Greek civilisation, after Alexandria. When the Ptolemies stopped exporting papyrus, partly because of competitors and partly because of shortages, the Pergamenes invented a new substance to use in codices, called pergaminus or parchment after the city. This was made of fine calf skin, a predecessor of vellum.

When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

Close to the city was a sanctuary of Asclepius, the god of healing. In this place people with health problems could bath in the water of the sacred spring, and in the patients' dreams Asklepios would appear in a vision to tell them how to cure their illness. Archeology has found lots of gifts and dedications that people would make afterwards, such as small terracotta body parts, no doubt representing what had been healed.

In the first century AD, the Christian Church at Pergamon was one of the Seven Churches to which the Book of Revelation was addressed (Revelation 1:11, NRSV).

Pergamon, Mysia, struck by Philetairos, 282-263 BC.
Obv: head of athena wearing attic helmet right.
Rev: FILETAIROU, Asklepios seated left, feeding snake from patera.
SNG BN 1643 ff.

ecoli
1415_Philadelphia,_Cilicia2.jpg
Philadelphia (Cilicia) - AE3 viewsc. 98-117 AD
bust of Minerva or Athena right wearing crested helmet
ΦΙΛΑΔЄΛ_ΦEωΝ
horizontal branch with two grapes
KIH_TωN
RPC III, 3214; SNG Levante 574; SNG Pfalz 998; Lindgren & Kovacs A1571A

ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
1310_Philadelphia.JPG
Philadelphia - AE6 viewsHermippos magistrate
2nd - 1st century BC
Macedonian shield (4 symetry)
winged thunderbolt, all within laurel wreath
EPMIΠ / ΠΩΣ / ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛ // ΦΕΩΝ
SNG Copenhagen 342; BMC 187.1-4var (Magistrat), Imhoof-Blumer, Lydien 9var (Rv.-Leg.), SNG von Aulock 3060; SNG München 396-397
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
philadelphia_claudius.jpg
philadelphia claudius3 viewsClaudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Philadelphia, Lydia. Bronze AE 19, RPC I 3034, aF, Philadelphia mint, 4.680g, 19.0mm, 0o, obverse T KLAUDIOS GERMANIKOS KAISAR, laureate head right; reverse FILADELFELFEWN NEOKAISAREWN EIDEMENEUS, bunch of ears of grain. ex FORVMPodiceps
016~3.JPG
Philadelphia, Lydia35 views159-133 B.C.
Bronze Æ16
4.84 gm, 16 mm
Obv.: Macedonian shield
Rev.: ΦIΛAΔEΛ/ΦEΩN above and below thunderbolt, monogram above, all within olive wreath
BMC Lydia, p.187, 1, 2; Sear 4723; cf SNG Von Aulock 3060.
Jaimelai
001~2.JPG
Philadelphia, Lydia86 views159-133 B.C.
Bronze Æ16
4.84 gm, 16 mm
Obv.: Macedonian shield
Rev.: ΦIΛAΔEΛ/ΦEΩN above and below thunderbolt, monogram above, all within olive wreath
BMC Lydia, p.187, 1, 2; Sear 4723; cf SNG Von Aulock 3060.

Another view
2 commentsJaimelai
Trajan_Philadelphia,_Lydia,_Artemis.jpg
Philadelphia, Lydia9 viewsObv: Trajan r.
Rev: Artemis

3.89g, 18mm
klausklage
Plotina_Philadelphia_Lydien.JPG
Philadelphia, Lydia4 viewsObv: CEBACTH ΠΛΩTEINA
Draped bust right
Rev: ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN within wreath

SNG Copenhagen 382

2.14g, 17mm
klausklage
Philadelphia_bronze.jpg
Philadelphia, Lydia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.46 viewsBronze AE 18, SNG Cop 350; SGCV II 4719 var, VF, Philadelphia mint, weight 6.332g, maximum diameter 17.2mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of Zeus right; reverse FILADELFEWN, lyre (kithara), monogram above, all within wreath

Ex Forum
1 commentsPhiloromaos
82949q00.jpg
Philadelphia, Lydia, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.39 viewsBronze AE 19, Imhoof--Blumer 2-3 var (monogram); Weber 6878 var (same); BMC p. 188, 13-15 var (w/Archiereos name, no monogram); SNG Cop 339 var (same); SNG VA -, VF, Philadelphia mint, weight 7.613g, maximum diameter 20.5mm, die axis 0o, obverse draped bust of Artemis right wearing chiton and stephane, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse FILADELFEWN ERMIPPOS ARCIEREUS, Apollo standing right, clad in chiton, plectrum in left, lyre (kithara) in right, monogram lower right; rare variety;Philoromaos
1421.jpg
philadelphia0001a2 viewsSemi-autonomous AD 198-268 (Includes time of Elagabalus)
Philadelphia, Lydia

Obv: ΔHMOC, unbearded bust of Demos right, hair bound in a taenia, slight drapery on left shoulder.
Rev: [ΦΛ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦ-E]ΩN →NEΩKOΡ/Ω, N above, lion walking right.
23 mm, 6.99 gms

BMC 41; Weber 6883; Mionnet IV 547, Kurth, Demos 396.
Charles M
1521.jpg
philaspijk0466 viewsElagabalus
Philadelphia

Obv: ...CAP ANTWNIN, Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front.
Rev: Chariot with domed canopy supported by four pillars, drawn right by four horses..
20 mm, 6.31 gms

Spijkerman 46
Charles M
1533c.jpg
philaspijk046_212 viewsElagabalus
Philadelphia

Obv: Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from front.
Rev: … →..., Chariot with domed canopy supported by four pillars, drawn right by four horses..
22 mm, 8.55 gms

Spijkerman 46
Charles M
522c.jpg
philaspijk0474 viewsElagabalus
Philadelphia

Obv: Laureate head right.
Rev: Bust of goddess, Asteria, veiled and draped, cruciform star on top of head.
14 mm, 2.3 gms

Spijkerman 47
Charles M
1746c.jpg
philaspijk047_21 viewsElagabalus
Philadelphia

Obv: ...NINO... Laureate head right.
Rev: ΦIΛA KOIC VPIAC, Bust of goddess, Asteria, veiled and draped, cruciform star on top of head.
14 mm, 2.70 gms

Spijkerman 47
Charles M
BCD_Phokis_295_2_this_coin.jpg
Phokis, Federal Coinage, 354-352 BC, AR Triobol - struck under Onymarchos24 viewsFrontal bull's head.
Laureate head of Apollo right, lyre behind, Φ – Ω below.

BCD Lokris/Phokis 295.2 (this coin); Williams - (O-/R216).

(14 mm, 2.75 g, 11h).
ex- BCD Collection: NAC 55 (8 October 2010) Lot 295.2.

The district of Phokis was centered on the ancient city of Delphi and its sacred precinct. This coin was struck from the silver appropriated from the Delphic Apollo Temple treasury by the Phokians during the Third Sacred War (356-346 BC). The sacred precinct at Delphi was seized by the Phokians and fortified at the start of the war. It is probable Onymarchos, the Phokian strategos of the time, struck this coinage within the sacred precinct and used it to pay for the ongoing war effort. Coins of this type are relatively rare despite the massive minting to fund the war effort. This results from to the fact that at war’s end the Lokrians collected all the Phokian coinage then in circulation and melted it down to make a massive silver hydria which was dedicated to Apollo at Delphi.
1 commentsn.igma
Ptolemy_II_Philadelphos~0.JPG
Ptolomy II Philadelphios24 viewsPtolemy II, ca. 2285-246 BC, diobol, Philadelphos, AE 29, 16.46 grams - type with Laureate Zeus and open-wing eagle with SIGMA over Galatian Shield to left of the eagle. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.Romanorvm
Bizantion.jpg
RIECHISCHE MÜNZEN. THRAKIEN, BYZANTION. AR Hemidrachme, ca. 416-357 10 viewsVs: ΠΥ, Stier mit erhobenem rechten Vorderhuf nach links auf Delphin stehend.
Rs: Viergeteiltes, windmühlenförmiges incusum
2,28 gr 14 mm. Vgl. SNG BM 36 ff. _2853
Antonivs Protti
TitusRaven~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Titus Denarius RIC 131111 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
Roman_Lead_Seal_03.jpg
Roman_Lead_Seal_0316 views22-31 mm / 18,75 g

Front:
Laureate head right seen from behind (?) facing laureate and draped bust (or female head wearing stephane) left seen from behind, two more facing heads below each of the large heads, delphin in the center of the field

Back:
Hump with belt holes at both sides
Andicz
RPC_II_1331_Domitianus_(2).jpg
RPC II 1331 Domitianus41 viewsObv: ΔOMITIAN KAICAP, Draped and cuirrassed bust with bare head right
Rev: ΦΛABI ΦIΛAΔEΛΦEΩN, Apollon standing right, holding plectrum and lyre
AE15 (15.02 mm 2.274 g 12h) Struck in Flavia Philadelphia (Lydia) during the reign of Vespasian
RPC II 1310
ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 48 lot 379
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RPC_II_1336_Domitia.jpg
RPC II 1336 Domitia24 viewsObv: ΔOMITIA AYΓOYCTA, Draped bust right
Rev: EΠI ΛAΓET ΦIΛAΔEΛΦE, Bunch of grapes
AE16 (16.06 mm 3.36 g 6h) Struck in Flavia Philadelphia (Lydia)
RPC 1336, BMC 65
FlaviusDomitianus
19_Hayes_Indian_Peace_Medal.JPG
Rutherford B. Hayes Indian Peace Medal26 viewsObv: RUTHERFORD B. HAYES - PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, Bust of President Hayes (19th President) facing left.

Rev: PEACE within a sunburst, above; scene of a farmer showing a Native American chief the benefit of civilization; in exergue: crossed peace pipe and tomahawk, encircled by laurel wreath.

Engraver: George Morgan

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: circa 1877 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 59 x 76 mm
Matt Inglima
olbia_Dittrich_83.jpg
Sarmatia, Olbia, Dittrich 837 viewsOlbia, 3rd-2nd century BC
AE 13, 2.19g, 12.76mm, 0°
obv. OL - BI
Tripod between
rev. Dolphin r., on each side a cap of the Dioscuri, 8-pointed star above
ref. Dittrich 83; Burachkov VI, 100, 101; AMNG I/1, pl. X, 31 (pic only)
very rare, F+, yellow brown patina
Pedigree:
ex Münzen-Ritter

Tripod and Dolphin are attributes of Apollo, probably Apollo Delphinios. And probably a temple for the Dioscuri, guardians of the sailors, has stood in Olbia too, as many finds of votive offerings are pointing out.

Jochen
coin652.jpg
Sear GCTV Vol.2 #6929 Pag.646 - SNG Spaer #51817 viewsBust of Artemis
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY" - Apollo seated
left on omphalos (center semicylindrical Stone
cult of Apollo at Delphi, fetish basalt altar
Mother Earth Mycenaean religion) with arrow
right hand raised and left in a supporting
arc. "CE / Λ" in left field and "AP"
(Monogram) in exergo.Ceca: Antioch on the Orontes
References: B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria)
# 8 p.22 - Sear GCTV Pag.646 Vol.2 # 6929
cars100
ZomboDroid_16092019092908.jpg
SELEUKID KINGDOM. Seleukos IV Philopator AR Tetradrachm; 28mm // 15,69g. Antioch on the Orontes, circa 187-175 BC.5 viewsObv.Diademed head right.
Rev.Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, holding arrow and resting hand on bow; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ to left, filleted palm branch in outer left field, Φ in exergue.
Ref.SC 1313.6b.
Canaan
greek82.jpg
Seleukid Kings of Syria, Antiochos II AR Tetradrachm34 viewsSeleukeia on the Tigris mint. 261-246 BC.
Obv.: Diademed head of Antiochos I right.
Rev.: Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, testing arrow and resting hand on bow; monograms to outer left and right.
SC 587.4a; HGC 9, 236g.
3 commentsMinos
10900241.jpg
Seleukos II16 viewsSeleukos II Kallinikos. 246-225 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 16.90 g, 9h). Uncertain Mint 44, probably in Mesopotamia. Diademed head right / Apollo Delphios, testing arrow, standing left, leaning on tripod to right; ΔI-in-circle to outer left. SC C742.5 (this coin illustrated); HGC 9, 303dd. Good VF, die rust on obverse, slight die shift on reverse. Rare.

From the MNL Collection. Ex Freeman & Sear inventory G4049 (March 2011); “Seleucus III” Hoard (CH X, 272).

Ex CNG 109, lot 241
arash p
4330109.jpg
Seleukos III26 viewsSELEUKID EMPIRE. Seleukos III Soter (Keraunos). 225/4-222 BC. AR Tetradrachm (29mm, 16.79 g, 12h). Antioch on the Orontes mint. Diademed head right / Apollo Delphios seated left on omphalos, testing arrow, resting hand on bow; monograms to outer left and right. SC 921.1; Le Rider, Antioche 31-74 (obv. die A3); HGC 9, 414c. VF, toned, small edge chip, light deposits on reverse.

From the Collection of a Novelist. Ex Agora Auctions 63 (20 December 2016), lot 53.
ex CNG Auc 433 lot 109
2 commentsarash p
Septimius_Severus_Philadelphia.jpg
Septimius Severus - Philadelphia, Lydia11 views193-211 AD
laureate head right
AY·K_AI·CЄOYHP_OC
she-wolf right, head turned left, suckling Romulus and Remus
ΦIΛAΔEΛ
ΦEΩN
BMC 200.77.
5,7g
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
coins126.JPG
Severus Alexander 17 viewsSalus

Hygieia (Roman equivalent: Salus) was a daughter of Asclepius. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation (and later: the moon), and played an important part in her father's cult (see also: asklepieion). While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health.

Though Hygieia had been the subject of a local cult since at least the 7th century BC, she did not begin to spread out until the Oracle at Delphi recognized her, and after the devastating Athens plague in 429 and 427 BC and in Rome in 293 BC. Her primary temples were in Epidaurus, Corinth, Cos and Pergamon.

Pausanias remarked that, at the asclepieion of Titane in Sicyon (founded by Alexanor, Asclepius' grandson), statues of Hygieia were covered by women's hair and pieces of Babylonian clothes. According to inscriptions, the same sacrifices were offered at Paros.

Ariphron, a Sicyonian artist from the 4th century BC wrote a well-known hymn celebrating her. Statues of Hygieia were created by Scopas, Bryaxis and Timotheus, among others.

She was often depicted as a young woman feeding a large snake that was wrapped around her body. Sometimes the snake would be drinking from a jar that she carried. These attributes were later adopted by the Gallo-Roman healing goddess, Sirona.

Severus Alexander Denarius, RIC 14, RSC 218, BMC 33
222 AD. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right /P M TR P COS P P, Salus seated left, feeding snake arising from altar.

Base metal.
ecoli
phokis_greek_triobol.jpg
Silver triobol, Williams Phokians 198 (O144/R117)2 viewsPhocis was mainly pastoral. The twenty-two confederate Phocian towns held their periodic synedrion (assembly) in a building called Phokikon, near Daulis, and here, perhaps, rather than at any one of the Phocian towns, the federal mint may have been established. Money would be issued at this mint only on the occasions of the meetings of the synedrion, when it may be supposed that a concourse of people from all parts of the Phocian territory was gathered together, and that a fair or market was held for the exchange and purchase of commodities, as at Delphi during the Pythian festivals. The bull's head likely commemorates the sacrifice of a prize bull for the community on one of these occasions. Part was burned for the god, but eating the meat was a mandatory religious duty.

This coin was purchased from forvm and the description comes from forvm as well.
Justin W
Skythia_Borysthenes_Arrowhead_1.jpg
Skythia, Borysthenes.13 viewsSkythia, Borysthenes. c 500 BC. AE Arrowhead (5.35 gm). Anepigraphic. Arrowhead proto-coinage. Bilobate and axial spine. Green patina. / Proto-coinage of this type is known from the island of Borysthenes (Berezean) at the mouth of the Dnieper River and adjacent areas on the mainland. The arrowhead is associated with Apollo the Healer, the patron deity of Borysthenes, colonized by the Milesians in 7th c. BC. In the 5th c. BC, a competing colony was established at nearby Olbia, which soon absorbed them. Olbians worshipped Apollo Delphinos and minted the closely-related "dolphin money" in his honor. VF. Early cast coinage. cf. Sergei L. Solovyov, 'Monetary Circulation and the Political History of Archaic Borysthenes', Ancient Civilizations from Scythia to Siberia, Vol. 12, N. 1-2, 2006, p. 66, fig. 3. See CNG Triton XVI lot 12.Christian T
Seleucid_Kings,_Philp_I_Philadelphios.JPG
Sleukid Kings of Syria. Philip I Philadelphos15 viewsAR tetradrachm
27mm, 15.7 grams
Circa 95/4-76/5 B.C.
Laureate bust left 
Seated left on throne; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΦΙΛΙΠΠΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΣ
HGC 9, 1319.
JBGood
Spain- Taragona- Amphitheatre.jpg
Spain- Taragona- Amphitheatre46 viewsThis conventional seating may be observed at the amphitheatre at Tarragona in northern Spain. Tarraco, its Latin name, was the capital of the province of Hispania Tarraconensis. The seating is essentially the same as that found in Rome’s Colosseum. The amphitheatre’s construction is dated to the second century AD, a time of extensive building of centres of public entertainment throughout the Mediterranean. On the right side, the seating was hewn from the bedrock, while on the left, or seaward side, the seating was built up from blocks, a phenomenon also found at Syracuse in Sicily.

However, in a recent visit to Pompeii some interesting divergence from the norm is easily to be observed, for which no reason appears to have been voiced. The town of Pompeii, destroyed in the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in AD 79, had a population in excess of 10,000, and was clearly a place of sufficient wealth to

sport not only an amphitheatre seating 20,000, but also a traditional Greek theatre and a smaller building called the Odeon. The "large" theatre, as it is now called, can seat an audience of 5,000, the "small" theatre, which was roofed, had accommodation for 500. Seating was according to rank, it is supposed, two side boxes (rather like the royal boxes of later theatres) for honoured guests, an inner cavea for the decurions or magistrates of the town, the middle rows for the more wealthy members of the community, the upper tiers for the ordinary citizens. If one looks closely it is clearly noticeable that this inner cavea consists of the first four or five rows of benches.

It is clear that, unlike the earlier form of the Greek theatres, the front rows are considerably wider than those higher up in the auditorium. The size of the seating is far beyond the dimensions of even a large and well-endowed personage, extending inwards for a good metre or more. The reasons for the additional size are unclear, because the larger width does not make these benches any more comfortable for the sitter, if anything they provide less support than the more narrow benches above. Presumably, the spectators brought cushions with them for lengthy performances in much the same way as fans for rugby or cricket matches do today. One solution may be that the wider seating allowed the dignatory to relax by reclining as if at dinner though this can hardly have been a posture acceptable for a quasi-religious festival nor one which would have endeared these wealthy members of the community to their less well-endowed fellows higher up, even if conspicuous consumption was the order of the day, particularly during the Roman empire.

In the "large" theatre the first four rows, in the "small" theatre and in the amphitheatre the first five rows stand out from the rest and, in fact, have their special place denoted by a partition. In some of the theatres in Greece, the officials judging the competitions, which were part and parcel of the festivals, and high ranking citizens might occupy a special bench, or the first row of the auditorium, but the broad nature of the bench at Pompeii appears unique. Pompeii began as a Oscan settlement in the 8th century BC and was heavily Hellenised by the 6th century. Thereafter, Pompeii had a fairly chequered history, being conquered and lost by the Etruscans and Samnites, before becoming a Roman colony in 80 BC. The Samnites of the central hills and the more local Oscan speakers, an Italic dialect which survived down to the period of the empire, remained culturally and linguistically influential, and it is possible that the Greek practice of uniformity in seating was altered by these Italic tribes who, at times, controlled Pompeii. On the other hand, there could be direct Roman or even Etruscan influence, though this formalised partitioning of seating is not seen in any of the archeaological sites in Rome or in nearby Campania, for example at Puteoli or at Capua. Finally, as for what purpose the large widths were intended, without clear evidence, and certainly with no ancient mention, means that speculation takes over. It could be that wooden seats rather like thrones were brought in, even sedan chairs for the high and mighty of the town, though it is worth bearing in mind that high-backed chairs easily obscured the views of those scarcely less wealthy immediately behind. The Roman males, it will be remembered, tended to lounge on low couches when they ate, rather than sitting in upright seats, which became popular only in the later Byzantine period. It also seems likely that, given the amount of space, it was not just the men who were seated here but entire families - perhaps picnic baskets as well. Refreshments were provided during performances, but the wealthy possibly brought their own equivalents of the modern cool bags and six-packs. The illustrations of the three places of entertainment at Pompeii do not appear to suggest that these special seating are the product of modern reconstructions, some of which have proved disastrous to ancient sites; and, therefore, there seems to be no alternative to accepting at least the idea that preferential seating was the order of the day in this rather provincial town on the Bay of Naples. Etruscan tombs often show their owners in a reclining position as if at a meal, and other forms of entertainment also feature which, overall, might suggest an influence here from north of the River Tiber.

Having dwelt at length, as it were, with the bottoms and the bottom-most seats of the ancient theatres and amphitheatres I now want to move on to the general ambience of the structure. The Roman amphitheatre or hippodrome were dirty smelly places where, by the end of the day’s proceedings, the stench from the dead and dying must have made an abatoir a sweet-smelling location. It is recorded that sprinkler systems were used in the Colosseum to spray the audience and the arena floor with scented water to alleviate the foulness of the atmosphere. By way of contrast, the Greek theatre must have been a place of peace and serenity, except for sore buttocks and aching backs.

Many commentators of the ancient theatre have sadly noted that the early pristine form, as found today at Epidaurus and Segesta, generally underwent alterations during the Roman period. It is noted that the slightly more than a semi-circular design was largely filled in during later antiquity by the Roman scena; and today many examples of the traditional Greek theatres sport Roman brickwork at the front which reached the same height, in some cases, as the uppermost tier of the cavea or auditorium. This height also allowed for a velabrum or canvass cover to be used to provide shade or shelter from the elements. At Taormina, ancient Tauromenium, for example:

"The brick scenic wall was preceded by a row of nine granite columns crowned by Corinthian capitals, which had both a decorative and bearing function, in that they supported the higher parts of the stage. The niches in the wall contained marble statues. On the sides, there are remains of the ‘parascenia’, square rooms used by actors and for scenic fittings. The actors entered the stage through side openings. A further row of sixteen columns closer to the orchestra framed the decorative front of the stage."

This is quite a departure from the earlier simplicity of the Greek theatre. However, it is certainly arguable that Baroque is not necessarily less pleasing than Romanesque even if blocking out the natural view also took the theatre out of its topographical or geographical context. For the purists among us, more sacrilege occurred, for instance, again at Taormina, where the first nine rows of the seating were removed making the orchestra large enough for gladiatorial combats and beast hunts, while at the same time allowing the audience safety high above the blood sports taking place below them. Of course, the construction of a front wall can easily be accounted for by the changing tastes in the entertainment itself, while the local audience presumably knew the view pretty well, and did not come to the theatre to gaze at Mount Etna. Furthermore, Taormina, high up on a hill overlooking the sea, had no extra space on which to build a new amphitheatre, more regularly the venue for gladiatorial combats. And it is also quite possible that there were simply insufficient funds. Taormina was neither a large nor a wealthy city.

Meanwhile, at Delphi the scena was "low so that the audience could enjoy the wonderful view", says one expert. Nonetheless, while the modern tourist may find the view as gratifying if not more so than the ruined theatre, the ancient audience came too see and hear the performances in honour of the Pythian Apollo. The ancient Greeks did not come for the view, they came for theatrical, religious even mystic experience. It is the modern philistine in us who enjoys the view. That being the case, the construction of the ancient theatre had little to do with searching for a site with a nice aspect, though these obviously exist, even in abundance, but for acoustic perfection and adequate accommodation. Finally, the best seats were closest to the stage and its proceedings, while the worst seats, for looking at the productions, had the best views. Does this mean that the most wealthy, with the largest bottoms, were obliged to watch the entertainment with no chance of letting the mind wander to the natural surroundings? Or does it mean that the women, slaves and poorest citizens, who sat high above the productions, probably could not hear or see what was going on hence took in the nice view instead. Therein lies the morality tale embedded in the title of this paper. If you had the means you were forced to take in the culture. If you were female or poor you could let your mind wander to other matters, including wonderful views of nature.
John Schou
SyriaDecapolisPhiladelphiaAsteria.jpg
Syria, Decapolis, Philadelphia. Commodus AE22. Veiled bust of Asteria53 viewsObv: L AVP KOM MODOC KAIC. Draped and cuirassed bust of Commodus as Caesar.
Rev: ΦΙΛ Κ C V ΘΕΑΛΕΤΕΡΙ. Asteria r., draped and veiled with star on top of head.
20mm, 8.6g.
Spijkerman 32. rare

Asteria was the mother goddess of the Tyrian Herakles(Melkart) and both had a special cult in Rabbat Amman(Philadelphia).
ancientone
ZomboDroid_07102019230518.jpg
Syria, Decapolis. Philadelphia. Domitian. A.D. 81-96.CY 143 (A.D. 80/1).2 viewsObv. Laureate head of Domitian right;
Rev. c/m: head of Herakles right within circular incuse / Veiled and draped bust of Tyche right; behind, date ([L ΓMP)]. References: Spijkerman 10a; Rosenberger 9; RPC 2107, Howgego 17. F
26mm
Canaan
philadelphia_commodus_spijkerman32.jpg
Syria, Dekapolis, Philadelphia, Commodus, Spijkerman 3253 viewsCommodus, AD 177-192
AE 22, 7.52g
obv. L AVR KOM - MODOC KAIC
bust, draped and cuirassed, bare head, r.
rev. FIL K CV - THEA ACTERIA
Bust of Asteria, veiled and draped, r.; star above
Spijkerman 32
rare, about VF

FIL K CV is the abbreviation of FILADELFEWN KOILHC SVRIAC, Philadelphia Coele-Syria.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
1 commentsJochen
philadelphia_elagabal_SNGlev1401.jpg
Syria, Dekapolis, Philadelphia, Elagabal, SNG Levante 14019 viewsElagabal, AD 218-222
AE 16, 3.03g, 180°
obv. AV KECA[R] ANTWNIN
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. FIL [KOI] CVR
Bust of Asteria, veiled, draped, r.
ref. SNG Levante 1401; SGI 3138
F
Jochen
EmesaPythianElagabalus.jpg
Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Emesa. Elagabalus AE22. Pythian games issue.48 viewsObv: AVT K M A ANTWNINOC (or similar), radiate head right.
Rev: MHTPO K EMICWN PYQIA HLIA, prize urn on table between two palm branches.

The Pythian Games (Delphic Games) were one of the four Panhellenic Games of Ancient Greece, a forerunner of the modern Olympic Games, held every four years at the sanctuary of Apollo at Delphi. They were held in honour of Apollo two years after (and two years before) each Olympic Games, and between each Nemean and Isthmian Games. They were founded sometime in the 6th century BCE, and, unlike the Olympic Games, also featured competitions for art and dance. The art and dance competitions pre-dated the athletic portion of the games, and were said to have been started by Apollo after he killed Python and set up the oracle at Delphi. Otherwise, the athletic events were the same as the Olympic Games. A four-horse chariot race was held in a hippodrome in the plain, not far from the sea, in the place where the original stadium was sited. -Wikipedia
ancientone
T_Quinctius_Flamininus.jpg
T. Quinctius Flamininus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²129
¹126 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet, flamen's cap left
(XVI)
Dioscuri right riding on horses, stars over pilei, each holding spear and reins; Macedonian shield below
T_Q
ROMA
¹Crawford 267/1; Sydenham 505, SRCV I 143, RSC I Quinctia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Roma Numismatics

Macedonian shield commemorates moneyer's ancestor T. Quinctius Flamininus who had founded town Venusia and became consul 198 BC. Victory over Macedonian king Philip V in the battle of Cynoscephalae 198 BC brought him the triumph and name Macedonicus. Before the battle he promised sacrifices to Dioscuri in Delphi this is the reason for their depiction on reverse which is scarce in these times.
Johny SYSEL
Taras_didrachm.jpg
Taras didrachm77 viewsHorseman riding left, holding shield and bridle.

Taras seated on dolphin left TAPAΣ beneath.

Tarentum, Calabria 390-385 BC

7.40g

Scarce

Vlasto 384, Period III, 380-345 BC (Age of Archytas); ; Fischer-Bossert 428, gives date of 390-380 and corresponds to SNG ANS 901.

Ex-Calgary Coin; Ex-Alberta Coin;

Tarentum, the only Spartan colony ever to be established, was founded in 706 BC by the Partheniae - Spartan children born to unmarried women as a product of Spartan desperation to ensure the survival and continuation of their demographic during the bloody Messenian wars, who were later disowned and expelled by the state - and Perioeci (subjects, but not citizens of Sparta), under the leadership of the Parthenian Phalanthos. According to legend, Phalanthos consulted the oracle at Delphi, and was told that he should found his new city 'where rain fell from a clear sky'. After much searching, and despairing of finding a suitable location for a city, Phalanthos was consoled by his wife Aethra who laid his head in her lap, and as her tears splashed upon his forehead he understood the oracle's words for his wife's name itself meant 'clear sky', and thus he determined to make the nearby harbour the site of their new home, which they named after Taras, the son of Poseidon and the nymph Satyrion.
4 commentsJay GT4
Vlasto_545.JPG
Taras, Calabria56 views344-334 BC (Period IV)
AR Didrachm (20mm, 7.54g)
Signed by the Kal... engraver. 
O: Nude horseman right, wearing shield on left arm and holding two spears in left hand, preparing to thrust third spear held in right hand; |- behind, Δ before, ΚΑΛ and Δ below.
R: Phalanthos astride dolphin right, holding crested helmet; stars flanking, ΤΑΡΑΣ to left, ΚΑΛ below.
Vlasto 545; Cote 215; McGill II, 41; Evans IV, H3; HN Italy 896; SNG ANS 971; Sear 345
ex Monarch Beach

Archidamos III reigned as King of Sparta from 360 BC until his death in 338. Summoned by the Tarentines to assist them in the first Lucanian war, he lead a mercenary army to Manduria in Calabria, where he fell in battle against the combined forces of the Messapians and Lucanians.
The historian Diodorus suggests that the death of Archidamos and the massacre of his army was divine vengeance for his plundering of the Temple of Apollo at Delphi.

The 4th century artist known to us only as the KAL engraver was arguably the finest die engraver in Magna Graecia. Specializing in common everyday scenes and eschewing the more aristocratic themes, his work had a certain elegance and sensitivity rarely seen in numismatic art.
The dolphin rider on this coin is bowing his head slightly and looking very pensively at the helmet in his hands. Is Phalanthos mourning for King Archidamos here? Sir Arthur Evans thought so, and the two stars on this reverse (one off flan), representing the Dioskouri and therefore Sparta the Mother City, lends credence to this idea. If so, then no other engraver could have captured this moment and this emotion quite like KAL…
1 commentsEnodia
Taras_Diobol.jpg
Tarentum Diobol -- 4th Century BC19 views1.11 g, __ mm, 150°
Minted at Tarentum
Silver Diobol
SNG Copenhagen 973ff

Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena Left.
Reverse: Herakles Strangling Nemean Lion; First Labor.

Tarentum, a city in Southern Italy, began as the Greek colony of Taras circa 706 BC. It was the only colony founded by the Lacedaemons. Taros was founded by Partheniae (Sons of Virgins), bastard sons of unmarried Spartan women and Perioeci (free men, but not citizens of Sparta) and named after the son of Poseidon, Taras. Other legends claim that either Taras himself or Herakles founded the city, both of whom are represented on much of the city's coinage. Taras won its first two wars against Rome for control of Southern Italy, but was conquered in 272 BC. The reverse of this coin shows Herakles strangling the Nemean Lion. According to legend, Hera drove Herakles mad, causing him to kill his wife and six sons before he regained his sanity. Seeking to atone, he visited the Oracle of Delphi, Pythoness, who told him that he must serve King Eurystheus of Tiryns for 12 years before being forgiven and gaining immortality. King Eurystheus ordered Herakles to perform 10 labors, but refused to count 2 of them because Herakles had help, leading to the 12 total mythical Labors of Herakles. The first of these was the slaying of a lion impervious to mortal weapons which was terrorizing the polis of Nemea. Herakles solved this feat by strangling it to death with his bare hands.
Hydro
Tetropolis_of_Seleucia_and_Pieria.jpg
Tetropolis of Seleucis and Pieria 147/6 B.C.9 viewsTetropolis of Seleucis and Pieria 147/6 B.C. Ae 20.5~21.6mm. 7.31g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ - ΔΗΜΩΝ above/below winged thunderbolt, monograms BHA above and BHY below, date ΕΞΡ in field above. (Seleucid year 165 = 147/6 B.C.), all contained within a laurel wreath.
The four sister cities of Antioch, Selucia, Apameia and Laodicia, all founded by Seleucus I, constituted at a later period a semi-autonomous tetropolis, which for the space of about 20 years, from the reign of Alexander Balas to that of Antiochus VII, struck Federal bronze coins under the name Adelphi Demi (ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ ΔΗΜΩΝ ).
ddwau
Seleucis_Pieria.jpg
Tetropolis of Seleucis and Pieria 148 B.C.6 viewsSeleucis and Pieria 148 B.C. Ae 17mm. 4.32g. Obv: Laureate head of Artemis right, quiver behind. Rev: ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ - ΔΗΜΩΝ either side of tripod, monograms left and right, date ΕΞΡ in ex. (Seleucid year 165 = 148 B.C.), all contained within a laurel wreath.
The four sister cities of Antioch, Selucia, Apameia and Laodicia, all founded by Seleucus I, constituted at a later period a semi-autonomous tetrapolis, which for the space of about 20 years, from the reign of Alexander Bala to that of Antiochus VII, struck Federal bronze coins under the name Adelphi Demi (ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ ΔΗΜΩΝ ). The several towns of the district called Seleucis and Pieria also issued autonomous bronze coins from the same period (B.C. 149) down to Imperial times, and Imperial money down to a late age.
ddwau
Seleucis_Pieria~0.jpg
Tetropolis of Seleucis and Pieria 148 B.C.11 viewsTetropolis of Seleucis and Pieria 148 B.C. Ae 20.3~21.8mm. 7.78g. Obv: Laureate head of Zeus right. Rev: ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ - ΔΗΜΩΝ either side of winged thunderbolt, monograms left and right, date ΕΞΡ in right field, above. (Seleucid year 165 = 148 B.C.), all contained within a laurel wreath.
The four sister cities of Antioch, Selucia, Apameia and Laodicia, all founded by Seleucus I, constituted at a later period a semi-autonomous tetrapolis, which for the space of about 20 years, from the reign of Alexander Bala to that of Antiochus VII, struck Federal bronze coins under the name Adelphi Demi (ΑΔΕΛΦΩΝ ΔΗΜΩΝ ).
ddwau
Trachy.jpg
Theodore Mancaphas, 1188-1189. Trachy120 viewsChrist standing on dais, IC - XC / Theodore standing facing, holding patriarchal cross-scepter transversely with both hands.
Philadelphia, 1188-1189.
26.7-29.0 mm, 4.2 g.
A. Urs Sommer 64.1
2 commentsPekka K
Usurper_Theodore_Mancaphas_(“the_Crazed”)_lg.jpg
Theodore Mancaphas. Usurper in Philadelphia, circa 1188-1189 and circa 1204-120621 viewsTheodore Mancaphas. Usurper in Philadelphia, circa 1188-1189 and circa 1204-1206. BI Aspron Trachy (27mm, 3.96 g, 6h). Christ Pantokrator standing facing on daïs; [monograms] flanking / Theodore standing facing, holding patriarchal cross. DOC 2; Bendall & Morrisson pl. XXV, 2; SB –. Good Fine, brown patina. Rare.

From CNG
The coinage of Theodore Mancaphas was first published in 1967 – although unattributed – and has been assigned to various rulers by some (see DOC pp. 393-395 for alternative attributions and Philip Grierson’s sound rejection of them). Indeed, we are explicitly told by the contemporary historian Nicetas Choniates that Mancaphas struck coinage with his name and image (although he states, surely incorrectly, in silver – with only electrum and highly debased billon issues surviving today).

The reverse legend, particularly clear on the current specimen, can be expanded to Θεόδωρος Βασιλευς Μαγκαφας. The use of basileus in place of despotes is remarkable for the time. Mancaphas (from the Turkish mankafa [“crazed”] was the (unflattering) family name of Theodore, one that his opponents whom were aware of the meaning must have found to be entirely appropriate!
Sosius
mankaphas.jpg
Theodore Mankaphas (mint of Philadelphia)60 views1188-1189
trachy 34
5,68 g
DOC 2, Joppich 7.1 R5
1 commentsantvwala
GRK_Thessalian_League_Sear_2237.jpg
Thessaly. Thessalian League7 viewsSear 2237; Rogers 4-42 var. (unlisted magistrate's symbol).

AE trichalkon, 7.99 g., 21.85 mm. max., 270°

Struck 196 - 27 B.C., probably in Larisa.

Obv.: Laureate head of Apollo right.

Rev: Athena Itonia striding right, hurling spear held in her right hand, shield on her left arm, ΘEΣΣA -- ΛΩN flanking, uncertain magistrate's symbol to near right.

The Thessalian League was a loose confederacy of city-states and tribes in the Thessalian valley in northern Greece. Philip II of Macedon took control of Thessaly in 344 B.C. After the Second Macedonian War (200-197 B.C.), the victorious Roman general T. Quinctius Flamininus declared all of Greece "free." He reorganized the Thessalian league, creating a federal council, the synedrion, and annually changing officers, strategoi. The seat of the league was in the largest Thessalian city, Larisa. It continued to exist even after Thessaly became part of the new Roman province of Macedonia in 146 B.C., although it then had little autonomy.

The Apollo head on the obverse reflects Thessaly's long-standing involvement in the Delphic Amphictyony, an association of Greek states that administered and protected the temple and oracle of Apollo at Delphi.

Athena Itonia, was the patron deity of Thessaly, whose sanctuary was located between Larisa Kremaste and Pherae. The image probably represents the cult statue of the goddess. Athena is depicted as an Athena Promachos (the Forefighter), advancing in full armor with spear and shield. Athena Itonia was not only a war goddess, but a goddess of the arts of peace, especially poetry.
Stkp
Jefferson_Peace_Medal.jpg
Thomas Jefferson, 1801 Indian Peace Medal31 viewsObv: TH. JEFFERSON PRESIDENT OF THE U. S. A. D. 1801, three-quarter bust of Thomas Jefferson (3rd President) facing left.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Note: Medals of this design were carried by the Lewis and Clark Expedition from 1804 to 1806.

Designer: John Reich

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1801 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
coin1~1.JPG
Thrace, Byzantium, Caracalla; 46 viewsThe origins of Byzantium are shrouded in legend. The traditional legend has it that Byzas from Megara (a town near Athens) founded Byzantium in 657 BC when he sailed northeast across the Aegean Sea. Byzas had consulted the Oracle at Delphi to ask where to make his new city. The Oracle told him to find it "opposite the blind". At the time, he did not know what this meant, but when he came upon the Bosporus he understood: on the opposite eastern shore was a Greek city, Chalcedon, whose founders were said to have overlooked the superior location only 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) away. Byzas founded his city there on the European coast and named it Byzantium after himself. It was mainly a trading city due to its location at the Black Sea's only entrance. Byzantion later conquered Chalcedon, across the Bosporus on the Asiatic side.

After siding with Pescennius Niger against the victorious Septimius Severus, the city was besieged by Roman forces and suffered extensive damage in 196 AD.[4] Byzantium was rebuilt by Septimius Severus, now emperor, and quickly regained its previous prosperity. It was bound to Perinthos during the period of Septimius Severus. The location of Byzantium attracted Roman Emperor Constantine I who, in 330 AD, refounded it as an imperial residence inspired by Rome itself. (See Nova Roma.) After his death the city was called Constantinople (Greek Κωνσταντινούπολις or Konstantinoupolis) ("city of Constantine"). It remained the capital of the Eastern Roman Empire, which is called the Byzantine Empire by modern historians.
ecoli
Thasos_2_.jpg
Thrace, Thasos Dolphins23 viewsThrace, Thasos
Obol 463-411 BC
Obv.: Two dolphins swimming in opposite directions, three pellets
Rev.: Quadrapartite incuse square
Ag, 0.57g, 7.7mm
Ref.: Rosen 146
Ex Lanz Numismatik
1 commentsshanxi
Maximinus_Deultum_Moushmov3641.jpg
Thracia, Deultum, Maximinus I, Yurukova 20458 viewsMaximinus I AD 235-238
AE 20, 4.79g
obv. IMP MAXIMINVS AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. P C F D
pointed Omphalos on base
Yurukova 204; SNG Bulgaria 756-760; Moushmov 3641
about VF, digger mark on reverse
added to www.wildwinds.com

OMPHALOS, umbilicus, hump. Ovoid resp. beehive shaped stone mark of uncertain meaning. The best-known exemplar, the Delphic Omphalos, today no more is regarded as meteoric object of the aniconic stone cult (Baetyl) but as prehellenic sacrifice mark of the earth-goddess as synthesis of Tymbos (= doomed tomb) and altar (for chthonic blood pouring).
1 commentsJochen
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-u7D9Sg7AbSAsb-Tiberius_sestertius_Asia.jpg
Tiberius (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius5 viewsCIVITATIBVS ASIAE RESTITVTIS - Statue of Tiberius seated left on curule chair with patera and sceptre.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS P M TR POT XXIIII - Legend surrounding large S C
Mint: Rome (22-23 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 24.90g / 34mm / 6h
Rarity: Scarce
References:
RIC I 48
Cohen 3
Sear 5 #1764
Acquisition/Sale: northsidety eBay

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

CIVITATIBVS ASIAE RESTITVTIS=The Cities of Asia Re-established.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS P M TR POT XXIIII =Tiberius Caesar, Divi Augusti Filius, Augustus, Pontifex Maximus, Tribunitiae Potestatis 24.


AD 17 Lydia Earthquake

Location of some of the affected towns and cities in Asia Minor
The AD 17 Lydia earthquake caused the destruction of at least twelve cities in the region of Lydia in the Roman province of Asia in Asia Minor. The earthquake was recorded by the Roman historians Tacitus and Pliny the Elder, and the Greek historians Strabo and Eusebius. Pliny called it "the greatest earthquake in human memory". The city of Sardis, the former capital of the Lydian Empire, was the most affected and never completely recovered from the destruction.

Damage
Historical records list up to fifteen towns and cities that were destroyed or damaged by the earthquake: Sardis, Magnesia, Temnos, Philadelphia, Aegae, Apollonis, Mostene, Hyrkanis, Hierapolis, Myrina, Cyme, Tmolus, Pergamon, Ephesus and Kibyra. Of these, Pergamon, Ephesus and Kibyra are not mentioned by Tacitus. The record of damage at both Ephesus and Kibyra may refer instead to an earthquake in AD 23. In Pergamon the Heroon of Diodoros Pasparos was remodelled after the earthquake.

Earthquake
There are very few extant details for this earthquake. It is known that it occurred during the night, in AD 17 and that it affected a series of cities. A variety of epicenters have been used in catalogues, near Ephesus in the NGDC database, at Sardis in the CFTI4MED database and near Magnesia in the IISEE catalogue.

Aftermath
The Roman Emperor, Tiberius, agreed to waive all taxes due from Sardis and the other cities for a period of five years after the earthquake. He further sent Sardis ten million sesterces and appointed Marcus Aletius, an ex-Praetor, to assess their needs. In recognition of the aid received and the tributes that were waived, twelve of the cities raised a colossal statue in Tiberius' honour in Julius Caesar's Forum in Rome, with each of the cities represented by a recognisable figure. Two additional figures were added later, representing Kibyra and Ephesus as they had also received aid from Tiberius. A copy of this statue, with the figures transferred to a frieze around the base, was erected in Puteoli where it can still be seen.

A statue was raised in Tiberius' honour at Sardis in AD 43, with an inscription calling him the "founder of the city". Another incomplete inscription, found at Sardis, is thought to have been a copy of a formal document from the cities to the emperor expressing their gratitude. The surviving part includes signatories from representatives of eight of the cities.

Commemorative coins were struck in AD 22–23 in Rome, showing Tiberius with the inscription "CIVITATIBVS ASIAE RESTITVTIS" or "cities of Asia restored". Provincial coins were also struck, including one from the city of Magnesia, bearing the inscription "ΤΙΒΕΡΙΟΝ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΟΝ ΚΤΙΣΤΗΝ" or "Tiberius Augustus Founder".

Some of the cities changed their names in honour of the emperor. Hierapolis became Hierocaesarea, Kibyra added Caesarea after its name, Philadelphia was renamed Neocaesarea, and Sardis added "Caesarea" briefly to its name.

Additional images: Cities affected by the earthquake of 17 AD and the marble base from Puteoli (Naples).

Provinces of Asia
The marble base, which was found at Puteoli (Naples) in 1793, dates to the second quarter of the first century AD (30-37 AD). It was built at the behest of the Collegium of the Augustales, in order to celebrate the magnanimity of Tiberius, and it supported a statue of the emperor.

One of the long sides bears a dedicatory inscription, which is flanked by the personifications of 14 Asian towns that were damaged by devastating earthquakes between 17 and 29 AD and had always received the emperor’s help, so that they built him a monument in Rome in about 30 AD, of which the Puteoli base is a small copy.
Important are the figures that symbolize the towns (on the right: Philadelphia, Tuolos and Kyme with a trident; on the left: Mostene, Aegre and Hierokaisareia;on the back: Temnos, Kibyra, Myrina, Ephesos, Apollonidea and Hyrcania), since they are the reproductions of famous ancient sculptures, of which they contribute to reconstruct the iconography.
Gary W2
TitusRaven.jpg
Titus / Tripod, Ravens, Dolphin RIC 13196 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
US_Medal_-Centennial.jpg
U.S. Centennial Medal19 viewsUNITED STATES.
Æ Medal (76mm, 273.96 g, 12h).
Exhibition Medal Commemorating the Centennial of Independence.
By H. Mitchell.
Dated 1876 in Roman numerals.

O: Female figure seated left, crowning instruments of science, commerce, and industry; shield below elbow; around, four oval medallions representing the four quarters of the globe

R: INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION/PHILADELPHIA, MDCCCLXXVI, AWARDED BY/UNITED STATES/CENTENNIAL/COMMISSION in four lines; all within wreath.

Julian AM-10. EF, warm brown surfaces, tiny edge bumps.

At 274 grams and 70+mm, this this thing is a big, beautiful beast!

Ex-CNG
Sosius
18_Grant_Indian_Peace_Medal.JPG
Ulysses S. Grant 1871 Indian Peace Medal25 viewsObv: UNITED STATES OF AMERICA / "LET US HAVE PEACE" / LIBERTY JUSTICE AND EQUALITY, Bust of President Grant (18th President) facing right, peace pipe and olive branch below.

Rev: ON EARTH PEACE GOOD WILL TOWARD MEN, The globe set before the HOLY BIBLE and agricultural tools above the date, 1871.

Note: This was the only peace medal that did not include the name of the President.

Engraver: Anthony Paquet

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1871 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 63 mm
Matt Inglima
BUST_CAP_1829_10C.jpg
UNITED STATES - Liberty Cap Dime28 viewsUNITED STATES - Liberty Cap Dime (10 Cents), AR, 1829, Philadelphia mint. Obv.: Bust of Liberty wearing cap faces left, surrounded by stars, date beneath bust. Rev.: Eagle with spread wings facing left, American shield on chest, stands on arrows and plants. Ribbon above reads E PLURIBUS UNUM. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above, value 10c below. Reference: KM#48.1 commentsdpaul7
USA_1832_10_CENT.jpg
UNITED STATES - Liberty Cap Dime13 viewsUNITED STATES - Liberty Cap Dime (10 Cents), AR, 1835, Philadelphia mint. Obv.: Bust of Liberty wearing cap faces left, surrounded by stars, date beneath bust. Rev.: Eagle with spread wings facing left, American shield on chest, stands on arrows and plants. Ribbon above reads E PLURIBUS UNUM. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA above, value 10c below. Reference: KM#48.dpaul7
SEATED LIB HALF.jpg
USA - Seated Liberty Half Dollar68 viewsUSA - Seated Liberty Half Dollar, 1874, with Arrows at Date... Philadelphia Mint. KM#107.dpaul7
LT12-1848.JPG
USA, Seated Liberty dime love token, 184815 views"CFW" in script. Semi-key date. Scarce, particularly as a love token. Ex-"engraved" (Collectors Universe). Total number of 1848 dimes struck = 451,500 (minted only at Philadelphia that year).lordmarcovan
LT27b-1863.jpg
USA, Seated Liberty dime love token, 186316 views"J", "K", and "S" (or maybe I,K,S?) in monogram. Old center mount- probably was a button or cufflink.
Semi-key date. Scarce, especially as a love token. Ex-"engraved" (Collectors Universe). Total number of 1863 dimes struck at all mints = 171,500 (minted only at Philadelphia that year).
lordmarcovan
LT43-1879.JPG
USA, Seated Liberty dime love token, 187923 viewsA" and "J" in monogram with ornamental border. KEY DATE. Rare, especially as a love token. High grade host coin, too! Came with an 1876 companion piece which had a different monogram but shared the "J" initial. That and their similar style indicate to me that they were probably from the same family and maybe were engraved by the same person. I'm not displaying that 1876 here since I already have a pictorial 1876 for this set. Ex-"seanq" (Collectors Universe). Total number of 1879 dimes struck at all mints = 14,000 (minted only at Philadelphia that year).
lordmarcovan
LT44b-1880.JPG
USA, Seated Liberty dime love token, 188013 views"C", "I" (or "J"), & "L" in monogram with ornamental border. KEY DATE. Rare, especially as a love token. I found this piece in a bulk lot for only $7.50! Not long before that, I had bought a similarly monogrammed example for about $125.00. I resold the $125.00 example at cost, and kept the lucky cherrypick. Both were remarkably similar in grade. Both ex-eBay. Total number of 1880 dimes struck at all mints = 36,000 (minted at Philadelphia only).
lordmarcovan
LT45-1881.JPG
USA, Seated Liberty dime love token, 188123 views"A", "H", and "W" in monogram, with flourishes. KEY DATE. Rare, especially as a love token. Ex-"Minerscoin" (Collectors Universe). Total number of 1881 dimes struck at all mints = 24,000 (minted at Philadelphia only).
lordmarcovan
70.jpg
Vespasian, AD 69-7948 viewsASIA, Flavia Philadelphia.

AE.

OYEΣΠAΣIANOΣ KAIΣAP, laureate head of Vespasian, right / EΠIMEΛHΘ ΠOΛEMAIOY KAI HPΩΔOY, ΦΛABI ΦIΛAΔEΛ, Zeus standing, left, holding eagle and sceptre; in field, altar.

RPC II, 1329. BMC, 061.


The 'N' in OYEΣΠAΣIANOΣ is retrograde and the 'A' in KAIΣAP upside down in the obverse legend!

1 commentssocalcoins
Vespasian_Philadelphia_Zeus_AE22_7.7g.jpg
Vespasian, Philadelphia, Zeus, AE2255 viewsLYDIA, Philadelphia. Vespasian. AD 69-79. Æ 22mm (7.70 g, 12h).
OYESΠACIANOC KAICAP; laureate head right
EΠIMELHΘ ΠOΛEM[]; Zeus standing left, holding eagle and scepter; altar before.
RPC 1329

From the J. S. Wagner Collection.

ex CNG, EA 185, Lot: 197
1 commentsareich
Titus-Denar-DelphinAnkr-RIC_IIn_112.jpg
VII - TITUS-a- Denar RIC II²/11211 viewsAv) IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head right

Rv) TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP
Dolphin coiled around anchor

Weight: 3,4g;; Ø: 18mm; Reference: RIC II² /112
ROME mint; struck: 1. January 80 A.D. – 30. June 80 A.D.
sulcipius
Titus-Denar-DreifußDelphin-RIC_In_128.jpg
VII - TITUS-a- Denar RIC II²/12827 viewsAv) IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head right

Rv) TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP
Dolphin right above tripod

Weight: 3,4g; Ø: 18mm; Reference: RIC II² /128
ROME mint; struck: 1. January 80 A.D. – 30. June 80 A.D.
sulcipius
Domitianus-Denar-DelphinAnker-RIC_IIIn2.jpg
VIII - DOMITIANUS -a- Denar RIC II²/228 viewsAv) IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG
Laureate head right

Rv ) TRP COS VII
Dolphin coiled around anchor

Weight: 3,2g; Ø: 19mm; Reference: RIC II²/2
ROME mint; struck: 13. september A.D. - 31.december 81 A.D:
1 commentssulcipius
12_Zachary_Taylor.JPG
Zachary Taylor, 1849 Indian Peace Medal26 viewsObv: ZACHARY TAYLOR PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES, draped bust of Zachary Taylor (12th President) facing left; 1849 below.

Rev: PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP, two clasped hands, crossed peace pipe and tomahawk above.

Engravers: Henry Kirke Brown (obverse), John Reich (reverse)

Mint: Philadelphia, Date: 1849 (20th Century Restrike), Bronze, Diameter: 76 mm
Matt Inglima
PergaAthenaOwl.jpg
[2400a] Pergamon, Mysia: AE14, ca. 300 BC70 viewsMYSIA, PERGAMON, Æ14, ca. 300 BC. BMC 15, SGC 3965. 2.0 gm. VF/aVF; Pergamon mint. Obverse: Head of Athena right, in close fitting crested helmet; Reverse; ATHENAS - NIKHFOPOY either side of owl standing, facing, wings closed; all within olive-wreath. Obverse device a clean strike of a lovely Athena. Ex Inclinatiorama.

The city of ancient Pergamon (or Pergamum, today's Bergama) was created by the newly-founded royal dynasty in the mid-third century BCE. It became one of the classic late-Hellenistic cities, on a dramatically steep site, with imaginatiave solutions to the urban design problems created by the site, wonderfully embellished by the generous attention of its royal (and other) patrons. The site divides into two main sections, the steep upper town and the flat lower town. Though today's Bergama is entirely in the lower areas, a number of important remains have survived even there: the Asklepieion, one of the major healing centres of antiqity, the Red Hall (Serapeum), the stadium, a Roman Bridge and tunnel. But it is the upper town that captures the imagination, with its extensive remains, innovations, and drama.
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~prchrdsn/pergamon.htm

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the Acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

The Great Altar of Pergamon is in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin. The base of this altar remains on the upper part of the Acropolis. Other notable structures still in existence on the upper part of the Acropolis include: a Hellenistic theater with a seating capacity of 10,000; the Sanctuary of Trajan (also known as the Trajaneum); the Sancturay of Athena; the Library; royal palaces; the Heroön; the Temple of Dionysus; the Upper Agora; and the Roman baths complex. Pergamon's library on the Acropolis is the second best in the ancient Greek civilisation (the ancient Library of Pergamum), after that of Alexandria. When the Ptolemies stopped exporting papyrus, partly because of competitors and partly because of shortages, the Pergamenes invented a new substance to use in codices, called pergaminus or parchment after the city. This was made of fine calf skin, a predecessor of vellum. The lower part of the Acropolis has the following structures: the Upper Gymnasium, the Middle Gymnasium, the Lower Gymnasium, the Temple of Demeter, the Sanctuary of Hera, the House of Attalus, the Lower Agora and the Gate of Eumenes.

Three km south of the Acropolis was the Sanctuary of Asclepius (also known as the Asclepeion), the god of healing. In this place people with health problems could bath in the water of the sacred spring, and in the patients' dreams Asklepios would appear in a vision to tell them how to cure their illness. Archeology has found lots of gifts and dedications that people would make afterwards, such as small terracotta body parts, no doubt representing what had been healed. Notable extant structures in the Asclepeion include the Roman theater, the North Stoa, the South Stoa, the Temple of Asclepius, a circular treatment center (sometimes known as the Temple of Telesphorus), a healing spring, an underground passageway, a library, the Via Tecta (or the Sacred Way, which is a colonnaded street leading to the sanctuary) and a propylon.

Pergamon's other notable structure is the Serapis Temple (Serapeum) which was later transformed into the Red Basilica complex (or Kızıl Avlu in Turkish), about 1 km south of the Acropolis. It consists of a main building and two round towers. In the first century AD, the Christian Church at Pergamon inside the main building of the Red Basilica was one of the Seven Churches to which the Book of Revelation was addressed (Revelation 1:12, ESV).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pergamon

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
PergamomAE17_SCGVII_3962var.jpg
[2420] Pergamon, Mysia,c. 200 - 133 B.C.62 viewsBronze AE 17, SGCV II 3962 var; BMC Mysia p. 133, 202, VF, weight 3.600 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 0o, Pergamon mint, c. 200 - 133 B.C.; Obverse: head Athena right wearing crested helmet with star, hair in curls down neck; Reverse: AQH-NAS / NIKHFOROU, owl standing facing on palm frond, wings spread, AP and MH monograms at sides. Ex FORVM.

The city of ancient Pergamon (or Pergamum, today's Bergama) was created by the newly-founded royal dynasty in the mid-third century BCE. It became one of the classic late-Hellenistic cities, on a dramatically steep site, with imaginatiave solutions to the urban design problems created by the site, wonderfully embellished by the generous attention of its royal (and other) patrons. The site divides into two main sections, the steep upper town and the flat lower town. Though today's Bergama is entirely in the lower areas, a number of important remains have survived even there: the Asklepieion, one of the major healing centres of antiqity, the Red Hall (Serapeum), the stadium, a Roman Bridge and tunnel. But it is the upper town that captures the imagination, with its extensive remains, innovations, and drama.
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~prchrdsn/pergamon.htm

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the Acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

The Temple of Athena:

Built in the 3rd century B.C.E., this is the oldest cult center of the city. The Doric order building was constructed on a peripteral plan with six columns on the facade and ten on the long sides. The krepis (the basement of the Temple) is formed by two steps and measures 41.7 x 71.4 ft. (12.72 x 21.77 m). The naos or cella (the inner sanctum) is divided in two and was dedicated to Goddess Athena but also to God Zeus.
Present state: Only some of the stepped foundations and the tunnel to the theater have survived.
http://www.goddess-athena.org/Museum/Temples/Pergamon.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

James Fitzgerald
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