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Search results - "Asclepius"
26531q00.jpg
100 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Prieur 720 (1 example), SNG Paris 2331, Weber -, VF, 13.043g, 26.9mm, 180o, Aegeae mint, 132 - 133 A.D.; obverse AUTOKR KAIS TRAIA ADRIANO SEB P P, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ETOUS QOR AIGEAIWN, eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, goat in ex; rare;

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

ex FORVM
dealer's picture
1 commentsareich
Intaglio.jpg
Asclepius Intaglio50 viewsMale figure Asclepius? holding two snakes.

Asclepius was the god of healing though he, like Heracles, was born as a mortal. Athena gave Asclepius two types of blood to help with his healing work, both from the gorgon, Medusa. One took life quickly but the other restored life. When Asclepius used this life restoring blood he encroached on the preserve of the gods and Zeus struck him down with a thunderbolt. One of the most famous centres for Asclepius worship was at Epidaurus on the Peloponnese. Snakes were sacred to the god and when the Romans embraced him as one of theirs his cult was supposedly taken to Rome in the body of a snake. He was preserved in the heavens as the constellation Ophiuchus, the serpent holder. The Romanised version of his name is Aesculapius.

0.34g

Greek or more likely Roman Provincial

Ex-Time Machine

Sold Forum Auctions December 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
anton_pius_asclep_asia.jpg
(0138) ANTONINUS PIUS9 views138 - 161 AD
AE 19.6 X 21 mm; 4.64 g
struck ca. 144-158
O: [ΑV ΤΙ ΑΙ ΑΔΡ ΑΝΤΩΝ]ƐΙΝΟС laureate head of Antoninus Pius, r.
R: ƐΠΙ СΤΡ ΚοV[ΑΡΤοV ΤΟ Β ΠƐΡΓ(Α)] Asclepius standing, facing, head, l., holding serpent-staff
Conventus of Pergamum; RPC 3192 temp.;cf. Weisser 580, Cop 482-3, BMC 280

laney
COMMODUS_NIKO_HYG_ASC.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS--NIKOPOLIS AD ISTRUM19 views177 - 192 AD
AE 28 mm; 10.89 g
O: Laureate head of Commodus right
R: Hygieia standing, r., feeding serpent from patera; to r., Asclepius standing, facing, head, l., holding serpent-staff
Moesia Inferior, Nicopolis ad Istrum; AMNG 1234

laney
041_Commodus_(177-192_A_D_),_AE-30___KOMMODOC___CTPDIO(L_orA)__IOEPGAMHON,_Q-001_6h_30,0mm_11,24g-s~0.jpg
041bp Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), Mysia, Pergamon, Weisser 1110, Diodorus, strategus, EΠI CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated left, 65 views041bp Commodus (166-180 A.D. as Caesar, 180-192 A.D. as Augustus), Mysia, Pergamon, Weisser 1110, Diodorus, strategus, Asia: Conventus of Pergamum; Mysia, EΠI-CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated left, holding patera feeding serpent,
avers:- AV-KA-AVP-ΚΟMOΔOC, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- EΠI-CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated, left, feeding serpent from patera, holding staff.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 30mm, weight: 11,24g, axis: 6h,
mint: Pergamum; Asia: Conventus of Pergamum; Mysia, date: 182-184 A.D., ref: Weisser 1110,
Q-001
quadrans
051_Caracalla_(198_-_217_A_D_)_AE-20_Lydia-_Thyateira_ANT_-NINOC_QVOTEIPHNWN_Q-001_6h_20mm_3,46ga-s.jpg
051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Lydia, Thyateira, SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing, 64 views051p Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), Lydia, Thyateira, SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing,
avers:- ANTΩ-NEINOC, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding serpent-entwined staff.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Thyateira, date: 198-217 A.D., ref: SNG TUEBINGEN 3857(1) / COLL Y(1), SLG WEBER 6934(1), SNG KOP 28 612(1),
Q-001
quadrans
1125_P_Hadrian_RPC1324.jpg
1324 Hadrian, Cistophorus MYSIA Pergamum mint Asclepius standing28 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1324; Metcalf 3

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Bare head, draped bust right, wearing paludamentum


Rev. COS III
Asclepius standing l. holding serpent-wreathed rod on ground in r., l. arm at side

10.64 gr
28 mm
6h
2 commentsokidoki
956_P_Hadrian_RPC1348.jpg
1348 Hadrian, Cistophorus IONIA Ephesus mint 128-38 AD Asclepius standing43 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1348; RIC II 481a; Metcalf, Cistophori type 20 (unlisted dies); RSC 290.

Obv. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P
Bare head right

Rev. COS III
Asclepius standing front head l. holding serpent-wreathed rod in r., l. arm at side.

11.06 gr
28 mm
6h

Note.
CNG 409 lot 602
Ex Classical Numismatic Group Inventory 761612 (December 2005).
4 commentsokidoki
1265_P_Hadrian_RPC1617.jpg
1617 MYSIA, Hadriani ad Olympum Hadrian, Asclepius standing16 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1617; von Fritze 511/2

Obv. AΥT KΑΙ ΤΡΑΙΑN ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС CЄB.
Laureate, draped bust right with paludamentum, seen from rear.

Rev. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΩΝ ΠΡΟC ΟΛVΝΠΩ.
Asclepius standing facing, head left, leaning upon serpent-entwined staff.

21.07 gr
31 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
1181_P_Hadrian_Pseudo_RPC1635.jpg
1635 MYSIA, Hadrianotherae Pseudo-autonomous under Hadrian, Asclepius standing5 viewsReference.
RPC III, 1635; von Fritze 550-3

Obv. ΙΕΡΑ СΥΝΚΛΗΤΟС
Draped bust of Senate, right

Rev. ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟΥΘΗΡΙΤΩΝ
Asclepius standing facing, head l., resting with r. hand on serpent-staff

4.05gr
19 mm
6h
okidoki
RIC_0264b.jpg
202. CARACALLA256 viewsCARACALLA. 198-217 AD.

The emperor visited Alexandria for intellectual and religious reasons, staying at the Serapeum and being present at the temple's sacrifices and cultural events. Earlier, during the German war, the emperor visited the shrine of the Celtic healing-god Grannus. Caracalla also visited the famous temple of Asclepius in Pergamum and fully participated in its program, which involved sleeping inside the temple compound and having his dreams interpreted.

It was this religious devotion that led to Caracalla's murder in 217. Although suspicious of the praetorian prefect Macrinus, Caracalla allowed himself to be accompanied by only a small, select corps of bodyguards on an early spring trip from the camp at Edessa to the temple of the moon-god at Carrhae, about 25 miles away. During the journey back on 8 April 217, Caracalla was killed. The returning guards claimed the emperor was ambushed while defecating, and that the alleged assassin was one of their own, a soldier named Martialis. Martialis was himself killed by the avenging guards, or so the story went. Suspicion was strong that Macrinus arranged the entire affair.

Caracalla's violent end seemed appropriate for an emperor who, early in his reign, had his own brother killed. Yet the moralizing about fratricide by both ancient and modern historians obscures the energetic, reformist and even intellectual character of Caracalla's reign. Some of the reforms, especially the pay raise for soldiers, would prove burdensome for future emperors, but the changes brought about in the little more than five years of Caracalla's sole rule would have long-lasting implications throughout the empire for generations to come.

AR Denarius (19mm, 3.11 gm). Struck 215 AD. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right / P M TR P XVIII COS IIII PP, Sol standing left, radiate, raising right hand and holding globe. RIC IV 264a; BMCRE 139; RSC 288. EF
Ex - CNG
2 commentsecoli73
952_P_Hadrian_Emmettcf917.jpg
5958 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 134-35 AD Asclepius standing12 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5958.4; Dattari-Savio Pl. 75, 1623 (this coin); Emmett 919.19

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ = year 19

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, left

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ
Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding short serpent-staff.

22.75 gr
32.50 mm
12h
okidoki
1239_P_Hadrian_RPC5958.jpg
5958 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Drachm 134-35 AD Asclepius standing6 viewsReference.
RPC III, 5958; Dattari 1623; Emmett 919.19

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ = year 19

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, left

Rev. L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ
Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding short serpent-staff

25.19 gr
33 mm
12h
okidoki
774_P_Hadrian_Emmett918.jpg
5959 EGYPT, Alexandria Hadrian Drachm 134-35 AD Asclepius standing35 viewsReference.
Emmett 918.19; RPC III, 5959.4; Dattari-Savio Pl. 76, 1625 (this coin)

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ = year 19

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear

Rev. L ENNEAK Δ
Asclepius standing facing head right, holding long serpent-staff.

25.91 gr
35 mm
12h
3 commentsokidoki
1273_P_Hadrian_RPC5959_3.jpg
5959 EGYPT, Alexandria Hadrian Drachm 134-35 AD Asclepius standing with olive-branch29 viewsReference.
Emmett 918.19; RPC III, 5959.3; Dattari-Savio Pl. 76, 1624 (this coin). Dattari 1624 and Pl. X (this rev. illustrated).

Issue L ƐΝΝƐΑΚΔ = year 19

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙС ΤΡΑΙΑΝ - ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС СƐΒ
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear

Rev. L ENNEAK Δ
Asclepius standing facing head right, holding long serpent-staff, holding olive-branch

25.18 gr
33.5 mm
12h
2 commentsokidoki
Thelpusa.jpg
Achaea. Arcadia, Thelpusa. Septimius Severus AE17. Unpublished106 viewsPeloponnesus. Thelpusa, Arcadia. Septimius Severus bust rt., Θ Ε Λ in wreath. Obverse die and reverse type not listed in BCD. BCD Pelop. I -; BCD Pelop II -; SNG Cop -; BMC -.

Thelpusa or Thelpousa (Greek: Θέλπουσα, also known as Telphusa/Τέλφουσα or Thelphusa/Θέλφουσα) was an ancient city-state in Azania in Arcadia.

The city was built on the left bank of the Ladon and bounded with Kleitor and Psophis. The name comes from the nymph Thelpousa or Thelpusa, daughter of Ladon. The city contained the temple of Eleusinian Demeter, and nearby, a stone statue of the goddess of the daughter and Dionysus and Ongius, chief of Thelpousa and the son of Apollo, Asclepius' children with the memory of Trygon and the temple of the twelve gods. When Pausanias] visited the city, Thelpousa was abandoned and ruined for many years. In 352 BC, its city residents took part with the Lacedaemonians. It was a member of the Achaean League and was cut off from the rights of law. Thelpusa was the patriot of Asclepius and Artion.
ancientone
IMG_1296.JPG
Asclepius182 viewsCapitoline museumsJohny SYSEL
Severus_Alexander_04.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, Parium, Severus Alexander, Asclepios20 viewsSeverus Alexander
Mysia, Parium
Obv.: IMP CAEƧ L ƧEP ƧE ALEXANDER, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: DEO AEƧ VB (Deo Aesculapius subvenienti - to Aesculapius, the god who helps), Asclepius seated right, holding raised foreleg of bull standing left, C G H I P (Colonia Gemella Iulia Hadriana Pariana) in exergue.
, 19mm, 5.27g
Ref.: SNG Cop - , BMC - , SNG BN - , SNG von Aulock -, ISEGRIM-, RPC VI temp 3871
2 commentsshanxi
Trajan_Decius_06.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Trajan Decius, Asclepius, Hermes14 viewsTrajan Decius
Pergamon, Mysia
Magistrate: Kominios Phlabios Glukn (strategos and theologos)
AE 35
Obv: ΑΥΤ Κ Γ ΜƐϹ ΚΥΙ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟϹ ΔƐΚΙΟϹ, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Decius, r.
Rev: ƐΠΙ Ϲ ΚΟΜ Φ ΓΛΥΚΩΝΟϹ, ΠƐΡΓΑΜΗΝΩΝ ΠΡΩ Γ ΝƐΩ, at l., Asclepius, standing facing, holding serpent staff; at r., nude Hermes, standing l., holding purse and caduceus
AE, 21.1g, 35mm
Ref.: Lindgren I-311, RPC Vol. IX, 544 (same dies)
shanxi
philip_neapolis_hygieia.jpg
BCC rgp2228 viewsRoman Provincial BCC rgp22
Neapolis-Samaria
Philip I 244-249CE
Obv:IMP M IVL PH[ILIPPVS AVG]
Radiate draped bust rt.
Rev: COL SER/G [NEAPOL]
Hygieia standing right, holding serpent,
facing Asclepius seated left, Mt. Gerizim above.
AE27mm. 15.09g. Axis :180
Not listed in SNG ANS, or Rosenberger.
Possible reference: Harl 9 / BMC Palestine 125,
but Asclepius seated, not standing.
v-drome
Caracalla__THRACE,_Serdica_.jpg
Caracalla / Asclepius God of Medicine 111 viewsTHRACE, Serdica.Caracalla.AD 198-217. (29mm, 14.39 g, 6h). Laureate head right / Asclepius seated left, holding patera and serpent-staff. H&J 12.18.20.13 var. (obv. legend); Varbanov 2204 var. (same). VF, green surfaces, fields smoothed. Rare.

EX CNG e-320 Lot 281
From The Sam Mansourati Collection
4 commentsSam
Caracalla_AE26_Nikopolis.jpg
Caracalla AE26 Nikopolis ad Istrum, Thrace. 26 viewsrev. Asclepius, 26mm, 10,68 g., _3947

Elagabalus AE 27 of Nikopolis ad Istrum. Magistrate Nob. Rufus. AVT K M AVRH ANTWNEINOC, laureate head right / VP NOBIOV ROVFOV NIKOPOLITWN PROC IC-TR-ON, Asklepios standing facing, leaning on serpent-entwined staff. Varbanov 3979; AMNG 1936.
Antonivs Protti
Caracalla_JuliaDomna_Markianopolis_Asklepios_AE26_11.3g.jpg
Caracalla and Julia Domna, Markianopolis, Asklepios, AE2652 viewsBronze pentassarion, Varbanov 1005, F,
AE26, 11.3g, 180
obv: ANTΩNINOC AVΓOVCTOC IOΛIA ΔOMNA, laureate bust of Caracalla right facing draped bust of Julia Domna left
rev: VΠ KVNTIΛIANOV MAPKIANOΠOLITΩN, Asklepios standing facing, holding a serpent-entwined staff, E in left field

ex FORVM Ancient Coins
1 commentsareich
Caracalla_AugustaTraiana_Asklepios_AE29_15.9g_lr.jpg
Caracalla, Augusta Trajana, Thrace, Asklepios, AE2980 viewsAE29, 15.9 g.
obv.: AVT KM AVP CЄVNP ANTΩNЄIN, laureate bust right, slight drapery on left shoulder
rev.: AVΓOVCTHC TPAIANHC, Asklepios standing left, holding snake-entwined staff
GICV -
areich
Caracalla_Pautalia_AsklepiosRidingDragon_AE27_13,6g.jpg
Caracalla, Pautalia, Asklepios riding dragon, AE2763 viewsAE 27, 13.6 g
obv: laureate and draped bust right
rev: Asklepios holding snake-entwined staff and riding a dragon right
Moushmov 4235
GICV -
areich
irenopolisdomitian.jpg
Cilicia, Irenopolis. AE 17 - Domitian 44 viewsDomitian, as Caesar, 81-96 AD. AE17, dated CY 42 (93/4 AD).
Obverse: KAICAP, Laureate head of Domitian right.
Reverse: Laureate head of Asclepius right.
RPC 1767.
ancientone
EB0539_scaled.JPG
EB0539 Sabina / Asclepius19 viewsSabina, AE 18 of Cibyra, Phrygia 128-138 AD.
Obv: [CABEINA CE]BACTH, draped bust right with hair coiled and piled on top of head above double stephane.
Rev: [ΚΙΒΥΡΑΤΩΝ], Asclepius standing facing, head left, resting on serpent-staff with his right hand.
References: RPC III 2301.
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 3.428 grams.
EB
Elagabalus_NikopolisAdIstrum_Asclepius.jpg
Elagabalus, Nikopolis ad Istrum, Asclepius35 viewsGICV -1 commentsareich
Elagabalus_NikopolisAdIstrum_Asclepius~0.jpg
Elagabalus, Nikopolis ad Istrum, Asclepius, AE2542 viewsAE25, 11.95g
governor Novius Rufus
obv: [] ANTONEINOC, laureate head right
rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO CI, CT - PO - N in field, Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding serpent staff resting on ground in right, mantle draped over left arm
GICV -
same obverse die as:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-24520
1 commentsareich
Faustina_Junior,_Augusta___Wife_of_Marcus_Aurelius.jpg
Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of emperor Marcus Aurelius64 viewsSilver Denarius, BMCRE II p. 404, 148; RSC II 195; SRCV II 5262; RIC III MA689 var. (no stephane); Hunter II 8 var. (same), Choice Very Fine , excellent centering, unusual artistic portrait for empress Faustina,toned, Rome mint, weight 2.655g, maximum diameter 17.8mm, die axis 0o, struck under Marcus Aurelius, 161 - 175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, wearing stephane and earring, bun in the back; reverse SALVS, Salus seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar, from patera in right hand, resting left elbow on throne, feet on footstool.
Rare with this grade.

Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks, who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.

*The logo of Pharmacology was taken from Salus 's Patera and snake .

From The Sam Mansourati Collection. / Item number RI 75220 (F)/ 20469 (S).

Given as a souvenir to a dear friend and a great Pharmacist on 9/8/2017.
Sam
e4.JPG
Gallienus11 viewsIMP GALLIENVS PF AVG
Salus Aug
Asclepius with snake-staff
ecoli
19357308.jpg
Greece, Gortys (Peloponnese Arcadia) - sanctuary of Asclepius365 viewsGortys lost its influence after foundation of Megalopolis in 371 BC.1 commentsJohny SYSEL
23344078.jpg
Greece, Kos - Asclepieion272 viewsparts of column, temple in the back ground.
Kos is place where Hippocrates (father of medicine) was born.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Asclepieion
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
Greek_Asclepios_Island_of_Kos_Caria.jpg
Greek Asclepius Island of Kos Caria80 viewsGreek, Caria Kos, 1st to 2nd Cebtury BC, 15mm, 3.7g, SNG Munich 535
OBV: Head of Asclepius with a laurel wreath on the right
REV: KWIWN ALKIDA, Crooked rod of Asclepius, serpent entwined

Kos or Cos (Greek: Κως) is a Greek island in the south Sporades group of the Dodecanese,
next to the Gulf of Gkova/Cos. It measures 40 kilometres (25mi) by 8 kilometres (5.0mi),
2.5mi from the coast of Bodrum, Turkey and the ancient region of Caria.
7 commentsRomanorvm
Had__tet__pan.jpg
Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Aegeae, Cilicia mint90 viewsSilver tetradrachm, (Prieur 720), (SNG Paris 2331), Aegeae mint, weight 13.48g, max. diameter 26.6mm, 132 - 133 A.D.; Obv. AΥTOKΡ KAIΣ TΡAIA AΔΡIANO ΣEB Π Π (mostly off flan), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Rev. ETOΥΣ •ΘOΡ(year 179=132/3 A.D)• (AIΓEAIΩN mostly off flan), eagle standing facing on harpe, wings spread, head turned right, recumbent goat r. in ex.

Background info. courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

Aegeae issued tetradrachms only during the reigns of Hadrian and Caracalla. The issues were probably related to visits of these emperors to the town or to its famous sanctuary of Asclepius. -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

The recumbent goat was the symbol for the city of Aegeae. It was a pun on AIGEAIWN (of the city of Aegeae) and AIGEIWN (of the goats). -- The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and Their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 253 by Michel and Karin Prieur

2 commentsSteve E
psudo-autonomous_MagnesiaAdSipylos_Sipylos_Asklepios_AE19_3_15g.jpg
Lydia, Magnesia ad Sipylum, Sipylos / Asklepios, AE1962 views19mm, 3.15g
obv: CIΠYΛOC, bearded head of the mountain-god Sipylos right
rev: MAΓNHTΩN; Asklepios with serpent-staff facing, head left

SNG von Aulock 2998; Lydische Stadtmnzen -; SNG Leypold -;
areich
051_Caracalla_(198_-_217_A_D_)_AE-20_Lydia-_Thyateira_ANT_-NEINOC_QVOTEIPHNWN_Q-001_6h_20mm_3,46ga-s.jpg
Lydia, Thyateira, 051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing, 61 viewsLydia, Thyateira, 051 Caracalla (196-198 A.D. Caesar, 198-217 A.D. Augustus ), SNG KOP 28 612(1), AE-20, ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing,
avers:- ANTΩ-NEINOC, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- ΘVATEI-PHNΩN, Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding serpent-entwined staff.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Thyateira, date: 198-217 A.D., ref: SNG TUEBINGEN 3857(1) / COLL Y(1), SLG WEBER 6934(1), SNG KOP 28 612(1),
Q-001
quadrans
MacrinusDiadumenian_Markianopolis_Asklepios_AE28_9.9g_lr~0.jpg
Macrinus and Diadumenian, Markianopolis, Asklepios, AE28126 viewsAE28, 9.9g
obv: confronted busts of Macrinus and his son Diadumenian, AVT KM OΠEΛCEVMAKPEINOC[...]
rev: VΠ ΠONTIANOV MARKIANOΠOLEITΩN, Asclepius standing right, head left, leaning on serpent-staff, mantle draped over arm

AMNG I/1, 749 (1 ex. in London) (thanks Jochen!)
GICV -
Pscipio: I love that obverse die! And the reverse is beautiful as well on your coin.
2 commentsareich
41605_Myrina,_Aeolis,_c__2nd_Century_A_D__telesphoros.jpg
Myrina, AE11, Athena/ MVPEI NAIΩN, Telesphoros standing facing12 viewsMyrina, Aeolis, 2nd Century A.D. Bronze AE 11, BMC Aiolis p. 138, 38, gF, reverse encrusted, Myrina mint, weight 1.470g, maximum diameter 14.8mm, die axis 0o, c. 2nd century A.D.; obverse helmeted bust of Athena right; reverse MVPEI NAIΩN, Telesphoros standing facing, hooded and draped; Telesphorus, a dwarf who always wore a hood or cap, was a son of Asclepius and brother of Hygieia. He symbolized recovery from illness. Originally a Celtic god, he was probably introduced to the Greeks by Galatians in Anatolia in the 3rd century B.C. His influence spread to the West under the Roman Empire, in particular during the 2nd century A.D. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
RPC_IV-3164.jpg
Mysia, Parium: Commodus (177-192 CE) Unit (RPC IV 3164; SNG BN 1484)25 viewsObv: IMP CAIMV COMODVS; Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: DEO AESC SVB; Asclepius seated right, examining hoof of a bull standing left; CG I H P in exergue
1 commentsQuant.Geek
asclepius.jpg
MYSIA, PERGAMON32 views2nd - 1st Cent. BC
AE 18 mm 5.30 g
O: Head of Asklepios r.
R: Snake entwined around staff.
laney
041_Commodus_(177-192_A_D_),_AE-30___KOMMODOC___CTPDIO(L_orA)__IOEPGAMHON,_Q-001_6h_30,0mm_11,24g-s.jpg
Mysia, Pergamon, 041 Commodus (177-192 A.D.), Diodorus, strategus, Weisser 1110, AE-30, EΠI CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated left, holding patera feding serpent,73 viewsMysia, Pergamon, 041 Commodus (177-192 A.D.), Diodorus, strategus, Weisser 1110, AE-30, EΠI-CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated left, holding patera feeding serpent,
avers:- AV-KA-AVP-ΚΟMOΔOC, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- EΠI-CTRΑ-ΔIOΔOPΩV_ΠEPΓAMH/ΝΩN, Asclepius seated, left, feeding serpent from patera, holding staff.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 30mm, weight: 11,24g, axis: 6h,
mint: Pergamum; Asia: Conventus of Pergamum; Mysia, date: 182-184 A.D., ref: Weisser 1110,
Q-001
quadrans
PergamonEphesosCommodus.jpg
Mysia, Pergamon. Alliance with Ephesos. AE34 of Commodus81 viewsObv: laureate-headed bust of Commodus (short beard) wearing cuirass and paludamentum, r.
Rev: to l., Asclepius standing, facing, (head, r.), holding serpent-staff; to r., cult statue of Artemis of Ephesus standing, facing, wearing kalathos, having supports.
34mm and 20.8g.
Howgego 70, Caracalla laureate, and reported on 114 coins from Pergamum.
Howgego 811 meaning revalued to 6 assarii, and reported on
32 coins from Ephesus.

ancientone
image00310.jpg
MYSIA. Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. Cistophoric Tetradrachm.4 views(Silver, 27 mm, 12.49 g, 11 h),
c. 92-88. Basket (cista mystica) from which snake coils; around, ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev. Two snakes coiled around a bow case; to left, ?EP? monogram; to right, serpent-entwined staff of Asclepius; between snakes' heads,
A? above monogram of ?PYT. Kleiner, Hoard 29. SNG France -.
Ruslan K
image00309.jpg
MYSIA. Pergamon. Circa 166-67 BC. Cistophoric Tetradrachm.73 views(Silver, 27 mm, 12.50 g, 12 h), c. 92-88.
Basket (cista mystica) from which snake coils; around, ivy wreath with fruits.
Rev. Two snakes coiled around a bow case; to left, ?EP? monogram; to right, serpent-entwined staff of Asclepius; between snakes' heads,
EY above monogram of ?PYT. Kleiner, Hoard 33. SNG France 1736-7.
2 commentsRuslan K
lydia1.jpg
Nacrasa, Lydia, c. 138 - 161 A.D. 8 views Bronze AE 16, RPC III 1812; SNG Cop 295; BMC Lydia p. 166, 7; SNG Munchen 335; SNGvA 3033 var. (magistrate); Imhoof-Blumer Lydien -, aVF/F, well centered, green patina, light corrosion, Nakrasa (near Kirkagach, Turkey) mint, 2.749 grams, 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Marcus Junianus strategos, c. 98 - 150 A.D.; obverse EΠI CTPA MAP IOVNIANOV, bearded head of Herakles right; reverse NAKPACITΩN, snake coiled around omphalos, head left; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection;rare; From Forum Ancient coins auction NORMAN K
812.jpg
nicaea005a2 viewsElagabalus
Nicaea, Bithynia

Obv: Μ ΑΥΡH ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟϹ ΑΥΓ, laureate head right.
Rev: NIKA-IEΩN, Asclepius standing, facing, looking left, resting on serpent entwined staff.
22 mm, 6.33 gms

RPC Online 3117; CNG EA 369, lot 418; Hirsch 293, lot 2890; Nomos Obolos 5, lot 692
Charles M
Pergamon_Asclepius.jpg
Pergamon - AE 1724 views133-16 BC
head of Asclepius right
a serpent-entwined staff
ΑΣΚΛΗΠΙΟΥ / ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ
Sear #3971
3,98g 17mm
Johny SYSEL
coins70.JPG
Pergamon, Mysia33 viewsPergamon or Pergamum (Greek: Πέργαμος, modern day Bergama in Turkey, 397′N 2711′E) was an ancient Greek city, in Mysia, northwestern Anatolia, 16 miles from the Aegean Sea, located on a promontory on the north side of the river Caicus (modern day Bakıray), that became an important kingdom during the Hellenistic period, under the Attalid dynasty, 282-129 BC. G34

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. The Great Altar of Pergamon is in the Pergamon Museum of Berlin.

Pergamon had the second best library in the ancient Greek civilisation, after Alexandria. When the Ptolemies stopped exporting papyrus, partly because of competitors and partly because of shortages, the Pergamenes invented a new substance to use in codices, called pergaminus or parchment after the city. This was made of fine calf skin, a predecessor of vellum.

When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

Close to the city was a sanctuary of Asclepius, the god of healing. In this place people with health problems could bath in the water of the sacred spring, and in the patients' dreams Asklepios would appear in a vision to tell them how to cure their illness. Archeology has found lots of gifts and dedications that people would make afterwards, such as small terracotta body parts, no doubt representing what had been healed.

In the first century AD, the Christian Church at Pergamon was one of the Seven Churches to which the Book of Revelation was addressed (Revelation 1:11, NRSV).

Pergamon, Mysia, struck by Philetairos, 282-263 BC.
Obv: head of athena wearing attic helmet right.
Rev: FILETAIROU, Asklepios seated left, feeding snake from patera.
SNG BN 1643 ff.

ecoli
PhilipI_Deultum_Asclepius.jpg
Philip I, Deultum, Asclepius, AE1718 viewsAE17, 3.0 g
obv: IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate and draped bust right
rev: C F P D, Asclepius standing facing, head left, holding snake-entwined staff.
areich
AezaniTrebonianusGallus1_Unpub_small.jpg
Phrygia, Aezani. Trebonianus Gallus. Unrecorded?21 viewsPhrygia, Aezani. Trebonianus Gallus (AD 251253). 28mm, 10.6g(?), 6h.
Obverse: ΑVΤ ΔЄΙΒ ΤΡЄΒ ΓΑΛ[ΛΟC?], laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind.
Reverse: ΑΙΖΑΝЄΙ ΤΩΝ, Asclepius(?) standing left, holding uncertain object in right hand and snake-entwined staff (?) in left.
References: BMC - Isegrim -
Ex Numismatik Lanz (eBay), 7-6-2013.
Mark Fox
akmoneia_zeus_ask_res.jpg
PHRYGIA, AKMONEIA21 views2nd - 1st Century BC
18.5 mm; 2.96 g
O: laureate head of Zeus right;
R: AKMON[I] TIMOΘE[O MHTΡO? or MENEΛA?], Asklepius standing facing, resting left hand on snake entwined staff
Akmoneia mint; cf BMC 10, SNG Von Aulock 3365
laney
D8.jpg
Prusias II (180-149 BC) Kingdom of Bithynia61 viewsObverse:
Head of Dionysos right, wreathed with ivy

Reverse:
The Centaur Chiron right, playing lyre; wears wreath, and chlamys of animal skin
'BASILEWS PROUSIOU'
HY monogram right.

Diameter: 21mm

Ref: SNG Cop 635, Aulock 255

Notes:
A great healer, astrologer, and respected oracle, Chiron was said to be the first among centaurs and highly revered as a teacher and tutor. Among his pupils were many heroes: Asclepius, Aristaeus, Ajax, Aeneas, Actaeon, Caeneus, Theseus, Achilles, Jason, Peleus, Telamon, Perseus, sometimes Heracles, Oileus, Phoenix, and in one Byzantine tradition, even Dionysos.
Xerxes King of Kings
Caracalla_Denarius_Asclepius.jpg
Roman Empire , Emperor Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.48 viewsSilver Denarius.
Ref; RIC IV 251; RSC III 302; BMCRE V p. 451, 103; Hunter III 27; SRCV II 6834, Very Fine , excellent portrait, slightly off center on a broad flan, some die wear, Rome mint, weight 3.232g, maximum diameter 19.2mm, die axis 180o, Struck in 215 A.D..
Obverse : ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right.
Reverse : P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, tribune of the people for 18 years, consul 4 times, father of the country), Aesculapius standing slightly right, head left, leaning on snake-entwined staff in right hand, globe at feet on right.


Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Aglaea and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing.

The Sam Mansourati Collection./Given as a souvenir to a superb dear friend Dr. Joseph Diaz.
3 commentsSam
GORDIAN_III_AR_DENARIUS_SALUS.jpg
Roman Empire , Emperor Gordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius97 viewsGordian III. AD 238-244. AR Denarius (20 mm, 2.92 g, 1 h) . Rome mint, 4th officina. 7th emission, struck AD 240.

Obverse : Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right .
Reverse : Salus standing right, feeding serpent from patera.

References: RIC IV 129a; RSC 325.
Superb extremely fine .

Salus was a Roman goddess. She was the goddess of health and the daughter of Asclepius God of Medicine .
Hygieia for Ancient Greeks.

New Owner : Miss. Arianna Parrillo.

EX ; The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 2032

Marcus Antonius Gordianus (January 20, 225 February 11, 244), known in English as Gordian III, was a Roman Emperor from 238 to 244. Marcus Antonius Gordianus' mother was the daughter of Gordian I and the sister of Gordian II. This made him the grandson and nephew of the two Gordian emperors. His younger sister was called Gordiana. Gordian had assumed the name of his maternal grandfather in 238.
It was the public hostility towards the successors of the Gordian emperors which brought the thirteen year old boy to the attention of the Roman senate. Not only was he a Gordian and hence to the ordinary Roman people's liking, but so too was his family very rich. Rich enough to finance a bonus payment to the people.So Gordian III became Caesar (junior emperor) alongside the two new Augusti Balbinus and Pupienus. But only a few months after this, Balbinus and Pupienus was murdered by the praetorian guard.This left Gordian III accede to the throne as emperor.
In 241 Gordian married Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, the daughter of Timesitheus. Gordian joined Timesitheus who was campaigning against the Persians. When Timesitheus died of an illness, he was replaced by Philip the Arab who was to become emperor when Gordian III died in 244. How Gordian died is not known, although Philip blamed it on an illness and it is thought that Philip engineered a mutiny. Gordian III was deified after his death. Gordian ruled from 238-244.

Gordian III is considered one of the most powerful men in the world.
1 commentsSam
Caracalla_AR_Asclepius.jpg
Roman Empire / Emperor Caracalla , Silver Denarius. 87 viewsCaracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.
Silver denarius, RIC IV 251; RSC III 302; BMCRE V p. 451, 103; Hunter III 27; SRCV II 6834, Choice EF, nice portrait, well centered, Rome mint, weight 2.902g, maximum diameter 18.5mm, die axis 180o, 215 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P (high priest, tribune of the people for 18 years, consul for the 4th time, father of the country), Aesculapius standing slightly right, head left, leaning on snake-entwined staff in right hand, globe at feet on right.

Asclepius is the god of medicine and healing in ancient Greek mythology. Asclepius represents the healing aspect of the medical arts, while his daughters Hygieia, Meditrina, Iaso, Aceso, Aglaea and Panacea (literally, "all-healing") symbolize the forces of cleanliness, medicine, and healing.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.

Given as a wedding present to my dear cousin Dr. Pierre Bazo.
3 commentsSam
Gordianus_III_AR_Denarius_Salus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE / Emperor Gordian III , AD ( 238 244 )86 viewsSilver Denarius , Rome mint , 3.18 gr .
Obverse ; IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG { IMP[erator] GORDIANVS PIVS FEL[ix] AVG[vstvs] / Emperor Gordianus, Dutiful Wise Augustus } , laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, from behind.
Reverse ; SALVS AVGVSTI, ( [Dedicated to] To the health of the Emperors ) Salus standing right, draped, from patera held in left hand, feeding snake held in right hand .
References ; RIC IV 129A (R), RSC IV 325, Hunter III 62, SRCV III 8681.

Choice EF example , excellent portrait, and artistic well executed dies.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 20610.
Given as a souvenir to a dear friend. ( 8/18/2016 )
Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks ( Her name is the source of the word "hygiene." ) , who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.

*The logo of Pharmacology was taken from Salus 's Patera and snake .

Sam
Maximinus_I_Denarius_Salus~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE / Emperor Maximinus I (AD 235 - 238) Silver Denarius Salus 89 viewsMaximinus I, 235 - 238 AD
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint, struck Mar 235 - Jan 236 A.D.
20mm, 3.23 gr.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus right.
IMP[erator] MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG[vstvs] Emperor Maximinus Dutiful Augustus

Reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI ( [Dedicated to] To the health of the Emperors ) , Salus ( Hygieia - Greek - ), seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar, from Patera in right hand, resting left elbow on throne.

References ; RIC 85
A superb Choice EF masterpiece example , artistic and well executed dies.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 20450
Given as a souvenir to a dear friend. ( 8/18/2016 )

Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks (Her name is the source of the word "hygiene." ) , who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.

*The logo of Pharmacology was taken from Salus 's Patera and snake .
1 commentsSam
moneta 699b.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Septimius Severus, Nicopolis, AE1735 viewsobv: Laureate, draped bust right
rev: Asclepius standing left, holding snake-entwined staff
Struck 193-211 A.D. at Nicopolis ad Istrum
1 commentsJericho
Maximinus_I_Denarius_Salus.jpg
ROMAN, Maximinus I (AD 235 - 238) Silver Denarius Salus 209 viewsMaximinus I, 235 - 238 AD
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint, struck Mar 235 - Jan 236 A.D.
20mm, 3.22 grams
Obverse: IMP MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Maximinus right.
IMP[erator] MAXIMINVS PIVS AVG[vstvs] Emperor Maximinus Dutiful Augustus

Reverse: SALVS AVGVSTI ( [Dedicated to] To the health of the Emperors ) , Salus ( Hygieia - Greek - ), seated left, feeding snake rising up from altar, from Patera in right hand, resting left elbow on throne.

References ; RIC 85
A superb Choice EF masterpiece example , artistic and well executed dies.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection./ NO. RI 20450.
Given as a souvenir to a dear friend. ( 8/18/2016 )


Salus was the Roman goddess of health. She was Hygieia to the Greeks ( Her name is the source of the word "hygiene." ), who believed her to be the daughter of Aesculapius, the god of medicine and healing, and Epione, the goddess of soothing of pain. Her father Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one serpent bringing another healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.

*The logo of Pharmacology was taken from Salus 's Patera and snake .
5 commentsSam
IMG_0011.JPG
Roman, Septimius Severus78 viewsAe 26/27. Wt 13g. Die axis 180. Septimius Severus, laureate right. AVT.K.A.CEMT.CEOVHPOC.
Rev. Aeslepiad Triad (Hygieia, Telesphorus, Asclepius)
Von Aulock 6243 BMC. (struck from same 2 dies but better).
Chris A
1884__Savoca_25th_Blue_Auction_lot_1289.jpg
saitta002a0 viewsElagabalus
Saitta, Lydia

Obv: AVT K M AVP ANTΩNЄINOC, laureate draped cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: ƐΠ ΦΑΒ ΓΑΙΟV ΑΡΧ Α [Τ Β?] →ϹΑΙΤΤΗ/ΝΩΝ, Asclepius standing facing, looking left, holding serpent-staff, and Hygieia standing facing, looking right, feeding serpent from patera.
23 mm, 5.33 gms

RPC Online 4483; SNG Leypold 1167

From Savoca Coins 25th Blue Auction, lot 1289
Charles M
Septimius_Severus_Asclepius.JPG
Septimius Severus Asclepios47 viewsMagistrate Aurelius Gallus.

Septimius Severus, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 193-211 AD, 26mm, 12.9g,
OBV: AV K C CEYHPOC, laureate and draped bust right
REV: VP AV GALLOV NIKOPOLITWN ΠPOC I below, Asclepios standing facing, head left,
holding serpent entwined staff

This coin appears to be unlisted with this OBV and REV combo. The reverse is similar to Moushmov 909 but the obverse legend is different.

RARE
1 commentsRomanorvm
coins126.JPG
Severus Alexander 17 viewsSalus

Hygieia (Roman equivalent: Salus) was a daughter of Asclepius. She was the goddess of health, cleanliness and sanitation (and later: the moon), and played an important part in her father's cult (see also: asklepieion). While her father was more directly associated with healing, she was associated with the prevention of sickness and the continuation of good health.

Though Hygieia had been the subject of a local cult since at least the 7th century BC, she did not begin to spread out until the Oracle at Delphi recognized her, and after the devastating Athens plague in 429 and 427 BC and in Rome in 293 BC. Her primary temples were in Epidaurus, Corinth, Cos and Pergamon.

Pausanias remarked that, at the asclepieion of Titane in Sicyon (founded by Alexanor, Asclepius' grandson), statues of Hygieia were covered by women's hair and pieces of Babylonian clothes. According to inscriptions, the same sacrifices were offered at Paros.

Ariphron, a Sicyonian artist from the 4th century BC wrote a well-known hymn celebrating her. Statues of Hygieia were created by Scopas, Bryaxis and Timotheus, among others.

She was often depicted as a young woman feeding a large snake that was wrapped around her body. Sometimes the snake would be drinking from a jar that she carried. These attributes were later adopted by the Gallo-Roman healing goddess, Sirona.

Severus Alexander Denarius, RIC 14, RSC 218, BMC 33
222 AD. IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right /P M TR P COS P P, Salus seated left, feeding snake arising from altar.

Base metal.
ecoli
asklepios.jpg
temple token from Antioch, Asklepios / serpent staff, AE1531 viewsSyria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch(?). Ca. 120-130s A.D.
15mm, 3.25g

'temple token' . Head of Asclepius right / Serpent-entwined staff. Butcher 12i; SNG BN 1855 (Pergamum).

long assumed to be from Pergamum in Mysia but accd. to Butcher Antiochene or of north Syrian origin.
'During the reign of Domitian there was constructed on the slopes of Mt. Silpius at Antioch a temple to Asclepius. Since the coins carry no ethnic or mark of denomination, it seems plausible that these were issued as temple tokens rather than as coin of the realm.'

McAlee, Coinage of Roman Antioch, p. 85, Fig. 14.
"Could be from Antioch, of Hadrianic date, judging from apparent find spots and officina letters A, B, G on some specimens, the same sequence as on civic coins of Antioch under Hadrian. Not included in catalogue, however, because lack of ethnic and date suggests they might be tokens not coins." (paraphrased)
areich
temple_token_from_Antioch,_Asklepios___serpent_staff,_AE15.JPG
Temple token from Antioch, Asklepios / serpent staff, AE15 60 viewsTemple token from Antioch, Asklepios / serpent staff, AE15
Syria, Seleucis and Pieria, Antioch(?). Ca. 120-130s A.D. 15mm, 3.25g. Head of Asclepius right / Serpent-entwined staff. Butcher 12i; SNG BN 1855 (Pergamum). Long assumed to be from Pergamum in Mysia but accd. to Butcher Antiochene or of north Syrian origin. 'During the reign of Domitian there was constructed on the slopes of Mt. Silpius at Antioch a temple to Asclepius. Since the coins carry no ethnic or mark of denomination, it seems plausible that these were issued as temple tokens rather than as coin of the realm.' McAlee, Coinage of Roman Antioch, p. 85, Fig. 14. "Could be from Antioch, of Hadrianic date, judging from apparent find spots and officina letters A, B, G on some specimens, the same sequence as on civic coins of Antioch under Hadrian. Not included in catalogue, however, because lack of ethnic and date suggests they might be tokens not coins."Ex areich, photo credit areich
Podiceps
coin824.JPG
Thrace; Anchialus (Ulpia Anchialus); Antoninus Pius18 viewsAnchialus (Ulpia Anchialus), Thrace; Antoninus Pius

bare head of Antoninus Pius, r.
Asclepius standing, l., holding serpent-staff
ecoli
Carac1stCaes.jpg
[1004a] Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.29 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 2, gF, Rome, 2.662g, 17.2mm, 0o; type from his first issue as Caesar., 196 A.D. Obverse: M AVR ANTONINVS CAES, boy's bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: SECVRITAS PERPETVA (Security Everlasting), Minerva with aegis on breast, standing left, holding spear in left and resting right on shield on the ground; well centered on a tight flan; scarce. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (Caracalla)

Michael L. Meckler,
Ohio State University

Caracalla was born 4 April 188 in Lyon, where his father was serving as governor of the province of Gallia Lugdunensis under the emperor Commodus. The child's name originally seems to have been Lucius Septimius Bassianus, the cognomen commemorating the family of the boy's Syrian mother, Julia Domna. When he was seven years old, his name was changed to Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. The name change was a way of connecting the family of Severus to that of the Antonines. Caracalla was a nickname taken from the name of a type of cloak popularized by the emperor, but this nickname, originally derisive, was never used officially.


From the time of his name change to Antoninus, Caracalla was the designated heir of Severus. Less than three years later he was proclaimed emperor, officially joining his father as co-rulers of the empire. At the age of 14 he was married to the daughter of the praetorian prefect Plautianus Publia Fulvia, Plautilla, but the teenager despised his wife. The marriage ended less than three years later after the execution of Plautianus for treason, and there were no children.

Squabbling and rivalry developed between Caracalla and Geta, who was only 11 months younger than his brother. Severus felt the lack of responsibilities in Rome contributed to the ill-will between his sons and decided that the family would travel to Britain to oversee military operations there. Caracalla was involved in directing the army's campaigns, while Geta was given civilian authority and a promotion to joint emperor with his father and brother. Within two years of the imperial family's arrival in Britain, Severus' health began to deteriorate, but his sons' relationship showed no signs of improvement. Severus died 4 February 211. Caracalla was 22 years old, Geta 21.

The brothers returned to Rome as joint emperors, but they eyed each other with suspicion and failed to cooperate on government appointments and policy decisions. Caracalla was being advised to have Geta murdered, and after at least one unsuccessful attempt, Geta was killed in late December 211. The murder led to a wholesale slaughter of Geta's supporters and sympathizers, and soldiers were allowed to wreak havoc on the residents of Rome. The looting and bloodshed lasted for at least two weeks, and one contemporary source claims 20,000 people were killed.

The year 212 saw a flurry of administrative reforms under the young emperor's leadership. Soldiers received increases in pay and in legal rights, but the most noteworthy change was the bestowal of Roman citizenship upon all free residents of the empire. This grant of universal citizenship, called by scholars the Constitutio Antoniniana, allowed for greater standardization in the increasingly bureaucratic Roman state. Construction was also well underway on the magnificant baths in Rome that would bear the emperor's name. The main building seems to have been completed four years later, but the entire complex was not finished until the reign of Alexander Severus.

Caracalla spent little time in Rome after the spring of 213. A visit to Gaul and a military campaign along the borders of Upper Germany and Raetia occupied much of the rest of the year. Winter may have been spent in Rome, but the following year Caracalla made a journey to the East in preparation for a war against the Parthians. Along the way, the emperor displayed an increasing fascination and identification with Alexander the Great. Like the Macedonian prince, however, Caracalla would not survive an expedition to the East. Only his ashes would return to Rome.

Civil war in the Parthian realm between brothers and rival kings Vologaeses VI and Artabanus V brought instability to the entire region, and Caracalla wished to take advantage of that instability to increase Roman control. Osroene was annexed in 213, but an attempt in the same year to take over Armenia backfired. Caracalla's campaigns in the East seemed designed to harass the Parthians more than anything else. In 215, Caracalla suspended plans to invade Parthia after Vologaeses handed over two political refugees, although Roman troops were sent into Armenia. The following year the emperor led his troops into Mesopotamia after being rebuffed in his request to marry the daughter of Artabanus. Roman armies were generally unopposed in their forays, the Parthian forces having retreated farther east. The Romans returned back across the Euphrates, wintering in Edessa.

Between campaigning seasons, Caracalla made a notorious visit to Alexandria in the fall and winter of 215-16. Rioting accompanied the imperial visit, and retribution was swift. The governor of Egypt was executed as were thousands of the city's young men. Alexandria was cordoned off into zones to prevent the free movement of residents, and games and privileges were revoked.

The emperor visited Alexandria for intellectual and religious reasons, staying at The Serapeum and being present at the temple's sacrifices and cultural events. Earlier, during the German war, the emperor visited the shrine of the Celtic healing-god Grannus. Caracalla also visited the famous temple of Asclepius in Pergamum and fully participated in its program, which involved sleeping inside the temple compound and having his dreams interpreted.

It was this religious devotion that led to Caracalla's murder in 217. Although suspicious of the praetorian prefect Macrinus, Caracalla allowed himself to be accompanied by only a small, select corps of bodyguards on an early spring trip from the camp at Edessa to the temple of the moon-god at Carrhae, about 25 miles away. During the journey back on 8 April 217, Caracalla was killed. The returning guards claimed the emperor was ambushed while defecating, and that the alleged assassin was one of their own, a soldier named Martialis. Martialis was himself killed by the avenging guards, or so the story went. Suspicion was strong that Macrinus arranged the entire affair.

Caracalla's violent end seemed appropriate for an emperor who, early in his reign, had his own brother killed. Yet the moralizing about fratricide by both ancient and modern historians obscures the energetic, reformist and even intellectual character of Caracalla's reign. Some of the reforms, especially the pay raise for soldiers, would prove burdensome for future emperors, but the changes brought about in the little more than five years of Caracalla's sole rule would have long-lasting implications throughout the empire for generations to come.


Copyright (C) 1998, Michael L. Meckler. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors; http://www.roman-emperors.org/sepsev.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
CaracallaRIC108.jpg
[1004b] Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.30 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 108, RSC 510, VF, 2.967g, 19.2mm, 180o, Rome mint, 208 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse PROF PONTIF TR P XI COS III, Emperor on horseback right, captive at feet; scarce. Ex FORVM.

This coin refers to the departure of Caracalla, Septimius, and Geta on their British expedition. Our dating of this departure to the year 208 depends on these coins dated TR P XI for Caracalla and TR P XVI for Septimius (Joseph Sermarini).

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus (Caracalla)

Michael L. Meckler,
Ohio State University

Caracalla was born 4 April 188 in Lyon, where his father was serving as governor of the province of Gallia Lugdunensis under the emperor Commodus. The child's name originally seems to have been Lucius Septimius Bassianus, the cognomen commemorating the family of the boy's Syrian mother, Julia Domna. When he was seven years old, his name was changed to Marcus Aurelius Antoninus. The name change was a way of connecting the family of Severus to that of the Antonines. Caracalla was a nickname taken from the name of a type of cloak popularized by the emperor, but this nickname, originally derisive, was never used officially.


From the time of his name change to Antoninus, Caracalla was the designated heir of Severus. Less than three years later he was proclaimed emperor, officially joining his father as co-rulers of the empire. At the age of 14 he was married to the daughter of the praetorian prefect Plautianus Publia Fulvia, Plautilla, but the teenager despised his wife. The marriage ended less than three years later after the execution of Plautianus for treason, and there were no children.

Squabbling and rivalry developed between Caracalla and Geta, who was only 11 months younger than his brother. Severus felt the lack of responsibilities in Rome contributed to the ill-will between his sons and decided that the family would travel to Britain to oversee military operations there. Caracalla was involved in directing the army's campaigns, while Geta was given civilian authority and a promotion to joint emperor with his father and brother. Within two years of the imperial family's arrival in Britain, Severus' health began to deteriorate, but his sons' relationship showed no signs of improvement. Severus died 4 February 211. Caracalla was 22 years old, Geta 21.

The brothers returned to Rome as joint emperors, but they eyed each other with suspicion and failed to cooperate on government appointments and policy decisions. Caracalla was being advised to have Geta murdered, and after at least one unsuccessful attempt, Geta was killed in late December 211. The murder led to a wholesale slaughter of Geta's supporters and sympathizers, and soldiers were allowed to wreak havoc on the residents of Rome. The looting and bloodshed lasted for at least two weeks, and one contemporary source claims 20,000 people were killed.

The year 212 saw a flurry of administrative reforms under the young emperor's leadership. Soldiers received increases in pay and in legal rights, but the most noteworthy change was the bestowal of Roman citizenship upon all free residents of the empire. This grant of universal citizenship, called by scholars the Constitutio Antoniniana, allowed for greater standardization in the increasingly bureaucratic Roman state. Construction was also well underway on the magnificant baths in Rome that would bear the emperor's name. The main building seems to have been completed four years later, but the entire complex was not finished until the reign of Alexander Severus.

Caracalla spent little time in Rome after the spring of 213. A visit to Gaul and a military campaign along the borders of Upper Germany and Raetia occupied much of the rest of the year. Winter may have been spent in Rome, but the following year Caracalla made a journey to the East in preparation for a war against the Parthians. Along the way, the emperor displayed an increasing fascination and identification with Alexander the Great. Like the Macedonian prince, however, Caracalla would not survive an expedition to the East. Only his ashes would return to Rome.

Civil war in the Parthian realm between brothers and rival kings Vologaeses VI and Artabanus V brought instability to the entire region, and Caracalla wished to take advantage of that instability to increase Roman control. Osroene was annexed in 213, but an attempt in the same year to take over Armenia backfired. Caracalla's campaigns in the East seemed designed to harass the Parthians more than anything else. In 215, Caracalla suspended plans to invade Parthia after Vologaeses handed over two political refugees, although Roman troops were sent into Armenia. The following year the emperor led his troops into Mesopotamia after being rebuffed in his request to marry the daughter of Artabanus. Roman armies were generally unopposed in their forays, the Parthian forces having retreated farther east. The Romans returned back across the Euphrates, wintering in Edessa.

Between campaigning seasons, Caracalla made a notorious visit to Alexandria in the fall and winter of 215-16. Rioting accompanied the imperial visit, and retribution was swift. The governor of Egypt was executed as were thousands of the city's young men. Alexandria was cordoned off into zones to prevent the free movement of residents, and games and privileges were revoked.

The emperor visited Alexandria for intellectual and religious reasons, staying at The Serapeum and being present at the temple's sacrifices and cultural events. Earlier, during the German war, the emperor visited the shrine of the Celtic healing-god Grannus. Caracalla also visited the famous temple of Asclepius in Pergamum and fully participated in its program, which involved sleeping inside the temple compound and having his dreams interpreted.

It was this religious devotion that led to Caracalla's murder in 217. Although suspicious of the praetorian prefect Macrinus, Caracalla allowed himself to be accompanied by only a small, select corps of bodyguards on an early spring trip from the camp at Edessa to the temple of the moon-god at Carrhae, about 25 miles away. During the journey back on 8 April 217, Caracalla was killed. The returning guards claimed the emperor was ambushed while defecating, and that the alleged assassin was one of their own, a soldier named Martialis. Martialis was himself killed by the avenging guards, or so the story went. Suspicion was strong that Macrinus arranged the entire affair.

Caracalla's violent end seemed appropriate for an emperor who, early in his reign, had his own brother killed. Yet the moralizing about fratricide by both ancient and modern historians obscures the energetic, reformist and even intellectual character of Caracalla's reign. Some of the reforms, especially the pay raise for soldiers, would prove burdensome for future emperors, but the changes brought about in the little more than five years of Caracalla's sole rule would have long-lasting implications throughout the empire for generations to come.


Copyright (C) 1998, Michael L. Meckler. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors; http://www.roman-emperors.org/sepsev.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
PergaAthenaOwl.jpg
[2400a] Pergamon, Mysia: AE14, ca. 300 BC70 viewsMYSIA, PERGAMON, 14, ca. 300 BC. BMC 15, SGC 3965. 2.0 gm. VF/aVF; Pergamon mint. Obverse: Head of Athena right, in close fitting crested helmet; Reverse; ATHENAS - NIKHFOPOY either side of owl standing, facing, wings closed; all within olive-wreath. Obverse device a clean strike of a lovely Athena. Ex Inclinatiorama.

The city of ancient Pergamon (or Pergamum, today's Bergama) was created by the newly-founded royal dynasty in the mid-third century BCE. It became one of the classic late-Hellenistic cities, on a dramatically steep site, with imaginatiave solutions to the urban design problems created by the site, wonderfully embellished by the generous attention of its royal (and other) patrons. The site divides into two main sections, the steep upper town and the flat lower town. Though today's Bergama is entirely in the lower areas, a number of important remains have survived even there: the Asklepieion, one of the major healing centres of antiqity, the Red Hall (Serapeum), the stadium, a Roman Bridge and tunnel. But it is the upper town that captures the imagination, with its extensive remains, innovations, and drama.
http://www.chass.utoronto.ca/~prchrdsn/pergamon.htm

The Attalids, the descendants of Attalus, the father of Philetaerus who came to power in 282 BC, were among the most loyal supporters of Rome among the Hellenistic successor states. Under Attalus I, they allied with Rome against Philip V of Macedon, during the first and second Macedonian Wars, and again under Eumenes II, against Perseus of Macedon, during the Third Macedonian War. For support against the Seleucids, the Attalids were rewarded with all the former Seleucid domains in Asia Minor.

The Attalids ruled with intelligence and generosity. Many documents survive showing how the Attalids would support the growth of towns through sending in skilled artisans and by remitting taxes. They allowed the Greek cities in their domains to maintain nominal independence. They sent gifts to Greek cultural sites like Delphi, Delos, and Athens. They defeated the invading Celts. They remodeled the Acropolis of Pergamum after the Acropolis in Athens. When Attalus III died without an heir in 133 BC he bequeathed Pergamon to Rome, in order to prevent a civil war.

The Great Altar of Pergamon is in the Pergamon Museum, Berlin. The base of this altar remains on the upper part of the Acropolis. Other notable structures still in existence on the upper part of the Acropolis include: a Hellenistic theater with a seating capacity of 10,000; the Sanctuary of Trajan (also known as the Trajaneum); the Sancturay of Athena; the Library; royal palaces; the Heron; the Temple of Dionysus; the Upper Agora; and the Roman baths complex. Pergamon's library on the Acropolis is the second best in the ancient Greek civilisation (the ancient Library of Pergamum), after that of Alexandria. When the Ptolemies stopped exporting papyrus, partly because of competitors and partly because of shortages, the Pergamenes invented a new substance to use in codices, called pergaminus or parchment after the city. This was made of fine calf skin, a predecessor of vellum. The lower part of the Acropolis has the following structures: the Upper Gymnasium, the Middle Gymnasium, the Lower Gymnasium, the Temple of Demeter, the Sanctuary of Hera, the House of Attalus, the Lower Agora and the Gate of Eumenes.

Three km south of the Acropolis was the Sanctuary of Asclepius (also known as the Asclepeion), the god of healing. In this place people with health problems could bath in the water of the sacred spring, and in the patients' dreams Asklepios would appear in a vision to tell them how to cure their illness. Archeology has found lots of gifts and dedications that people would make afterwards, such as small terracotta body parts, no doubt representing what had been healed. Notable extant structures in the Asclepeion include the Roman theater, the North Stoa, the South Stoa, the Temple of Asclepius, a circular treatment center (sometimes known as the Temple of Telesphorus), a healing spring, an underground passageway, a library, the Via Tecta (or the Sacred Way, which is a colonnaded street leading to the sanctuary) and a propylon.

Pergamon's other notable structure is the Serapis Temple (Serapeum) which was later transformed into the Red Basilica complex (or Kızıl Avlu in Turkish), about 1 km south of the Acropolis. It consists of a main building and two round towers. In the first century AD, the Christian Church at Pergamon inside the main building of the Red Basilica was one of the Seven Churches to which the Book of Revelation was addressed (Revelation 1:12, ESV).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pergamon

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
AsclepiosAE16SNGBNParis1828.jpg
[2470] Asclepios AE16, Pergamon (Mysia), 133 BC - Imperial Times. 63 viewsMysia, Pergamon. 133 BC - Imperial Times. SNG BN Paris 1828. AE 16mm (3.76 gm). Very fine. Obverse: head Asclepios right. Reverse: [A]ΣKΛHΠIO[Y] - [ΣΩ]THP[OΣ], Serpent curled around scepter of Asclepios. Ex Tom Vossen.

Asclepius
by Ron Leadbetter

Asclepius was a Greek hero who later become the Greek god of medicine and healing. The son of Apollo and Coronis, Asclepius had five daughters, Aceso, Iaso, Panacea, Aglaea and Hygieia. He was worshipped throughout the Greek world but his most famous sanctuary was located in Epidaurus which is situated in the northeastern Peloponnese. The main attribute of Asclepius is a physician's staff with an Asclepian snake wrapped around it; this is how he was distinguished in the art of healing, and his attribute still survives to this day as the symbol of the modern medical profession. The cock was also sacred to Asclepius and was the bird they sacrificed as his altar.

The mother of Asclepius, Coronis, was a mortal, the daughter of Phlegyas, a king of Thessaly. Coronis was unfaithful to Apollo, and Artemis, Apollo's twin sister, killed her for her unfaithfulness. Coronis was placed upon a funeral pyre. (One version says that Apollo cast her into the fires of his own anger.) As her body started to burn, Apollo felt sorrow for his unborn son and snatched the child Asclepius from his mother's corpse, saving him from death. Apollo then handed Asclepius to the Centaur Chiron who became his tutor and mentor.

Chiron taught Asclepius the art of healing. According to Pindar (Pythian Odes), Asclepius also acquired the knowledge of surgery, the use of drugs, love potions and incantations, and according to Apollodorus (the Library), Athena gave Asclepius a magic potion made from the blood of the Gorgon. Legend tells that the blood of the Gorgon has a different effect depending from which side the blood was taken. If taken from the right side of the Gorgon, it has a miraculous effect and is said to be able to bring the dead back to life, but taken from the left side it is a deadly poison.

With these gifts Asclepius exceeded the fringes of human knowledge. However, he offended the great god Zeus by accepting money in exchange for raising the dead. (In one version it was the goddess Artemis who implored Asclepius to resurrect Hippolytus, a favourite of hers.) In the eyes of Zeus, Asclepius' action upset the natural order of the universe - a mere mortal helping man evade death. With one swift action, the great Zeus sent down a thunderbolt killing both men. (In some versions Zeus only killed Asclepius.)
Realising the good Asclepius had brought to man, the great Zeus made him into a god, placing him among the stars, transforming Asclepius into the constellation Ophiuchus (the serpent-bearer). The snake was used in the healing ritual; non-poisonous snakes were left in the dormitory where the sick slept overnight on the bare ground.

The cult of Asclepius became very popular during the 300s BCE and the cult centres (known as an Asclepieion) were used by priests to cure the sick. Invalids also came to the shrines of Asclepius to find cures for their ailments (in the same fashion pilgrims visit Lourdes today.) The process of healing was known as incubation. The patient would spend the night in a dormitory. During the night they would supposedly be visited by the god in a dream. Priests would interpret the dreams and then recommend a remedy or give advice on how they could be cured with perhaps a recommended visit to the baths and gymnasiums. There were many centres and schools of medicine, from Trikkis in Thessaly to the island of Cos. It is believed that Hippocrates, a great doctor of antiquity, plied his trade on the island of Cos. It is also said that Hippocrates was a descendant of Asclepius.

The Romans adopted the cult of Asclepius, but changed his name to Latin; they called him Aesculapius.

"Asclepius." Encyclopedia Mythica. 2008. Encyclopedia Mythica Online.
10 Apr. 2008 .

The Asklepion of Pergamon dates from the 4th century BC. This therapeutic center was of the same type as the one in Kos- a large health center. Most of the remains today of this center belong to the changes that were carried out by Emperor Hadrian.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




Cleisthenes
 
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