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Search results - "Aquileia"
Julian-7.jpg
49 viewsJVLIAN II - AE3 - 355/360 - Aquileia mint
Obv.: D N CL IVLIANVS NOB CAES, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev.: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman. AQT in ex.
Gs. 2,5 mm. 16,7
RIC 213
Maxentius
Randy.JPG
Falling horseman63 viewsAll 15 official mints.
Alexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
Barbaous Mint

Updated coins with a new background (thanks Jay!)
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
valens12.jpg
Valens, RIC IX 12b Aquileia47 viewsValens, AE3, 367-375 CE.
Obverse: D N VALENS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing lert, holding wreath and palm.
Mintmark SMAQP Aquileia, 17.5 mm, 2.4 g.

NORMAN K
Maximian_RIC_Aquileia_29b_tflip.jpg
2 Maximian41 viewsMAXIMIANUS
AE1 Follis. 300 AD
IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales & cornucopia, AQP in ex.
RIC Aquileia 29b
Sosius
001638_l.jpg
7 Maxentius53 viewsMAXENTIUS
AE Follis (24-27 mm, 5.96 g)
Aquileia Mint, late Summer 307.

O: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.

R: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated l. on shield in tetrastyle temple, r. handing globe to Maxentius (in military dress, stading r.), l. hand holding sceptre; seated captive between;

Victories as acroteria; she-wolf and twins in pediment; AQP in ex.

RIC VI Aquileia 113.

Dark patina. Extremely fine.

Ex Auctiones GmbH
3 commentsSosius
Arcadius-Aquileia-RIC47d-2.JPG
Arcadius-Aquileia-RIC47d-227 viewsAE4, Aquileia mint 383-388AD
Obverse: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse:VICTORIA AVGGG, Two Victories facing with wreaths.
SMAQS in exergue
RIC 47d
13mm, 1.4 gms.
Jerome Holderman
constansaqs.jpg
Constans, RIC VIII 79 Aquileia15 viewsObverse: CONSTAN-S PF AVG, laurel and rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VICTORIAE DD AVGGQ NN, Two Victories facing each other with wreaths and palms
Mintmark: dot AQS, 15.5 mm., 1.1 g.
NORMAN K
aqp.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VII 145, Aquileia, 337-361 CE24 viewsObverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse:GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.
Mintmark: dot AQP, Aquileia 15.5 mm., 1.6 g.
RIC VII Aquileia 145
NORMAN K
gallien_providentia_res.jpg
(0253) GALLIENUS14 views253-268 AD
AE 20 mm, 2.49 g
O: GALLIENVS AVG radiate bust right
R: PROVID AVG Providentia standing left holding globe and transverse scepter; AQS in exe
Aquileia mint
laney
maxentius_temple_bk_res.jpg
(0306) MAXENTIUS17 views306 - 312 AD
AE Follis 25 mm
O: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG laureate head right
R: CONSERV VRB SVAE Roma steated in hexastyle temple holding globe and scepter
Aquileia mint
laney
constantius_ii_ft_aq_s_res.jpg
(0324) CONSTANTIUS II12 views324 - 337 AD (as Caesar)
337 - 361 AD (as Augustus)
AE 18 mm, 1.96 g
O: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG diademed draped cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO soldier advancing left and spearing a fallen horseman; II in left field; AQS in exe.
Aquileia mint
laney
GRATIAN_CONC_B_10_08.jpg
(0367) GRATIAN--CONCORDIA41 views367-383 AD
AE 17.5 mm 2.46 g
O: DN GRATIANVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
R: CONCORDIA AVGGG, Roma seated facing, head left, on throne, nolding globe and reversed spear
SMAQP in exe
Aquileia
RIC IX 32 (a) Scarce
laney
coin29.JPG
001. VRBS ROMA Aquileia15 viewsRIC VII Aquileia 122 R2
ecoli
coins476.JPG
001b. Crispus Aquileia Vota12 viewsRIC VII Aquileia 89 R2
ecoli
coin484.JPG
001b. Crispus Aquileia Vota7 viewsRIC VII Aquileia 108 S
ecoli
coins145.JPG
002. CONSTANTINOPOLIS Aquileia9 viewsRIC VII Aquileia 129
ecoli
02-Claudius-II-The-26.jpg
02. Claudius II: Thessalonica fractional.19 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CLAVDIO OPTIMO IMP / Veiled bust of Claudius II, Gothicus.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark:: . TS . Γ .
1.35 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #26; PBCC #906; Sear #16399.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
03-Constantius-The-25.jpg
03. Constantius I: Thessalonica fractional.21 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Thessalonica mint.
Obverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO PRINCIPI / Veiled bust of Constantius I.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: . T . SB .
1.78 gm., 16 mm.
RIC #25; PBCC #908; Sear unlisted.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
IMG_3433.jpg
04 Constantius Gallus32 views
DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right; A behind bust
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
bare-headed, reaching,LXXII left, wreath in center
AQP in ex
Aquileia 198
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
022.JPG
04 Constantius II94 viewsConstantius II AE3. D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is bare-headed, reaching backwards; II in left field, AQP in ex.
Aquileia 212
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
540152_498248696878713_800190106_n.jpg
04 Constantius II71 viewsD N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, A behind/ FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO soldier spearing falling enemy horseman, hair straight up, reaching backwards, LXXII to left, S between AQS in ex.
RIC Aquileia 193


"The reverse mark LXXII refers to the a standard of 72 coins to the pound. The gold solidus and silver light miliarense were both also struck at this c. 4.5 gram standard."
Randygeki(h2)
cniiaq112.jpg
04 Constantius II38 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, PDC, A behind/ Phrygian helmet, sitting on ground, arm(s) up, A in left field. AQT dot in ex

Aquileia 113/147
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4198.jpg
04 Constantius II27 viewsConstantius II AE3. D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is bare-headed, reaching backwards; LXXII left /Chi-Rho in centr, AQT in ex Aquileia 1951 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_3760.jpg
04 Constantius II55 views23 mm , 5,17g.
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind.

FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing horseman, Phrygian helmet, sitting on ground, arm(s) up, Star in left field

AQS Dot in ex.

RIC Aquileia 153
(horseman type corrected, acc. to RIC VIII p. 548, "Addenda and Corrigenda")
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4420.jpg
04 Constantius II16 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing a horseman, Phrygian helmet, forward on ground, on hands and knees
AQS dot / star in right field
25 mm 4.38 g
Aquileia 96
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
04-Maximianus-Sis-41.jpg
04. Maximian: Siscia fractional.43 viewsAE3 fractional (half follis?), 317-18, Siscia mint.
Obverse: DIVO MAXIMIANO SEN FORT IMP / Veiled bust of Maximian.
Reverse: REQVIES OPTIMORVM MERITORVM / Emperor seated on curule chair, raising right hand and holding sceptre.
Mint mark: SIS
1.61 gm., 15mm.
RIC #41; PBCC #838; Sear #16412.

Around the years 317 - 318, Constantine issued commemorative coins honoring three deified emperors: Claudius II Gothicus, Constantius I, and Maximian. It is not real clear when these coins were issued, but RIC assigns them to the years 317-18 saying there is evidence they were issued near or at the end of the Sol coinage. They are small AE3 in size (16 mm), but on flans that are much thinner and weigh significantly less than other coins of the period. Therefore they are generally regarded as fractionals. They were minted at Treveri, Arelate, Rome, Aquileia, Siscia, and Thessalonica.

Why these three emperors? Constantine claimed Claudius II Gothicus was one of his ancestors (probably not true). Constantius I was Constantine's father, and Maximian was the father of Constantine's wife, Fausta.

Callimachus
aquileia.jpg
07412 viewshill132
aquileia1.jpg
075 Magnus Maximus. AE423 viewsobv: DN MAG MA_XIMVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA_NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMAQS
1 commentshill132
aquileia2.jpg
076 Magnus maximus. AE415 viewsobv: DN MAG MA_XIMVS PF AVG pearl dia. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: SPES RO_MA NORVM campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMAQP
hill132
IMG_2755.JPG
1 Constans65 viewsCONSTANS

4.39g. 24 mm

Obv: D N CONSTANS P F AVG.
Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; A to left.
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO .
Constans standing left in galley, holding crowning Victory on globe and labarum with Chi-Rho; A to left; to right, Victory steering galley left. AQP dot in ex

Aquileia
RIC 117.
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Maximianus_Q0x1_h_mm_g-s.jpg
120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Aquileia, RIC VI 076a, AE-Follis, -/-/AQP, FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing, #172 views120a Maximianus Herculeus (285-286 Caesar, 286-305, 307-308 & 310 A.D. Augustus), Aquileia, RIC VI 076a, AE-Follis, -/-/AQP, FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing, #1
avers: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: FIDES MILITVM AVG G ET CAES S N N, Fides standing holding standard in each hand.
exergue: -/-/AQP, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 2nd reign, 306-307 A.D., ref: RIC-VI-076a, p-467, C-123,
Q-001
quadrans
ConstansVot.jpeg
1405a, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Alexandria)39 viewsBronze AE 4, RIC 37, gVF, Egypt, Alexandria, 1.54g, 15.0mm, 180o, 345-347 A.D. Obverse: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed head right; Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX in wreath, SMALA in exergue.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion UniversityPublished: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
Constans.jpg
1405n, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Siscia)56 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 241, S 3978, VM 69, VF, Siscia, 2.32g, 18.3mm, 180o. Obverse: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Phoenix radiate, standing on rocky mound, GSIS and symbol in ex; nice green patina.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
U2476F1OVDKUXTA.jpeg
1405t, Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D. (Thessalonica )38 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D., Bronze AE 3, unattributed; Thessalonica mint, 2.25g, 18.9mm, 0; aVF.

Flavius Julius Constans, third and youngest son of Constantine I and Fausta, was born between 320 and 323 A.D. Primary sources for the life and reign of Constans I are scarce. To reconstruct his life and career, one must draw on a variety of references in both fourth century and later works. Raised as a Christian, he was made a Caesar on 25 December 333 A.D. Constans I and his two brothers, after the death of their father on 22 May 337 and the subsequent "massacre of the princes" in which many other relatives were purged, met in the first part of September 337 in Pannonia to re-divide the empire among themselves. There they were acclaimed Augusti by the army. Constans' new realm included Italy, Africa, Illyricum, Macedonia, and Achaea. Shortly before his father's death, Constans' engagement to Olympias, the daughter of the Praetorian Prefect Ablabius, was announced; although the match was never solemnized because of political reasons.

It would appear that Constans was successful in the military sphere. Following his accession to the purple in 337, he seems to have won a victory over the Sarmatians. In 340 Constans was able to beat back an attempt by his brother Constantine II to seize some of his realm. The latter died in a battle fought near Aquileia and Constans absorbed his late brother's territory. In 341 and 342 he conducted a successful campaign against the Franci. He also visited Britain in 343, probably on a military campaign.

As an emperor Constans gets mixed reviews. In what may be a topos, sources suggest that the first part of his reign was moderate but in later years, however, he became overbearing. The emperor apparently attempted to obtain as much money as he could from his subjects and sold government posts to the highest bidder. His favorites were allowed to oppress his subjects. Sources also condemn his homosexuality. He did have some military success and, in addition to other military threats, he had to deal with Donatist-related bandits in North Africa.

Like his father Constantine I and his brother Constantius II, Constans had a deep interest in Christianity. Together with Constantius II he issued (or perhaps re-issued) a ban against pagan sacrifice in 341. The next year, they cautioned against the destruction of pagan temples. Unlike his brother Constantius II, who supported the Arian faction, he stood shoulder to shoulder with Athanasius and other members of the Orthodox clique. In fact, it is due to his request that the Council of Serdica was called to deal with the ecclesiastical squabble between Athanasius of Alexandria and Paul of Constantinople on one side and the Arian faction on the other.

When Magnentius was declared emperor in Gaul during January 350, Constans realized his reign was at an end. When he learned of the revolt, he fled toward Helena, a town in the Pyrenees. Constans was put to death by Gaeso and a band of Magnentius' assassins, who dragged their victim from a temple in which he had sought refuge.

By Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University and Robert Frakes, Clarion University.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Cnstntine2.jpg
1406a, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D. (Antioch)28 viewsConstantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC 87, gVF, Antioch, 2.17g, 17.6mm, 0o, 330-335 A.D. Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers, each holding spear and shield on ground, flanking two standards, SMANE in exergue.

Constantine II (February 317 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). The eldest son of Constantine I the Great and Fausta, he was born at Arles. Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II became Emperor jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans. His section of the Empire was Gaul, Britain and Spain. At first, he was the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion was Italy, Africa and Illyria. As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship, and in 340 he marched against Constans in Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle. Constans came to control Constantine II's portion of the empire.
Cleisthenes
Constantine2.jpg
1406c, Constantine II, 337-340 A.D.36 viewsConstantine II, 317-340. AE3, RIC VII, 74 ('theta' = r), page 581 2.22 grams, 333-335 AD, Constantinople mint, VF. Obverse : CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C - Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS - Two soldiers looking in at each other and both holding a spear; between them, two standards. CONS (theta) (dot) in exergue. Rare.

Constantine II (February 317 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). The eldest son of Constantine I the Great and Fausta, he was born at Arles. Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II became Emperor jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans. His section of the Empire was Gaul, Britain and Spain. At first, he was the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion was Italy, Africa and Illyria. As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship, and in 340 he marched against Constans in Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle. Constans came to control Constantine II's portion of the empire.
Cleisthenes
Aquileia_RIC_VIII_170,_148_Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_palm-AQT-palm_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #1101 views148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #1
avers:- D N MAGNEN TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 170, Sear 18829.
Q-001
quadrans
Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_AQP-palm_RIC-170_C-00_Aquileia-_Q-001_h_23-25mm_5,39g-s.jpg
148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #298 views148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #2
avers:- D N MAGNEN TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: -/-//palmbranch AQP palmbranch, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: 5,39g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 170, Sear 18829.
Q-002
quadrans
Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_star_AQP_RIC-173_Aquileia-_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 173, *//AQP, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories,108 views148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), Aquilea, RIC VIII 173, *//AQP, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories,
avers:- D N MAGNEN TIVS P F AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE D D N N AVG ET CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: *//AQP, diameter: 22-23mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 173,
Q-001
quadrans
MAurel RIC1058.jpg
161-180 AD - MARCUS AURELIUS AE sestertius - struck 172-173 AD37 viewsobv: M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXVII (laureate head right)
rev: GERMANICO AVG IMP VI COS III (trophy of arms, German {Marcomann} woman seated left below, in attitude of mourning, on two shields; German standing to right, his head turned and his hands bound behind him), SC in ex.
ref: RIC III 1058 (S), Cohen 227 (15frcs)
22.46gms, 30mm,
Very rare
History: In the second half of the second century was the most important and dangerous invasion of the Marcomanni. Their leader, Ballomar, had formed a coalition of Germanic tribes, they crossed the Danube and achieved a smashing victory over 20,000 Romans near Carnuntum. Ballomar then led the larger part of his host southwards towards Italy, while the remainder ravaged Noricum. The Marcomanni razed Opitergium (Oderzo) and besieged Aquileia. The army of praetorian prefect Furius Victorinus tried to relieve the city, but was defeated and its general slain.
In 172, the Roman legions crossed the Danube into Marcomannic territory. Although few details are known, the Romans achieved success, subjugating the Marcomanni and their allies, the Naristi and the Cotini. This fact is evident from the adoption of the title "Germanicus" by Marcus Aurelius, and the minting of coins with the inscription "Germania subacta". This rare coin is one of them.
berserker
IMG_3729~0.jpg
164. Maxentius (306-312 A.D.)16 viewsAv.: IMP C MAXENTIVS PF AVG
Rv.: CONSERV VRB SVAE
Ex.: AQS

AE Follis 24-26 / 7.3g
RIC VI 116 Aquileia
Juancho
RI_168bi_img.jpg
168 - Constantine II - Follis - RIC VII Ticinum 16718 viewsAE3
Obv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, Laureate, bust left, wearing imperial mantle, holding Victory on globe in right hand and mappa in left
Rev: VIRTVS EXERCIT, two captives seated at foot of banner inscribed VOT/XX in two lines
Minted in Aquileia (S | F //AQT).
Reference: RIC VII Aquileia 56 (R4)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169bg_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - Barbarous imitiation of RIC VIII Aquileia 09939 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTANS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor in military dress standing left on galley, holding Phoenix and labarum, Victory sitting at the stern, steering the ship
Marbarous imitation of a coin minted in Aquileia; (//AQP dot), A.D. 348-350
Reference: cf. RIC VIII Aquileia 99 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169ai_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 09972 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTANS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor in military dress standing left on galley, holding Phoenix and labarum, Victory sitting at the stern, steering the ship
Minted in Aquileia; (//AQP dot), A.D. 348-350
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 99 (C)
3 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_169p_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 103 27 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points upwards to the right.
Minted in Aquileia, officina 1; (/AQP Dot),
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 103
maridvnvm
RI_170cw_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia -24 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust left, holding globe in right hand, N in right field
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor bare headed & in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives in Phrygian helmets standing, facing each other before him
Minted in Aquileia (//AQP Dot)
Reference:- RIC VIII Aquileia -

Looking at RIC there are three issues for this type at Aquileia.

The first has no letters on either side. The captives are described as standing and would have AQP:dot: in exe. - RIC VIII Aquileia 107

The next two both have N behind the bust and an N in the left field on the reverse with the captives described as kneeling.

with AQP in exe this would be RIC VIII Aquileia 119
and with AQP* in exe this would be RIC VIII Aquileia 120

My example seems to be a mule from the later issues with letter behind the bust and the earlier issue with the captives standing but with no letter on the reverse.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170fl_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 09615 viewsAE2
Obv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman falls forwards on his hands and knees. He is wearing a cap
Minted in Aquileia; (_ | *//AQS dot). 348 A.D. - 350 A.D.
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 96 (S)
maridvnvm
RI_170bp_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 102 15 viewsAe2
Obv: CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe
Rev: FEL . TEMP . REPARATIO, Soldier advancing right, head left, holding spear and leading small figure from hut beneath tree
Minted in Aquileia (//AQS dot).
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 102 (C)
maridvnvm
RI_170cz_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 113/147 37 viewsAE2
Obv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right; A behind bust
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman is sitting on ground. He is wearing a cap
Minted in Aquileia (A | _ /AQP dot).
Reference:- RIC VIII Aquileia 147
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170cl_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Aquileia 21520 viewsAE3
Obv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He is bare headed
Minted in Aquileia (II | * //AQS Dot).
Reference:- RIC VIII Aquileia 215
maridvnvm
RI_170ee_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Aquileia 22828 viewsAE3
Obv: D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right;
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horsemanwears a pointed hat and reaches back towards the emperor but faces away!
Minted in Aquileia (* // dot AQS dot?).
Reference:- RIC VIII Aquileia 228 (C)

2.19 gms. 17.68 mm. 0 degrees.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170dt_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII VIII Aquileia 20822 viewsAE3
Obv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bare headed (hair straight up) and bearded and reaches towards emperor (type FH3)
Minted in Aquileia (II | _ //AQT). September A.D. 352 - November A.D. 355
Reference:- RIC VIII Aquileia 208 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_175l_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Aquileia 19420 viewsAE3
Obv: DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right; A behind bust
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching backwards
Minted in Aquileia (LXXII | S | _ // AQS),
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 194 (C).
maridvnvm
RI_175q_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Aquileia 19829 viewsAE3
Obv: DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right; A behind bust
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching backwards
Minted in Aquileia (LXXII | Wreath | _ // AQS),
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 198 (C).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_175d_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3 - RIC VIII Aquileia 209 14 viewsObv: DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching backwards
Minted in Aquileia (II | _ // AQT), September A.D. 352 - Winter A.D. 354
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 209 (C)
maridvnvm
IMG_4897.JPG
177. Constantine II (337340 A.D.)16 viewsAv.: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Rv.: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
in wreath: VOT / dot / V
Ex.: dot AQT dot

AE Follis 18 / 2.1g
RIC VII 95 var. Aquileia
Scarce!
Juancho
17k-Constantine-Aqu-048.jpg
17k. Constantine: Aquileia.18 viewsAE3, 320, Aquileia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG / Helmeted bust of Constantine.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCI / Standard with VOT XX on it, captive, seated on ground on either side. S in left field; F in right field.
Mint mark: AQP
2.63 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #48; PBCC #751; Sear #16323.
Callimachus
17o-Crispus-Aqu-009.jpg
17o. Crispus: Aquileia.17 viewsAE3, 317, Aquileia mint.
Obverse: CRISPVS NOB CAES / Laureate bust of Crispus.
Reverse: PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS / Crispus standing, helmeted and in military dress, cloak over shoulder, resting his shield on ground, holding spear.
Mint mark: AQT
3.71 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #9; PBCC #748; Sear 16709.

The reverse legend of this coin is unique in all of Roman coinage. It can not be a simple spelling error -- PRINCIPIA (military headquarters) for PRINCIPI (Prince) -- because it exists on coins from several different mints. Thus it has got to be taken as referring to the military training given to Crispus and his commission to Gaul in 317 - 318.
Callimachus
IMG_2438.JPG
19 Constantius II32 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, PDC, A behind/ Phrygian helmet, sitting on ground, arm(s) up, A in left field. AQT dot in ex

Aquileia 113/147
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_9001.JPG
195. Flavius Victor (387-388 A.D.)17 viewsAv.: DN FL VICTOR PF AVG
Rv.: SPES ROMANORVM
Ex.: SMAQP

AE Follis 13 / 1.3g
RIC IX Aquileia 55b
Juancho
VespDenSalus.jpg
1aw Vespasian44 views69-79

Denarius
Laureate head, right, IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN
Salus seated left with patera, SALVS AVG

RIC 513 (C2)

Suetonius wrote: The Flavians seized power, and the Empire, long troubled and adrift, afflicted by the usurpations and deaths of three emperors, at last achieved stability. True they were an obscure family, with no great names to boast of, yet one our country has no need to be ashamed of. . . . Vespasian was born in the Sabine country, in the little village of Falacrinae just beyond Reate (Rieti), on the 17th of November 9 AD in the consulship of Quintus Sulpicius Camerinus and Gaius Poppaeus Sabinus, five years before the death of Augustus. He was raised by his paternal grandmother Tertulla on her estate at Cosa. . . .

Under Claudius, he was sent to Germany (in 41 AD) to command a legion, thanks to the influence of Narcissus. From there he was posted to Britain (in 43 AD), where partly under the leadership of Aulus Plautius and partly that of Claudius himself, he fought thirty times, subjugating two powerful tribes, more than twenty strongholds, and the offshore island of Vectis (the Isle of Wight). This earned him triumphal regalia, and a little later two priesthoods and the consulship (in 51 AD) which he held for the last two months of the year. . . . He won, by lot, the governorship of Africa (in 63 AD), ruling it soundly and with considerable dignity. . . .

An ancient and well-established belief became widespread in the East that the ruler of the world at this time would arise from Judaea. This prophecy as events proved referred to the future Emperor of Rome, but was taken by the Jews to apply to them. They rebelled, killed their governor, and routed the consular ruler of Syria also, when he arrived to restore order, capturing an Eagle. To crush the rebels needed a considerable force under an enterprising leader, who would nevertheless not abuse power. Vespasian was chosen, as a man of proven vigour, from whom little need be feared, since his name and origins were quite obscure. Two legions with eight divisions of cavalry and ten cohorts of auxiliaries were added to the army in Judaea, and Vespasian took his elder son, Titus, along as one of his lieutenants. . . .

Yet Vespasian made no move, though his follower were ready and eager, until he was roused to action by the fortuitous support of a group of soldiers unknown to him, and based elsewhere. Two thousand men, of the three legions in Moesia reinforcing Othos forces, despite hearing on the march that he had been defeated and had committed suicide, had continued on to Aquileia, and there taken advantage of the temporary chaos to plunder at will. Fearing that if they returned they would be held to account and punished, they decided to choose and appoint an emperor of their own, on the basis that they were every bit as worthy of doing so as the Spanish legions who had appointed Galba, or the Praetorian Guard which had elected Otho, or the German army which had chosen Vitellius. They went through the list of serving consular governors, rejecting them for one reason or another, until in the end they unanimously adopted Vespasian, who was recommended strongly by some members of the Third Legion, which had been transferred to Moesia from Syria immediately prior to Neros death. . . .

Vespasian, an unheralded and newly-forged emperor, as yet lacked even a modicum of prestige and divine majesty, but this too he acquired. . . . Returning to Rome (in 70 AD) attended by such auspices, having won great renown, and after a triumph awarded for the Jewish War, he added eight consulships (AD 70-72, 74-77, 79) to his former one, and assumed the censorship. He first considered it essential to strengthen the State, which was unstable and well nigh fatally weakened, and then to enhance its role further during his reign. . . .
2 commentsBlindado
PupineusSestPax.jpg
1ck Pupienus30 views238

Sestertius

Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust, right, IMP CAES PVPIEN MAXIMVS AVG
Pax seated left with branch & scepter PAX PVBLICA SC

RIC 22b

Herodian, continuing the story of the rebellion against Maximinus, wrote: [Pupienus] led most of these soldiers out to attack Maximinus; the rest remained behind to guard and defend the city. . . . In the meantime, having completed his march, Maximinus was poised on the borders of Italy; after offering sacrifices at all the boundary altars, he advanced into Italy. . . . When no opposition was offered, they crossed the Alps without hindrance. . . . While the army was in the plain, the scouts reported that Aquileia, the largest city in that part of Italy, had closed its gates and that the Pannonian legions which had been sent ahead had launched a vigorous attack upon the walls of this city. In spite of frequent assaults, they were completely unsuccessful. . . .

As time passed, the army of Maximinus grew depressed and, cheated in its expectations, fell into despair. . . . As Maximinus rode about, the [people of Aquileia] shouted insults and indecent blasphemies at him and his son. The emperor became increasingly angry because he was powerless to retaliate. . . . The emperor's soldiers were. . . in need of everything. There was scarcely even sufficient water for them. . . .

Without warning, the soldiers whose camp was near Rome at the foot of Mount Alba, where they had left their wives and children, decided that the best solution was to kill Maximinus and end the interminable siege. . . . [T]he conspirators went to Maximinus' tent about noon. The imperial bodyguard, which was involved in the plot, ripped Maximinus' pictures from the standards; when he came out of his tent with his son to talk to them, they refused to listen and killed them both. . . .

For the rest of the time the two emperors governed in an orderly and well-regulated manner, winning approval on every hand both privately and publicly. The people honored and respected them as patriotic and admirable rulers of the empire. . . . It so happened that the two men were not in complete accord: so great is the desire for sole rule and so contrary to the usual practice is it for the sovereignty to be shared that each undertook to secure the imperial power for himself alone. Balbinus considered himself the more worthy because of his noble birth and his two terms as consul; [Pupienus] felt that he deserved first place because he had served as prefect of Rome and had won a good reputation by his administrative efforts. Both men were led to covet the sole rule because of their distinguished birth, aristocratic lineage, and the size of their families. This rivalry was the basis of their downfall. When [Pupienus] learned that the Praetorian Guard was coming to kill them, he wished to summon a sufficient number of the German auxiliaries who were in Rome to resist the conspirators. But Balbinus, thinking that this was a ruse intended to deceive him (he knew that the Germans were devoted to [Pupienus]), refused to allow [Pupienus] to issue the order. . . . While the two men were arguing, the praetorians rushed in. . . . When the guards at the palace gates deserted the emperors, the praetorians seized the old men and ripped off the plain robes they were wearing because they were at home. Dragging the two men naked from the palace, they inflicted every insult and indignity upon them. Jeering at these emperors elected by the senate, they beat and tortured them. . . . When the Germans learned what was happening, they snatched up their arms and hastened to the rescue. As soon as the praetorians were informed of their approach, they killed the mutilated emperors.
1 commentsBlindado
AurelianusAntPietas.jpg
1dk Aurelian28 views270-275

Radiate, cuirassed bust, right, IMP AVRELIANVS AVG
Aurelian & Severina or priest standing facing each other, each holding short sceptre, sacrificing at altar between them, S in ex, PIETAS AVG

Zosimus recorded: Aurelianus, having regulated the empire, went from Rome to Aquileia, and from thence into Pannonia, which he was informed the Scythians were preparing to invade. For this reason he sent orders to the inhabitants of that country to carry into the towns all their corn and cattle, and every thing that could be of use to the enemy, in order to distress them with famine, with which they were already afflicted. The Barbarians having crossed the river into Pannonia had an engagement, the result of which was nearly equal. But the same night, the Barbarians recrossed the river, and as soon as day appeared, sent ambassadors to treat for peace. |25

The Emperor, hearing that the Alemanni and the neighbouring nations intended to over-run Italy, was with just reason more concerned for Rome and the adjacent places, than for the more remote. Having therefore ordered a sufficient force to remain for the defence of Pannonia, he marched towards Italy, and on his route, on the borders of that country, near the Ister, slew many thousands of the Barbarians in one battle. Several members of the senate being at this time accused of conspiring against the emperor were put to death ; and Rome, which before had no walls, was now surrounded with them. This work was begun in the reign of Aurelianus, and was finished by Probus. At the same time Epitimius, Urbanus, and Domitianus, were likewise suspected as innovators, and were immediately apprehended and punished. During these occurrences in Italy and Pannonia, the emperor prepared to march against the Palmyrenians, who had subdued all Egypt, and the east, as far as Ancyra in Galatia, and would have acquired Bithynia even as far as Chalcedon, if the inhabitants of that country had not learned that Aurelianus was made emperor, and so shook off the Palmyrenian yoke. As soon as the emperor was on his march thither, Ancyra submitted to the Romans, and afterwards Tuana, and all the cities between that and Antioch. There finding Zenobia with a large army ready to engage, as he himself also was, he met and engaged her as honour obliged him [an defeated the enemy. . . .

[Having crushed Palmyra and razed it] He then entered Rome in triumph, where he was most magnificiently received by the senate and people. At this period also be erected that sumptuous temple of the sun, which he ornamented with all the sacred spoils that he brought from Palmyra; placing in it the statues of the sun and Belus. After this he easily reduced Tatricus with his rebellious accomplices, whom he brought to signal punishment. He likewise called in all the counterfeit money, and issued new, to avoid confusion in trade. Besides which he bestowed on the people a gift of bread, as a mark of his favour; and having arranged all affairs set out on a journey from Rome. . . .

During his stay at Perinthus, now called Heraclea, a conspiracy was thus formed against him. There was in the court a man named Eros, whose office was to carry out the answers of the emperor. This man had been for some fault threatened by the emperor, and put in great fear. Dreading therefore lest the emperor should realize his menaces by actions, he went to some of the guard, whom he knew to be the boldest men in the court; be told them a plausible story, and shewed them a letter of his own writing, in the character of the emperor (which he had long before learned to counterfeit), and persuading them first that they themselves were to be put to death, [h]e endeavoured to prevail on them to murder the emperor. The deception answered. Observing Aurelianus to go out of the city with a small retinue, they ran out upon him and murdered him.

RIC 138
Blindado
ValentinianIIAE3UrbsRom.jpg
1et Valentinian II19 views373-392

AE3, Nicomedia

Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust rightt, D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG
Roma seated on cuirass, holding spear and Victory on globe, VRBS ROMA

The SMN mintmark indicates that the coin was minted in Nicomedia, but RIC does not list this reverse type for that mint.

Sim to RIC 51

Zosimus reports: Valentinian being dead, the tribunes Merobaudes and Equitius, reflecting on the distance at which Valens and Gratian resided, the former being in the east, and the latter left by his father in the western part of Gaul, were apprehensive lest the Barbarians beyond the Ister should make an effort while the country was without a ruler. They therefore sent for the younger son of Valentinian, who was born of his wife the widow of Magnentius, who was not far from thence with the child. Having clothed him in purple, they brought him into the court, though scarcely five years old. The empire was afterwards divided between Gratian and the younger Valentinian, at the discretion of their guardians, they not being of age to manage their own affairs. The Celtic nations, Spain, and Britain were given to Gratian; and Italy, Illyricum, and Africa to Valentinian. . . .

Affairs being thus situated in the east, in Thrace, and in Illyricum, Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire, if possible totally, but should he fail in the whole, to secure at least some part. . . . he immediately entered Italy without; resistance, and marched to Aquileia. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina, who, as I before mentioned, had been the wife of Magnentius, but after his decease was taken in marriage by the emperor Valentinian on account of her extraordinary beauty. She carried along with her her daughter Galla. After having passed many seas, and arriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. He was astonished at hearing of this, and began to forget his extravagance, and to lay some restraint on his wild inclination for pleasure. . . . Theodosius then delivered to Valentinian as much of the empire as his father had possessed; in which he only acted as he was enjoined by his duty to those who so merited his kindness. . . .

intelligence was brought that the emperor Valentianian was no more, and that his death happened in this manner: Arbogastes, a Frank, who was appointed by the emperor Gratian lieutenant to Baudo, at the death of Baudo, confiding in his own ability, assumed the command without the emperor's permission. Being thought proper for the station by all the soldiers under him, both for his valour and experience in military affairs, and for his disregard of riches, he attained great influence. He thus became so elevated, that he would speak without reserve to the emperor, and would blame any measure which he thought improper. This gave such umbrage to Valentinian. . . .

Eugenius became the sincere friend of Arbogastes, who had no secret which he did not confide to him. Recollecting Eugenius, therefore, at this juncture, who by his extraordinary learning and the gravity of his conversation seemed well-adapted for the management of an empire, he communicated to him his designs. But finding him not pleased with the proposals, he attempted to prevail on him by all the arts he could use, and entreated him not to reject what fortune so favourably offered. Having at length persuaded him, he deemed it advisable in the first place to remove Valentinian, and thus to deliver the sole authority to Eugenius. With this view he proceeded to Vienna, a town in Gaul, where the emperor resided; and as he was amusing himself near the town in some sports with the soldiers, apprehending no danger, Arbogastes gave him a mortal wound.
Blindado
TheodosAE4VotMult~0.jpg
1eu Theodosius24 views379-395

AE4

Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG
VOT V MVLT X within wreath, ASISC in ex

RIC 29d

Zosimus recorded: [Valentinian] commanded some legions from the stations in Pannonia and Moesia, to embark for Africa [to crush a rebellion]. On this the Sarmatians and the Quadi. . . , availing themselves, of the opportunity afforded by the departure of the legions for Africa, invaded the Pannonians and Moesians. . . . The barbarians therefore revenged themselves by plundering all the country along the Ister, carrying off all that they found in the towns. The Pannonians were by these means exposed to the cruelty of the barbarians, while the soldiers were extremely negligent in the defence of their towns, and committed as much mischief as the Barbarians themselves in all places on this side of the river. But Moesia was free from harm, because Theodosius, who commanded the forces there, courageously resisted the Barbarians, and routed them when they attacked him. By that victory he not only acquired great renown, but subsequently attained the imperial dignity. . . .

When the affairs of the empire were reduced to this low condition, Victor, who commanded the Roman cavalry, escaping the danger with some of his troops, entered Macedon and Thessaly. From thence he proceeded into Moesia and Pannonia, and informed Gratian, who was then in that quarter, of what had occurred, and of the loss of the emperor [Valens] and his army. Gratian received the intelligence without uneasiness, and was little grieved at the death of his uncle, a disagreement having existed between them. Finding himself unable to manage affairs, Thrace being ravaged by the Barbarians, as were likewise Pannonia and Moesia, and the towns upon the Rhine being infested by the neighbouring Barbarians without controul, he chose for his associate in the empire, Theodosius, who was a native of a town called Cauca, in the part of Spain called Hispania Callaecia, and who possessed great knowledge and experience of military affairs. Having given him the government of Thrace and the eastern provinces, Gratian himself proceeded to the west of Gaul, in order, if possible, to compose affairs in that quarter. . . .

During the stay of the new emperor, Theodosius, at Thesslonica, a great concourse arrived there from all parts of persons soliciting him on business, both public and private; who having obtained of him whatever he could conveniently grant, returned, to their homes. As a great multitude of the Scythians beyond the Ister, the Gotthi, and the Taiphali, and other tribes that formerly dwelt among them, had crossed the river, and were driven to infest the Roman dominions, because the Huns, had expelled them from their own country, the emperor Theodosius prepared for war with all his forces. . . . The army having made this good use of the occasion afforded by fortune, the affairs of Thrace, which had been on the brink of ruin, were now, the Barbarians being crushed beyond all hope, re-established in peace. . . .

Meanwhile, the emperor Theodosius, residing in Thessalonica, was easy of access to all who wished to see him. Having commenced his reign in luxury and indolence, he threw the magistracy into disorder, and increased the number of his military officers. . . . As he squandered the public money without consideration, bestowing it on unworthy persons, he consequently impoverished himself. He therefore sold the government of provinces to any who would purchase them, without regard to the reputation or ablity of the persons, esteeming him the best qualified who brought him the most gold or silver. . . .

Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina. . . . [A]rriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. . . . The emperor, being delivered from this alarm, marched with great resolution with his whole army against Maximus. . . . Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. . . . The emperor Theodosius, having consigned Italy, Spain, Celtica, and Libya to his son Honorius, died of a disease on his journey towards Constantinople.
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MagnMaxAE2RepReip.jpg
1ew Magnus Maximus45 views383-388

AE2

Diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG
Emperor standing left, raising kneeling female; mintmarks PCON, SCON and TCON known, REPARATIO REIPVB

RIC 26a

Zosimus reports: While the affairs of Thrace were, thus situated, those of Gratian were in great perplexity. Having accepted the counsel of those courtiers who usually corrupt the manners of princes, he gave a reception to some fugitives called Alani, whom he not only introduced into his army, but honoured with valuable presents, and confided to them his most important secrets, esteeming his own soldiers of little value. This produced among his soldiers a violent hatred against him, which being gradually inflamed and augmented incited in them a disposition for innovation, and most particulary in that part of them which was in Britain, since they were the most resolute and vindictive. In this spirit they were encouraged by Maximus, a Spaniard, who had been the fellow-soldier of Theodosius in Britain. He was offended that Theodosius should be thought worthy of being made emperor, while he himself had no honourable employment. He therefore cherished the animosity of the soldiers towards the emperor. They were thus easily induced to revolt and to declare Maximus emperor. Having presented to him the purple robe and the diadem, they sailed to the mouth of the Rhine. As the German army, and all who were in that quarter approved of the election, Gratian prepared to contend against Maximus, with a considerable part of the army which still adhered to him. When the armies met, there were only slight skirmishes for five days; until Gratian, |115 perceiving that the Mauritanian cavalry first deserted from him and declared Maximus Augustus, and afterwards that the remainder of his troops by degrees espoused the cause of his antagonist, relinquished all hope, and fled with three hundred horse to the Alps. Finding those regions without defence, he proceeded towards Rhaetia, Noricum, Pannonia, and the Upper Moesia. When Maximus was informed of his route, he was not negligent of the opportunity, but detached Andragathius, commander of the cavalry, who was his faithful adherent, in pursuit of Gratian. This officer followed him with so great speed, that he overtook him when he was passing the bridge at Sigidunus, and put him to death. . . .

The reign of Gratian being thus terminated, Maximus, who now considered himself firmly fixed in the empire, sent an embassy to the emperor Theodosius, not to intreat pardon for his treatment of Gratian, but rather to increase his provocations. The person employed in this mission was the imperial chamberlain (for Maximus would not suffer an eunuch to preside in his court), a prudent person, with whom he had been familiarly acquainted from his infancy. The purport of his mission was to propose to Theodosius a treaty of amity, and of alliance, against all enemies who should make war on the Romans, and on refusal, to declare against him open hostility. Upon this, Theodosius admitted Maximus to a share in the empire, and in the honour of his statues and his imperial title. . . .

Affairs being thus situated in the east, in Thrace, and in Illyricum, Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire, if possible totally, but should he fail in the whole, to secure at least some part. . . . he immediately entered Italy without; resistance, and marched to Aquileia. . . .

Theodosius, having passed through Pannonia and the defiles of the Appennines, attacked unawares the forces of Maximus before they were prepared for him. A part of his army, having pursued them with the utmost speed, forced their way through the gates of Aquileia, the guards being too few to resist them. Maximus was torn from his imperial throne while in the act of distributing money to his soldiers, and being stripped of his imperial robes, was brought to Theodosius, who, having in reproach enumerated some of his crimes against the commonwealth, delivered him to the common executioner to receive due punishment. Such was the end of Maximus and of his usurpation. Having fraudulently overcome Valentinian, he imagined that he should with ease subdue the whole Roman empire. Theodosius, having heard, that when Maximus came from beyond the Alps he left his son Victor, whom he had dignified with the title of Caesar, he immediately sent for his general, named Arbogastes, who deprived the youth both of his dignity and life.
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IMG_3288.jpg
2 Constantius II27 viewsConstantius II AE Centenionolis.
3.32 gr 19.9 mm
348-350 AD. DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, diademed bust left, holding globe / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Constantius standing left with labarum, captives at feet. Mintmark AQP dot.

Aquileia
RIC VIII 107
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_2564.JPG
3 Constantius II49 views

Constantius II

Billon centenionalis
Aquileia, officina 2; 348-350 CE
Size and Weight: 20mm x 21mm, 3.85g
Obverse: CONSTANT-IVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Reverse: FELTEMPREPAR-ATIO
Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points upwards and to the right.
Exergue: AQS

Ref: RIC VIII Aquileia 102; LRBC 887.
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ConVIIAquil65or85.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Aquileia 065 or 085 - D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG26 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 320-321 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
Emperor Constantine
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG
Laurel wreath enclosing VOT / XX.
Our Lord Constantine Chief Priest Emperor offers vows so that he may have a prosperous twenty year reign.
Exergue: AQP or ●AQP● (Aquileia mint, first officina)

RIC VII Aquileia 65 or 85; VM 79
2.58g; 18.9mm; 165
Pep
03382z00.jpg
315. Quintillus109 viewsQuintillus, August or September - October or November 270 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius Claudius Quintillus (d. 270) was brother of the Roman Emperor Claudius II, and became the Emperor himself in 270.

Historia Augusta reports that he became Emperor in a coup d'tat. Eutropius reports Quintillus to have been elected by soldiers of the Roman army immediately following the death of his brother. The choice was reportedly approved by the Roman Senate. Joannes Zonaras however reports him elected by the Senate itself.

Records however agree that the legions which had followed Claudius in campaigning along the Danube were either unaware or disapproving of Quintillus' elevation. They instead elevated their current leader Aurelian to the rank of Augustus. Historia Augusta reports Aurelian to have been chosen by Claudius himself as a successor, apparently in a deathbed decision.

The few records of Quintillus' reign are contradictory. They disagree on the length of his reign, variously reported to have lasted as few as 17 days and as many as 177 days (about six months). Records also disagree on the cause of his death. Historia Augusta reports him murdered by his own soldiers in reaction to his strict military discipline. Jerome reports him killed, persumably in conflict with Aurelian. John of Antioch and Joannes Zonaras reported Quintillus to have committed suicide by opening his veins and bleeding himself to death. John reports the suicide to have been assisted by a physician. Claudius Salmasius pointed that Dexippus recorded the death without stating causes. All records however agree in placing the death at Aquileia.

Quintillus was reportedly survived by his two sons.

Historia Augusta reports Claudius and Quintillus having another brother named Crispus and through him a niece, Claudia. who reportedly married Eutropius and was mother to Constantius Chlorus. Historians however suspect this account to be a genealogical fabrication to flatter Constantine the Great.

Surviving Roman records considered Quintillus a moderate and capable Emperor. He was seen as a champion of the Senate and thus compared to previous Emperors Servius Sulpicius Galba and Publius Helvius Pertinax. All three were highly regarded by Senatorial sources despite their failure to survive a full year of reign.

Bronze antoninianus, RIC 58, C-47, S 3246, EF, 3.37g, 19.9mm, 180o, Mediolanum mint, obverse IMP QVINTILLVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse MARTI PACI, Mars holding olive branch and spear, P in ex; found in England; Ex Forum
1 commentsecoli
CtVIIIAquil79.jpg
337-350 AD - Constans - RIC VIII Aquileia 079 - VICTORIAE DD AVGGQ NN39 viewsEmperor: Constans (r. 337-350 AD)
Date: 347-348 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE4

Obverse: CONSTAN-S PF AVG
Constans Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; laureate and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: VICTORIAE DD AVGGQ NN
The victories of our Lords and Emperors.
Two Victories facing each other, each holding a wreath and a palm branch.
Exergue: ●AQP (Aquileia mint, first officina)

RIC VIII Aquileia 79; VM 57
1.79g; 15.8mm; 30
Pep
JovVIIIAquil247.jpg
363-364 AD - Jovian - RIC VIII Aquileia 247 - VOT / V / MVLT / X25 viewsEmperor: Jovian (r. 363-364 AD)
Date: 363-364 AD
Condition: aVF
Size: AE2

Obverse: D N IOVIAN-VS P F AVG
Our Lord Jovian Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: VOT / V / MVLT / X in four lines within laurel wreath.
Because of the vows, 5 years; through more vows, 10 years.
Exergue: AQVILP (Aquileia mint, first officina)

RIC VIII Aquileia 247; VM 13
2.67g; 21.9mm; 180
Pep
ValensVM46_3.jpg
364-378 AD - Valens - Van Meter 46 - GLORIA ROMANORVM44 viewsEmperor: Valens (r. 364-378 AD)
Date: 364-378 AD
Condition: Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: DN VALEN-S PF AVG
Our Lord Valens Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: GLORIA RO-MANORVM
Glory of the Romans.
Emperor advancing right, dragging captive with right hand and holding labarum in left.
Exergue: ?SMAQP (Aquileia mint, first officina)

VM46
2.40g; 18.6mm; 195
Pep
ValIIIXAquil58(a).jpg
375-392 AD - Valentinian II - RIC IX Aquileia 58(a) - SALVS REIPVBLICAE38 viewsEmperor: Valentinian II (r. 375-392 AD)
Date: 388-392 AD
Condition: VF
Size: AE4

Obverse: DN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG
Our Lord Valentinian Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
The Republic is safe.
Victory advancing left, holding trophy on shoulder with right hand, dragging captive with left hand.
in left field.
Exergue: AQ(P or S) (Aquileia mint, first or second officina)

RIC IX Aquileia 58(a); VM 47
1.25g; 14.1mm; 210
Pep
coin593.JPG
501. Contantine I VIRTVS EXERCIT Aquileia16 viewsContantine I

obv: CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust right
rev: VIRTVS EXERCIT, VOT XX on standard, with two captives

S F in fields, AQP in exergue- Aquileia mint, Prime officina

RIC VII Aquileia 48
ecoli
coin97.JPG
501b. Crispus, PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS Aquileia23 viewsCRISPVS NOB CAES
PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS

Emperor holding shield and spear.

RIC 10
1 commentsecoli
coin1011.JPG
502 Constantine II Aquileia GLORIA EXERCITVS11 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
AQP
RIC VII Aquileia 140 R5
ecoli
98170.jpg
502. CONSTANTINE II156 viewsFlavius Claudius Constantinus, known in English as Constantine II, (316 - 340) was Roman Emperor (337 - 340). The eldest son of Constantine I and Fausta, he was born at Arles, and was raised as a Christian.

On March 1, 317, Constantine was made Caesar, and at the age of seven, in 323, took part in his father's campaign against the Sarmatians.

At the age of ten became commander of Gaul, after the death of his half-brother Crispus. An inscription dating to 330 records the title of Alamannicus, so it is probable that his generals won a victory over Alamanni. His military career continued when Constantine I elected his son field commander during the 332 campaign against the Goths.

Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II became Emperor jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans. His section of the Empire was Gaul, Britannia and Hispania.

At first, he was the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion was Italia, Africa and Illyricum. As Constans came of age, Constantine would not relinquish the guardianship and in 340 he marched against Constans in Italy, but was defeated at Aquileia and died in battle. Constans came to control his deceased brother's realm.

CONSTANTINE II, as Caesar. 317-337 AD. Reduced Follis (18mm, 2.74 gm). Siscia mint. Struck 321-324 AD. Laureate head right / VOT / X in two lines across field; all within wreath; SIS sunburst. RIC VII 182. Ex-CNG
ecoli73
coin775.JPG
502. Constantine II Aquileia GLORIA EXERCITVS8 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
RIC VII Aquileia 140 R3
ecoli
coin279.JPG
503. Constans25 viewsFlavius Julius Constans (320 - January 18, 350), was a Roman Emperor who ruled from 337 to 350. Constans was the third and youngest son of Constantine the Great and Fausta, Constantine's second wife.

From 337, he was a joint ruler with his brothers Constantius II and Constantine II. Constantine II attempted to take advantage of his youth and inexperience by invading Italy in 340, but Constans defeated Constantine II at Aquileia, where the older brother died.

The writer Julius Firmicus Maternus mentioned that Constans visited Britain in the early months of 343, but did not explain why. The speed of his trip, paired with the fact he crossed the English Channel during the dangerous winter months, suggests it was in response to a military emergency of some kind.

In 350, the general Magnentius declared himself emperor with the support of the troops on the Rhine frontier, and later the entire Western portion of the Roman Empire. Constans lacked any support beyond his immediate household, and was forced to flee for his life. Magnentius' supporters cornered him in a fortification in southeastern Gaul, where he was killed.

Constans, AE3. 340-348 AD. DN CONSTANS P F AVG, diademed draped bust right / VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN, two Victories standing facing each other, each holding wreath & palm.
ecoli
coins361.JPG
504. Constantius II Fel Temp Aquileia 7 viewsDN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
FEL TEMP-REPARATIO
AQS dot
Aquileia 205 C
ecoli
51- Maximianus-4.JPG
51- Maximianus #4-S29 viewsAE Follis, 286-305 AD , Aquileia mint.
Obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, Laureate head right
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Moneta.
standing with scales and cornucopia. Crescent left, III right.
AQP in exergue
26mm , 8.2gm
RIC 29b, VM43

jdholds
coin419.JPG
515. Theodosius I REPARATIO REIPVB Aquileia14 viewsTheodosius I AE2. 379-383 AD. D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing front, head left, offering right hand to female on left to help her rise from kneeling position, & holding Victory on a globe, SMAQP in ex. Cohen 27. Aquileia RIC 30d
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coin267.JPG
515b. Magnus Maximus35 viewsA Spaniard, Maximus was proclaimed emperor by his troops in 383, while serving with the army in Britain. Later legend made him King of the Britons; he handed the throne over to Caradocus when he went to Gaul to pursue his imperial ambitions.

Following his destruction of Gaul, Maximus went out to meet his main opponent, Gratian, who he defeated near Paris. Gratian, after fleeing, was killed at Lyon on August 25, 383. Soon after, Maximus managed to force Valentinian II out of Rome after which he fled to Theodosius I, the Eastern Roman Emperor. Maximus made his capital at Augusta Treverorum (Treves, Trier) in Gaul. He became a popular emperor, although also a stern persecutor of heretics.

Theodosius I and Valentinian II campaigned against Magnus Maximus in July-August 388. Maximus was defeated in the Battle of the Save, near Emona, and retreated to Aquileia. Andragathius, magister equitum of Maximus and killer of Gratian, was defeated near Siscia, his brother Marcellinus again at Poetovio. Maximus surrendered in Aquileia and although pleaded for mercy was executed. However, his wife and two daughters were spared. Maximus' son, Flavius Victor, was defeated and executed by Valentinian's magister peditum Arbogast in the fall of the same year.

What happened to his family is not related, although it is clear that they survived and that his descendants continued to occupy influential posts. We encounter a possible daughter of Magnus Maximus, Sevira, on the Pillar of Eliseg, an early medieval inscribed stone in Wales which claims her marriage to Vortigern, king of the Britons. Another daughter was possibly married to Ennodius, proconsul Africae (395). Their grandson was Petronius Maximus, who was another ill-fated emperor, ruling in Rome for but 77 days before he was stoned to death while fleeing from the Vandals on May 24, 455. Other descendants included Anicius Olybrius, emperor in 472, but also several consuls and bishops such as St. Magnus Felix Ennodius (Bishop of Pavia c. 514-21).

Magnus Maximus AE-4

Obv: MM right, DN MAG MAXIMVS PF AVG; Reverse: SPES ROMANORVM, campgate with two turrets and star above. Coin is nice VF for this small issue.
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coin268.JPG
515c. Flavius Victor29 viewsFlavius Victor was the infant son of Magnus Maximus by his wife Helen, allegedly the daughter of Octavius. He was proclaimed an Augustus from 384 to his death in 388.

Victor's father was considered a usurper of the Western Roman Empire. He negotiated receiving recognition by the legitimate Augusti Valentinian II and Theodosius I. When negotiations failed, Maximus pressed the matter by proclaiming his son an Augustus, indicating an attempt to secure a succession. This method had been used by former Emperor Valentinian I who declared his son and heir Gratian an Augustus in 367 and by Theodosius who had declared his own son and heir Arcadius an Augustus in 383.

Maximus and Victor gained recognition of their legitimacy for their co-reign by Theodosius in 386. In 387, Maximus campaigned in Italy against Valentinian II. Victor was left behind in Trier. His father defeated Valentinian but failed against a then hostile Theodosius in 388. Theodosius send Arbogastes in Trier to slay Victor.

Victor's death left Valentinian II, Theodosius and Arcadius as the sole Augusti in the Empire

RIC IX Aquileia 55b
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coin216.JPG
515d. EUGENIUS. 392-394 AD31 viewsEUGENIUS. 392-394 AD. 14mm. Struck 393-394 AD. Aquileia
mint. Diademed, draped, cuirassed and bearded bust right / Victory
advancing left, holding wreath and palm; AQP. RIC IX 59;
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coin402.JPG
516a Johannes42 viewsAfter the death of Honorius on August 15, 423, his closest male relative was Valentinian, son of Galla Placidia. Valentinian was currently at Constantinople. This power vacuum allowed Ioannes, the primicerius notariorum (chief notary) to seize power in the west. Virtually nothing is known of Ioannes himself, though he was said to have had a mild character. He was supported by the magister militum Castinus and by Aetius, son of the magister militum Gaudentius. After his acclamation at Rome, Ioannes transferred his capital to Ravenna. Ioannes' rule was accepted in Gaul, Spain and Italy, but not in Africa. Ioannes' attempts to negotiate with the eastern emperor Theodosius II were unsuccessful. He seems not to have had a firm grasp of power and this encouraged eastern intervention. In 425, Theodosius II sent an expedition under the command of Ardabur the Elder to install Valentinian as emperor in the west. Ardabur was captured, but treated well, as Ioannes still hoped to be able to negotiate with Theodosius. Ardabur, however, persuaded some of Ioannes' officials to betray him. After his capture, Ioannes was taken to Aquileia where he was mutilated, then executed. Three days after Ioannes's execution, one of his generals, Aetius, arrived in Italy with a large force of Huns. Rather than continue the war, Valentinian bought off the Huns with gold and Aetius with the office of comes.
1 commentsecoli
69-Maxentius-2.JPG
69-Maxentius -2-S30 viewsAE Follis, Aquileia mint, 307 AD.
Obv: IMP C MAXENTIVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated in tetrastyle temple handing globe to Maxentius, seated captive between them. Victory as acroteria, she wolf and twins in pediment.
AQS in exergue.
25mm , 6.9gm
RIC 113
jdholds
VitelliusARdenariusVesta.jpg
709a, Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.42 viewsVITELLIUS AR silver denarius. RSC 72, RCV 2200. 19mm, 3.2 g. Obverse: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; Reverse - PONT MAXIM, Vesta seated right, holding scepter and patera. Quite decent. Ex. Incitatus Coins. Photo courtesy of Incitatus Coins.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Vitellius (69 A.D.)

John F. Donahue
College of William and Mary


It is often difficult to separate fact from fiction in assessing the life and reign of Vitellius. Maligned in the ancient sources as gluttonous and cruel, he was also a victim of a hostile biographical tradition established in the regime of the Flavians who had overthrown him. Nevertheless, his decision to march against Rome in 69 was pivotal, since his subsequent defeat signalled the end of military anarchy and the beginning of an extended period of political stability under Vespasian and his successors.

Early Life and Career

Aulus Vitellius was born in September, 15 AD, the son of Lucius Vitellius and his wife Sestilia. One of the most successful public figures of the Julio-Claudian period, Lucius Vitellius was a three-time consul and a fellow censor with the emperor Claudius. Aulus seems to have moved with equal ease in aristocratic circles, successively winning the attention of the emperors Gaius, Claudius, and Nero through flattery and political skill.

Among his attested public offices, Vitellius was a curator of public works, a senatorial post concerned with the maintenance and repair of public buildings in Rome, and he was also proconsul of North Africa, where he served as a deputy to his brother, perhaps about 55 A. D. In addition, he held at least two priesthoods, the first as a member of the Arval Brethren, in whose rituals he participated from 57 A.D., and the second, as one of the quindecemviri sacris faciundis, a sacred college famous for its feasts.

With respect to marriage and family, Vitellius first wed a certain Petroniana, the daughter of a consul, sometime in the early to mid thirties A.D. The union produced a son, Petronianus, allegedly blind in one eye and emancipated from his father's control as a result of being named his mother's heir. Tradition records that Vitellius killed the boy shortly after emancipation amid charges of parricide; the marriage soon ended in divorce. A second marriage, to Galeria Fundana, daughter of an ex-praetor, was more stable than the first. It produced another son, who was eventually killed by the Flavians after the overthrow of Vitellius, as well as a daughter. Galeria is praised by Tacitus for her good qualities, and in the end it was she who saw to Vitellius' burial.

Rise to Power and Emperorship

Without doubt, the most fortuitous moment in Vitellius' political career was his appointment as governor of Lower Germany by the emperor Galba late in 68. The decision seemed to have caught everybody by surprise, including Vitellius himself, who, according to Suetonius, was in straitened circumstances at the time. The choice may have been made to reduce the possibility of rebellion by the Rhine armies, disaffected by Galba's refusal to reward them for their part in suppressing the earlier uprising of Julius Vindex. Ironically, it was Vitellius' lack of military achievement and his reputation for gambling and gluttony that may have also figured in his selection. Galba perhaps calculated that a man with little military experience who could now plunder a province to satisfy his own stomach would never become disloyal. If so, it was a critical misjudgement by the emperor.

The rebellion began on January 1, 69 ("The Year of the Four Emperors"), when the legions of Upper Germany refused to renew their oath of allegiance to Galba. On January 2, Vitellius' own men, having heard of the previous day's events, saluted him as emperor at the instigation of the legionary legate Fabius Valens and his colleagues. Soon, in addition to the seven legions that Vitellius now had at his command in both Germanies, the forces in Gaul, Britain, and Raetia also came over to his side. Perhaps aware of his military inexperience, Vitellius did not immediately march on Rome himself. Instead, the advance was led by Valens and another legionary general, Aulus Caecina Alienus, with each man commanding a separate column. Vitellius would remain behind to mobilize a reserve force and follow later.

Caecina was already one hundred fifty miles on his way when news reached him that Galba had been overthrown and Otho had taken his place as emperor. Undeterred, he passed rapidly down the eastern borders of Gaul; Valens followed a more westerly route, quelling a mutiny along the way. By March both armies had successfully crossed the Alps and joined at Cremona, just north of the Po. Here they launced their Batavian auxiliaries against Otho's troops and routed them in the First Battle of Bedriacum. Otho killed himself on April 16, and three days later the soldiers in Rome swore their allegience to Vitellius. The senate too hailed him as emperor.

When Vitellius learned of these developments, he set out to Rome from Gaul. By all accounts the journey was a drunken feast marked by the lack of discipline of both the troops and the imperial entourage. Along the way he stopped at Lugdunum to present his six-year-old son Germanicus to the legions as his eventual successor. Later, at Cremona, Vitellius witnessed the corpse-filled battlefield of Otho's recent defeat with joy, unmoved by so many citizens denied a proper burial.

The emperor entered Rome in late June-early July. Conscious of making a break with the Julio-Claudian past, Vitellius was reluctant to assume the traditional titles of the princes, even though he enthusiastically made offerings to Nero and declared himself consul for life. To his credit, Vitellius did seem to show a measure of moderation in the transition to the principate. He assumed his powers gradually and was generally lenient to Otho's supporters, even pardoning Otho's brother Salvius Titianus, who had played a key role in the earlier regime. In addition, he participated in Senate meetings and continued the practice of providing entertainments for the Roman masses. An important practical change involved the awarding of posts customarily held by freedmen to equites, an indication of the growth of the imperial bureaucracy and its attractiveness to men of ambition.

In other matters, he replaced the existing praetorian guard and urban cohorts with sixteen praetorian cohorts and four urban units, all comprised of soldiers from the German armies. According to Tacitus, the decision prompted a mad scramble, with the men, and not their officers, choosing the branch of service that they preferred. The situation was clearly unsatisfactory but not surprising, given that Vitellius was a creation of his own troops. To secure his position further, he sent back to their old postings the legions that had fought for Otho, or he reassigned them to distant provinces. Yet discontent remained: the troops who had been defeated or betrayed at Bedriacum remained bitter, and detachments of three Moesian legions called upon by Otho were returned to their bases, having agitated against Vitellius at Aquileia.

Flavian Revolt

The Vitellian era at Rome was short-lived. By mid-July news had arrived that the legions of Egypt under Tiberius Julius Alexander had sworn allegiance to a rival emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the governor of Judaea and a successful and popular general. Vespasian was to hold Egypt while his colleague Mucianus, governor of Syria, was to invade Italy. Before the plan could be enacted, however, the Danube legions, former supporters of Otho, joined Vespasian's cause. Under the leadership of Antonius Primus, commander of the Sixth legion in Pannonia, and Cornelius Fuscus, imperial procurator in Illyricum, the legions made a rapid descent on Italy.

Although his forces were only half of what Vitellius commanded in Italy, Primus struck first before the emperor could muster additional reinforcements from Germany. To make matters worse for the Vitellians, Valens was ill, and Caecina, now consul, had begun collaborating with the Flavians. His troops refused to follow his lead, however, and arrested him at Hostilia near Cremona. They then joined the rest of the Vitellian forces trying to hold the Po River. With Vitellius still in Rome and his forces virtually leaderless, the two sides met in October in the Second Battle of Bedriacum. The emperor's troops were soundly defeated and Cremona was brutally sacked by the victors. In addition, Valens, whose health had recovered, was captured while raising an army for Vitellius in Gaul and Germany; he was eventually executed.

Meanwhile, Primus continued towards Rome. Vitellius made a weak attempt to thwart the advance at the Apennine passes, but his forces switched to the Flavian side without a fight at Narnia in mid-December. At Rome, matters were no better. Vespasian's elder brother, Titus Flavius Sabinus, the city prefect, was successful in an effort to convince Vitellius to abdicate but was frustrated by the mob in Rome and the emperor's soldiers. Forced to flee to the Capitol, Sabinus was set upon by Vitellius' German troops and soon killed, with the venerable Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus set ablaze in the process. Within two days, the Flavian army fought its way into Rome. In a pathetic final move, Vitellius disguised himself in dirty clothing and hid in the imperial doorkeeper's quarters, leaning a couch and a mattress against the door for protection. Dragged from his hiding place by the Flavian forces, he was hauled off half-naked to the Forum, where he was tortured, killed, and tossed into the Tiber. The principate could now pass to Vespasian.

Assessment

Vitellius has not escaped the hostility of his biographers. While he may well have been gluttonous, his depiction as indolent, cruel, and extravagant is based almost entirely on the propaganda of his enemies. On the other hand, whatever moderating tendencies he did show were overshadowed by his clear lack of military expertise, a deficiency that forced him to rely in critical situations on largely inneffective lieutenants. As a result he was no match for his Flavian successors, and his humiliating demise was perfectly in keeping with the overall failure of his reign.

Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Mag-Max-Aqu-55a.jpg
72. Magnus Maximus.21 viewsAE 4, summer 387 - Aug. 28, 388, Aquileia mint.
Obverse: DN MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Maximus.
Reverse: SPES ROMANORVM / Camp gate with star between its two turrets.
Mint mark: SMAQ(?)
1.32 gm., 13 mm.
RIC #55a; LRBC #1003; Sear #20657.

The last letter of the mint mark is not readable. It should be a P or S.
Callimachus
53-Maxentius-Aqu-113.jpg
96 Maxentius: Aquileia follis.28 viewsFollis, late 307 AD, Aquileia mint.
Obverse: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Maxentius.
Reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE / Roma seated on shield in tetrastyle temple, handing globe to Maxentius, seated captive between them. Victories as acroteria, wolf & twins in pediment.
Mint mark: AQS
6.26 gm., 24 mm.
RIC #113; PBCC #728; Sear #14992
1 commentsCallimachus
Valentinian_I_31.jpg
A159 viewsValentinian I AE3

Attribution: RIC IX 9a, type I, Aquileia
Date: AD 364-367
Obverse: DN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped,
and cuirassed bust r.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REI PVBLICAE, victory marching l. holding wreath and palm, A in l. field, either SMAQP or SMAQS in exergue
Size: 18 mm
Weight: 2.6 grams

Valentinian I, a Pannonian officer, was proclaimed emperor by the military and senate upon the demise of Jovian. A month later, in AD 364, he elevated his brother Valens to Augustus. Their agreement placed Valentinian I in control of the Balkans and the eastern provinces, while Valens took Illyricum and the west. Valentinian spent most of his reign confronting various invaders such as the Alemanni, Quadi, and Sarmatians. In AD 375, while addressing a deputation of representatives from the invaders, he became so irritated and enraged that he suffered a stroke and died.

This coin was from my very first uncleaned lot ever! It was the nicest of the bunch; naturally I have to keep it for sentimental reasons...
Noah
Maiorina Magnencio RIC VIII Aquileia 170.jpg
A131-05 - Magnencio (350 - 353 D.C.)43 viewsAE2 Maiorina Centenional 18 x 20 mm 5.6 gr.

Anv: "DN MAGNEN-[TIVS P F AVG]" - Busto a cabeza desnuda, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha. "A"= Marca de valor = 1 Centenionalis, en campo izquierdo detrs del busto.
Rev: "[VICTORIA]E DD NN AVG ET CAES" - Dos Victorias de pi enfrentadas, sosteniendo una corona de laureles en la que se inscribe "VOT V MVLT X" en cuatro lneas. "Palma AQ[P S T Palma]" en exergo.

Acuada 351/2 D.C.
Ceca: Aquileia (Off.Incierta)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Aquileia) #170 Pag.331 - Cohen Vol.VIII #68 Pag.19 - DVM #29 Pag.301 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8724 Pag.220 - Bastien #366 - LRBC #909
mdelvalle
Centenional Valente RIC IX Aquileia 9b, type iii(b).jpg
A138-10 - Valente (364 - 378 D.C.)51 viewsAE3 Centenional 17 x 18 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "DN VALE[N]-S P F AVG" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SECVRITAS [REIPV]BL[IC]AE" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando una corona en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y una hoja de palma en la izquierda. "SMAQS" en exergo y " B / " en campo izquierdo.

Acuada 364 - 367 D.C.
Ceca: Aquileia (Off.2da.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Aquileia) #9b Pag.95 tipo iii b - Cohen Vol.VIII #47 Pag.110 - DVM #49 Pag.308 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9077.d. Pag.274 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4118
mdelvalle
Nummus Valentiniano II Dos Victorias.jpg
A141-30 - Valentiniano II (375 - 392 D.C.)58 viewsAE4 Nummus 12 mm 1.2 gr.
Hijo de Valentiniano I, Augusto jr. de Occidente con su Padre y Graciano su medio hermano hasta 383 D.C. y luego Augusto Sr. hasta 392 D.C.

Anv: "DN V[ALENTINI AN]VS P F AVG" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[V]ICTORIA AV[G]GG" Dos Victorias de pi enfrentadas portando sendas coronas de laureles. "[SMAQP o S]" en exergo.

Acuada 388 - 392 D.C.
Ceca: Aquileia (Off.Incierta)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Aquileia) #47a Pag.104 - Cohen Vol.VIII No Listada - DVM #50 Pag.312 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9184.g. Pag.284
mdelvalle
Nummus Magno Maximo RIC IX Aquileia 55a P.jpg
A144-02 - Magno Máximo (383 - 388 D.C.)55 viewsAE4 Nummus 11 x 12 mm 1.1 gr.

Anv: "DN MAG MA - XIMVS PF AVG " - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SPES RO] - MA - NORVM " - Puerta de campamento, sin puertas ni ventanas, dos torres, " * " arriba, cuatro capas de piedras. "SMAQP" en exergo.

Acuada 387 - 388 D.C.
Ceca: Aquileia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Aquileia) #55a Pag.105 - Cohen Vol.VIII #7 Pag.167 - DVM #16 Pag.314 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9264.d. Pag.291 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4206
mdelvalle
Constantius_I_Altar.JPG
ALTAR, CONSTANTIUS I126 viewsStruck A.D.307 - 308 under Maxentius, AE Follis of Aquileia.
Obverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO AVG. Veiled head of Constantius I facing right.
Reverse: MEMORIA DIVI CONSTANTI. Monumental altar enclosure, doors embellished with handles in the shape of a ring held in the mouth of a bucranium, surmounted by eagle with wings spread standing facing, head turned to left and holding wreath in its beak; in exergue, AQS.
Diameter: 25mm | Weight: 5.3gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC VI : 127
SCARCE

"Cohen 24 (not giving mintmark) and Voetter, Gerin Cat., p. 62, have AVG only in the obv. legend of this type at Aquileia." - source Curtis Clay.
*Alex
Aquileia_RIC_VIII_170,_148_Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_palm-AQT-palm_Q-001_h_mm_g-s~0.jpg
Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #1144 viewsAquilea, RIC VIII 170, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #1
avers:- DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 170, Sear 18829.
Q-001
quadrans
Aquileia_RIC_VIII_170,_148_Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_palm-AQP-palm_Q-001_h_23-25mm_5,39g-s.jpg
Aquilea, RIC VIII 170, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #2135 viewsAquilea, RIC VIII 170, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), -/-//palmbranch AQT palmbranch, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories, #2
avers:- DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: -/-//palmbranch AQP palmbranch, diameter: 23-25mm, weight: 5,39g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 170, Sear 18829.
Q-002
quadrans
Aquileia_RIC_VIII_173,_148_Magnentius_AE-2-25-Cent_DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG_VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES_star_AQP_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
Aquilea, RIC VIII 173, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), *//AQP, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories,120 viewsAquilea, RIC VIII 173, 148 Magnentius (350-353 A.D.), *//AQP, AE-2, Centenionalis, VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories,
avers:- DN-MAGNEN-TIVS-PF-AVG, Bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, A behind head.
revers:- VICTORIAE-DD-NN-AVG-ET-CAES, Two Victories standing, facing each other, together holding wreath reading VOT/V/MVLT/X.
exerg: *//AQP, diameter: 22-23mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Aquileia, date: 350-353 AD., ref: RIC VIII 173,
Q-001
quadrans
AQUILEIA.jpg
AQUILEIA - Antonio II. Panciera 149 viewsAQUILEIA - Antonio II. Panciera (1402-1411)
Obverse: Coat of arms of the Patriarch, in a beaded circle; "+ANTONIVS * PATRIARCH" around which is another beaded circle.
Reverse: Eagle over beaded circle; above it a rosetter, under, right and left a star. "AQU ILE GEN SIS" around which is another beaded circle.
dpaul7
AQUILEIA__LUDWIG.jpg
AQUILEIA - Ludwig von Teck II51 viewsAQUILEIA - Ludwig von Teck II (1412-1420) AR Denar. Obv.: Bavarian arms (Rautenschild), LODOVICVS DVX D TECh Rev.: Madonna and child; PAThA AQVILE. Reference: Bernardi 69; Biaggi 193.dpaul7
abm_AQP[dpt].jpg
AQUILEIA 2 P AQP [dot] in right field3 viewsRIC VII, 128.
Second issue from the first workshop with a pellet in the field.
Weight 3.01g
Adrianus
abm_AQS[dot].jpg
AQUILEIA 2 S AQS [dot] in field6 viewsRIC VII, 128.
Aquileia's second issue from the second workshop. with a pellet in the right hand field.
Weight 2.73g.
Adrianus
l2~0.JPG
Aquileia AQS33 viewsAquileia

A former city of the Roman Empire, situated at the head of the Adriatic, on what is now the Austrian sea-coast, in the country of Goerz, at the confluence of the Anse an the Torre. It was for many centuries the seat of a famous Western patriarchate, and as such plays and important part in ecclesiastical history, particularly in that of the Holy See and Northern Italy.

The site is now known as Aglar, a village of 1500 inhabitants. The city arose (180 B.C.) on the narrow strip between the mountains and the lagoons, during the Illyrian wars, as a means of checking the advance of that warlike people. Its commerce grew rapidly, and when Marcus Aurelius made it (168) the principal fortress of the empire against the barbarians of the North and East, it rose to the acme of its greatness and soon had a population of 100,000. It was pillaged in 238 by the Emperor Maximinus, and it was so utterly destroyed in 452 by Attila, that it was afterwards hard to recognize its original site. The Roman inhabitants, together with those of smaller towns in the neighbourhood, fled to the lagoons, and so laid the foundations of the city of Venice. Aquileia arose again, but much diminished, and was once more destroyed (590) by the Lombards; after which it came under the Dukes of Friuli, was again a city of the Empire under Charlemagne, and in the eleventh century became a feudal possesion of its patriarch, whose temporal authority, however, was constantly disputed and assailed by the territorial nobility.

002. CONSTANTINOPOLIS Aquileia

RIC VII Aquileia 129 R4

Ex-Varangian
ecoli
Arcadius_58c.jpg
Arcadius - AE 421 viewsAquileia
388-393 AD
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N ARCADI_VS P F AVG
Victory advancing left, holding trophy and dragging captive
SALVS REI_PVBLICAE
(XP)
AQS
RIC IX Aquileia 58c
1,01 g 12-11 mm
Johny SYSEL
arcadius_salus_R9_Aquiliea_58c.jpg
Arcadius AE4, (RIC Aquileia 58c)8 viewsAquileia mint, 2nd officina, 388-391. 13 mm, 1.26 g, 0.

Obverse: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, looking right.

Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE Victory advancing left, holding trophy over shoulder and dragging a captive behind her. Chi-Rho in left field.

Exergue: AQS

Reference: RIC IX Aquileia 58c.
Manuel
Arcadius 142.jpg
Arcadius, RIC IX 45c, Aquileia26 viewsObv: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG
Bust: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Emperor advancing right holding labarum and dragging captive.
Exe: SMAQS
Date: 383-388 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "C"
Bluefish
arcadio_salvs_6_aquileia.jpg
Arcadius, salvs reipvblicae, Aquileia, AE424 viewsantvwala
Arcadius- Aquileia RIC 47d.JPG
Arcadius- Aquileia RIC 47d38 viewsAE4, Aquileia mint 383-388AD
Obverse: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse:VICTORIA AVGGG, Two Victories facing with wreaths.
SMAQS in exergue
RIC 47d
12mm, 1.4 gms.
1 commentsJerome Holderman
Licinius_iovi_BCC_Lr53.jpg
BCC Lr5319 viewsLate Roman
Licinius I 308-324 CE
Obv:IMP LICINIVS P F AVG
Laureate, draped? and cuir. bust rt.
Rev:IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter standing left holding
thunderbolt and scepter.
In exergue: AQS
AE20mm. 3.26gm. Axis:330
RIC VII 6 or 7 Aquileia Mint, 317CE
v-drome
Constantine_II_BCC_LR58.jpg
BCC LR5810 viewsLate Roman
Constantine II 317-340 CE
Obv:CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Laureate and cuir. bust rt.
Rev:GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Two soldiers standing, spears,
shields, and one standard
between them. In ex.: (dot)AQP
AE 16mm 1.69gm. Axis:180
RIC VII before Aquileia 144
v-drome
crispus9x.jpg
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT V, Aquileia8 viewsCrispus, Caesar 317 - 326 A.D. Silvered AE 3, RIC VII 68, Aquileia mint, 2.817g, 19.85mm, 0o, 320 - 321 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT V in wreath, AQT in ex; traces of silvering; ex FORVMPodiceps
crispus_aquileia108.jpg
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT X in wreath, AQS in ex; RIC VII 108 Aquileia13 viewsCrispus, Caesar 317 - 326 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC VII 108, gVF, Aquileia mint, 2.666g, 20.5mm, 180o, 322 A.D.; obverse CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT X in wreath, AQS in ex; flan crack. Ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
0046.jpg
CAMPGATE, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.99 viewsType:
Ruler / Years: Constantine II 337 - 340 A.D.
Denomination: AE 3
Metal Type: Bronze
Size / Weight: 2.024g, 19.2mm

Orientation: 180 deg.

Condition:

Obverse Description: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Obverse Legend: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

Reverse Description: campgate with four turrets and open gates, S - F at sides

Reverse Legend: VIRTVS CAESS

Exergue: TCONST

Attributes: RIC 322

Notes: Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father`s death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarrelling with his brother Constans, he invaded his territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.

Scott M
1FV_unito.jpg
Campgate: Flavius Victor, AE3, zecca di Lugdunum (?)14 viewsFlavius Victor (AD 387-388), AE3, Lugdunum (?) mint
AE, 0,95 gr, 13 mm, R
D/ DN FL VIC-TOR PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
R/ SPES RO-MA-NORVM, campgate, four layers, two turrets, no doors, LVGP in ex.
RIC IX Lugdunum 36b
Nota: l'identificazione della zecca dubbia per le condizioni dell'ex. Compatibile con: SMAQP (Aquileia)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (20 marzo 2013, numero catalogo 181), ex Ludovic Dellery collection (Dijon France, fino al 2013)
paolo
1flavius_ritagliato.jpg
Campgate: Flavius Victor, AE4, zecca di Aquileia (387-388 d.C.)12 viewsFlavius Victor, AE4, Aquileia mint (387-388 AD)
AE, 1,1 gr, 12,7 mm, R
D/ DN FL VIC TOR PF AVG, busto diademato, perlato drappeggiato e corazzato a dx
R/ SPES ROMANORVM, campgate sei livelli, due torrette, stella, SMAQS in ex
Ric IX 55b
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 29 maggio 2017, numero catalogo 279), ex collezione R.M. (Savona, Italia dal 23 aprile 2017), ex collezione John Denman (Penrith, Regno Unito, fino all'aprile 2017), ex find Uk
paolo
Magno_massimo_unita.jpg
Campgate: Magnus Maximus (383-388 d.C.), zecca di Aquileia28 viewsMagnus Maximus (383-388 d.C.)
AE, 1,6 gr, 12,0 mm
D/ D N MAG MAXIMVS P F AVG, diademed bust right
R/ SPES ROMANORVM, camp gate with star between two turrets, SMAQ in ex
RIC IX Aquileia 55
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (29 novembre 2012, numero catalogo 172); ex Borislav P. Kirev collection (Rector Orbis Inc., Tampa, Saint Petersburg, Florida, Usa, fino al 2012)
paolo
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO.jpg
Claudius II Gothicus DIVO CLAVDIO52 viewsClaudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 AD

Obverse:
Radiate head right

DIVO CLAVDIO

DIVO, god

CLAVDIO, Cladius

Dot in right field

Reverse:
CONSECRATIO

Showing: eagle standing left, head right

Domination: Antoninianus, Copper, size 17 mm

Mint: ???

The Helvetica tables list this as RIC V (1) 266 this also according to The helvetica is the same reference number for all mints..
It lists 2 dots below on the obverse , but my coin shows the dots to the right if I see them correctly
I'm still not sure on the mint it's either Lyons, Rome or Aquileia .

Comment: Consecratio. In the first and second centuries when a popular emperor or their family member dies, they were consecrated as gods. Their successors built a personality cult around the dead emperor, serving as chief priest, and often dedicating temples to the dead. In the third century this custom faded out as the Cristian era evolved. Some common types of these depict a cult item or temple of the deified emperor. Some include: a cart drawing the cult image of the deified emperor, an emperor throne, a funeral pyre, an eagle, altar or peacock
John S
valentinian_II_aquileia.jpg
CONCORDIA AVGGG, Roma enthroned facing, SMAQS in exergue; RIC IX 32c12 viewsValentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D. Bronze AE 3, RIC IX 32b, F, Aquileia mint, 2.18g, 17.5mm, 0o, 378 - 383 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGGG, Roma enthroned facing, head left, holding globe and reversed spear, SMAQS in exergue; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
00562.jpg
Constans (RIC 103, Coin #562)13 viewsConstans, RIC 103, AE2, Aquileia, 348 - 350 AD.
Obv: D N CONSTANS P F AVG Pearl-diademed, draped
and cuirassed bust left, globe in right.
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO (AQT dot) Helmeted soldier, leading
barbarian with right hand from hut under tree, spear in left.
Size: 22.8mm 4.54g.
MaynardGee
Constans-ric-viii-Aquileia-99.jpg
Constans AE3 - Galley19 viewsRoman Imperial, Constans AE3, 337-350 AD, Aquileia mint, 2.5g, 18mm

Obverse: CONSTA-NS PF AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, Emperor in military dress standing on galley moving left, holding wreath-bearing Victory on globe, and standard with chi-rho on banner. Victory sitting at the stern, steering the ship. Mintmark: AQP "Restoration of Happy Times"

Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 91.
Gil-galad
constans-twovictories-reshoot.jpg
Constans AE3, 337-350 AD16 viewsRoman Imperial, Constans AE3, (337-350 AD), 1.3g, 17.2mm

Obverse: CONSTAN-S P F AVG, Laureate, rosette-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: VICTORIAE DD AVGGQ NN, Two Victories standing facing each other, each holding palm branch and wreath. AQP in ex. "The Two Victories who rule our two emperors."

Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 87
Gil-galad
coin16_quad_sm.jpg
CONSTANS PF AVG / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE4 follis, 346-348 10 viewsCONSTAN - S PF AVG, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust left, the laurel leaves are denoted as longish shapes / GLOR - IA EXERC - ITVS, two soldiers, helmeted, draped, cuirassed, standing front, heads turned toward each another, each holding inverted spear in outer hand and resting inner hand on shield; between them, a standard, device on banner large dot, with 3 badges. Mintmark AQS in exergue, palm branch "upright" in both left and right fields.

Ӕ4, 15.5mm, 1.10g, die axis 6h (coin alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

RIC VIII Aquileia 22: ID straightforward thanks to unusual obverse and palm branches in the fields, even if the mintmark were unclear.

P F AVG = Pius Felix Augustus = the pius (dutiful) and fortunate (happy) emperor. Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army" AQuileia mint, S = officina #2.

CONSTANS, * c. 323 February 350 (aged ~27) in Vicus Helena, southwestern Gaul (Elne, southern France)
25 December 333 337 (as Caesar in Constantinople under his father); 337 340 (joint emperor with Constantius II and Constantine II, over Italia and Africa); 340 350 (after defeating Constantine II, Western Emperor, together with Constantius II in the East).

More biographical info in http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-147486
Yurii P
45.jpg
Constans, RIC VII 79, Aquileia44 viewsObv: CONSTANS P F AVG
Bust: Laureate and Rosette-Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN
2 Victories facing, holding wreaths and palm branches.
Exe: (dot) AQP
Date: 337-350 AD
Denom: Ae4
Rated "C4"
Bluefish
coin967.JPG
Constans, two victories with wreath, Aquileia6 viewsRIC VIII Aquileia 83
ecoli
Constantine_I.jpg
Constantine I (r. 306-337 AD) - AE3 - Aquileia67 viewsObv: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG - laureate head right
Rev: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG - Legend surrounding wreath terminating in large jewel, enclosing VOT dot XX with palm branches left and right
AQP in exergue

Mint of Aquileia, first officina, struck in 322 AD
References: RIC VII Aquileia 104 (C2)
Weight: 2.62 g
Dimensions: 18 mm
1 commentskrazy
CONTINE1-8-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantine I, Aquileia RIC VII-104.P20 viewsAE3
Aquileia mint, 322 A.D.
19mm, 3.08g
RIC VII-104

Obverse:
CONSTANTINVS AVG
Laureate head right.

Reverse:
DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG
VOT
XX
AQP
Wreath within which is VOT XX, with laurel branches to left and right.
rubadub
Const1 71.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VI 141, Aquileia46 viewsObv: IMP CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Bust: Laureate and cuirassed bust right
Rev: MARTI CONSERVATORI
Mars, helmeted, standing right and looking left, holding reversed spear and leaning on shield.
Exe: AQT
Date: 312-313 AD
RIC VI 141
Denom: Follis
Bluefish
266 Constantine Vows.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 85, Aquileia20 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS AVG
Bust: Laureate head right
Rev: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG
VOT XX in 2 lines within laurel wreath
Exe: (dot) AQP (dot)
Date: 320-322 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "C2"
Bluefish
constantine-ii-vot-reshoot.jpg
Constantine II AE3, 320-321 AD, Aquileia mint19 viewsRoman Imperial, Constantine II as Caesar AE3, (320-321 AD), Aquileia mint, 2.5g, 17mm

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB, Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left.

Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, VOT V in wreath, dot in badge at top of wreath. AQT dot in ex. "Our Caesar vows five years of service."

Reference: RIC VII Aquileia 95v

Ex: Rudi Smits
Gil-galad
constantinII_aquileia_93var.jpg
Constantine II RIC VII, Aquileia 94 var.43 viewsConstantine II, Caesar AD 317-337, son of Constantine I the Great
AE - Follis, 2.88g, 19mm
Aquileia 3rd officina, AD 321
obv. CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
wreath with VOT/V
exergue: dot AQT dot
RIC VII, Aquileia 94 var.
R2; about EF

RIC VII, Aquileia 94 has obv. legend NOB CAES instead of NOB C! Because another coin is known (RIC VII, Aquileia 101 var.) with NOB C and ex. dot AQT dot it is probably an intermediate issue between AD 321 (NOB CAES) and AD 322 (NOB C). Thanks Stickman!
Jochen
Comstantine_II_Vot_C_dot_AQT_dot_Aquillia.jpg
Constantine II Vot V Aquillia53 viewsConstantine II CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C LDC
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT dot V
dot AQT dot Aquileia
James b4
Comstantine_II_Vot_C_dot_AQT_dot_Aquillia_ld.jpg
Constantine II Vot V Aquillia36 viewsConstantine II CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C LC
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT V
dot AQT dot Aquileia
RIC VII Aquileia 96 r3
James b4
Constantine_II_Aquilia_Vot_X_AQT_LDA_Left.jpg
Constantine II VOT X Aquileia55 viewsConstantine II
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
LDC left CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
VOT X
Aquileia
Not in RIC
1 commentsJames b4
4859_4860.jpg
Constantine II, AE3, CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, Wreath, VOT/(Dot)/V, within.3 viewsAE3
Constantine II
Caesar: 317 - 337AD
Augustus: 337 - 340AD
Issued: 320 - 321AD
18.0mm 2.54gr
O: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C; Laureate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM; Wreath, VOT/(Dot)/V, within.
Exergue: (Dot)AQT(Dot)
Aquileia Mint
Aorta: 562: B29, O7, R5, T105, M3.
RIC VII 96, corr. (obverse legend); Sear 17170.
zurqieh_dubai 391118945916
6/2/15 2/16/17
Nicholas Z
Con2 207.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII 96, Aquileia45 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Bust: Laureate and cuirassed bust right
Rev: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
VOT V in 2 lines within laurel wreath.
Exe: (dot) AQT (dot)
Date: 320-321 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "R4" Unconfirmed obverse legend.
Bluefish
constantinII_aquileia_95.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII, Aquileia 9525 viewsConstantine II, AD 317-340
AE 3, 2.81g
Aquileia, AD 321, 3rd officina
obv. CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, l.
rev. CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
Laurel wreath inscribed with VOT / X
in ex. dot AQT dot
ref. RIC VII, Aquileia 95; C.39
R1!, F+/about VF, nearly black patina
pedigree:
ex Marc Breitsprecher (Ancient Imports)
ex coll. Victor Failmezger
ex Numismatic Fine Arts Auction 3/93, Lot 2150
ex old Bavarian coll. #4159
ex A. Riechmann/Halle #1623 (AD 1919?)

For more information please look at the article 'The Bavarian Collection' at the board 'History and Archaeology'.
Jochen
Constantine_II,_VOT_X,_Aquileia,_r4.JPG
Constantine II, VOT X, Aquileia, RIC 1157 viewsConstantine II, 337-340AD, 19 mm, 3.3 g. Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C; laureate and cuirassed bust right. Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM around VOT X (with palm branches)in laurel wreath, AQT in exergue. RIC VII Aquileia 115, r4 (rare). ex areich, photo credit areich

Podiceps
constantine_Vot_xx_aqp_Aquilia.jpg
Constantine Nearly Fully Silvered Vot XX Aquilia117 viewsConstantine I CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
L DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG
VOT dot XX dot in badge at top of wreath
AQP Aquileia RIC VII Aquileia 65 r2
1 commentsJames b4
CONST_I_AQUILEIA_SOLO.JPG
Constantine the Great26 viewsConstantine I - Aquileia Mint - AE Follis - RIC VII 4

O: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right

R: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing left, holding globe, right hand raised, chlamys across left shoulder, flying under left arm. AQP in exergue

3.7g, 18.9/19.5mm, 135 degree die axis, 317AD
BiancasDad
Constantine R-11.jpg
Constantine the Great 314 CE, Aquileia mint, Æ 19-21mm, Follis, 1st officina.38 viewsConstantine the Great 314 CE, Aquileia mint, 19-21mm, Follis, 1st officina.

Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, laureate cuirassed bust right

Reverse: SOLI INVICTO COMITI, Sol standing left with orb & raising right hand, AQP in ex.

Reference: Aquileia RIC VII 4
Daniel Friedman
Constantinople Commem.jpg
Constantinople Commem.- Aquileia RIC 137 cf125 viewsobv: CONSTANTINOPLIS
rev: Victory on prow
AQS in exergue, Aquileia, second officina
F in l. field, Celator forgot to complete it, so it looks like an 'I'
RIC 137 cf, R4

This is one of the few coins that I think RIC was even close to getting a correct rarity on. I have yet to see another example of this issue from this mint. If you have one, please send me a scan! Shame about the patina on the obverse.
3 commentswolfgang336
Constantinopolis, Aquileia, RIC 123.JPG
Constantinopolis, Aquileia, RIC 12346 viewsAE3, Aquileia mint, 330-346 AD
Obverse: CONSTANTINOPOLIS, Helmeted, cuirassed bust of Constantinople left.
Reverse: Victory on prow.
AQP in exergue
17mm, 18gm
2 commentsJerome Holderman
coin12_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C (the 2nd) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3 follis (317-337 A.D.) 23 viewsCONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers facing each other, holding spears and shields, with one standard between them, devices on banners not very clear, but probably dots or "o". Mintmark: Epsilon SIS in exergue.

AE3, 18-19mm, 1.65g, die axis 2 (turned medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

IVN = IVNIOR = Junior, NOB C = Nobilitas Caesar, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", officina Epsilon (workshop #5), SIScia mint (now Sisak, Croatia).

Siscia mint combined with two standards and IVN NOB C variety points to only two types, RIC VII Siscia 220 and RIC VII Siscia 236, both of Constantine II, with possible officinas A, delta, gamma and epsilon. So even though the name is not very clear and theoretically the officina letter may be B rather than E, we can be sure that it is Constantine and that officina is E. Type 236 should have dots before and after the
mintmark, and it doesn't seem the case here, so this must be RIC VII Siscia 220, officina epsilon. Minting dates according to some sources: 330-335 AD.

Flavius Claudius Constantinus Augustus, born January/February 316, was the elder son if Constantine the Great and his second wife Fausta. Constantine II was born in Arles (south of modern France) and raised a Christian. On 1 March 317, he was made Caesar. A child general: in 323, at the age of seven, he took part in his father's campaign against the Sarmatians. At age ten, he became commander of Gaul, following the death of Crispus. An inscription dating to 330 records the title of Alamannicus, so it is probable that his generals won a victory over the Alamanni. His military career continued when Constantine I made him field commander during the 332 campaign against the Goths.

Following the death of his father in 337, Constantine II initially became augustus jointly with his brothers Constantius II and Constans, with the Empire divided between them and their cousins, the Caesars Dalmatius and Hannibalianus. This arrangement barely survived Constantine Is death, as his sons arranged the slaughter of most of the rest of the family by the army. As a result, the three brothers gathered together in Pannonia and there, on 9 September 337, divided the Roman world between themselves. Constantine, proclaimed Augustus by the troops received Gaul, Britannia and Hispania. He was soon involved in the struggle between factions rupturing the unity of the Christian Church. The Western portion of the Empire, under the influence of the Popes in Rome, favored Catholicism (Nicean Orthodoxy) over Arianism, and through their intercession they convinced Constantine to free Athanasius, allowing him to return to Alexandria. This action aggravated Constantius II, who was a committed supporter of Arianism.

Constantine was initially the guardian of his younger brother Constans, whose portion of the empire was Italia, Africa and Illyricum. Constantine soon complained that he had not received the amount of territory that was his due as the eldest son. Annoyed that Constans had received Thrace and Macedonia after the death of Dalmatius, Constantine demanded that Constans hand over the African provinces, to which he agreed in order to maintain a fragile peace. Soon, however, they began quarreling over which parts of the African provinces belonged to Carthage, and thus to Constantine, and which belonged to Italy, and therefore to Constans. Further complications arose when Constans came of age and Constantine, who had grown accustomed to dominating his younger brother, would not relinquish the guardianship. In 340 Constantine marched into Italy at the head of his troops. Constans, at that time in Dacia, detached and sent a select and disciplined body of his Illyrian troops, stating that he would follow them in person with the remainder of his forces. Constantine was engaged in military operations and was killed in an ambush outside Aquileia. Constans then took control of his deceased brother's realm.
Yurii P
coin757.JPG
Constantius Gallus Fel Temp Aquileia6 viewsDN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C


Aquileia 209
ecoli
lxxii_k.jpg
Constantius Gallus, AD 351-3544 viewsAE22, 3.4g, 12h; Aquileia mint, 354.
Obv.: DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C; Bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind.
Rev.: FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO; Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman turns to face soldier and raises left arm; he is bare-headed; LXXII in left field, wreath in center // AQP
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 198, p. 333.
John Anthony
constantius1.jpg
Constantius II Ae3 Aquileia 11 viewsBritanikus
Constantius_II_FT_Aquileia~0.JPG
Constantius II FT Aquileia25 viewsConstantius II: A.D. 337-361. AE Half Centenionalis, Aquileia Mint. RIC.215
OBV: Diademed dr cuir bust of Constantius II r.
REV: Soldier spearing fallen enemy horseman.
Romanorvm
cons_fel_temp_com.JPG
Constantius II RIC VII Aquileia 19977 viewsAE 18 mm 3.1 grams
OBV :: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG. Pearled diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO. Emperor spearing fallen horseman who is reaching with hair straight up
EX :: AQP ( Aquileia )
RIC VII Aquileia 199
RIC rated S
fromo uncleaned lot 06/2008
Johnny
vcb~0.jpg
Constantius II RIC VIII 145s, Aquileia37 viewsObverse: FLIVL CONSTANTIVS NOBC: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS: two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.
dot AQS in ex. Aquileia mint.
RIC VIII 145s Aquileia 16.8 mm., 1.5 g. rated R4
1 commentsNORMAN K
CONTIUS2-1-ROMAN.jpg
Constantius II, Aquileia RIC VIII-076(P)43 viewsAE4
Aquileia mint, 347-348 A.D.
16mm, 0.96g
RIC VIII-76

Obverse:
CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Laurel and rosette-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
VICTORIAE DD AVGG Q NN
AQP
Two Victories facing one another, each holding wreath and palm.
rubadub
constantius-ii-caesar-aquiliea-reshoot.jpg
Constantius II, as Caesar, AE3, 335-336 AD15 viewsRoman Imperial, Constantius II, as Caesar, AE3, (335-336 AD), 2.2g, 18mm

Obverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two soldiers facing with spears and shields, two standards between, Mintmark: AQP in ex. "Glorious Execution"

Reference: RIC VII Aquileia 120
Gil-galad
constantiusII_aquileia193_1.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VII, Aquileia 193108 viewsConstantius II 324 - 361, son of Constantine I
AE - AE 3, 4.48g, 19.6mm
Aquileia 2nd officina, 352 - 355
obv. DN CONSTAN - TIVS PF AVG
bust draped, cuirassed, pearl-diademed, r., A behind
rev. [FEL TEMP RE] - PARATIO
Helmeted soldier to l., shield on l. arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on
ground at r. Horseman is bare-headed, turns head back and stretches hand against soldier (type FH3)
field: left LXXII, right S
exergue: AQB
RIC VII, Aquileia 193
VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

LXXII = Roman 72. The Maiorina in the first time had a weight of 4.54g = 1/72 of a Roman Pound. Later the weight sunk down and yet before 355 the Maiorina was no more struck.
1 commentsJochen
260 Constantius II.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VIII 208 / 212, Aquileia33 viewsObv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Bust: Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Soldier spearing fallen horseman. FH3 - Reaching.
Exe: AQP "II" in fielf left
Date: 352-358 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated: "C"
Bluefish
constantiusII_aquileia_96.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VIII, Aquileia 9649 viewsConstantius II, AD 324-362, son of Constantine I
AE - AE 2, 6.2g, 24mm
Aquileia, 1.officina, 2.group, AD 348-350
obv. DN CONSTAN - TINVS PF AVG
draped, cuirassed bust, pearl-diademed head r.
rev. FEL TEMP RE - PARATIO
Soldier spearing falling horseman; he is waeing a pointed hat and is kneeling l. in front of his horse (RIC type FH1 kneeling, rare)
field right: star
exergue: AQP dot
RIC VIII, Aquileia 96; LRBC 892
S!, about EF, flan break at 9 o'clock

Not in Helvetica's list.

This issue celebrates Constantius' victory in the battle of Singara AD 344 against the Sassanides and the capture of their successor of the throne.
1 commentsJochen
sxyz.jpg
Constantius II, RIV VIII 107 Aquileia24 viewsConstantius II AE 2 Centenionalis.
Obverse - DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left holding globe.
Reverse - FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Constantius standing left with Chi-Rho standard and shield with two bound captives.
AQS in ex. Aquileia mint 20 mm diam. 3.4 g
NORMAN K
AA4B877B-5CF0-4AFD-B692-FBE5F935644B.jpeg
Constantius II/Gloria Exercitvs, 337-341 AD7 viewsAE15, 1.1g. Obverse: laurel and rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed. CONSTANT IVS PF AVG. Reverse: 2 soldiers standing facing each other, resting hand on shield, 1 standard between them. GLORIA EXERCITVS. Probably RIC VIII Aquileia 26.Celticaire
constans  twin vic  com.JPG
constants RIC VIII Aquileia28 viewsAE 15 mm 1.2 grams 347-348 AD
OBV :: CONSTAN-S PF AVG. Laurel and rosette diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VICTORIA DD AVGG Q NN. Two victories facing each other holding wreaths raised in air
EX :: dot AQP ( Aquileia)
RIC VIII Aquileia 79
RIC rated C4
from uncleaned lot 10/2006
Johnny
100_0708.JPG
Copy of Decentius9 viewsIn the style of Aquileia RIC 167 - legends and style not quite right for official stylesimmurray
025~0.JPG
Crispus21 viewsCrispus AE3. 316-317 AD. CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate draped & cuirassed bust right / PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS, the prince in military dress standing left with spear & shield, AQT in ex. Aquileia
RIC 9
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
00704.jpg
Crispus (RIC 109, Coin #704)4 viewsRIC 109 (R2), AE3, Aquileia, 322 AD.
OBV: CRISPVS NOB CAES; Laureate and cuirassed bust right.
REV: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM / VOT X (AQS); Legend around and within wreath, palm branch to left and right.
SIZE: 19.6mm, 3.50g
MaynardGee
781_Crispus_Aquileia.jpg
Crispus - AE 3 (follis)3 viewsAquileia
317 AD
laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
CRISPVS NOB CAES
soldier standing left, wearing helmet and cloak, holding spear and resting hand on shield
PRINCIPIA I_V_VENTVTIS
AQT
RIC VII Aquileia 9
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
crosipus43.jpg
Crispus AE follis. Aquileia RIC 69, R315 viewsCrispus AE follis. CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / CAESARVM NOSTRORVM around VOT V (with centering dot) within wreath. Mintmark AQT.
"VD"
Britanikus
Crispus_Aquiliea.JPG
Crispus Aquiliea21 viewsCrispus, Aquileia, 20mm, 3.3g
Obverse: CRISPVS NOB CAES, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: PRINCIPIA IV-VENTVTIS, Prince, in military outfit, standing left, holding shield and sceptre
AQT in Exergue
318 - 320 AD

SCARCE
Romanorvm
cscpt.jpg
Crispus RIC 41 Aquileia, 320 CE16 viewsObverse : CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate cuirassed bust right
Reverse : VIRTVS EXERCIT, two captives seated back to back on either side of banner inscribed VOT X.
S-F across fields.
Mintmark AQT. Aquileia 18 mm diam., 4.1g
NORMAN K
cr1.jpg
Crispus RIC VII 9 Aquileia 316-317 CE18 viewsObverse: CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS, Crispus in military dress, standing left with vertical spear, resting right hand on a shield at his side.
Mintmark AQT, 19.4 mm, 2.9 g.
RIC VII Aquileia 9.
NORMAN K
crispus_vot_v_forvm.jpg
crispus vot v 9 viewsCrispus CRISPVS NOB CAES LDC left
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
VOT V
dot AQS dot
Aquileia
RIC VII Aquileia 88 r2
James b4
CRISPUS_VOT_V_dot_AQS_dot.jpg
Crispus Vot V Aquilia56 viewsCrispus CRISPVS NOB CAES
LDC CAESARVM NOSTRORVM
VOT dot V
dot AQS dot
Aquileia RIC VII Aquileia 87
1 commentsJames b4
Crispus_Vot_V_AQT.jpg
Crispus Vot V RIC VII Aquileia 68 Nice Desert Patina19 viewsCrispus CRISPVS NOB CAES L
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT V
AQT Aquileia
RIC VII Aquileia 68
r3 usually 18-19 mm
1 commentsJames b4
crispus_vot_1.jpg
Crispus VOT X Aquilia31 viewsCrispus CRISPVS-NOB CAES LDC
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT dot X
palm branches left and right of vot... Legend
AQS Aquileia RIC VII Aquileia 108
s 322 AD
1 commentsJames b4
CRISPUS-2.jpg
CRISPUS236 viewsObv-CRISPVS NOB CAES laureate draped and cuirassed spear pointing forward shield on left arm bust left

Rev- VIRTVS EXERCIT standard inscribed VOT X in two lines standing on ground, captive to either side

Exe-S AQT F Aquileia mint 320 AD

Ref- RIC VII Aquileia 43
Matthew Raica
00diocaquileia.jpg
DIOCLETIAN 18 viewsAE follis. Aquileia , 301 AD. 10.18 gm. Laureate head right. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG. / Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. In exergue AQP.
RIC VI 31 a.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
benito
polllo.JPG
Diocletian41 viewsDIOCLETIAN. 286-305 AD. Follis. Aquileia mint, 2nd officina. Struck 296 AD. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae; AQS. RIC VI 23a. near EF, Some silvering remaining. Molinari
00diocletianmonet.jpg
DIOCLETIAN35 viewsAE follis. Aquileia , 301 AD. 10.18 gm. Laureate head right. IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG. / Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia. SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. In exergue AQP.
RIC VI 31 a.
benito
Diocletian.png
Diocletian11 viewsDiocletian, Post abdication Follis, Aquileia, AD 305-306. DN DIOCLETIANO FELICISSIMO SEN AVG, laureate bust right, wearing imperial mantle, holding olive-branch and mappa / PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG, Providentia standing right, extending right hand to Quies, standing left, holding branch and sceptre. S-F across outer fields. Mintmark AQP. RIC VI Aquileia 64a Ajax
roman18.jpg
Diocletian AE Follis38 views302-303 AD. Aquileia mint.
Obv.: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG - Laureate head of Diocletian.
Rev.: SACR MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR - Moneta holding scales and cornucopiae. AQP in ex. VI in r. field.
RIC 35a
2 commentsMinos
Diocletian_Aquileia.png
Diocletian Aquileia13 viewsDiocletian
Reigned 284-305

O: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG, Laureate bust right

R: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae, AQS mintmark

RIC VI Aquileia 29a
Gao
EB0740_scaled.JPG
EB0740 Maximianus / Moneta16 viewsMaximianus 286-305, AE Follis, Aquileia 300.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. Mintmark AQP.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 29b; Sear 13300.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 10.111g.
EB
EB0741_scaled.JPG
EB0741 Maximianus / Roma in Temple12 viewsMaximianus second reign 306-308, AE Follis, Aquileia.
Obverse: IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: CONSERV-VRB SVAE, Roma seated facing, head left, shield at side, holding globe and sceptre within hexastyle temple which has knobs as acroteria and wreath in pediment. Mintmark AQP.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 118.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 5.543g.
EB
EB0744_scaled.JPG
EB0744 Constantius I / Moneta40 viewsConstantius I 293-305, AE Follis, Aquileia 301 AD.
Obverse: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right.
Reverse: SACR MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae. V in right field. Mintmark AQΓ.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 34a.
Diameter: 28mm, Weight: 8.936g.
1 commentsEB
EB0781_scaled.JPG
EB0781 Constantine I / Captives9 viewsConstantine I 307-337, Aquileia, AE Follis. 320 AD.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG, helmeted cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VIRTVS EXERCIT S-F, standard inscribed VOT XX between two captives, both looking left. Mintmark AQP.
References: RIC VII 48.
Diameter: 18.5mm, Weight: 3.822g.
EB
EB0881_scaled.JPG
EB0881 Constantine I / Sol5 viewsConstantine I 307-337, AE follis, Aquileia, circa 317 AD.
Obverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SOLI INV-I-CTO COMITI, Sol standing half left, holding globe and raising right hand, chlamys across left shoulder, flying under left arm, A/X - F. Mintmark AQ.
References: Cf. RIC VII 4.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 2.909g.
EB
Constantine II 33.jpg
F367 viewsConstantine II AE3

Attribution: RIC VII 182, Siscia, Officina 4
Date: AD 321-324
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate head r.
Reverse: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, laurel wreath surrounding VOT/./X,
Δ SIS and sunrise in exergue
Size: 20 mm nearly fully silvered
Weight: 3.27 grams

Constantine II assumed the title of Augustus, along with his bothers Constantius II and Constans, on September 9, AD 337 after the death of his father. He took the western provinces under his supervision. Constantine II and his brothers soon quelled an insurrection by their cousins Delmatius and Hannibalianus, who were subsequently killed. All seemed well between the siblings until Constantine II decided to overrun his brother Constans and extend his holdings. They met in battle during the spring of AD 340 at Aquileia. Constans emerged victorious while his bother Constantine II met his fate and was killed.
12 commentsNoah
fhc7.JPG
Falling horseman90 viewsAll 15 official mints.
Alexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
fhlbld.jpg
Fel Temp Reparatio Fallen Horseman193 viewsAlexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
Barbaous Mint
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
forvpltft.jpg
FEL TEMP REPARATIO from the Forvm Catalog378 viewsRow 1 Fallen Horseman

Constantius II-Aquileia
Constantius II-Constantinople
Constantius II-Heraclea

Row 2Fallen Horseman

Constantius II-Arles
Constantius II-Thessalonica
Julian II-Sirmium
Julian II-Siscia
Constantius Gallus-Constantinople

Row 3 Barbarian Hut

Constans-Aquileia
Constans-Alexandria
Constantius II-Cyzicus

Row 4 Galley

Constantius II-Thessalonica
Constans-Siscia

Row 5 Galley

Constantius II-Thessalonica
Constantius II-Siscia
Constans-Siscia
Constans-Thessalonica

Row 6 Phoenix

Constantius II-Siscia
Constans-Siscia
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
coin_6_quart.jpg
FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C (the 2nd) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE4 follis (324-361 A.D.) 30 viewsFL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers facing each other, holding spears and shields, with one standard between them, large filled "dot" on banner. Mintmark: dot AQP in exergue.

AE4, 16+mm, 1.53g, die axis 6 (coin alignment), noticeable shift of the reverse die right, material: bronze/copper-based alloy

FL IVL = Flavius Iulius (the first names), NOB C = Nobilitas Caesar (title before becoming an Augustus, i. e. after he ascended as Caesar in 324, but before the death of his father in 337), Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army" AQP = Aquileia mint, primary officina (workshop #1), issue mark "dot".

Mintmark dot AQP points to just one type, RIC VII Aquileia 145, and clears the possible misreading of the end of the obverse legend: it is indeed ...NOB C, not AVG. Strangely though the mint years listed are 337-361, after the ascension as Augustus. A clear example of this type can be seen at WildWinds, and features the same huge filled "dot" as in my coin: http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/ric/constantius_II/_aquileia_RIC_VII_145_P.jpg

There is also an example in this gallery with roughly the same obverse and reverse style:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-126821

Flavius Julius Constantius Augustus, born 7 August 317, was Roman Emperor from 337 to 361 (caesar to his father in 324-337). The middle and most successful son of Constantine I and Fausta, he ascended to the throne with his brothers Constantine II and Constans upon their father's death. In 340, Constantius' brothers clashed over the western provinces of the empire. The resulting conflict left Constantine II dead and Constans as ruler of the west until he was overthrown and assassinated in 350 by the usurper Magnentius. Unwilling to accept Magnentius as co-ruler, Constantius defeated him at the battles of Mursa Major and Mons Seleucus. Magnentius committed suicide after the latter battle, leaving Constantius as the sole ruler of the empire. His subsequent military campaigns against Germanic tribes were successful: he defeated the Alamanni in 354 and campaigned across the Danube against the Quadi and Sarmatians in 357. In contrast, the war in the east against the Sassanids continued with mixed results.

He was an Arian and clashed with his brother Constans (who was a devote Nicene Orthodox) over this. Subsequently he changed his position somewhat, trying to find a compromise between the two Christian denominations, and subscribed to a milder version of Arianism later known as "Semi-Arianism". In 351, due to the difficulty of managing the empire alone, Constantius elevated his cousin Constantius Gallus to the subordinate rank of Caesar, but had him executed three years later after receiving scathing reports of his violent and corrupt nature. Shortly thereafter, in 355, Constantius promoted his last surviving cousin, Gallus' younger half-brother, Julian, to the rank of Caesar. However, Julian claimed the rank of Augustus in 360, leading to war between the two. Ultimately, no battle was fought as Constantius became ill and died on 3 November 361, though not before naming Julian (of the apostasy infamy) as his successor.
Yurii P
flaviovitt_aquileia.jpg
Flavius Victor - Spes Romanorvm127 viewsCastrorvm Ianva, Aquileia1 commentsantvwala
spesromanorvm2.jpg
Flavius Victor - Spes Romanorvm20 viewsCastrorum Ianva, Aquileiaantvwala
coin563.jpg
Flavius Victor AE 4 Aquileia RIC 5528 viewsFlavius Victor AE 4 Aquileia RIC 55 . 387-388 AD. D N FL VICTOR P F AVG, diademed bust right / SPES ROMANORVM, camp gate with star between two turrets, SMAQ in ex. Cohen 3.
Coin #563
cars100
Flavius_Victor_RIC_55b.JPG
Flavius Victor, RIC 55b13 viewsDN FL VICTOR PF AVG
SPES ROMANORVM
AE-4, 13mm, 0.96g
Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Campgate with four rows and two turrets, no doors, star above
Aquileia mint
SMAQS in ex.
novacystis
flavius_victor_aquileia_55(b).jpg
Flavius Victor, RIC IX, Aquileia 55(b)23 viewsFlavius Victor, 387-388, son of Magnus Maximus
AE 4, 0.9g, 13mm
Aquileia, 1st officina
obv. DN FL VIC - TOR PF AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, pearl-diademd, r.
rev. SPES RO - MA - NORVM
City gate with 2 towers, star between, open door
in wx. SMAQP
ref. RIC IX, Aquileia 55(b); C. 3
Scarce, VF

In spite of his depiction Flavius Victor was 4-5 years old when his coins were struck.
Jochen
frthuts.jpg
FTR Huts49 viewsAlexandria
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
00214.jpg
Galerius (RIC 26b, Coin #214)12 viewsRIC 26b (C), AE Follis, Aquileia, 297-298 AD.
Obv: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (AQ gamma) Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera in right hand, cornucopiae in left.
Size: 27.9mm 11.08gm
MaynardGee
DSCN6929.JPG
Galerius Maximian Augustus. 312 - 313. Aquileia mint. AE Folles 22mm7 viewsGalerius Maximian Augustus. 312 - 313. Aquileia mint,

Obv. IMP MAXIMINVS PF AVG . Laureate head right

Rev. GENIO A-VGVSTI . Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera over tripod altar, cornucopiae . AQS in Ex.

Ref. RIC VI Aquileia 130
Lee S
aquileia.jpg
GLORIA EXERCITVS, RIC 29 or similar, Aquileia13 viewsConstantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.
Bronze AE 3, RIC VIII 29 or similar, F, Aquileia mint, 1.244g, 15.8mm, 0o, 337 - 340 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTI-VS P F AVG, laurel-rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers, each holding spear and resting hand on shield, flanking standard, AQS in ex; scarce. Ex FORVM
Podiceps
GordianIAfr.jpg
Gordian I Africanus / Athena59 viewsGordian I Africanus, Egypt, Alexandria. A.D. 238. BI tetradrachm (22 mm, 12.47 g, 12 h). RY 1.
O: A K M AN ΓOPΔIANOC CЄM AΦ ЄVCЄB, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Gordian I right
R: Athena seated left, holding Nike and spear; in left field, date (L A).
- Kln 2600; cf. Dattari (Savio) 4656 (legend); Kampmann & Ganschow 68.6., Ex Coin Galleries (16 July 2003), 264.

Perhaps the most reluctant of Emperors, Gordian I (Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus Augustus) was Roman Emperor for one month with his son Gordian II in 238, the Year of the Six Emperors. Caught up in a rebellion against the Emperor Maximinus Thrax, he was defeated by forces loyal to Maximinus before committing suicide.

According to Edward Gibbon:

"An iniquitous sentence had been pronounced against some opulent youths of [Africa], the execution of which would have stripped them of far the greater part of their patrimony. () A respite of three days, obtained with difficulty from the rapacious treasurer, was employed in collecting from their estates a great number of slaves and peasants blindly devoted to the commands of their lords, and armed with the rustic weapons of clubs and axes. The leaders of the conspiracy, as they were admitted to the audience of the procurator, stabbed him with the daggers concealed under their garments, and, by the assistance of their tumultuary train, seized on the little town of Thysdrus, and erected the standard of rebellion against the sovereign of the Roman empire. (...) Gordianus, their proconsul, and the object of their choice [as emperor], refused, with unfeigned reluctance, the dangerous honour, and begged with tears that they should suffer him to terminate in peace a long and innocent life, without staining his feeble age with civil blood. Their menaces compelled him to accept the Imperial purple, his only refuge indeed against the jealous cruelty of Maximin (...)."

Because of the absence of accurate dating in the literary sources, the precise chronology of these events has been the subject of much study. The present consensus among historians assigns the following dates (all in the year 238 A.D.) to these events: March 22nd Gordian I, II were proclaimed Emperors in Africa; April 1st or 2nd they were recognized at Rome; April 12th they were killed (after reigning twenty days); April 22nd Pupienus and Balbinus were proclaimed Emperors; June 24th Maximinus and his son were assassinated outside of Aquileia; July 29th Pupienus and Balbinus were assassinated and Gordian III proclaimed as sole Augustus.
3 commentsNemonater
Gratian.jpg
Gratian AE235 viewsObv: DN GRATIANVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing facing, head left, Victory on globe in left hand, right hand raising kneeling, turreted female, mintmark SMAQ in ex
Size: 24mm, 5.43g
Mint: Aquileia, 378-383 AD
1 commentsickster
gratian_siliqua.jpg
Gratian Siliqua17 viewsRIC Vol IX, Aquileia; page 96, 14(b)
OBV:DNGRATIA NVSPFAVG - bust r; pearl diad, cuir. and dr.
REV:VOTIS/X MVLTIS/XX in wreath; AQPS in ex.
3rd period - 17NOV375 AD to 9AUG378 AD
1 commentsJames b4
onorio_salreip_aquileia.jpg
Honorius, Salvs Reipvblicae, Aquileia22 viewsantvwala
constantius_II_hut_aqui.jpg
Hut type, Aquileia, AQP(dot)7 viewsConstantius II, Billon centenionalis, Hut type, Aquileia Mint, Officina 1, AD 348-350. 20mm, 3.23g. 
Obverse: Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand 
D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG 
Reverse: Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points upwards and to the right. 
FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO 
Field Marks: None. 
Exergue: AQP(dot) 
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 102. Ex MoremothPodiceps
constans_aquileia_hut.jpg
Hut type, Aquileia, AQS dot6 viewsConstans, Billon centenionalis, Hut type, Aquileia Mint, Officina 2, AD 348-350. 19x21mm, 3.34g. 
Obverse: Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand 
D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG 
Reverse: Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points upwards and to the right. 
FEL TEMP REPAR-ATIO 
Exergue: AQS (dot) 
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 103. Ex MoremothPodiceps
MISC_Italian_Aquileia_Bernardi_69_.JPG
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.56 viewsCNI VI 1, Bernardi 69a, Biaggi 193.

AR Soldo da 12 bagattini (denar), .57 gr., 16 mm., struck 1412-1420 under Patriarch Louis II of Teck (Italian, Ludovico II di Teck; German, Ludwig II von Teck) (1412-1439).

Obv: +LODOVICVS ◦ dVX ◦ d ◦ TECh, shield with Patriarchal coat of arms (diamond pattern).

Rev: PAThE AQVILE, Nimbate Madonna with nimbate infant Jesus to her right.

Aquileia was founded by the Romans in 180/181 B.C., and became one of the most prominent cities in the Roman Empire. It was destroyed by Attila in 452 A.D. and again by the Lombards in 590. The Lombard Dukes of Friuli ruled Aquileia and the surrounding territory until 774, when Charlemagne conquered the Lombard duchy and turned it into a Frankish duchy of the Carolingian Empire. By the 11th century, the patriarch of Aquileia had grown strong enough to assert temporal sovereignty over Friuli and Aquileia. In 1077, the Holy Roman Emperor gave the region to the patriarch as a feudal possession. Louis II of Teck was a German prelate, who was elected as patriarch with the help of Holy Roman Emperor Sigismund of Luxemburg, the King of Hungary. During the war with the Republic of Venice, which broke out in 1411, Louis sided for Sigismund. The patriarchate was conquered by Venice in 1419, and the patriarch lost his temporal authority on July 7, 1420, when his territories were secularized by Venice.
1 commentsStkp
MISC__Italian_States_Aqieliae_Bernardi_22.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.20 viewsBernardi 22, Biaggi 147, CNI VI p. 13, 17-27

AR denaro (nominal weight .1.03 gr. but actually ranging from .86-1.31 gr., .847); .77 gr., 20.32 mm. max., 0◦.

Struck ca. 1269 under Patriarch Gregorio di Montelongo (1251-1269).

Obv: GREGO - RIV'PA, Patriarch seated facing, holding cross-tipped scepter and gospel.

Rev: AQVI -- LEGIA, Eagle standing left, head rght, with wings displayed; pellets flanking head.

Bernardi rarity R.
1 commentsStkp
MISC_Italian_States_Aqiliea_Bernardi_64b.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.14 viewsBernardi 64b, CNI VI p. 36, 10.

AR denaro (nominal weight .83 gr. in 1398 and .73 gr. in 1401, but actually ranging from .67-.87 gr.; nominal fineness .542); .75 gr., 18.53 mm. max., 0◦.

Struck 1398-1401 under Patriarch Antonio I Gaetani (1395-1402).

Obv: + AnTOnIVS ☼ PATRIARChA [AR lignate], shield with Patriarch's coat of arms (two diagonal bands).

Rev: AQV -- ILE -- GEn -- SIS, voided long cross with five-petal roses in the quarters, small cross above the cross.

Bernardi rarity R2.
Stkp
MISC_Italian_States_Aqiliea_Bernardi_65a.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.15 viewsBernardi 65a, CNI VI p. 35, 1.

AR denaro (nominal weight .83 gr. in 1398 and .73 gr. in 1401, but actually ranging from .53-.86 gr.; nominal fineness .542); .61 gr., 17.64 mm. max., 0◦.

Struck 1398-1401 under Patriarch Antonio I Gaetani (1395-1402).

Obv: + AnTOnIVS P -- ATRhA, ancient helmet surmounted by a rampant eagle's head, facing right, flanked by letters A-n, over slightly-inclined shield with Patriarch's coat of arms (two diagonal bands).

Rev: * AQV ☼ ILE ☼ GEn ☼ SIS, eagle facing right with wings spread.

Bernardi rarity C.
Stkp
MISC_Italian_States_Aqiliea_Bernardi_67a.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.18 viewsBernardi 67a, CNI VI p. 36, 1.

AR denaro (nominal weight .72 gr. in 1402 and .71 gr. in 1403, but actually ranging from .54-.68 gr.; nominal fineness .528 in 1402 and .521 in 1403); .66 gr., 17.43 mm. max., 0◦.

Struck 1402-1403 under Patriarch Antonio II Panciera (1402-1411).

Obv: + AnTOnIVS * PATRIARCA, shield with Patriarch's coat of arms; diagonal band in top compartment over star below.

Rev: * AQV ☼ ILE ☼ GEn ☼ SIS, eagle facing right with wings spread.

Bernardi rarity C.
Stkp
MISC_Italian_States_Aquiliea_Bernardo_43_bertrando.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.16 viewsBernardi 43, Biaggi 171, CNI VI p. 26, 9-14

AR denaro (median weight 1.01 g.; nominal weight .1.10 g., nominal fineness 0.602); .83 g., 17.18 mm. max., 180◦.

Struck ca. 1336-1338 under Patriarch Bertrando di San Genesio (1334-1350).

Obv: + BER-TRAn-D'PA-Th'A [An ligate], Cross that intersects a beaded circle and legend.

Rev: [S] KMA--ChOR', Saint Hermagoras/Ermacora, beardless. seated and facing, wearing pontifical robe and a cap, holding cross in left hand and raising right hand in blessing.

According to Aquiliean tradition, Hermagoras was the leader of the nascent Christian community in Aquileia, and was consecrated bishop by Saint Peter. Hermagoras and his deacon Fortunatus evangelized the area but were eventually arrested by Sebastius, a representative of Nero. They were tortured and beheaded.

Bernardi rarity R.
Stkp
MISC_Italy_Aquiliea_Bernardi_47_Bertrando.jpg
Italian States. Aquileia, Patriarchate.15 viewsBernardi 47, Biaggi 170, CNI VI p. 26, 6-8

AR denaro (median weight 0.97 g.; nominal weight .1.10 g., nominal fineness 0.573); .72 g., 19.09 mm. max., 180◦.

Struck 1340 under Patriarch Bertrando di San Genesio (1334-1350).

Obv: [BERTR]--AnDVSP, Nimbate (ornate halo of annulets) Virgin Mary seated, holding nimbate infant Jesus to her left.

Rev: + AQVIL--ECEnS, Eagle with spread wings facing left, B on its breast.

Bernardi rarity R.
Stkp
IMG11198.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - basilica188 viewsBasilica is dedicated to the Virgin Mary and the Saints Hermagora and Fortunatus and was built in the first half of the 11th century by Patriarch Poppo in Romanesque style. Upper parts and roof were built by Markward von Randeck in 14th-15th century in Gothic style.
Mosaics from 4th century were hidden under the floor until 1909.
Johny SYSEL
IMG_6734.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - forum197 viewsJohny SYSEL
IMG11174.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor199 viewsJonas swallowed by sea monster
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
IMG11189.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor203 viewsPost-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
IMG11190.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor199 viewsscene of the Good Shepherd with the Mystic Flock
Christ is portrayed as a beardless young man bearing the lost lamb upon his shoulders. In one hand he holds the syrinx, symbol of the gentless he takes cere of his flock with.
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
IMG11196.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor195 viewsFishing scene describes the preaching of the Apostles ("Follow me and I will make you fishers of men":Matthew 4,19). The fishes represent the people listening to the good news, the boat is symbol of the church, the net represents the kingdom of heaven ("The kingdom of heaven is like big net that was cast into the sea...": Matthew 13,47).
Post-Theodorian South hall (end of 4th century)
Mosaics were originally part of Theodorian complex destroyed by Attila. Basilica was built on its site in 1031 and mosaics remained untouched under the floor.
Johny SYSEL
IMG_6742.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor190 viewsRam and battle between Cock and Tortoise. The Cock is symbol of the light of a new day, thus representing Christ, the "light of the world". The tortoise, whose Greek name means "dweller of the darkness", is instead of the symbol of Evil.
Post-Theodorian North hall (middle of the 4th century)
Johny SYSEL
IMG_6746b.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - mosaic floor193 viewsPost-Theodorian North hall (middle of the 4th century)Johny SYSEL
IMG11099.JPG
Italy, Aquileia - Roman house238 viewsJohny SYSEL
5630_5631.jpg
Jovian, AE3, NO LEGEND; Wreath, VOT V/MVLT X, within.13 viewsAE3
Jovian
Augustus: 363 - 364AD
Issued: 363 - 364AD
19.0mm 2.70gr 6h
O: DN IOVIA-NVS PF AVG; Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Wreath, VOT V/MVLT X, within; dot within badge at top of wreath.
Exergue: AQUILS
Aquileia Mint
RIC VIII Aquileia 247; Sear 19227.
Aorta: 123: B2, O3, R16, T24, M3.
JAZ Numismatics/John Zielinski Auction 112, Lot # 21.
11/16/17 11/23/17
Nicholas Z
jovian247.jpg
Jovian, Aquileia, RIC VIII 247, 363-364 CE.13 viewsObverse: DN IOVIA NVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VOT V, MVLT X within wreath on 4 lines.
AQVILP in ex. Aquileia mint, 19.8 mm, 3.0 g.
NORMAN K
IMG_1192.JPG
Jovian. Aquileia. 363-364 AD. AE20.16 viewsJovian. Aquileia. 363-364 AD.
Obv. DN IOVIA-NVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev. VOT V MVLT X within wreath. Mintmark AQVILP or AQVILS.
Ref. RIC VIII Aquileia 247.
( A nice find in an uncleaned lot!! )
Lee S
julian_fh.jpg
Julian II Caesar, 355-36014 viewsAE3, 19mm, 3.1g, 9h; Aquileia mint, AD 355-361.
Obv.: DN IVLIANVS NOB C; Draped and cuirassed bust right, M behind.
Rev.: FEL TEMP REPARATIO; Helmeted soldier on left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman turns to face soldier and raises left arm; he is bare-headed // dot AQT palm
Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 225 (p.336).
Notes: eBay sale 5/31/15, biggyg2, 21.
John Anthony
licinius.jpg
LICINIUS I34 viewsAE follis. Aquileia, 317 AD. 3.50 grs. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP LICINIUS PF AVG / Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and leaning on sceptre. IOVI CONSERVATORI. In exergue AQS.
RIC 6.
1 commentsbenito
licinius~0.jpg
LICINIUS I17 viewsAE follis. Aquileia, 317 AD. 3.50 grs. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP LICINIUS PF AVG / Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and leaning on sceptre. IOVI CONSERVATORI. In exergue AQS.
RIC 6.
benito
liciniusI2.jpg
LICINIUS I13 viewsAE follis. Aquileia 319-320 AD. 3,28 grs. Helmeted, cuirassed bust right IMP LICINIVIS AVG / Labarum with banner inscribed VOT/XX with captive bound and seated on either side. VIRTVS EXERCIT. S/ F across fields. AQS in exergue .
RIC 50 (var-error)
benito
liciniusI2~0.jpg
LICINIUS I19 viewsAE follis. Aquileia 319-320 AD. 3,28 grs. Helmeted, cuirassed bust right IMP LICINIVIS AVG / Labarum with banner inscribed VOT/XX with captive bound and seated on either side. VIRTVS EXERCIT. S/ F across fields. AQS in exergue .
RIC 51 (var-error)
benito
LIC131A.jpg
Licinius I RIC VII 131 Aquileia17 viewsLicinius I, AE follis 308-324 CE.
Obverse: IMP LIC LICINVS PF AVG, Laureate bust right.
Reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left by tripod altar, naked except chlamys across shoulder & modius on head, holding patera and cornucopia
AQ GAMMA IN EX. AQUILEIA MINT, 22.6 mm., 2.9 g.
NORMAN K
lic4together.jpg
Licinius I (RIC VII#86 Aquileia)21 viewsLicinius I 308-324AD AE3 Follis

Obverse-IMPLICI NIVS AVG,(Laureate head right)

Reverse-DOMININLICINIAVG,(Laurel wreath around VOT.XX

Exergue..AQS

RIC VII#86 Aquileia
1 commentsPaul R3
coin605.JPG
Licinius I VIRTVS-EXERCIT Aquileia12 viewsRIC VII Aquileia 52

ecoli
3444_(1)_3445_(1).jpg
Licinius I, Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI 5 viewsAE Follis
Licinius I
Augustus: 308 - 324AD
Issued: 317AD
20mm 2.93gr
O: IMP LICINIVS PF AVG; Laureate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI; Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and scepter.
Exergue: AQS
Aquileia Mint
Aorta: 782: B12, O18, R28, T31, M3.
RIC VII 7, Officina 2
alghanem1 282267629994
11/29/16 1/20/17
Nicholas Z
257a Licinius I.jpg
Licinius I, RIC VII 67, Aquileia65 viewsObv: IMP LICINIVS AVG
Bust: Laureate head right
Rev: DOMINI (dot) N (dot) LICINI AVG
VOT XX in 2 lines within laurel wreath
Exe: AQS
Mint: Aquiliea
Date: 320-321 AD
Denom: Follis
Rated "R1"
Bluefish
licinius_ii_Vot_V_AQT.jpg
Licinius II VOT V Aquileia37 viewsLicinius II LICINIVS IVN NOB CAES L
CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT V
AQT Aquileia RIC VII Aquileia 71 r5
James b4
Aq1 copy.jpg
Licinius II, Ae 3, Struck 320 A.D. 3gm & 17mm31 viewsOBV/ LICINIVS IVN NOB CAES; laur and cuir bust l, holding Victory on globe.
REV/VIRTVS EXERCIT; two captives flanking a standard inscribed VOT XX; S/F in fields. AQS in exergue
RIV VII, 44 (Rare 4)
A choice example of this rare Aquileia issue...cleaned by me!
Mayadigger
licinius_vot_xx_aquilia.jpg
Licinius VOT XX Aquileia38 viewsLicinius I IMP LIC-INIVS AVG L
DOMINI dot N dot LICINI AVG VOT dot XX
AQS Aquileia
RIC VII Aquileia 67 r1
James b4
MarcAurelSestDanube.jpg
MAFJ9 Away to War26 viewsMarcus Aurelius

Sestertius
170

Laureate head, right, M ANTONINVS AVG TR P XXIIII
Aurelius on horse right holding spear, soldier in front with spear and shield, three soldiers behind him with standards, COS III PROFECTIO AVG S C

RIC 977

Marcus twice between 168 and 174 had to command armies in Germany and Pannonia, which took him to a rough, often cold and dark frontier not fit for other members of the imperial family. A RAND study of US military personnel subjected to repeated and lengthy deployments to Afghanistan and Iraq concluded, "Researchers found that cumulative months of deployment matter. More cumulative months of deployment increased the risk of divorce among military couples, regardless of when the couple married or when the deployment occurred. The risk of divorce was higher for hostile deployments than for non-hostile deployments. . . ." People are people, and similar strains appear to have affected Marcus and Faustina, and may have contributed to Commodus' personal development into a monster in the absence of his father.

Marcus' generals held the Marcommani at bay during the Parthian war, but on Lucius' return, according to the Historia Augusta, "[B]oth the emperors [in 68] set forth, clad in military cloak. Both the Victuali and Marcomanni were throwing everything into disorder, and other peoples as well, who had taken flight under pressure from the more distant barbarians, were going to make war unless they were allowed in. The emperors' departure produced no small gain, for, when they had come as far as Aquileia, most of the kings withdrew, together with their peoples, and put to death those responsible for the disturbances. . . . Marcus. . . believed that the barbarians were feigning both their retreat and other measures purporting to offer military security--to avoid being crushed by the weight of such great preparations; and he held they must press on. Finally, having crossed the Alps, they proceeded a considerable distance and settled everything pertinent to the defense of Italy and Illyricum." Lucius died during the return to Rome in 169, and Marcus became the sole ruler of the empire.

The Marcommani nevertheless invaded Italy in 170 and besieged Aquileia, and Marcus returned to war, planning an offensive on the Danube. Eutropius recorded:

Having persevered, therefore, with the greatest labour and patience, for three whole years at Carnuntum, he brought the Marcomannic war to an end; a war which the Quadi, Vandals, Sarmatians, Suevi, and all the barbarians in that quarter, had joined with the Marcomanni in raising; he killed several thousand men, and, having delivered the Pannonians from slavery, triumphed a second time at Rome with his son Commodus Antoninus, whom he had previously made Caesar. As he had no money to give his soldiers, in consequence of the treasury having been exhausted for the support of the war, and as he was unwilling to lay any tax on the provinces or the senate, he sold off all his imperial furniture and decorations, by an auction held in the forum of the emperor Trajan, consisting of vessels of gold, cups of crystal and murrha, silk garments belonging to his wife and himself, embroidered with gold, and numbers of jewelled ornaments. This sale was continued through two successive months, and a great quantity of money was raised from it.
1 commentsBlindado
magnus_reparatio_reipub_arles_ric_26b.jpg
Magnentius AE2, Gloria Romanorum (RIC Aquileia 162)9 viewsObverse: D N MAGNENTIVS P F AVG Bare head, looking right. Letter A behing bust.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM Emperor on horseback, striking down enemy.

Aquileia mint, 2nd officina, 350-351.

22 mm, 2.86 g, 180.

Reference: RIC VIII Aquileia 162.
Manuel
275- Magnentius-3.JPG
Magnentius-328 viewsAE Centenionalis, Aquileia, 350-353 AD
Obverse:DN MAGNENTIVS PF AVG, Draped bust right, A behind
Reverse: VICTORIAE DD NN AVG ET CAES, Two Victories holding shield inscribed VOT / V / MVLT / X
AQS in exergue
RIC 167
20mm, 3.8gm
Jerome Holderman
Magnus_Maximus_1.jpg
Magnus Maximus15 viewsMagnus Maximus
, Aquileia mint
Obv.: D N MAG MA[XIMVS P F AVG], Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev.: [SPES] RO-MA-NOR[VM] / SMAQP, Campgate with two turrets; star above
, 12mm, 0.9g
Ref.: RIC IX 55a
Ex Lanz Numismatik
shanxi
mark_aurel_338_2.jpg
Marcus Aurelius RIC III, 338540 viewsAR - Denar, 3.25g, 18.8mm
Rome, Dec. 175 - Dec. 176
obv. M ANTONINVS AVG GERM SARM
head laureate, r.
rev. TRP XXX IMP VIII COS III PP
Pile of arms
in ex: DE GERM
RIC III, 338
Scarce; VF(?)
added to www.wildwinds.com

Early in 169, the Marcomanni and Quadi crossed the Danube, penetrated the intervening provinces, and entered Italy. The culmination of their onslaught was a siege of Aquileia. The effect upon the inhabitants of the peninsula was frightful. This was the first invasion of Italy since the late second century B.C., when the Cimbri and Teutones had been separately crushed by Marius.
After a rapid mobilization of forces MARCUS AURELIUS turned north and began his counterattacks against the barbarians. First and foremost, the enemy had to be driven out of Italy and then into their own territory beyond the Danube. But it was a time-consuming and expensive operation. 23 Nov. 176 he held the triumph over Germans and Sarmati. Raetia and Noricum became Roman provinces.
1 commentsJochen
She-wolf.jpg
Maxentius18 viewsMaxentius, 307-312. Follis (Silvered bronze, 25 mm, 6.77 g, 7 h), Aquileia, late summer 307. IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG Laureate head of Maxentius to right. Rev. CONSERV VRBS SVAE / AQΓ Roma seated left within tetrastyle temple, holding scepter and handing globe to Maxentius standing right, holding scepter; seated captive between; Victories as acroteria, she-wolf and twins in pediment. RIC 113. Good very fine.
From the S. Pozzi Collection, privately purchased from K. Alber on 16 January 1973 and previously acquired from G. Brosi, Basel.
Ancient Aussie
625_Maxentius_Ostia.jpg
Maxentius - AE follis8 viewsOstia
309-312 AD
laureate head right
IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG
Castor and Pollux, each with star above cap, chlamys over shoulder, leaning on scepter with outer arm, holding bridled horse with inner hand
AETE_RNITAS__AVG N
MOSTS
RIC 35; Cohen 5; Sear 14975
6,25g
ex Jiř Militk
Johny SYSEL
Maxentius_RIC_113.jpg
Maxentius RIC 11346 viewsObv IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG, laureate head of Maxentius right
Rev: CONSERV VRB SVAE, tetrastyle temple with she-wolf suckling Romulus and Remus within pediment and Victories as acroteria; within, Roma seated left on round shield, holding scepter, presenting globe to emperor standing right, foot resting on bound captive seated right, and holding scepter, AQr in ex
Mint: Aquileia 306-312 AD
Size:24 mm, 6.94 g, 6 h
Ids: RIC 113
2 commentsickster
maxentius_113.jpg
Maxentius RIC VI, Aquileia 11394 viewsMaxentius 306 - 312, drawn at the battle of the Milvian bridge, son of Maximianus
AE - AE 2, 6.42g, 24mm
Aquileia 3. officina, late summer AD 307
obv. IMP C MAXENTIVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. CONSERV - VRB SVAE
helmeted Roma sitting l. on shield in tetrastyle temple, holding sceptre l.,
handing globe to the emperor with r., who stands r. in military dress
before her, holding sceptre l. and stretching out r. hand to globe, seated
captive between. Pediment with she-wolf and twins, r. and l. on roof as
acroteria victories holding wreath.
exergue: AQ Gamma
RIC VI, Aquileia 113; C.42
good F

PEDIMENTUM, the trigonal field above the front of the temple (gr. tympanon)
ACROTERIUM, figure or figures standing above the corners and on top of the temple
2 commentsJochen
312647d.jpg
Maxentius Follis24 viewsMaxentius, 307-312, Follis
IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG.
Obv: Laureate head right.
CONSERV - VRB SVAE, AQS in exergue.
Rev: Roma seated left on shield, holding a spear, presenting a globe to Maxentius who stands right, holding a spear, his foot on a bound and seated captive, all within a tetrastyle temple with Victories holding wreaths as acroteria and the archetypal she-wolf and twins within the pediment.
RIC VI 113, Aquileia mint, 2nd officina, struck 307;
Cohen 42; Paolucci-Zub 173.
OldMoney
Maxentius_ric_113.JPG
Maxentius, 306 - 312 AD61 viewsObv: IMP C MAXENTIVS PF AVG, laureate head of Maxentius facing right

Rev: CONSERV VRB SVAE, Roma seated left on a shield inside of a tetrastyle temple, presenting a globe to Maxentius standing right, a bound captive is seated between them; Victories with wreaths as acroteria, she-wolf and twins in pediment; AQS in exergue.

Billon Follis, Aquileia mint, 307 AD

6.2 grams, 26 x 23 mm, 180

RIC VI 113, S14992, VM 19
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Maxentius- CONSERV new.jpg
Maxentius- Conserv44 viewsMaxentius, February 307 - 28 October 312 A.D.

Obverse:Laureate head right
IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG

IMP: Imperator,
C: Caes,
MAXENTIVS: Maxentius
P F: Pius Felix,
AVG: Augustus,

Reverse:
CONSERV VRB SVAE

CONSERV: Protector
VRB: City, i.e Rome
SVAE: His

Showing: Hexastyle temple, Roma seated within, globe in r., spear in l., shield at r. side, star on pediment

Domination: AS or Follis, Bronze, size 22 mm

Mint: AQP, AQ is Aquileia in Italy, P ( Prima)
John Schou
TC-02.jpg
Maximian (A.D. 286-305)15 viewsSilvered Follis, A.D. 296, Aquileia, 27.1mm, 8.94g, 180, RIC VI 23b.
Obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI. Genius standing left holding paterain right, cornucopia in left; AQP in ex
Joseph D5
Maximian RIC 23b.jpg
Maximian - follis RIC 23b22 viewsFollis, RIC 23b, 9.26g; minted in Aquileia, 300 A.D.; obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse: SACRA MONET AVG G ET CAESS NOSTR, aequitas standing, holding scales & cornucopia, AQG(Gamma) in ex. Priscian
MaximianHerculiusAquileiaMonetaFollis1_Close.jpg
Maximian Herculius, first reign, follis, Aquileia mint. RIC 31b.16 viewsMaximian Herculius, first reign (AD 286305). follis, 28mm, 10.47 g., 6h. Aquileia mint, 2nd officina. Struck AD 301.
Obverse: IMP MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Moneta standing and facing with head left, holding scales in right hand and cornucopia in left arm; V//AQS.
References: RIC VI Aquileia 31b (C)
Ex Martyn Bodkin, 3-22-2013. Reportedly found 30 years ago, possibly at Aylesford, in Kent, England.

Mark Fox
bigun_jg_01_smaller.jpg
MAXIMIANUS60 viewsMAXIMIANUS
28.6 mm, 180,
Laureate head right / Fides standing left holding two standards.
Obverse legend: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
Reverse legend: FIDES MILITVM AVGG ET CAESS NN
In ex.: AQP
-------------------------------------
RIC VI 60b p319
A reverse legend that appears only at Aquileia c. 305-306.

(Marcus Aurelius Valerianus Maximianus)
Junior co-Emperor of the First Tetrarchy
AD 286-305
Tkonnova
423_Maximian_Aquileia.jpg
Maximianus - AE silvered follis9 viewsabdication follis

Aquileia
305-306 AD
laureate bust dressed in imperial mantle right holding olive-branch and mappa
D N MAXIMIANO BAEATISSIMO SEN AVG
Quies standing left extending hand against Providentia who is holding scepter and branch
PROVIDENTIA DEORVM QVIES AVGG
S F
AQS
RIC VI Aquileia 63b
11,27g

rare
Johny SYSEL
maximianus.jpg
Maximianus AE Follis23 viewsOBV: MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES
laureate head right
REV: SACRA MONET AVGG-ET CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing left holding scales & cornucopiae, AQG in ex.
Date: 300 A.D. Aquileia Mint
RIC VI Aquileia 30b, rated C2
27.2mm, 9.99g
miffy
Temple_Roma5.jpg
Maximianus I. Herculius4 viewsCatalog: RIC 118; Coh. 64
Material: Bronze
Weight: 7.11 g
Maximianus I. Herculius, 2nd Government 307-310 AD
Follis
Aquileia, 1st Officina, 307 AD
Vs .: IMP C MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, head with laurel wreath on the
reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE / AQP, six columnar Temple with cult image of the Roma

ex Mnzzentrum Mller, auction 72, 1992, lot 533
Ancient Aussie
1364.jpg
Maximianus: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI24 viewsMaximianus Follis. ca 296 AD. IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, holding patera & cornucopiae, AQP in ex. RIC Aquileia 23b. ex Busso Peus, Frankfurt, Auktion 28.4.1993 Number 756.Podiceps
maximinus_II_02.jpg
Maximinus II AE Follis 19 viewsObv: MAXIMINVS NOB CAES - Laureate bust right.
Rev: VIRTVS AVG ET CAESS NN - Prince standing facing, head left, in military dress, right holding up small Victory, left supporting spear and shield resting on ground; to left, seated captive.
Mint: Aquileia (AQΓ)
Date: 305-306 AD
Ref: RIC VI 72b
Notes: Rare.
oa
maximinus-ii-caesar-horseback-shield.jpg
Maximinus II, AE Follis, Aquileia mint, (305-306 AD)8 viewsRoman Imperial, Maximinus II, AE Follis, Aquileia mint, (305-306 AD)

Obverse: MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, Laureate, helmeted, cuirassed bust left, holding sceptre over right shoulder and decorated shield on left arm.

Reverse: VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN, Prince on horseback, shield on left arm, galloping right and spearing kneeling enemy, second enemy prostrate on ground. Mintmark AQ

Reference: RIC 68b; Sear IV 14778
Gil-galad
maximusprincRIC3.jpg
Maximus / Princeps89 viewsMaximus (Caesar, 235/6-238). AR Denarius Rome mint, 236-7.
O: MAXIMVS CAES GERM; Bareheaded and draped bust right
R: PRINC IVVENTVTIS; Maximus standing left, holding baton and spear; two signa to right
- RIC IV 3; RSC 10

Gaius Julius Verus Maximus (Maximvs Caesar) was the son of Maximinus I Thrax. Maximus was most likely given the rank of Caesar at the same time or shortly after his father assumed the rank of Augustus. He was reportedly a very handsome youth. Maximvs Caesar was loyal to his father and remained by his side during his campaign on the Danube. He was also present at the disastrous siege of Aquileia in 238 AD.

After the revolt of Gordian I and Gordian II and ascension of Balbinus and Pupienus, Maximinus and Maximus marched on Rome. They first reached the city of Aquileia, expecting an easy victory as the city's walls had long been in disrepair. However, under the leadership of senators Rutilius Pudens Crispinus and Tullus Menophilus, the walls had been repaired and the city rallied to defend itself in a siege. The Aquileians had plenty of food and good morale.

According to Herodian of Antioch, "The army of Maximinus grew depressed and, cheated in its expectations, fell into despair when the soldiers found that those whom they had not expected to hold out against a single assault were not only offering stout resistance but were even beating them back. The Aquileians, on the other hand, were greatly encouraged and highly enthusiastic, and, as the battle continued, their skill and daring increased. Contemptuous of the soldiers now, they hurled taunts at them. As Maximinus rode about, they shouted insults and indecent blasphemies at him and his son. The emperor became increasingly angry because he was powerless to retaliate. Unable to vent his wrath upon the enemy, he was enraged at most of his troop commanders because they were pressing the siege in cowardly and halfhearted fashion. Consequently, the hatred of his supporters increased, and his enemies grew more contemptuous of him each day."

Condemned by the Senate, Maximus and his father were murdered by their own troops just outside Aquileia on June 24th, 238 AD.
2 commentsNemonater
maximus_3.jpg
Maximus RIC IV, 372 viewsMaximus, Caesar 236 - 238, son of Maximinus I
AR - Denar, 3.12g, 19mm
Rome, spring 236 - March/April 238
obv. MAXIMVS CAES GERM
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. PRINC IVVENTVTIS
Maximus standing l., holding rod in r. hand and
reversed spear in l. hand; behind him 2 standards.
RIC IV, 3; C.10
Scarce; good EF
added to www.wildwinds.com

Maximus, made Caesar by his father AD 236 and killed together with him at Aquileia AD 238.
2 commentsJochen
Costanzo_croce_1.JPG
RIC VII Aquileia 127 17 viewsConstantius II
335-336
D/ FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
R/ GLOR-IA EXERCIT-VS, two soldiers facing with spears and shields, two standards between, cross with a dot between standards, AQS in ex.
RIC VII Aquileia 127
1 commentsMatteo
ROMAN_EMPIRE_CONSTANTINE_II_AQUILEIA_RIC_144var.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Constantine II 23 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Constantine II (337-340 AD) AE3. Obv.: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C laureate, cuirassed bust right Rev.: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers either side of standard, holding spears & shields, [dot] AQP in exergue = Aquileia mint. (RIC 144v, unbroken obv. legend).dpaul7
FORVM_Constantinople_Commemorative_Aquileia_mint_Rare.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, CITY COMMEMORATIVE, CONSTANTINOPOLIS, 334 -335 A.D. Aquileia mint18 viewsCity of Constantinople Commemorative, 334 -335 A.D. Aquileia mint. Bronze AE 3, 1.780g, 18.5mm, 0o, VF, 335 - 337 A.D. Obv: Constantinopolis' helmeted bust left in imperial cloak and holding scepter across left shoulder; CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS. Rev: Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right, resting left on grounded shield, F left, AQ[ ] in ex. Ref: RIC 137. RAREBard Gram O
cons_votxx.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, CONSTANTINE I as Augustus. AE3 of Aquileia. Struck A.D.322. 224 viewsObverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG. Laureate head of Constantine facing right.
Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG. Laurel wreath encircling palm branches either side of VOT XX; in exergue, AQP.
RIC VII : 104

4 commentsdivvsavgvstvs
15902LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I the Great130 viewsCONSTANTINE I. 307-337 AD. Follis - 20mm (4.24 g). Aquileia mint. Struck 312-313 AD.

Laureate and cuirassed bust right / Mars standing right, holding spear and shield; AQP.

EF, glossy dark brown patina. Rare issue.
5 commentssseverus
Constantinvs-Vot-XX.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I The Great AE3 A.D. 306-337 Aquileia mint22 viewsConstantine I The Great AE3 A.D. 306-337 Aquileia mint

Obv: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG - Laureate head right
Rev: DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG - Wreath within is written VOT XX

ex: (dot) AQP (dot)
ref : RIC VII, 85
minted AD 321 ,
1 commentsGeorge
coins1 258.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I VOT XX50 viewsConstantine the Great, 321 A.D., Aquileia mint.
OBV: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right.
REV: DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG, wreath with VOT (dot) XX enclosed in it. (dot) AQP (dot) in exergue.
ancientcoins
moneta 578.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine I, Aquileia - RIC VII 5779 viewsConstantine I AE3
obv: CONSTANTINVS AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust right.
rev: VIRTVS EXERCIT VOT XX. Two captives seated on either side of standard inscribed VOT XX.
left field: S
right field: F
exergue: dot AQP dot
Struck 320 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VII 57 (R4)
Van Meter 92
Jericho
12946q00~7.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine II, 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.28 viewsType:

Ruler / Years: Constantine II 22 May 337 - March or April 340 A.D.

Denomination: AE 3

Metal Type: Bronze

Size / Weight: 2.764g, 18.9mm

Orientation: 180 deg.

Condition: VF

Obverse Description: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Obverse Legend: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C

Reverse Description: VOT X in wreath laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left

Reverse Legend: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM

Exergue: TSBVI Thessalonica mint,

Attributes: RIC 128

Notes: Constantine II was the son of Constantine I, the eldest with his second wife, Fausta. He was born in Arles (which was renamed Constantia in his honor in 328, explaining the CON mintmarks for Arles) and was made Caesar before he was a year old in 316 A.D. Upon his father`s death, Constantine II inherited the Western part of the empire. After quarrelling with his brother Constans, he invaded his territory, only to be killed in an ambush near Aquileia. His coins often include "IVN" in the legend, an abbreviation for junior.

Scott M
Constantine II VOT V obv and rev.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantine II, RIC 94v65 viewsConstantine II
AE3
Aquileia Mint. 321 A.D.
Obv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C - Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT V
Exergue: (dot)AQT(dot)
Ref: RIc 94 (variant)
1 commentsseraphic
Constantius_Gallus.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius Gallus18 viewsAquileia 352-355
RIC 194
1 commentsNumis-Student
gallus fel temp.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius Gallus, Aquileia RIC VIII 20388 viewsAE3. 2.89 gms.
obv: DN CONSTANTIVS IVN NOB C - Bareheaded bust right, draped and cuirassed
rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO - Soldier on right and advancing left, shield on left arm, spearing an enemy horseman - the bareheaded horseman looks back and extends his left hand.
exergue: dot AQT dot
Struck 352-355 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VIII 203
Jericho
CONSTANTIUS_I_FIDES_MILITUM.JPG
Roman Empire, CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS as Augustus. AE Follis of Aquileia. Struck c.A.D.305 - 306. 34 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Laureate head of Constantius I facing right.
Reverse: FIDES MILITVM AVGG ET CAESS NN. Fides standing facing left holding two standards; in exergue, AQS.
RIC VI : 60a. Weight 8.9gms.
*Alex
cstii~0.jpg
Roman Empire, CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS, FOLLIS RIC 30a Aquileia, 300 CE 76 viewsObverse: CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Laureate head right.
Reverse: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR, Monet standing left holding scales and cornucopia.
AQT in ex. 9.4 g, 36 mm
2 commentsNORMAN K
divo_cons_altar~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, CONSTANTIUS I. Commemorative AE Follis of Aquileia. Struck A.D.307 - 308 under Maxentius. 44 viewsObverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO AVG. Veiled head of Constantius I facing right.
Reverse: MEMORIA DIVI CONSTANTI. Large altar, doors embellished with handles in the shape of a ring held in the mouth of a lion (?), surmounted by eagle with wings spread standing facing, head turned to left and holding wreath in its beak; in exergue, AQS.
RIC VI : 127 Weight 5.3gms.
Scarce.
*Alex
IMG_3760~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Constantius II42 views23 mm , 5,17g.
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right, A behind.

FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing horseman, Phrygian helmet, sitting on ground, arm(s) up, Star in left field

AQS Dot in ex.

RIC Aquileia 153
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
vcb.jpg
Roman Empire, Constantius II RIC VIII 145s, Aquileia28 viewsObverse: FLIVL CONSTANTIVS NOBC: laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLORIA EXERCITVS: two soldiers holding spears and shields with one standard between them.
dot AQS in ex. Aquileia mint.
RIC VIII 145s Aquileia 16.8 mm., 1.5 g. rated R4
NORMAN K
moneta 364.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Constantius II, Aquileia - RIC VIII 20582 viewsConstantius II AE3
obv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Diadamed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO. Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who wears FOOT LOCKER work uniform and reaches back.
left field: II
exergue: AQS dot
Struck 352-355 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VIII 205
Van Meter 100
Jericho
crispus_vot.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispus74 viewsCrispus. Caesar, A.D. 317-326. follis (18 mm, 3.35 g, 12 h). Aquileia. CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust of Crispus right / D N CAESARVM NOSTRORVM, votive wreath inscribed VOT//V in three lines; AQS. RIC 87. Choice EF, fully silvered. 3 commentsJohn M
CrispusAquileia.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispus - Aquileia - AE313 viewsCrispus c.320

Obv: CRISPVS NOB CAES; Laur., cuir. bust rt.

Rev: VIRTVS EXERCIT; two captives beneath banner inscribed "VOT / X".

Mint: Aquileia

Ref: RBC Fail. no. 291 (s); RIC VII no. 41 (s).

20.6mm 3.78g
Sylvianus
moneta 49.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispus, Aquileia - RIC VII 8762 viewsCrispus AE3
obv: CRISPVS NOB CAES. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
rev: CAESARVM NOSTRORVM VOT V. VOT V enclosed in wreath.
exergue: dot AQS dot
Struck 321 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VII 87 (R1)
Jericho
bpTet2bDiocFollisMon.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Diocletian48 viewsFollis, 10.1 gm, 27.4 mm
Obv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG
Laureate head, right.
Rev: SACR MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing left, holding scale and cornucopiae
Minted between 302-303 at Aquileia. mm: /AQS/VI, RIC VI 35a.
Massanutten
bot13.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Diocletian AE Follis 112 views302-303 AD. Aquileia mint.
Obv.: IMP DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG - Laureate head of Diocletian.
Rev.: SACR MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR - Moneta holding scales and cornucopiae. AQP in ex. VI in r. field.
RIC 35a
2 commentsMinos
bpLRE1H3FlavVict.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Flavius Victor, Ae4, Aquileia, RIC 55(b) (S), LRBC 1104, 387-88 AD24 viewsObv: D N FL VICTOR P F AVG Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust, right.
Rev: SPES ROMANORVM Five tiered campgate with two beacons and star above.
1 gm 13.5 mm Exergue: SMAQP
Massanutten
bpLRE1F3Gratian.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Gratian, Ae3, Aquileia, RIC 32(a) (S), LRBC 1068, 375-78 AD35 viewsObv: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG
Pearl diademed and draped bust, right.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVGGG
Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe and upside down spear, left leg bared.
2.6 gm 17 mm Exergue: SMAQP
Massanutten
GRATIAN_GLOR-ROM_SMAQS~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, GRATIAN. AE3 of Aquileia. Struck A.D.367 - 37524 viewsObverse: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Gratian facing right.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Gratian advancing right, holding standard in his left hand and dragging captive by the hair with his right; in exergue, SMAQS.
RIC IX : 11c | LRBC : 1017-22.
SCARCE
*Alex
GRATIAN_VIRTUS_SMAQS~0.JPG
Roman Empire, GRATIAN. AE3 of Aquileia. Struck A.D.378 - 38325 viewsObverse: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Gratian facing right.
Reverse: VIRTVS ROMANORVM. Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe in her right hand and downward facing spear in her left; in exergue, SMAQS.
RIC IX : 35a.
RARE
*Alex
AqvilVOTor.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Julian II, AE3 Aquileia41 viewsAE3 17.2x18.7mm
RIC VIII : 245
gparch
liciniusaqui.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Licinius I252 viewsAE follis. Aquileia, 317 AD. 3.50 grs. Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP LICINIUS PF AVG / Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and leaning on sceptre. IOVI CONSERVATORI. In exergue AQS.
RIC 6.
7 commentsbenito
maxentiuswhole.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maxentius, Ae Follis, AD 306-31256 viewsMaxentius (306-312), AE follis, 307, Aquileia.
Obverse: IMP C P F AVG MAXENTIVS the head. right.
Reverse: CONSERV VRB SUAE. Roma seated facing left in a tetrastyle temple, holding a scepter and globe; Maxentius standing facing right, holding scepter and stepping on captive. Wolf and twins on temple pediment; in exergue, AQS. RIC 113. 6.17 g
Jean Elsen auc 120 lot 320
2 commentschance v
bpTetMaxentiusAquileia2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maxentius, Follis55 viewsReduced Follis, 5.8 gm, 25.82 mm.
Obv: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG
Laureate head, right.
Rev: CONSERV VRB SVAE
Roma at right, seated on shield, facing left and handing globe to Maxentius in military dress and holding scepter at left, facing right in tetrastyle temple. Seated captive between. Victories as acroteria atop left and right pillars. She wolf and twins in pediment.
Minted in early 307 at Aquilleia, mm: AQΓ, RIC VI 113
Massanutten
1347_maxentius_compl.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maxentius, Follis, Aquileia15 viewsIMP C MAXENTIUS PF AVG
CONSTAN URB SUAE AQS
mint: Aquileia
Franz-Josef M
moneta 453.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Maximianus, Aquileia - RIC VI 2952 viewsMaximian Follis
obv: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Laureate head right.
rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR. Aequitas standing left, holding scales and cornucopia.
exergue: AQS
Struck 301 A.D. at Aquileia
RIC VI 29b
Van Meter 43
Jericho
TC-05~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, SEVERUS II, AE Follis of Aquileia. Struck: A.D. 306-30746 viewsAE Follis, A.D. 306-307, Aquileia, 28mm, 7.36g, 180, RIC VI 80b.
Obv: IMP C SEVERVS PF AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN. Severus riding horse right, spearing barbarian; second barbarian lying on ground; AQS in ex.
Joseph D5
Screenshot_2019-08-24_12_02_40.png
Roman Imperial, Maxentius as Augustus, AE Follis.6 viewsAquileia 307-310 A.D. 5.95g - 26.2mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: IMP C MAXENTIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right.

Rev: CONSERV-VRB SVAE - Roma seated facing, head left, in hexastyle temple, holding globe and sceptre, knobs as acroteria; X in pediment. Mintmark AQΓ.

RIC VI 121a, Γ, X.
Christian Scarlioli
Screenshot_2019-05-19_12_43_11.png
Roman Imperial, Theodosius I as Augustus, AE3. 8 viewsAquileia 379-383 A.D. 2.21g - 20.8mm, Axis 6h.

Obv: DN THEODO-SIVS PF AVG - Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: CONCOR-DIA AVGGG - Constantinopolis, turret on head, seated facing, head right, left hand resting on knee and holding reversed spear in right hand. Mintmark SMAQP.

RIC IX 33b.
Scarce.
Coin came with old ticket.
scarli
Crispus_RIC_VII_Aquileia-9.jpg
Roman Imperial: Crispus (316-317 CE) AE Follis, Aquileia (RIC VII Aquileia 9)9 viewsObv: CRISPVS NOB CAES; laureate, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev: PRINCIPIA IVVENTVTIS; Crispus in military dress, standing left with vertical spear, resting right hand on a shield at his side; AQT in exergue
Quant.Geek
Roman_Imperial_RIC23a.jpg
Roman Imperial: Diocletian (284-305 CE) BIL Follis, Aquileia (RIC-23a)8 viewsObv: IMP DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG; Laureate head right
Rev: GENIO POPV-LI-ROMANI; Genius standing left, modius on head, shoulder draped, holding patera and cornucopiae; AQP in exergue
SpongeBob
Maximian_RIC-29b.jpg
Roman Imperial: Maximian (286-305 CE) Follis, Aquileia (RIC-29b; RCV 13300)6 viewsObv: IMP MAXIMIANVS P F AVG; Laureate head of Maximian right
Rev: SACRA MONET AVGG ET CAESS NOSTR; Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopia; V in right field; AQP in exergue
Quant.Geek
magnus.jpg
Roman Magnus Maximus AE47 viewsMagnus Maximus, AE4, 11-12 mm. Aquileia. 387-388 AD.

Obv: DN MAG MA(-XIMVS PF AVG), diademed, draped and
cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SPES ROMANORVM , Campgate, 6 rows, two turrets with beacons, star above.
Mintmark SMAQS,

RIC IX Aquileia 55a; Sear 20657.

Scarce.
Tanit
Pupienus portrait - RIC 10(a).jpg
Roman, Pupienus, April - June 238 A.D.917 viewsMARCVS CLODIVS PUPIENVS MAXIMVS was born about 164. He was a Senator in 238 when the revolt of the Gordians broke out against Maximinus I, and he was one of the Senate's "Committee of Twenty" to oversee the defense of Italy in support of the Gordians. When the Gordians were quickly killed in Africa, the Senate made Pupienus and a Senator named Balbinus co-Augusti. Pupienus was to lead the army and Balbinus was to administrate. Maximinus was soon killed by his own men at Aquileia but discontent in Rome led to the murder of Pupienus by the Praetorian Guard on July 29, 238. This portrait is from a Antonianus (ex-Forum) in my collection (see jimwho523's gallery for actual coin)13 commentsjimwho523
RRC139-1.jpg
RRC139/01 (Anonymous) Brockage40 viewsObv. Helmeted head of Roma right, mark of value (X) behind
Rev. Brockage of obverse
18 mm; 3,88 gr
Rome, 190-180 B.C.
References RRC139/01

A brockage is a minting error, which occurrs if an already struck coin sticks to one of the dies without the mint workers noticing. The next coin to be struck receives the negative of the former coin, rather than the design on the die. Here, the head of Roma has been stamped in incuse (negative) on the obverse, rather than the Dioscuri. Thanks to Andrew for identifying the coin as RRC139/01.

The moneyers left no personal mark on the coins of this period, so this coin cannot be linked with any person. During the time this coin was struck, Rome had just emerged victorious from the Seleucid War, for which they obtained 15'000 talents of silver in indemnities: she completeted the Via Aemilia and began founding colonies in the north (Aquileia, Pisa, Lucca, Mutina, Parma). The Senate also extended its grip over Italy by issueing the Bacchanalian Decree throughout the peninsula.
Syltorian
TC-05.jpg
Severus II (A.D. 306-307)29 viewsAE Follis, A.D. 306-307, Aquileia, 28mm, 7.36g, 180, RIC VI 80b; rare.
Obv: IMP C SEVERVS PF AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: VIRTVS AVGG ET CAESS NN. Severus riding horse right, spearing barbarian; second barbarian lying on ground; AQS in ex.
Joseph D5
sev76.jpg
Severus II, RIC VI 76 Aquileia12 viewsSeverus II AE follis
Obverse: IMP SEVERVS PF AVG, laureate bust right
Reverse: FIDES MILITVM AVGG ET CAESS NN, Fides standing facing, head left, holding two standards.
Mintmark AQP, Aquileia 28.2 mm., 10.1 g.
sold 3-2018
NORMAN K
STEIERMARK_BERTHOLD.jpg
STEIERMARK - Bishop Berthold126 viewsSTEIERMARK - Bishop Berthold von Aquileia (1218-1251) AR pfennig. Obv.: Seated bishop with crozier in each hand, legend around. Rev.: Bishp's bust between 2 church towers topped by crosses; ringlet above. CnA1, Ch11.dpaul7
Strap_End_2.jpg
Strap End 4th century.56 viewsStrap end from end of Roman military belt (cingulum). Used on belts with propeller stiffeners. Parallels are found in Roman Military Equipment, 2nd edition, figure 137, #7 from Aquileia, #9 from Sagvar Hunary, and #12 from Winchester UK. otlichnik
CONST_1_FOLLIS_AQS.JPG
Struck A.D.305 - 306. CONSTANTIUS I CHLORUS as Augustus. AE Follis of Aquileia. 10 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTIVS P F AVG. Laureate head of Constantius I facing right.
Reverse: FIDES MILITVM AVGG ET CAESS NN. Fides standing facing left holding two standards; in exergue, AQS.
Diameter: 27mm | Weight: 8.9gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC VI : 60a
*Alex
DIVO-CONSTANTIO_ALTAR_2.JPG
Struck A.D.307 - 308 under Maxentius. DIVUS CONSTANTIUS I. Commemorative AE Follis of Aquileia4 viewsObverse: DIVO CONSTANTIO AVG. Veiled head of Constantius I facing right.
Reverse: MEMORIA DIVI CONSTANTI. Large altar, doors embellished with handles in the shape of a ring held in the mouth of a lion, surmounted by eagle with wings spread standing facing, head turned to left and holding wreath in its beak; in exergue, AQS.
Diameter: 25mm | Weight: 5.3gms | Die Axis: 6
RIC VI : 127
SCARCE

"Cohen 24 (not giving mintmark) and Voetter, Gerin Cat., p. 62, have AVG only in the obv. legend of this type at Aquileia." - source Curtis Clay.
*Alex
MAXIM_2ND_REIGN_AQP.JPG
Struck A.D.307 - 308. MAXIMIANUS. Second Reign. AE Follis (Nummus) of Aquileia4 viewsObverse: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Laureate head of Maximianus facing right.
Reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE. Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe in her right hand and spear or sceptre in her left, all within hexastyle temple with ornamented pediment. In exergue, AQP.
Diameter: 26mm | Weight: 7.9gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC VI : 118

This coin was struck c.A.D.307 - 308, during Maximianus' short joint reign with Maxentius, to commemorate the rebuilding of the Temple of Venus and Rome and in conjunction with celebrations for the benefactions given to Rome and Carthage, Maxentius' principal bases of power. The Temple of Venus and Rome, thought to be that shown on this coin, was commissioned by Hadrian in A.D.121 and finished under Antoninus Pius in A.D.141. In A.D.283 a fire destroyed the roof, and the temple was rebuilt by Maxentius, who retained the original plan.
The existing remains of this temple are on the right side of the picture below.
*Alex
Liciniusvotxx.JPG
Struck A.D.320. LICINIUS I. AE3 (Nummus) of Aquileia. 55 viewsObverse: IMP LICINIVS AVG. Laureate head of Licinius facing right.
Reverse: DOMINI N LICINI AVG. Laurel-wreath around VOTXX; in exergue; AQS.
RIC VII : 86. Weight 3.3gms.
RARE

This coin is one of those struck in c.A.D.320 to commemorate the fifteenth anniversary of the reign of Constantine, which was also celebrated in the West as the fifteenth anniversary of Licinius.
*Alex
CONSTANTIN-1_VOT_XX_AQP.JPG
Struck A.D.322. CONSTANTINE I as Augustus. AE3 of Aquileia11 viewsObverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG. Laureate head of Constantine facing right.
Reverse: D N CONSTANTINI MAX AVG. Laurel wreath encircling palm branches either side of VOT XX; in exergue, AQP.
RIC VII : 104

This coin is one of the issues struck to commemorate the fifteenth anniversary of Constantine's reign.
*Alex
URBS_ROMA_AQP_Flower.JPG
Struck A.D.334 - 335 under Constantine I. AE3 "URBS ROMA" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Aquileia6 viewsObverse: VRBS ROMA. Helmeted and plumed bust of Roma facing left. Two dots on helmet.
Reverse: No legend. She-wolf, flower symbol on shoulder, standing facing left, suckling Romulus and Remus; above, two stars; dot in field to right; in exergue, AQP.
Diameter: 15mm | Weight: 2.1gms.
RIC VII : 128 | Sear : 16504
VERY RARE
*Alex
CONSTANTINOPOL_AQP.JPG
Struck A.D.334 - 335 under Constantine I. AE3 "CONSTANTINOPOLIS" COMMEMORATIVE ISSUE of Aquileia5 viewsObverse: CONSTANTINOPOLIS. Laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis wearing imperial mantle facing left and holding sceptre over left shoulder.
Reverse: No legend. Victory standing facing left, right foot on prow, holding sceptre and shield with dot in centre; in exergue, AQP.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 2.3gms.
RIC VII : 123
VERY RARE
*Alex
GRATIAN_GLOR-ROM_SMAQS.JPG
Struck A.D.367 - 375. GRATIAN. AE3 of Aquileia7 viewsObverse: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Gratian facing right.
Reverse: GLORIA ROMANORVM. Gratian advancing right, holding standard in his left hand and dragging captive by the hair with his right; in exergue, SMAQS.
RIC IX : 11c | LRBC : 1017-22.
SCARCE
*Alex
GRATIAN_VIRTUS_SMAQS.JPG
Struck A.D.378 - 383. GRATIAN. AE3 of Aquileia12 viewsObverse: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG. Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Gratian facing right.
Reverse: VIRTVS ROMANORVM. Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe in her right hand and downward facing spear in her left; in exergue, SMAQS.
RIC IX : 35a.
RARE
1 comments*Alex
MAXIMIANUS_TEMPLE.JPG
TEMPLE, Maximianus, Temple of Roma94 viewsAE Follis of Aquileia, struck A.D.307 - 308 under the second reign of MAXIMIANUS.
Obverse: IMP C MAXIMIANVS P F AVG. Laureate head of Maximianus facing right.
Reverse: CONSERV VRB SVAE. Roma seated facing, head left, holding globe in her right hand and spear or sceptre in her left, all within hexastyle temple with ornamented pediment. In exergue, AQP.
Diameter: 26mm | Weight: 7.9gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC VI : 118

This coin was struck c.A.D.307 - 308 to commemorate the rebuilding of the Temple of Roma during Maximianus' joint reign with Maxentius and in conjunction with celebrations for the benefactions given to Rome and Carthage, Maxentius' principal bases of power.
*Alex
th1AE2-.jpg
THEODOSIUS I AE2 (majorina pecunia) - AD379-38326 viewsobv: D.N.THEODO-SIVS.PF.AVG (diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: REPARATIO.REIPVB / SMAQP (emperor standing front, head left, offering right hand to female on left to help her rise from kneeling position, & holding Victory on a globe)
ref: RIC IX-Aquileia30d, C.27
4.67gms, 24mm
berserker
Theodosius_I_6_opt.jpg
THEODOSIUS I AE2, RIC 30d, REPARATIO REIPVB39 viewsOBV: D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing front, head left, offering right hand to female on left to help her rise from kneeling position, & holding Victory on a globe, SMAQS in ex.
5g, 22 mm

Minted at Aquileia, 379-83 AD
1 commentsLegatus
teodosio,_votXmvltXX,_Aquileia.jpg
Theodosius I, Vot X Mvlt XX, Aquileia, AE48 viewsantvwala
Theodosius- Aquileia- RIC 47b2.JPG
Theodosius- Aquileia- RIC 47b224 viewsAE4, 379-395 AD, Aquileia mint
Obverse: DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG, Diademmed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG, Two victories facing holding wreaths
SMAQS in exergue
RIC 47b2
12mm, 1.0 gms.
Jerome Holderman
Theodosius-Aquileia-RIC47b.JPG
Theodosius-Aquileia-RIC47b12 viewsAE4, Aquileia mint, 388-392 AD
Obverse: DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG, Two victories facing with wreaths.
SMAQS in exergue
1.2gm , 13mm
Jerome Holderman
Cons_Aquilea_k.jpg
Time of Constantine and Sons12 viewsTime of Constantine and Sons
Follis, 19mm, 2.8g, 12h; Aquileia mint, AD 336.
Obv.: CONSTAN-TINOPOLIS; laureate, helmeted bust of Constantinople left, wearing imperial mantle, holding scepter.
Rev.: Victory standing on prow, holding long scepter in right hand, resting left hand on shield; // AQP
Reference: RIC VII 123, r3, p. 407
From the YOC Collection / 16-429-25
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Valens.jpg
Valens 26 views364-378 AD.
AE3 pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
1.88 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: D N VALEN-S P F AVG
Rev.: GLORIA RO-MANORVM
Emperor walking right, head left, holding labarum, grasping bound captive at the top of the head
A to right
SMAQ? (P or S) in ex.
RIC IX Aquileia 7b, type I (a or b)
Aquileia mint, 364-367 A.D.
Jaimelai
valens_secvtitas.jpg
Valens37 views364 - 378 A.D.
AE3 pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
2.17 gm, 18 mm
D N VALENS P F AVG
SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE
Victory advancing left holding wreath & palm
SMAQP in ex.
RIC IX Aquileia 12b, type xvi (a)
Aquileia mint, 364 - 370 A.D.

"she's got legs"
Jaimelai
00576.jpg
Valens (RIC 12b, Coin #576)6 viewsRIC 12b (C), AE3, Aquileia, 367 - 375 AD.
OBV: D N VALENS P F AVG; Pearl diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE (●SMAQP); Victory walking left, wreath in right, palm frond in left.
SIZE: 18.5mm 2.04g
MaynardGee
valens.jpg
Valens AE3 62 viewsValens AE3

Obv: D N VALEN-S P F AVG - Diademed bust right, draped and cuirassed
Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE - Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm Star/Dot. Exe: SMAQS

RIC IX, Aquileia 18(a); C. 47; struck 17 Nov. 375-9 Aug.378; With star/dot it is type xix(b).

scarce.


Tanit
constans1.jpg
Valens AE3, Securitas (RIC IX Aquileia 9a)14 viewsAquileia mint, 2nd officina, 367-375. 18 mm, 1.77 g, 180.

Obverse: D N VALENS P F AVG Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAEVictory advancing left, holding wreath and palm branch.

Exergue: SMAQS

Reference: RIC IX Aquileia 9a.
Manuel
aquileia9biORweb.jpg
Valens AE3. AD 367-37032 viewsO: D N VALEN-S P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, holding wreath & palm, A to left
SMAQP in ex.
18mm 1.72g RIC IX Aquileia 9b, type i (a)
casata137ec
Valens.JPG
Valens AE3. Aquileia. 14 viewsDN VALEN-S PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor advancing right, holding labarum, dragging captive. Right field: wreath. Mintmark: SMAQS. RIC IX Aquileia 11b, type xiv (b).Antonivs Protti
q7.JPG
Valens Aquileia GLORIA ROMANORVM15 viewsRIC IX Aquileia 7b, type i (a) c
ecoli
coin604.JPG
Valens Aquileia GLORIA ROMANORVM4 viewsRIC IX Aquileia 7a, type i (a) c
ecoli
coin796.JPG
Valens Gloria Romanorum Aquileia3 viewsRIC IX Aquileia 7b, type vi (b)
ecoli
Valens-_SECVRITAS_REIPVBLICAE_1.jpg
Valens SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE10 viewsObverse:
Pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right

D N VALENS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
VALENS: Valens
P F: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, the security of the republic

SECVRITAS: Security
REIPVBLICAE: Republic

in the left field of the reverse it is either an A or delta

Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm

Domination: Bronze, AE 3, Size 16 mm.

Mint: mintmark, but it looks like 4-5 letters, so I am thinking Aquileia
John S
VALENS-1-ROMAN.jpg
Valens, Aquileia RIC IX-12b.xvib15 viewsAE3
Aquileia mint, 365-375 A.D.
17mm, 1.90g
RIC IX-12b.xvib

Obverse:
D N VALENS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE
SMAQS
Victory advancing left, holding wreath and palm.
rubadub
314 Valens.jpg
Valens, RIC IX 9b iii(b), Aquileia64 viewsObv: DN VALENS PF AVG
Bust: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE
Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm branch
Exe: SMAQS B over (dot) in field left
Date: 364-367 AD
Mint: Aquiliea
Denom: Ae3
Ref: RIC IX 9b type iii (b)
Rated "C"
Bluefish
VALENS_GLORIA_ROMANORVM.JPG
Valens- GLORIA ROMANORVM57 viewsValens, 28 March 364 - 9 August 378 A.D.


Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
VALENS: Valens
P F: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse :
GLORIA ROMANORVM, The glory of the Romans

GLORIA: Glory
ROMANORUM: The Romans
A: Alfa, first Officina



Emperor advancing right, looking left, dragging captive with right, standard in left

Diameter: Bronze AE 3, 18.mm

Mint: SMAQP = Aquileia, first officina. RIC IX 7(b)i(a)
John S
Valens-6.JPG
Valens-621 viewsAE3, 364-378 AD, Aquileia mint
Obverse: DN VALENS PF AVG, Diademmed , draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left with wreath and palm. A left.
SMAQS in exergue, RIC 9b type Ib
2.3gm , 18mm
Jerome Holderman
VALENS-6.jpg
VALENS-673 viewsObv: D N VALENS P F AVG pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right

Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm branch

Exe: dot in crescent/SMAQS Aquileia mint

Ref: RIC IX 9b type ix 1.7g 18mm Dug in Bulgaria
Matthew Raica
valens.jpg
Valens: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Aquileia13 viewsValens; AE 3. Obverse: D N VALENS P F AVG, Diademed bust right;
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory walking holding wreath; Minted in Aquileia (B / | / SMAQS), A.D. 367 - 378; RIC IX Aquileia 9b type iiib; Item ref: RI179a. ex Maridvnvm
Podiceps
coin40.jpg
Valentian I, A3 RIC IX Aquileia 7a type xiii (a)9 viewsValentian I, A3 RIC IX Aquileia 7a type xiii (a)
DN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG, bust right,
laureate,draped,and cuirassed. 364-7 AD. Rev.
GLORIA RO-MANORVM, emperor
Dragging captive by hair, holding banner.
SMAQP in ex. Aquileia mint. Coin #40
cars100
w14.JPG
Valentinian I Aquileia GLORIA ROMANORVM8 viewsDN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG
GLORIA RO-MANORVM
RIC IX Aquileia 7a, type ix (a) or (b) c
ecoli
valentinianus.JPG
Valentinian I, AE3, Aquileia. 364-367 AD. 37 viewsDN VALENTINI-ANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Emperor in military dress, advancing right, head left, holding labarum, dragging captive behind him. No fieldmarks. Mintmark dot SMAQP dot. RIC IX Aquileia 11a, type xv (a).Antonivs Protti
Valentinian I 31a.jpg
Valentinian I, RIC IX 7a, Aquileia48 viewsObv: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG
Bust: Pearl-Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Emperor advancing right holding labarum and dragging captive.
Exe: SMAQP B/(dot) in field right
Mint: Aquiliea
Date: 364-367 AD
Denom: Ae3
Ref: RIC IX 7a
Rated "C"
Bluefish
Valentian- REPARATIO REIREPVBLICAE new.jpg
Valentinian I- Reparatio Reipvblicae59 viewsValentinian I, 25 February 364 - 17 November 375 A.D.

Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

IMP VALENTIANVS PF AVG

IMP, Imperator

DIOCLETIANVS, Diocletianus

PF, PIUS FELIX,

AVG: Augustus

Reverse:
REPARATIO REIPUBLICAE

REPARATIO: Restoretion

REIPUBLICAE: Republic

Showing: Emperor holding with his left hand a woman i her hand, and holding Victoria with globe in his right hand

Domination: Follis, Copper, size 23 mm

Mint: SMAQ ( Aquileia) P (Prima Oficina)
John Schou
Valentinian I-Aquileia-RIC 12a.JPG
Valentinian I-Aquileia-RIC 12a43 viewsAE3, 364-375 AD, Aquileia mint
Obverse: DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, Diademed , draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICAE, Victory left with wreath and palm. (Pellet-Delta)SMAQS in exergue.
RIC 12a
18mm , 2.7gms
Jerome Holderman
Valentinian_II_3_opt.jpg
VALENTINIAN II AE2, RIC 30b.2, Reparatio Reipvb29 viewsOBV: D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: REPARATIO REIPVB, emperor standing facing, head left, holding Victory on globe in left hand & raising kneeling, turreted woman, SMAQS in ex.
6.4g, 23mm

Minted at Aquileia, 375-9 AD
Legatus
Valentinian II RIC 18C Aquileia.JPG
Valentinian II RIC 18C Aquileia41 viewsAE3, 375-392 AD, Aquileia Mint
Obverse: DN VALENTINIA-NVS IVN PF AVG, Diademed , draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SECVRITAS- REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left with wreath and palm, * left (pellet) right.
SMAQS in exergue. RIC 18c Type XIXb
18mm, 2.4gm
Jerome Holderman
Valentinian II RIC 34C Aquileia.JPG
Valentinian II RIC 34C Aquileia40 viewsAE3, 375-392 AD, Aquileia Mint
Obverse: DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: VICTORIA AVGGG, Victory advancing left with wreath and palm.
SMAQP in exergue
RIC 34C Rated as R2
18mm , 2.8gm
Jerome Holderman
coin558.JPG
Valentinian II Victory left Aquileia6 viewsRIC IX Aquileia 46a
ecoli
4587_4589.jpg
Valentinian II, AE2, REPARATIO REIPVB6 viewsAE2
Valentinian II
Augustus: 375 - 392AD
Issued: 378 - 383AD
23.0mm
O: DN VALENTINIANVS IVN PF AVG; Diademed (pearls) bust, right.
R: REPARATIO REIPVB; Valentinian II standing facing, holding hand of kneeling woman with Concordia to left and Victory on Globe in hand to right.
Exergue: SMAQS
Aquileia Mint
RIC IX Aquileia 30b; Sear 20272.
Aorta: 133: B1, O3, R9, T19, M3.
aitorazpeitia 321138549858
6/12/13 4/4/17
Nicholas Z
Valentinian II 161a.jpg
Valentinian II, RIC IX 45a, Aquileia49 viewsObv: D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG
Bust: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Emperor advancing right holding chi-rho labarum and dragging captive.
Exe: SMAQS
Mint: Aquileia
Date: 375-383 AD
Denom: Ae3
Ref: RIC IX 45a
Rated "C"
Bluefish
valentiniano_II_salvs6.jpg
Valentinian II, Salvs Reipvblicae, Aquileia or Nicomedia?, AE414 viewsantvwala
valentiniano_II_salvs5_aquileia.jpg
Valentinian II, Salvs Reipvblicae, Aquileia, AE420 viewsantvwala
Valentinian II- Reparatio Reipublicae.jpg
Valentinian II- Reparatio Reipublicae52 viewsValentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.


Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
DN VALENTIANVS PF AVG

DN: Dominus Noster

Valentianvs: Valentianus

PF, PIUS FELIX,

AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
REPARATIO REIPUBLICAE, restore the republic

REPARATIO: Restore

REIPUBLICAE: Republic

Emperor standing half left, raising kneeling turreted woman with right hand and holding Victory on globe in left.

Domination: Copper, AE2, size 24 mm

Mint: SMAQ ( Aquileia) P (Prima Oficina). Minted 378-383, RIC IX Aquileia 30c.

Comment:
The quick way to tell Val I from Val II Is Val I has a fatter rounder head.
John Schou
Valentinian II- Victoria.jpg
Valentinian II- SALVS REI PVBLICAE54 viewsValentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.


Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.

DN VALENTINI - ANVS PF AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord

VALENTINIANVS: Valentinian

PF, PIUS FELIX, piteous and happy

AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
SALVS REI PVBLICAE, Health of the republic

SALVS: Health
REI PVBLICAE: Republic

Victory advancing left, holding standard over shoulder and dragging captive

Domination: Copper, AE4, size 12 mm

Mint: Aquileia or Rome .

Comment:
This is the SALVS REI PVBLICAE type. This type was not struck for Valentininan I but only for Valentininan II. (and Theodosius I, Arcadius and Honorius). IF the obv. legend of the coin is broken DN VALENTINI - ANVS PF AVG then the mint is Aquileia or Rome. All other mints have unbroken obv. legends.
Source: Guido Bruck, Die sptrmische Kupferprgung, Graz/Austria 1961
John Schou
Valentinian II-Aquileia RIC 58a.JPG
Valentinian II-Aquileia RIC 58a25 viewsAE4, Aquileia mint, 375-392 AD
Obverse: DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing left, dragging captive and carrying trophy.
AQP in exergue.

13mm, 1.2
Jerome Holderman
victory.jpg
Valentinian the 1st victory advancing left36 viewsDn Valentini-Anvs Pf Avg. Pearl diadem,draped,cuirassed. Secvritas-Reipvblicae. Victory advancing left holding wreath and palm branch. Wreath in left field.SMAQP in exergue. Mint: Aquileia. Rarity: C. Ric IX Aquileia 12a type xiv(a).tiberiusjulius
V1368sm.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1368131 viewsAR Denarius, 3.60g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: IMPER below; Vespasian riding l., r. hand raised
RIC 1368 (R2). BMC 419. RSC 221. BNC 378.
Ex Knker 304, 19 March 2018, lot 1085.

Fascinating coins often come out of civil war. In late October 69 the Second Battle of Cremona was fought between the legions of Vitellius and Vespasian. It resulted in the utter defeat of the Vitellian side and their slow retreat towards Rome. Not long afterwards the Spanish legions went openly for Vespasian, which up until that point had only been neutrally friendly toward him. Coins were quickly struck for Vespasian in the newly won province. Most of these are attributed to Tarraco and an unknown Spanish mint. Intriguingly, a small military issue was contemporaneously struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian.

Here we have an extremely rare denarius from that uncertain military issue showing Vespasian in military dress riding left in the act of addressing his troops. Clearly, this is a propaganda type that was produced to help consolidate the legions in a newly won province. The type occurs no where else and is unique to the series. The portrait bears no resemblance to Vespasian, which is further evidence of the coin's early mintage, perhaps pre-dating the other Spanish issues.

Struck in high relief on a large flan.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
Constantine Virtvs Exercit.jpg
VIRTVS EXERCIT- RIC Aquileia 48104 viewsConstantine I

obv: CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, Helmeted, cuirassed bust right
rev: VIRTVS EXERCIT, VOT XX on standard, with two captives

S-F in fields, AQP in exergue- Aquileia mint, Prime officina

RIC VII Aquileia 48
wolfgang336
vrbs_roma_ric_vii_aquileia_122_r2.jpg
Vrbs Roma - Aquileia28 viewsAQP
Ric VII Aquileia 122 r2
d=18 - p=2,39g
antvwala
Vrbs_Roma_Aquileia_Ric_VII_122_R3.jpg
Vrbs Roma - Aquileia26 viewsAQS
Ric VII Aquileia 122 R3
d=17 mm - p=2,51g
antvwala
vrbs_roma_aquileiaric_VII_122_r3.jpg
Vrbs Roma - Aquileia28 viewsAQS (dot in field right?)
Ric VII Aquileia 122 r3
d=18 mm - p=2,39g
antvwala
urbs_roma_aquileia_ric_VII_122_r2.jpg
Vrbs Roma - Aquileia16 viewsAQP
Ric VII Aquileia 122 r2
d=16mm p=2,04g
antvwala
vrbs_roma_acquileia_ric_VII_136_r4.jpg
Vrbs Roma - Aquileia50 viewsAQP - F between stars
Ric VII Aquileia 136, r4
d= 17mm, p=1,95g
antvwala
Gor3Jup.jpeg
[1106a] Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D.75 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 84, RSC 109, VF, Rome, 4.101g, 24.0mm, 0o, 241 - 243 A.D. Obverse: IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: IOVI STATORI, Jupiter standing facing, head right, thunderbolt in left and scepter in right. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Gordian III (238-244 A.D.)

Michael L. Meckler
Ohio State University

Relatively few details are known about the five-and-a-half year reign of the teenage emperor Gordian III. Continuity with the Severan era seems to have marked both the policy and personnel of his government. Security along the frontiers remained the most pressing concern, and the young emperor would die while on campaign against the expanding Sassanian empire and its energetic leader, Shapur I.

The future emperor was born in Rome on 20 January 225. His mother was a daughter of the senator Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus (known later to historians as Gordian I). His father was undoubtedly a senator, but the name of his father is today unknown. The father was already dead before the start of the African uprising, involving the boy's grandfather, against the emperor Maximinus Thrax in early 238. At the time of the revolt, Maximinus was in Pannonia leading military campaigns to protect the Danube region. Maximinus' representative in Rome was a loyal Praetorian Prefect, Vitalianus. Gordian I's 13-year-old grandson faced no hardships as a result of the revolt, because Vitalianus was assassinated by agents sent by Gordian I before the African uprising was revealed in Rome.

Senators in Rome quickly acknowledged Gordian I as emperor, but the revolt in Africa was soon suppressed. After the deaths of the boy's grandfather (Gordian I) and uncle (Gordian II) were announced in Rome, probably near the end of April 238, a select group of 20 senators decided upon two of their own, Pupienus and Balbinus, as new emperors who would continue to lead the uprising against Maximinus. Not all senators were pleased with the selections, and they immediately stirred up their clients and dependents to prevent a public proclamation of the new emperors. Pupienus, moreover, had been an unpopular urban prefect, and many ordinary Romans were quite willing to take part in rioting against his accession. The grandson of Gordian I made a perfect focal point to represent the concerns of the critics of Pupienus and Balbinus. The 13-year-old was brought from his home, named Marcus Antonius Gordianus after his grandfather, and proclaimed Caesar and imperial heir by the senate.

After the death of Maximinus at the siege of Aquileia, perhaps in early June 238, conflicts between the two emperors Pupienus and Balbinus, and among the emperors, soldiers and ordinary Romans, came to the fore. Sometime during the summer, soldiers of the Praetorian Guard became unruly during a festival, stormed into the imperial complex on the Palatine, and captured, tortured and killed the emperors. The young Caesar was then proclaimed emperor by both the soldiers and the senate.

Little reliable information is available about the first few years of Gordian III's reign. Pupienus and Balbinus suffered damnatio memoriae, though it is difficult to ascertain how many other members of the senatorial elite (if any) were either dismissed from their posts or executed by the new regime. The families prominent during the Severan dynasty, and even some families prominent under the Antonines, continued to control offices and commands with a teenage emperor on the throne. In 240, an uprising again originated in the province of Africa, with the proconsul Sabinianus proclaimed emperor. Like the uprising of Gordian I in Africa two years earlier, this uprising was quickly suppressed, but unlike the events of 238, the revolt of Sabinianus failed to gain support in other parts of the empire.

In late 240 or early 241, Gordian III appointed Timesitheus as pretorian prefect. Timesitheus, who was of Eastern origin, had a long career in the imperial service as a procurator in provinces ranging from Arabia to Gaul and from Asia to Germany. Timesitheus' proven abilities quickly made him the central figure in Gordian III's government, and the praetorian prefect's authority was enhanced by the marriage of his daughter, Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, to the young emperor in the summer of 241.

Maintaining security along the frontiers remained the emperor's most serious challenge. Difficulties along the Danube continued, but the greater danger was in the East. The aggressive expansion of the renewed Persian empire under the Sassanian emperor Ardashir I continued under his son and successor, Shapur I. The focus of that expansion was in upper Mesopotamia (in what today is southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern Iraq), much of which had been under direct Roman control for more than a generation. Ardashir may already have captured Nisibis and Carrhae during the final months of Maximinus' reign. In 240, the ailing Ardashir seems to have made his son Shapur co-regent. During this year Hatra, the location of Rome's easternmost military garrison, (today in northern Iraq roughly 55 miles south of Mosul), was captured by the Sassanians.

Planning for a massive Roman military counterattack was soon underway. Soldiers travelled from the West during the following year, when Carrhae and Nisibis were retaken, and the Romans won a decisive victory at Resaina. Gordian III joined his army in upper Mesopotamia for campaigning in 243, but during the year the emperor's father-in-law, Timesitheus, died of an illness. The surviving Praetorian Prefect, C. Julius Priscus, convinced the emperor to appoint his brother M. Julius Philippus -- who would succeed Gordian III as the emperor Philip the Arab -- as Timesitheus' successor. The campaign against the Sassanians continued as the Roman army proceeded to march down the Euphrates during the fall and early winter.

Early in 244, the Roman and Sassanian armies met near the city of Misiche (modern Fallujah in Iraq, 40 miles west of Baghdad). Shapur's forces were triumphant, and the city was renamed Peroz-Shapur, "Victorious [is] Shapur." Shapur commemorated his victory with a sculpture and trilingual inscription (at Naqsh-i-Rustam in modern-day Iran) that claimed that Gordian III was killed in the battle.

Roman sources do not mention this battle, indicating instead that Gordian III died near Circesium, along the Euphrates some 250 miles upstream from Peroz-Shapur, and that a cenotaph was built at a location named Zaitha. Philip is universally blamed in these sources for causing Gordian III's death, either directly or by fomenting discontent with the emperor by cutting off the troops' supplies. Philip, who was proclaimed Gordian III's successor by the army, seems to have reported that the 19-year-old emperor died of an illness.

However Gordian III died, it seems unlikely to have been as a direct result of the battle at Misiche/Peroz-Shapur. The emperor's Persian campaigns were promoted within the Roman Empire as a success. Other than the loss of Hatra, the Sassanians gained control over no additional territory as a result of the war, and Shapur did not disturb Roman interests in upper Mesopotamia for nearly eight years. Gordian III was deified after his death, and the positive portrayal his reign received was reinforced by the negative portrayals of his successor, Philip.

Gordian III was a child emperor, but his reign was not perceived as having been burdened by the troubles faced by other young emperors (such as Nero, Commodus and Elagabalus). Competent administrators held important posts, and cultural traditions appear to have been upheld. Gordian III's unlikely accession and seemingly stable reign reveal that child emperors, like modern-day constitutional monarchs, had their advantage: a distance from political decision-making and factionalism that enabled the emperor to be a symbol of unity for the various constituency groups (aristocrats, bureaucrats, soldiers, urban residents) in Roman society. The paucity of information about Gordian III's reign makes it difficult to know whether the young emperor truly lived up to such an ideal, but the positive historical tradition about him gives one the suspicion that perhaps he did.

Copyright (C) 2001, Michael L. Meckler
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Gord3Nicaea.jpg
[1106b] Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D. (Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor)52 viewsGordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Nicaea, Bithynia, N.W. Asia Minor. Bronze AE 20, S 3671, SNG Cop 526, VF, Nicaea, Bithynia, 2.950g, 18.8mm, 180o, 238 - 244 A.D. Obverse M ANT GOPDIANOC AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: NIKAI / EWN, two legionary eagles between two standards. Ex FORVM.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Gordian III (238-244 A.D.)

Michael L. Meckler
Ohio State University

Relatively few details are known about the five-and-a-half year reign of the teenage emperor Gordian III. Continuity with the Severan era seems to have marked both the policy and personnel of his government. Security along the frontiers remained the most pressing concern, and the young emperor would die while on campaign against the expanding Sassanian empire and its energetic leader, Shapur I.

The future emperor was born in Rome on 20 January 225. His mother was a daughter of the senator Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus (known later to historians as Gordian I). His father was undoubtedly a senator, but the name of his father is today unknown. The father was already dead before the start of the African uprising, involving the boy's grandfather, against the emperor Maximinus Thrax in early 238. At the time of the revolt, Maximinus was in Pannonia leading military campaigns to protect the Danube region. Maximinus' representative in Rome was a loyal Praetorian Prefect, Vitalianus. Gordian I's 13-year-old grandson faced no hardships as a result of the revolt, because Vitalianus was assassinated by agents sent by Gordian I before the African uprising was revealed in Rome.

Senators in Rome quickly acknowledged Gordian I as emperor, but the revolt in Africa was soon suppressed. After the deaths of the boy's grandfather (Gordian I) and uncle (Gordian II) were announced in Rome, probably near the end of April 238, a select group of 20 senators decided upon two of their own, Pupienus and Balbinus, as new emperors who would continue to lead the uprising against Maximinus. Not all senators were pleased with the selections, and they immediately stirred up their clients and dependents to prevent a public proclamation of the new emperors. Pupienus, moreover, had been an unpopular urban prefect, and many ordinary Romans were quite willing to take part in rioting against his accession. The grandson of Gordian I made a perfect focal point to represent the concerns of the critics of Pupienus and Balbinus. The 13-year-old was brought from his home, named Marcus Antonius Gordianus after his grandfather, and proclaimed Caesar and imperial heir by the senate.

After the death of Maximinus at the siege of Aquileia, perhaps in early June 238, conflicts between the two emperors Pupienus and Balbinus, and among the emperors, soldiers and ordinary Romans, came to the fore. Sometime during the summer, soldiers of the Praetorian Guard became unruly during a festival, stormed into the imperial complex on the Palatine, and captured, tortured and killed the emperors. The young Caesar was then proclaimed emperor by both the soldiers and the senate.

Little reliable information is available about the first few years of Gordian III's reign. Pupienus and Balbinus suffered damnatio memoriae, though it is difficult to ascertain how many other members of the senatorial elite (if any) were either dismissed from their posts or executed by the new regime. The families prominent during the Severan dynasty, and even some families prominent under the Antonines, continued to control offices and commands with a teenage emperor on the throne. In 240, an uprising again originated in the province of Africa, with the proconsul Sabinianus proclaimed emperor. Like the uprising of Gordian I in Africa two years earlier, this uprising was quickly suppressed, but unlike the events of 238, the revolt of Sabinianus failed to gain support in other parts of the empire.

In late 240 or early 241, Gordian III appointed Timesitheus as pretorian prefect. Timesitheus, who was of Eastern origin, had a long career in the imperial service as a procurator in provinces ranging from Arabia to Gaul and from Asia to Germany. Timesitheus' proven abilities quickly made him the central figure in Gordian III's government, and the praetorian prefect's authority was enhanced by the marriage of his daughter, Furia Sabinia Tranquillina, to the young emperor in the summer of 241.

Maintaining security along the frontiers remained the emperor's most serious challenge. Difficulties along the Danube continued, but the greater danger was in the East. The aggressive expansion of the renewed Persian empire under the Sassanian emperor Ardashir I continued under his son and successor, Shapur I. The focus of that expansion was in upper Mesopotamia (in what today is southeastern Turkey, northern Syria and northern Iraq), much of which had been under direct Roman control for more than a generation. Ardashir may already have captured Nisibis and Carrhae during the final months of Maximinus' reign. In 240, the ailing Ardashir seems to have made his son Shapur co-regent. During this year Hatra, the location of Rome's easternmost military garrison, (today in northern Iraq roughly 55 miles south of Mosul), was captured by the Sassanians.

Planning for a massive Roman military counterattack was soon underway. Soldiers travelled from the West during the following year, when Carrhae and Nisibis were retaken, and the Romans won a decisive victory at Resaina. Gordian III joined his army in upper Mesopotamia for campaigning in 243, but during the year the emperor's father-in-law, Timesitheus, died of an illness. The surviving Praetorian Prefect, C. Julius Priscus, convinced the emperor to appoint his brother M. Julius Philippus -- who would succeed Gordian III as the emperor Philip the Arab -- as Timesitheus' successor. The campaign against the Sassanians continued as the Roman army proceeded to march down the Euphrates during the fall and early winter.

Early in 244, the Roman and Sassanian armies met near the city of Misiche (modern Fallujah in Iraq, 40 miles west of Baghdad). Shapur's forces were triumphant, and the city was renamed Peroz-Shapur, "Victorious [is] Shapur." Shapur commemorated his victory with a sculpture and trilingual inscription (at Naqsh-i-Rustam in modern-day Iran) that claimed that Gordian III was killed in the battle.

Roman sources do not mention this battle, indicating instead that Gordian III died near Circesium, along the Euphrates some 250 miles upstream from Peroz-Shapur, and that a cenotaph was built at a location named Zaitha. Philip is universally blamed in these sources for causing Gordian III's death, either directly or by fomenting discontent with the emperor by cutting off the troops' supplies. Philip, who was proclaimed Gordian III's successor by the army, seems to have reported that the 19-year-old emperor died of an illness.

However Gordian III died, it seems unlikely to have been as a direct result of the battle at Misiche/Peroz-Shapur. The emperor's Persian campaigns were promoted within the Roman Empire as a success. Other than the loss of Hatra, the Sassanians gained control over no additional territory as a result of the war, and Shapur did not disturb Roman interests in upper Mesopotamia for nearly eight years. Gordian III was deified after his death, and the positive portrayal his reign received was reinforced by the negative portrayals of his successor, Philip.

Gordian III was a child emperor, but his reign was not perceived as having been burdened by the troubles faced by other young emperors (such as Nero, Commodus and Elagabalus). Competent administrators held important posts, and cultural traditions appear to have been upheld. Gordian III's unlikely accession and seemingly stable reign reveal that child emperors, like modern-day constitutional monarchs, had their advantage: a distance from political decision-making and factionalism that enabled the emperor to be a symbol of unity for the various constituency groups (aristocrats, bureaucrats, soldiers, urban residents) in Roman society. The paucity of information about Gordian III's reign makes it difficult to know whether the young emperor truly lived up to such an ideal, but the positive historical tradition about him gives one the suspicion that perhaps he did.

Copyright (C) 2001, Michael L. Meckler
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
MarcusAureliusLiberalitas_sestertius.jpg
[905a] Marcus Aurelius, 7 March 161 - 17 March 180 A.D.137 viewsMARCUS AURELIUS AE [b[Sestertius. RIC 1222. 30mm, 24.5g. Struck at Rome, 177 AD. Obverse: M ANTONINUS AVG GERM SARM TR P XXXI, laureate head right; Reverse: LIBERALITAS AVG VII IMP VIIII COS III P P, Liberalitas standing left holding coin counter & cornucopia, SC in fields. Nice portrait. Ex Incitatus. Photo courtesy of Incitatus.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Marcus Aurelius (A.D. 161-180)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University


Introduction and Sources
The Vita of the emperor in the collection known as the Historia Augusta identifies him in its heading as Marcus Antoninus Philosophus, "Marcus Antoninus the Philosopher." Toward the end of the work, the following is reported about him, sententia Platonis semper in ore illius fuit, florere civitates si aut philosophi imperarent aut imperantes philosopharentur (27.7), "Plato's judgment was always on his lips, that states flourished if philosophers ruled or rulers were philosophers." It is this quality of Marcus' character which has made him a unique figure in Roman history, since he was the first emperor whose life was molded by, and devoted to, philosophy (Julian was the second and last). His reign was long and troubled, and in some ways showed the weaknesses of empire which ultimately led to the "Decline and Fall," yet his personal reputation, indeed his sanctity, have never failed of admirers. Contributing to his fame and reputation is a slender volume of Stoic philosophy which served as a kind of diary while he was involved in military campaigns, the Meditations, a book which can be described as an aureus libellus, a little golden book.

The sources for understanding Marcus and his reign are varied but generally disappointing. There is no major historian. The chief literary sources are the biography in the Historia Augusta, as well as those of Hadrian, Antoninus, Verus, and Avidius Cassius. Debate about this collection of imperial biographies has been heated and contentious for more than a century. In all likelihood, it is the work of a single author writing in the last years of the fourth-century. The information offered ranges from the precisely accurate to the wildly imaginative.

Cassius Dio, who wrote in the decade of the 230s, produced a long history of the empire which has survived, for our period, only in an abbreviated version. Fourth century historians, such as Aurelius Victor and Eutropius, occasionally furnish bits of information. Marcus' teacher, Fronto, a distinguished orator and rhetorician, is extremely useful. Papyri, inscriptions, coins, legal writings, and some of the church writers, such as Tertullian, Eusebius, and Orosius, are very important. Archaeology and art history, with their interpretation of monuments, make the history of Marcus' principate literally visible and offer important clues for understanding the context of his actions.

Early Life
He was born M. Annius Verus on April 26, 121, the scion of a distinguished family of Spanish origin (PIR2 A697). His father was Annius Verus (PIR2 A696), his mother Domitia Lucilla (PIR2 D183). His grandfather held his second consulate in that year and went on to reach a third in 126, a rare distinction in the entire history of the principate, and also served Hadrian as city prefect. The youth's education embraced both rhetoric and philosophy; his manner was serious, his intellectual pursuits deep and devoted, so that the emperor Hadrian took an interest in him and called him "Verissimus," "Most truthful," by punning on his name. He received public honors from an early age and seems to have long been in Hadrian's mind as a potential successor. When Hadrian's first choice as successor, L. Ceionius Commodus, died before his adoptive father, the second choice proved more fruitful. The distinguished senator T. Aurelius Fulvus Boionius Arrius Antoninus, from Cisalpine Gaul, did succeed Hadrian, whose arrangements for the succession planned for the next generation as well. He required Antoninus to adopt the young Verus, now to be known as M. Aelius Aurelius Verus, as well as Commodus' son, henceforth known as L. Aelius Aurelius Commodus (PIR2 C606). The former was a bit more than seventeen years old, the latter was eight.

Career under Antoninus Pius
The long tenure of Antoninus Pius proved one of the most peaceful and prosperous in Roman history. The emperor himself was disinclined to military undertakings and never left Italy during his reign. Disturbances to the pax Romana occurred on the fringes of empire. Responses were decisive and successful, with legates in charge in the provinces. As a consequence, neither Caesar gained military experience nor was shown to the armies, a failing which later could have proved decisive and disastrous. Marcus rose steadily through the cursus honorum, holding consulates in 140 and 145, combining magistracies with priesthoods. He received the tribunicia potestas in 147, and perhaps also imperium proconsulare. Yet he never neglected the artes liberals. His closest contacts were with Fronto (c.95-c.160), the distinguished rhetorician and orator. His acquaintance included many other distinguished thinkers, such as Herodes Atticus (c.95-177), the Athenian millionaire and sophist, and Aelius Aristides (117-c.181), two of whose great speeches have survived and which reveal much of the mood and beliefs of the age. Yet it was Epictetus (c.50-c.120) who had the greatest philosophical impact and made him a firm Stoic. In the year 161 Marcus celebrated his fortieth birthday, a figure of noble appearance and unblemished character. He was leading a life which gave him as much honor and glory as he could have desired, probably much more than his private nature enjoyed, yet his life, and that of the empire, was soon to change. The emperor died on March 7, but not before clearly indicating to magistrates and senate alike his desire that Marcus succeed him by having the statue of Fortuna, which had been in his bedroom, transferred to Marcus. There was no opposition, no contrary voice, to his succession. He immediately chose his brother as co-emperor, as Hadrian had planned. From the beginning of the year they were joint consuls and held office for the entire year. Their official titulature was now Imperator Caesar M. Aurelius Antoninus Augustus and Imperator Caesar L. Aurelius Verus Augustus. The military qualities adumbrated by the word Imperator were soon much in demand, for the empire was under pressure in the year 161 in Britain, in Raetia, and in the east, where Parthia once again posed a significant danger.

The Parthian War (161-166)
The incursion in northern Britain and the difficulties along the Danube were soon satisfactorily managed by legates. The danger in the East was of a different magnitude. Tensions between Rome and Parthia had intensified in the last years of Antoninus' reign over control of Armenia, the vast buffer state which had often aroused enmity between the two powers, since each wished to be able to impose a king favorable to its interests. With Antoninus' death and the uncertainty attendant upon a new emperor (in this case two, a dyarchy, for the first time in Rome's history), the Parthian monarch, Vologaeses III, struck rapidly, placed his own candidate upon the Armenian throne, and inflicted severe setbacks upon the Roman forces sent to oppose him. Marcus decided to send his colleague Lucius Verus, whose imperial prestige would underscore the seriousness of the empire's response. Verus lacked military experience and was sorely lacking in the attributes of leadership and command; further, he was notorious for being chiefly interested in amusements and luxury. But Marcus surrounded him with several of the best generals at the empire's disposal, chief among them Avidius Cassius (c.130-175) (PIR2 A1402). From 162 on, Rome's successes and conquests were extensive and decisive. Most of Parthia's significant cities and strongholds, such as Seleucia and Ctesiphon, were stormed and destroyed, and the army's movements eastward recalled the movements of Alexander the Great some five centuries earlier. By 166, Parthia had capitulated and a Roman nominee sat on the Armenian throne. The victory appeared to be the most decisive since Trajan's conquest of Dacia, but, when Verus returned to Italy with his triumphant army, there came also a devastating plague, which had enormous effect on all provinces.
As is the case with all ancient diseases, it is almost impossible to identify this one. In all likelihood, however, it was smallpox; how severe the toll was is debated. Clearly, it cast a pall over the triumph celebrated by the two emperors, who were honored with the titles Armeniacus and Parthicus. The last years of this decade were dominated by efforts to overcome the plague and provide succour to its victims. But already in 166, the German tribes smashed the Danubian limes, threatening the empire's stability and even existence, more than Parthia had ever done. The first campaigns were punctuated by the death of Verus in 169, leaving Marcus as sole emperor. And so began the most difficult period of his life.

The German Wars
Early in 169, the Marcomanni and Quadi crossed the Danube, penetrated the intervening provinces, and entered Italy. The culmination of their onslaught was a siege of Aquileia. The effect upon the inhabitants of the peninsula was frightful. This was the first invasion of Italy since the late second century B.C., when the Cimbri and Teutones had been separately crushed by Marius. Perhaps more vivid in the collective imagination was the sack of Rome by the Gauls in 387, when the city was saved only by the payment of ransom.
The two emperors hastened north, after a rapid mobilization of forces, which included the drafting of slaves, since the manpower potential of the empire had been so impaired by the consequences of the plague and the losses and troop commitments in the East. Verus died while in the north; Marcus returned to Rome with the body and gave his brother full honors. He then turned north again and began his counterattacks against the barbarians. He did not know it at the time, but he was destined to spend most of his remaining years on the northern frontier. The only interlude was caused by revolt in the east.

We have no record of Marcus' ultimate intentions in these campaigns, yet the various stages were clear. First and foremost, the enemy had to be driven out of Italy and then into their own territory beyond the Danube. He strove to isolate the tribes and then defeat them individually, so that the ultimate manpower superiority of the empire and its greater skill in warfare and logistics could more easily be brought to bear. It was a successful strategy, as one tribe after another suffered defeat and reestablished ties with Rome. But it was a time-consuming and expensive operation, requiring the recruitment of two new legions, II Italica and III Italica, the construction of many new camps, such as the legionary fortress at Regensburg, with success accruing year by year. He intended to create two new provinces, Marcomannia and Sarmatia, thereby eliminating the Hungarian Plain and the headwaters of the Elbe as staging areas for invasion.

This steady, slow progress was interrupted in 175 by the action of the distinguished general Avidius Cassius, governor of Syria, who claimed the empire for himself. Whether he responded to a rumor of Marcus' death or, as gossip had it, conspired with Marcus' wife, the emperor's response was quick and decisive. Leaving the northern wars, he traveled to the East, but Avidius was killed before Marcus arrived in the region. After spending time settling affairs and showing himself to some of the provinces, with particular attention shown to Athens, where he was initiated into the Eleusinian mysteries, as Hadrian and Verus had been. He returned to Italy and soon answered the call to duty once more on the northern frontier. He took with him as colleague his son Commodus, now merely sixteen years old but already long since marked out as his father's intended successor. The military campaigns proved successful, but in the spring of 180, when Marcus died, at least one more year of warfare was necessary for the attainment of the grand enterprise. Marcus recommended to Commodus continuation of the war, but the new emperor was eager to return to Rome and the ease and luxury of the imperial court and entered into a peace agreement. Never again was Rome to hold the upper hand in its dealings with the Germanic tribes beyond the now reestablished borders of the empire.

Administrative and Religious Policy
Marcus was a conscientious and careful administrator who devoted much attention to judicial matters. His appointments to major administrative positions were for the most part admirable. Difficult tasks were put in the charge of the most capable men; he was not afraid of comparison with his subordinates. Social mobility continued as it had been under his predecessors, with men from the provinces advancing into the upper echelons of the Roman aristocracy. Those of humble birth could make a good career; such a one was Pertinax (126-193), a gifted general, who in early 193 became emperor for a space of less than three months.

The judicial administration of Italy was put in the hands of iuridici, who represented the emperor and thus spoke with his authority. This was a practice which had been established by Hadrian but had been allowed to lapse by Antoninus. The centralization of government continued apace. The imperial finances were sorely stretched by the almost continuous wars. Trajan had brought great wealth, Decebalus' treasure, into the empire after his conquest of Dacia. No such profit awaited Marcus. When preparing for the northern wars, he auctioned off much of the imperial palace's valuables. In spite of the enormous expenses of war, Commodus found ample funds upon his accession as sole emperor for his expenditures and amusements.

Although Marcus was a devoted thinker and philosopher, he was deeply religious, at least outwardly. The state cult received full honor, and he recognized the validity of other people's beliefs, so that the variety of religions in the vast extent of the empire caused no difficulties for inhabitants or government, with one significant exception. The Christians were not hampered by any official policy; indeed the impact of the church spread enormously in the second century. Yet their availability as scapegoats for local crises made them subject to abuse or worse. There was violence against them in 167, and perhaps the worst stain on Marcus' principate stemmed from the pogrom of Christians in Lugdunum in southern France in 177. He did not cause it, nor, on the other hand, did he or his officials move to stop it. Indeed, Tertullian called him a friend of Christianity. Yet the events were a precursor of what would come in the century and a quarter which followed.

Building Programs and Monuments
Many of Marcus' predecessors transformed the face of the capital with their building programs, either by the vast range of their undertaking or by the extraordinary significance of individual monuments. Others did very little to leave a tangible mark. Marcus fell into the latter group. There is record of very few monuments for which he and his brother were responsible. Very early in their reign they honored the deceased Antoninus with a column in the Campus Martius, no longer in situ but largely surviving. The shaft, which seems not to have been sculpted, was used for the restoration of Augustus' obelisk, now in Piazza Montecitorio, in the eighteenth century. The base, which was sculpted on all four sides, is now on display in the Vatican Museum. The chief feature is the apotheosis of the emperor and his long deceased wife, the elder Faustina, as they are borne to heaven. Also presented on this relief are two eagles and personifications of the goddess Roma and of the Campus Martius, represented as a young male figure.

There were three arches which commemorated the military achievements of the two emperors. No trace has been found of an early monument to Verus. Two arches later honored Marcus, both of which have disappeared but have left significant sculptural remains. The eight rectangular reliefs preserved on the Arch of Constantine came from one arch. Similarly, the three reliefs displayed in the stairwell of the Conservatori Museum on the Capitoline Hill came from another. One relief has disappeared from the latter monument.

Certainly the best known monument of Marcus' principate is the column, which rises from Piazza Colonna. It is twin to Trajan's column in height and design, although the artistic craftsmanship of the reliefs which envelop the shaft is much inferior. The subject is Marcus' campaigns against the Marcomanni and Sarmati in the years 172-75. The most interesting panel represents the famous rainstorm, when the army, overwhelmed by drought, was suddenly saved by the divine intervention of rain. Although begun in the latter part of the decade, the column was not completed until 193, when Septimius Severus had become emperor.

The famous equestrian statue of Marcus Aurelius, which survived the centuries near San Giovanni in Laterano because the rider was identified as Constantine, no longer greets the visitor to the Capitoline, where Michelangelo had placed it in the sixteenth century. It was removed in the 1980s because pollution was destroying it. After careful treatment and restoration, it is now displayed within the museum, with a replica placed in the center of the piazza.

Although outside Rome, mention should be made of the monumental frieze commemorating Lucius Verus' victory over the Parthians in 165. It was an ornament of the city of Ephesus; the extensive sculptural remains are now in the Ephesus Museum in Vienna.

Family
As part of Hadrian's plans for his succession, when Ceionius Commodus was his choice, Marcus was betrothed to the latter's daughter. But when Ceionius died and Antoninus became Hadrian's successor, that arrangement was nullified and Marcus was chosen for the Emperor's daughter, the younger Faustina (PIR2 A716). She had been born in 129, was hence eight years younger than he. They were married in 145; the marriage endured for thirty years. She bore him thirteen children, of whom several died young; the most important were a daughter, Lucilla, and a son Commodus. Lucilla was deployed for political purposes, married first to Lucius Verus in 164, when she was seventeen, and then, after his death, to Claudius Pompeianus Quintianus of Antioch, a much older man who was an important associate of her father /ii]PIR2 C973). Commodus became joint-emperor with his father in 177 and three years later ruled alone.

Faustina's reputation suffered much abuse. She was accused of employing poison and of murdering people, as well as being free with her favors with gladiators, sailors, and also men of rank, particularly Avidius Cassius. Yet Marcus trusted her implicitly and defended her vigorously. She accompanied him on several campaigns and was honored with the title mater castrorum. She was with him in camp at Halala in southern Cappadocia in the winter of 175 when she died in an accident. Marcus dedicated a temple to her honor and had the name of the city changed to Faustinopolis.

Death and Succession
In early 180, while Marcus and Commodus were fighting in the north, Marcus became ill. Which disease carried him off we do not know, but for some days Marcus took no food or drink, being now eager to die. He died on March 17, in the city of Vindobona, although one source reports that it was in Sirmium. His ashes were brought to Rome and placed in Hadrian's mausoleum. Commodus succeeded to all power without opposition, and soon withdrew from the war, thereby stymieing his father's designs and ambitions. It was a change of rulers that proved disastrous for people and empire. Dio called the succession a change from a golden kingdom to one of iron and rust.

Reputation
Gibbon called Marcus "that philosophic monarch," a combination of adjective and noun which sets Marcus apart from all other Roman emperors. His renown has, in subsequent centuries, suffered little, although he was by no means a "perfect" person. He was perhaps too tolerant of other people's failings, he himself used opium. The abundance of children whom his wife bore him included, alas, a male who was to prove one of Rome's worst rulers. How much better it would have been if Marcus had had no son and had chosen a successor by adoption, so that the line of the five good emperors, Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus, Marcus, could have been extended. It was not to be, and for that Marcus must accept some responsibility.

Yet he was a man of ability and a sense of duty who sacrificed his own delights and interests to the well-being of the state. He was capax imperii, he did his best, and history has been kind to him. As Hamlet said to Horatio, when awaiting the appearance of the ghost of his father,

"He was a man! Take him for all in all, I shall not look upon his like again." (I 2, 187-88)

His memory remains vivid and tactile because of the famous column, the equestrian statue, and his slender volume of thoughts, written in Greek, the Meditations, from which I choose two quotations with which to conclude:

"If mind is common to us, then also the reason, whereby we are reasoning beings, is common. If this be so, then also the reason which enjoins what is to be done or left undone is common. If this be so, law also is common; if this be so, we are citizens; if this be so, we are partakers in one constitution; if this be so, the Universe is a kind of Commonwealth." (4.4)

"At dawn of day, when you dislike being called, have this thought ready: 'I am called to man's labour; why then do I make a difficulty if I am going out to do what I was born to do and what I was brought into the world for?'" (5.1; both in Farquharson's translation)

Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
   
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