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Search results - "Aphrodite"
Aphroditopolis.jpg
34 viewsEGYPT, Aphroditopolis
PB Tessera (13mm, 1.78 g)
Eros standing left, stooping over bird to left
Head of hippocamp right (or swan right?)
Milne 5325-9; Dattari (Savio) 11856-7; Köln -; Rostowzew & Prou 714 (dolphin)

The reverse type here more closely resembles a swan than it does a hippocamp. While the swan is a symbol of Aphrodite, Dattari (Savio) 11857 clearly shows the head a hippocamp. It is possible that these are two distinct types.
Ardatirion
Aphroditopolis_5320.jpg
23 viewsEGYPT, Aphroditopolis
PB Tessera (15mm, 3.02 g, 4 h)
Old man standing right, leaning on staff (Anchises?)
Aphrodite seated facing on rock, head right, raising arms to cover breast
Milne 5320-4; Dattari (Savio) 11851-2; Köln -

Assuming that the types of Aphroditopolis uniformly bear relation to the goddess, the elderly male figure on the obverse presents an enigma. Perhaps the man is Anchises, the father of Aeneas. While he was certainly younger during his dalliances with Aphrodite, the artist could presumably have been influenced by the Virgilian image of an elderly man.
Ardatirion
Julius_Caesar_RSC_12.jpg
01 Julius Caesar, Venus39 viewsJulius Caesar. AR Denarius. Military mint traveling with Caesar in North Africa c. 47-46B.C. (3.88, 19.2mm, 6h). Obv: Diademed head of Venus right. Rev: CAESAR, Aeneas walking left, carrying Anchises and the Palladium. Craw. 458/1. RSC 12, Sear RCV 1402.

Minted to pay his legends during their African campaign against the Pomeians, this coin harkens to Caesar’s mythical origin from Venus. Aeneas, a survivor of Troy, was the son of Aphrodite’s liaison with the mortal Anchises. Aeneas lead a group of survivors, the Aeneads, ultimately to the Italian peninsula.
1 commentsLucas H
KnidosARdrachm.jpg
020a, CARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm.62 viewsCARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm - 16mm (6.06 g). Obverse: forepart of roaring lion right; Reverse: archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia. Cahn 80 (V38/R53); SNG Helsinki 132 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 232 (same dies). Toned, near VF, good metal. Ex Barry P. Murphy.

While this coin falls within the time frame that numismatists call "Classical" Greek coinage, I have chosen to place it in both the "Archaic" (coin 020a) and "Classical" Greek sections of my collection. This specimen is one of those wonderful examples of transition--it incorporates many elements of the "Archaic" era, although it is struck during the "Classical" Greek period and anticipates characteristics of the later period.

As noted art historian Patricia Lawrence has pointed out, "[this specimen portrays] A noble-headed lion, a lovely Late Archaic Aphrodite, and [is made from]. . . beautiful metal." The Archaic Aphrodite is reminiscent of certain portraits of Arethusa found on tetradrachms produced in Syracuse in the first decade of the 5th century BC.

Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city probably of Lacedaemonian colonization. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum, Turkey) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.

The city was at first governed by an oligarchic senate, composed of sixty members, and presided over by a magistrate; but, though it is proved by inscriptions that the old names continued to a very late period, the constitution underwent a popular transformation. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic. They ultimately submitted to Cyrus, and from the battle of Eurymedon to the latter part of the Peloponnesian War they were subject to Athens.

In their expansion into the region, the Romans easily obtained the allegiance of Knidians, and rewarded them for help given against Antiochus by leaving them the freedom of their city.

During the Byzantine period there must still have been a considerable population: for the ruins contain a large number of buildings belonging to the Byzantine style, and Christian sepulchres are common in the neighbourhood.

Eudoxus, the astronomer, Ctesias, the writer on Persian history, and Sostratus, the builder of the celebrated Pharos at Alexandria, are the most remarkable of the Knidians mentioned in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidus

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
coins123.JPG
202a. Plautilla60 viewsVenus

The Roman goddess of love and beauty, but originally a vegetation goddess and patroness of gardens and vineyards. Later, under Greek influence, she was equated with Aphrodite and assumed many of her aspects. Her cult originated from Ardea and Lavinium in Latium. The oldest temple known of Venus dates back to 293 BCE, and was inaugurated on August 18. Later, on this date the Vinalia Rustica was observed. A second festival, that of the Veneralia, was celebrated on April 1 in honor of Venus Verticordia, who later became the protector against vice. Her temple was built in 114 BCE. After the Roman defeat near Lake Trasum in 215 BCE, a temple was built on the Capitol for Venus Erycina. This temple was officially opened on April 23, and a festival, the Vinalia Priora, was instituted to celebrate the occasion.

Venus is the daughter of Jupiter, and some of her lovers include Mars and Vulcan, modeled on the affairs of Aphrodite. Venus' importance rose, and that of her cult, through the influence of several Roman political leaders. The dictator Sulla made her his patroness, and both Julius Caesar and the emperor Augustus named her the ancestor of their (Julian) family: the 'gens Julia' was Aeneas, son of Venus and the mortal Anchises. Ceasar introduced the cult of Venus Genetrix, the goddess of motherhood and marriage, and built a temple for her in 46 BCE. She was also honored in the temple of Mars Ultor. The last great temple of Venus was built by the emperor Hadrianus near the Colusseum in 135 CE.

Roman statues and portraits of Venus are usually identical to the Greek representations of Aphrodite.

AR Denarius. PLAVTILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS VICTRIX, Venus standing left holding apple & palm, leaning on shield, Cupid at her feet. RSC 25.
ecoli
853_P_Hadrian_RPC2400~0.JPG
2400 LYDIA, Sardis Hadrian, Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos21 viewsReference.
RPC III, 2400; BMC 134; Sardis 285

Issue No magistrate name

Obv. ΑΥ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙΑΝΟС ΑΔΡΙΑΝΟС
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., with drapery over shoulders

Rev. ΠΑΦΙΗ СΑΡΔΙΑΝΩΝ
Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon with star and crescent above; to l. and r., flaming torch and column; paved semi-circular walled courtyard in front

10.36 gr
25 mm
6h
1 commentsokidoki
597_P_Hadrian_Emmett1246.jpg
6381 EGYPT, Alexandria. Hadrian Nome Obol 126-27 AD Hathor/Aphrodite22 viewsReference.
Emmett 1244.11; RPC III, 6381

Issue Aphroditopolite

Obv. ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙ ΤΡΑΙ ΑΔΡΙΑ СΕΒ
Laureate head of Hadrian, r., drapery on l. shoulder.

Rev. ΑΦΡΟΔΙ, L ΙΑ
Hathor/Aphrodite standing, facing, head l., wearing feathers between two spurs, holding in r. hand figure of Demeter veiled, standing, r., torch in r. hand, and something circular in l. hand, and in l. hand, figure of Isis standing, facing

4.18 gr
18 mm
12h
okidoki
Akarnania,_Leukas,_167-100_BC,_AR_Didrachm.jpg
Akarnania, Leukas, 87 BC, AR Didrachm46 viewsCult statue of the goddess Aphrodite Aeneias with stag standing right, holding aplustre, bird on standard behind; all within a laurel wreath.
ΛΕΥΚΑΔΙΩΝ ΦΙΛΑΝΔΡΟΣ (Leukadion Philandros) above prow of galley right.

de Callataÿ Didrachms of Leukas 195-212 dies O31/R2; BCD Akarnania 313-314; BMC 180, 101-103; Postolokas, Lambros 67, 688 var.

(23 mm, 7.90 g, 11h)
Forestier & Lambert.

Based on the study of de Callataÿ, Didrachms of Leukas, this coin was struck in the summer and autumn of 87 BC as a contribution to Sulla’s campaign against Mithrades Eupator. De Callataÿ connected it with the encampment of Sulla’s troops at Leukas that year and argued that the coinage is a pseudo-civic Greek coinage issued by and for for the Romans. This is reflected in the reverse iconography where the galley prow is distinctively Roman, identifieable as such by the wolf head on the prow, above the ram, a decorative element unknown on Greek vessels.

This coin was struck when the Hellenistic age was in advanced decline, succumbing to the expansionary drive of Rome. The coins of this issue were often struck from relatively crude dies in an advanced state of wear. Yet they retain a charm and aesthetic that in some sense seems to speak of the last gasps of a dying Hellenistic age. The obverse image is thought to depict the cult statue of Aphrodite Aeneias, whose sanctuary was situated near the town of Leukas, overlooking the shipping canal that separated the island from the mainland.
2 commentsn.igma
coins103.JPG
Antoninus Pius. Thrace, Philippopolis; 25 viewsAres

In Greek mythology, Ares ("battle strife") is the god of war and son of Zeus (king of the gods) and Hera. The Romans identified Mars, the god of war (whom they had inherited from the Etruscans) with Hellenic Ares, but among them, Mars stood in much higher esteem. Among the Hellenes, Ares was always mistrusted: his birthplace and true home was placed far off, among the barbarous and warlike Thracians (Iliad 13.301; Ovid); to Thrace he withdrew after he was discovered on a couch with Aphrodite ( Odyssey 8.361).

Although important in poetry, Ares was only rarely the recipient of cult worship, save at Sparta, where he was propriated before battle, and in the founding myth of Thebes, and he appeared in few myths (Burkert 1985, p.169). At Sparta there was a statue of the god in chains, to show that the spirit of war and victory was never to leave the city. At Sparta young dogs and even humans were sacrificed to him. The temple to Ares in the agora of Athens that Pausanias saw in the 2nd century AD had only been moved and rededicated there during the time of Augustus; in essence it was a Roman temple to Mars. The Areopagus, the "hill of Ares" where Paul preached, is sited at some distance from the Acropolis; from archaic times it was a site of trials. Its connection with Ares, perhaps based on a false etymology, may be purely etiological. Ares s throne at Mount Olympus is said to be covered with human skin.

Antoninus Pius AE18 of Philippopolis, Thrace. AVT AI ADRIA ANTWNEIN, bare head right / FILIPPOPOLEITWN, Ares standing left, holding spear in left hand, shield leaning against him at right. BMC 10.
ecoli
Aphrodite _ British Museum.jpg
Aphrodite673 viewsMarble statue of a naked Aphrodite crouching at her bath1 commentsBacchus
gordianIII_SNGlev774~0.jpg
Aphrodite521 viewsAphrodite is the greek goddess of beauty and love. She is much older and more primordial than Venus. Venus was a more local goddess and came to Rome not before the 4th century. Aphrodite is melted together of indoeuropean-hellenistic, aegaean-anatolean and semitic-oriental elements. The origin of her name is unknown, perhaps it is related to the sem.*asthart. Her relation to Cyprus is referring to that origin. Possibly the name of the month April comes from etruscan *aprodita. So there could be an etruscan intermediation. She seems to be a conglomerate of old fertility goddesses. Her attributes dolphin and shell points to marine, dove, sparrow and and swane to caelestic and apple, rose and pomegranat to herbal sexual spheres. With Homer Aphrodíte replaces the dark weird deities as a light goddess of charm and gracefulness. She was called 'philommeides', the smiling, and she was the mistress of the Graces.
On the rev. of this coin we see Aphrodite as a later depiction as goddess of grace and seduction. She holds a mirror as the symbol of vanity. Her companions are two Erotes with torches to ignite love.
2 commentsJochen
009n.jpg
Aphrodite (standing figure of)220 viewsLYDIA. Tralles. Tranquillina. Æ 30. A.D. 241-244. Obv: ΦOY.CAB.T-PANKYΛΛINA. Draped bust right; countermark on lower front part of bust Rev: (…)ΩNΠ (…)I.KΛ.ΦIΛIΠΠON.KENTA(…). Inscription around oak-wreath; inside wreath TPAΛΛIA-ΠYθIA on either side of tripod, which is encircled by serpent . Ref: BMC -. Axis: 165°. Weight: 12.40 g. Note: Unpublished? CM: Cult statue of Aphrodite right, in oval punch, 6 x 8 mm. Howgego 228 (16 pcs). Note: The countermark of this coin was applied at Aphrodisias in Caria, where only foreign coins were countermarked to make them valid in that city. Collection Automan. Automan
Akarnania,_Leukas,_167-100_BC,_AR_Didrachm.jpg
Aphrodite Aeneias 166 viewsAkarnania, Leukas, 167-100 BC, AR Didrachm
Cult statue of the goddess Aphrodite Aeneias with stag standing right, holding aplustre, bird on standard behind; all within a laurel wreath. / ΛΕΥΚΑΔΙΩΝ ΦΙΛΑΝΔΡΟΣ (Leukadion Philandros) above prow of galley right.
BCD Akarnania 313-314; BMC 180, 101-103; Postolokas, Lambros 67, 688 var.
(23 mm, 7.90 g, 11h)

This coin was issued as the Hellenistic age was in decline, succumbing to the expansionary drive of Rome. The coins of this issue were often struck from relatively crude dies in an advanced state of wear. Yet they retain a charm and aesthetic that in some sense seems to speak of the last gasps of a dying Hellenistic age. The obverse image is thought to depict the cult statue of Aphrodite Aeneias, whose sanctuary was situated near the town of Leukas, overlooking the shipping canal that separated the island from the mainland.
Lloyd T
prnbzw~0.jpg
Aphrodite and Ares on Cilician AR Stater of Satrap Pharnabazos172 views
Circa 380-374/3 B.C.(21mm, 10.39g, 11h). Struck circa 380-379 B.C. Casabonne series 3; Moysey Issue 3, 3-5 var. (dolphin on obv.); SNG France 246 var. (rev. legend). Obverse Head of nymph facing three-quarters left. Reverse Helmeted head of Ares left, Aramaic PRNBZW to left. Near EF, toned, struck from a slightly worn obverse die.

Ex CNG.

There is still an ongoing debate whether who represent the obverse and reverse of this coin type of Pharnabazos. The obverse obviously was inspired by the renowned Syracusan tetradrachm of Kimon, whose three-quarter facing head of the nymph Arethusa was widely copied throughout the ancient world. A handful of ancient poleis adopted this style to represent their local nymph or goddess on their coins. A perfect example is the numerous coins of Larissa in Thessaly representing the local nymph of the same name. It is possible to assume then that the obverse of our coin might be another female deity other than Arethusa. A current opinion holds that the obverse represents Aphrodite, the goddess of love; and the reverse depicts Ares, the god of war. The two were known in ancient mythology as lovers, and commonly paired together on ancient coins. Of special note on this coin is the reverse: while most coins of this type display static male heads with little originality, the reverse die is probably from a special issue marked by superior style and executed with extreme delicacy. It has been suggested (Leu Auction 81, lot 317) that the head of Ares may be a disguised portrait of Pharnabazos himself.

1 commentsJason T
Aphrodite_Aphrodisias_2011.JPG
Aphrodite of Aphrodiasis41 viewsStatue of Aphrodite of Aphrodisias, today in the Archaeological Museum of Aphrodisias, Caria. Depicted on coins from Aphrodisias.Jochen
IMG_2451.JPG
Aphrodite of Cnidus206 viewsPallazo Altemps

Roman copy of Praxiteles's original.
Johny SYSEL
Gamerses_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Gamerses, Satrap of Lydia12 viewsLydia
Gamerses, Satrap of Lydia
about 400 B.C.
Obv.: Youthful head of eunuch Gamerses, wearing earring and necklace.
Rev. ΓΑΜΕΡΣΟΥ Bearded Zeus, wearing himation, standing right, holding eagle on his outstretched left hand, long scepter with his right hand; in field left, star.
Æ, 1.66g, 12.5mm
Ref.. S. Schultz, Aphroditekopf oder Dynastiebildnis, SM 42 (1992), 113
shanxi
Livia_Julia_R694_Pergamon_fac.jpg
Asia Minor, Mysia, RPC, Pergamon, Livia, Julia7 viewsLivia & Julia (Wife and Daughter of Augustus)
circa 10-2 BC
Charinos Grammateus, magistrate.
Obv: ΛΙΒΙΑΝ ΗΡΑΝ ΧΑΡΙΝΟΣ. Draped bust of Livia right.
Rev: ΟΥΛΙΑΝ ΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΗΝ. Draped bust of Julia (as Aphrodite) right.
Æ, 18 mm, 3.38 g
Ref.: RPC 2359
shanxi
Laodikeia_01.jpg
Asia Minor, Phrygia, Laodikeia, Aphrodite, cornucopiae 13 viewsLaodikeia
Asia Minor, Phrygia
after 133 BC, roman rule
Obv.: Head of Laodice or Aphrodite right, long curl hanging down her neck, wearing stephane
Rev.: ΛAOΔI-KEΩN, double cornucopiae left, fillet hanging down on left
AE, 7.33g, 21mm
Ref.: BMC 39, SNG von Aulock 3803, SNG Munich 344
shanxi
Corinthian_Stater_Silver~0.JPG
Athena, Corinthian Stater162 viewsLeucas, Akarnania, Greece, 350 - 300 B.C.
Silver stater, BMC Corinth p. 133, 97 - 101 var (Λ behind neck and mast, monogram below), rough VF, Leucas mint, weight 8.132g, maximum
diameter 22.4mm, die axis 270o, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying left, Λ below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite)
left wearing Corinthian helmet over a leather cap, mast with yard behind;

Romanorvm
auglivprov2OR.jpg
Augustus, with Julia Augusta (Livia), RPC 246628 viewsIonia, Smyrna mint, Augustus, with Julia Augusta (Livia), struck circa 10 B.C. AE, 20mm 4.58g, Leontiskos Hippomedontos, magistrate, RPC 2466; SNG Copenhagen 1334
O: ΣEBAΣTΩI ZMYPNAIOI, Jugate heads right of Augustus, laureate, and Livia, draped
R: ΔIONIΣIOΣ KOΛΛYBAΣ, Aphrodite Stratonicis standing facing, holding scepter and Nike, leaning on column; to right, dove standing left
1 commentscasata137ec
smyrna_tyche.jpg
Æ 17; Tyche/ Aphrodite Stratonikis with Nike12 viewsSmyrna (BC 180-130) AE 17, 180-130 BC. AE17. Turreted head of Tyche right, in dotted circle / Aphrodite Stratonikis in long garb and polos standing right next to column from which Nike flies up to crown her with wreath; ΣΜΥΡΝΑΙΩΝ to right, magistrate to left. Ex Sayles & LavenderPodiceps
BCC_LT66_Venus_Aphrodite__tessera.jpg
BCC LT6621 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Roman 1st-3rd Century CE
Obv: Standing figure, crudely
rendered. Perhaps Venus/
Aphrodite drying hair?
Rev: Blank?
9.75 x 8 x 1.5mm.
Weight: 0.62gm.
cf. Hamburger #61 and 62
cf. BCC LT18
v-drome
serapis_tessera_BCC_Lt9.jpg
BCC Lt956 viewsLead Tessera
Caesarea Maritima
Obv: Mummiform Zeus Heliopolites standing facing, holding
whip and grain ears; at feet, foreparts of bulls on either side.
Rev: Standing figure,head turned to the left, perhaps
Venus/Aphrodite, who also was honored with a temple
at Heliopolis (Baalbek).
9mm. 0.38gm. Axis:0
1 commentsv-drome
GRK_Boetia_Thespiae_Sear_2458.jpg
Boeotia. Thespiae9 viewsSGCV 2458; BMC Central Greece pg. 90, 4; SNG Copenhagen 401-402

AR obol, .63 g., 9.78 mm. max.

Struck ca. 431-424 B.C.

Obv: Boeotian shield

Rev: ΘEΣ, upward-facing crescent comprised of three lines.

Thespiae was a member of the Boeotian League. In 424 B.C. during the Peloponnesian War, the Thespian contingent of the Boeotian army sustained heavy losses in the Athenian invasion of Boeotia at the Battle of Delium. In 423 B.C. the Thebans dismantled the walls of Thespiae, apparently as a measure to prevent a democratic revolution. The terminus of this emission coincides with these events.

The crescent on the reverse of this coin refers to Aphrodite Melainis, who was worshipped at Thespiai as a moon goddess. The legend is an abbreviation for ΘΕΣΠΙΕΩΝ of Thespians.
Stkp
BOSP_KINGDOM_2_HEADS.jpg
BOSPORAN KINGDOM -- Queen Gepaepyris28 viewsBOSPORAN KINGDOM -- Queen Gepaepyris (37-39 AD) AE23 12 Nummi. BACIΛICCHC ΓHΠAIΠYPEΩC, diademed draped bust right / IB, veiled bust of Aphrodite Urania right, wearing calathus. MacDonald 306, Anokhin 326 var. dpaul7
thrace_caesarea.jpg
Caesarea (Pantikapaion), Aphrodite/ ΚΑΙ−ΣΑ/ΡΕ−ΩΝ, scepter topped with pomegranate flower, H (year 8)21 viewsCaesarea (Pantikapaion), Thrace, c. 17 - 4 B.C. Bronze AE 18, RPC I 1936, SNG Fitzwilliam 1275, Anokhin 322, BMC Thrace -, SNG Stancomb -, F, Pantikapaion mint, 6.458g, 21.1mm, 0o, 13 - 12 B.C.; obverse draped and veiled bust of Aphrodite right, wearing calathus; reverse “ΚΑΙ−ΣΑ/ΡΕ−ΩΝ”, scepter topped with pomegranate flower, H (year 8) lower right. The veiled bust is sometimes identified as Livia or as Queen Dynamis but RPC I rejects these identifications as unlikely because it would be inappropriate to depict either of them with kalathos on their head. Ex FORVMPodiceps
1266_Caligula_Aphrodisias.jpg
Caligula - Aphrodisias10 views37-41 AD
laureate head right
ΓAIOΣ__KAIΣAP
diademed head of Aphrodite right
AΦPOΔI_ΣIEΩN
RPC I 2845; BMC 97-8
4,0g 16mm
ex Aureo & Calicó
Johny SYSEL
Aphrodisias.JPG
Caria, Aphrodisias (AD 200-250) AE 24. Senate/Aphrodite32 viewsImperial Times, ca 200-250 AD. AE24. IЄPA CV - NKΛHTOC, diademed bust of Senate right; countermark. / AΦPOΔЄI-CIЄΩN, Aphrodite standing facing, holding scepter and apple.
BMC 31; SNG Copenhagen -
ancientone
aphrodisias_gordianIII_SNGaulock2461cf.jpg
Caria, Aphrodisias, Gordian III, MacDonald Type 187 var. 21 viewsGordian III, AD 238-244
AE 30 (2 assaria), 14.09g, 30.48mm, 165°
struck AD 238-341 (see MacDonald below)
obv. AV KM ANT - GORDIANOC (1st N reversed)
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. AFROD. - EI[CIE]EWN
Cult statue of Aphrodite Aphrodisias in ependytes and with kalathos, stg. r. on plinthe, head flanked by
crescent and star, both hands outstretched forwards; l. beside her small priestress std. with raised hand
on sella r., r. beside her a fountain with arched cover.
ref. MacDonald Type 187 var., 0234 var., R432 var.; cf. SNGF von Aulock 2461; not in Leypold, Keckmann,
Sammlung Karl, BMC
rare, F+, some deposits of sand-patina

MacDonald: Types 187-189 are an exception to the rule that the portrait of the emperor appears only on the largest denominations of Aphrodisias. The reason is fairly obvious. The portraits of 0234-0236 are distinctly juvenile, and early in the reign of Gordian III there were no other members of the imperial family whose portraits might be put on the coins. When Gordian III married Tranquillina, her portrait appeared on this denomination, Types 190-192
Jochen
aphrodisias_pseudoautonom_MacDonald145.jpg
Caria, Aphrodisias, pseudo-autonomous, MacDonald 14510 viewsCaria, Aphrodisias, pseudo-autonomous, c.AD 225-250
AE 22, 4.90g, 22.39mm, 180°
obv. [IEROC] - DEMOC
Head of Demos,laureate, r.
rev. [A]FROD - E - I - CIEWN
Cult statue of Aphrodite Aphrodisias, in ependytes and with kalathos, stg. r., holding
unknown object in extended hands; l. behind her small priestress std. r., r. before her
fountain with oval cover; in upper l. field star, in upper r. field crescent
ref. MacDonald type 145 (O203/R376); BMC 34; SNG Copenhagen 107
rare, F+, flan break-out at 10h

O203 is the only die where Demos is called "holy". Regarding its style this type is later than
the types 133-144. The increase of the module suggests the time around AD 250 (MacDonald)
Jochen
Domna,_AE-32_Assaria__Caria__Aphrodisias__Aphrodite__MacDonald_p_92,_Type_83_O136_R235.jpg
Caria, Aphrodisias. Julia Domna. AE-Diassarion. Menestheus Isobounus, Magistrate. Rx./ Aphrodite33 viewsCaria, Aphrodisias. Julia Domna, the wife of Septimius Severus. Augusta, AD 193 – 217. AE-31. Diassarion, c. AD 195-196. Menestheus Isobounus, Magistrate. 7.35g. IOVΛIA ΔOMNA AYΓOYCTA, her draped bust rt. / EΠI APXTΩN ΠE MENECΘEA ICOBOYNON, Aphrodite standing lt., holding Eros and a sceptre, AΦPOΔEICI – EΩN, in ex.
Mionnet III p. 327, 144; MacDonald p.92, type 83 (O136/R235); Wadd. 2213; SNG München 137 (Same obv. die).
2 commentsFausta
karia_prow_res.jpg
CARIA, CNIDOS22 views250 - 210 BC
AE 13 mm, 2.09 g
O: [DAMOKRATIAS] Head of Aphrodite wearing stephane, right
R: KNI [TELESI]FRW[N] Prow right, club below.
Knidos, SNG Keckman 182
laney
cnidusprowOR.jpg
Caria, Cnidus mint, SNG Keckman 201 (head to left)46 viewsCaria, Cnidus mint, 250-210 B.C. AE, 12mm 2.78g, SNG Keckman 201 (head to left)
O: Head of Aphrodite l.
R: Illegible ethnic (KNI) and illegible magistrate name, prow l., below, club
casata137ec
Caria_Knidos_SNG-Cop211.jpg
Caria, Knidos17 viewsCaria, Knidos 480-450 BC AR Drachm.  Forepart of lion r. / Head of Aphrodite r., of fine archaic style, hair in queue and bound with diadem of beads; all within incuse square.  VF. 
SNG Copenhagen 211-2; cf Cahn series V, 86; SNG Helsinki 137.
Christian T
Caria,_Knidos,_250-210_BC,_AE10,_Head_of_Aphrodite_r_,_KNI,_Prow_Galley,_SNG_Keckman_1_182,_Q-001,_0h,_11mm,_1,41g-s.jpg
Caria, Knidos, (c.250-210 B.C.), SNG Keckman 1 182, AE-11, -/-//--, KNI above prow right, Scarce!96 viewsCaria, Knidos, (c.250-210 B.C.), SNG Keckman 1 182, AE-11, -/-//--, KNI above prow right, Scarce!
avers: Head of Aphrodite right, wearing stephane.
reverse: KNI above prow right, magistrate's name (?) below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 10,0-11,0mm, weight: 1,41g, axes: 0h,
mint: Caria, Knidos, date: c. 250-210 B.C., ref: SNG Keckman 1 182 (?), SNG Helsinki 182,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Knidos.jpg
Caria, Knidos. Ae12. Prow over club.83 viewsObv: Head of Aphrodite l., wearing stephane.
Rev: Prow l.; club and magistrate's name below.
1 commentsancientone
ABN_copy.jpg
CARIA, Knidus21 viewsCARIA, Knidus, Aphrodite left/Prow, KNI PYO WNO , club below. Lind. I, 635.Molinari
463_Greek_unpub.jpg
CARIA. Knidos. Ae (Circa 375-340 BC). Bo-, magistrate. 13 viewsReference. Very rare
Ἐόβωλο[ς] Br. M. 87
Or: ΑΝΙΒΩ Journ. int. XI 267

SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -; BMC -; Isegrim -; apparently unpublished.

Obv:
Head of Aphrodite right, with hair bound in sphendone.

Rev: BΩ / KNI.
Prow right.

1.32 gr.
12 mm.
1 commentsokidoki
GRK_Rhodes_S_5074.JPG
Carian Islands, Rhodes16 viewsSear 5074 var., SNG Copenhagen 750-751 & 858-9, SNG Helsinki 384-392 var., SNG Keckman 384-421, SNG von Aulock 2796-2797 var., BMC Caria pg. 238-239, 74ff var., Laffaille 503 var.

AE 10, circa 350-300 B.C.

Obv: Diademed head of Rhodos right, hair rolled.

Rev: P-O in lower field, rose with bud to the right, H to the left.

In 408 B.C., the cities on the island of Rhodes united to form one territory and built the city of Rhodes, as their new capital on the northern end of the island. The Peloponnesian War had so weakened the entire Greek culture that it lay open to invasion. In 357 B.C., the island was conquered by the king Mausolus of Caria, then it fell to the Persians in 340 B.C., and in 332 B.C. became part of the empire of Alexander the Great. Following the death of Alexander, his generals vied for control of his empire. Rhodes formed strong commercial and cultural ties with the Ptolemies of Egypt, and together formed the Rhodo-Egyptian alliance that controlled trade throughout the Aegean in the 3rd century B.C. The city developed into a maritime, commercial and cultural center, and its coins circulated nearly everywhere in the Mediterranean. In 305 B.C, Antigonus directed his son, Demetrius, to besiege Rhodes in an attempt to break its alliance with Egypt. Demetrius created huge siege engines, but despite this engagement, in 304 B.C., he relented and signed a peace agreement, leaving behind a huge store of military equipment. The Rhodians sold the equipment and used the money to erect a statue of their sun god, Helios, which became known as the Colossus of Rhodes.

In Greek mythology, Rhodos was the goddess of the island of Rhodes and wife of Helios. She was the daughter of Aphrodite and Poseidon.
Stkp
Sikyonia,_Sikyon,_AR_Triobol.jpg
Chimaera and Dove 253 viewsSikyonia, Sikyon, 330/20-280 BC, AR Triobol
Chimaera standing left; ΣI below. / Dove flying left; Δ above tail feathers. BCD Peloponnesos 298 (this coin); BMC 112 var.; SNG Copenhagen 61 var. (ΔI on reverse) - very rare variant.
(15 mm, 2.99 g, 7h)
CNG; ex- BCD Collection; LHS 96 (8 May 2006) Lot 298.

The Chimaera, featured on the obverse of this coin, was a mythical fire-breathing beast; a composite of a lion, a goat and a snake. In myth, it inhabited Lycia in Asia Minor. It’s sighting was considered to be a portent or omen of storms, shipwrecks and natural disasters. The Chimaera’s representation in the arts is wholly Greek. It evolved to become a decorative motif in the region around Corinth. The pairing of a motif that forebodes disaster on the obverse, with a dove, the symbol of Aphrodite, goddess of love on the reverse is curious. Perhaps this was a metaphor for the ancients’ view of the double-sided nature of life?
2 commentsLloyd T
Cilicia_incertum_AR9_0_57g.jpg
Cilicia, Incertum, obol20 views9mm, 0.57g
obv:facing head (of Helios?) in dotted circle
rev: head of Aphrodite (?) left, wearing stephane
(SNG France 236)
areich
Cilicia_Nagidos_SNG-ANS1778.jpg
Cilicia, Nagidos9 viewsNagidos. 374-356 BC. AR Stater (10.70 gm). Aphrodite enthroned l., feet on stool, holding phiale over circular altar; Eros stg l. behind, holding branch. / Dionysos stg. l. holding bunch of grapes and thyrsos; NAΓIΔEΩN. EF.   Lederer Nagidos 25; SNG ANS 178-179; SNG France 21; Casabonne Type 4. cf SNG Levante 9; BMC 21.111,12 Christian T
greek5.jpg
Cilicia, Nagidos Ar Stater62 views(400-385 BC)
Obv.: Aphrodite seated, holding phiale over altar, Eros standing behind, crowning her with wreath.
Rev.: Dionysos holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos, A in wreath to left.
Casabonne type 4, Lederer 26.
Minos
greek6.jpg
Cilicia, Nagidos Ar Stater34 views(385-375 BC)
Obv.: Aphrodite seated, holding phiale over altar, Eros standing behind, crowning her with wreath.
Rev.: Dionysos holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos.
SNG France 21.
Minos
Cilicia_Nagidos_Aphrodite_Dionysos_obolAR10_0_68g.jpg
Cilicia, Nagidos, Aphodite / Dionysos, obol48 viewsca. 420-380 BC
10mm, 0.68g
obv: head of Aphrodite facing slightly right, hair in sphendone
rev: wreathed head of young Dionysos facing slightly left
(SNG Levante 6)
4 commentsareich
Cilicia_Nagidos_Aphodite_Dionysos_obol~0.jpg
Cilicia, Nagidos, Aphodite / Dionysos, obol 25 viewsca. 420-380 BC
9-10mm, 0.70g
obv: head of Aphrodite left
rev: NAΓI; bearded head of Dionysos left
(SNG France 2 , 11)
areich
Nagidos_Stater.jpg
CILICIA, Nagidos. Circa 400-380 BC. AR Stater 91 viewsCILICIA, Nagidos. Circa 400-380 BC. AR Stater. Head of Dionysos right, wearing wreath of ivy / Head of Aphrodite right, hair bound in sphendone. SNG Levante 2; SNG France -; BMC Cilicia pg. 110, 3; SNG von Aulock -; SNG Copenhagen -. EF, double struck on the reverse, bankers punch marks, oblong flan. Splendid engraving by a talented artist. Rare.5 commentsPhiloromaos
gordianIII_SNGlev774.jpg
Cilicia, Seleukia ad Calycadnum, Gordian III SNG Lev. 774 var.110 viewsGordian III AD 238-244
AE 35, 21.23g
Seleukeia ad Calycadnum, struck after AD 241
obv. MAR ANTONIOC GORDIANOC/CEB
bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. CELEYKEWN TWN PROC/KA-L/YK-AD/N-W
Aphrodite standing facing, head right, holding mirror: Erotes standing facing on
either side, each holding marriage torch.
exergue: ELEYTHE/RAC
SNG Levante 774 var.; SNG Paris 1029 var.; Howgego 670
Choice good VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

So-called MARRIAGE ISSUE
c/m on obverse: Delta containing central dot, in triangular punch
2 commentsJochen
prnbzw.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. Satrap Pharnabazos II. AR Stater.21 viewsCirca 380-374/3 B.C.(21mm, 10.39g, 11h). Struck circa 380-379 B.C. Casabonne series 3; Moysey Issue 3, 3-5 var. (dolphin on obv.); SNG France 246 var. (rev. legend). Obverse Head of nymph facing three-quarters left. Reverse Helmeted head of Ares left, Aramaic PRNBZW to left. Near EF, toned, struck from a slightly worn obverse die.

Ex CNG.

There is still an ongoing debate whether who represent the obverse and reverse of this coin type of Pharnabazos. The obverse obviously was inspired by the renowned Syracusan tetradrachm of Kimon, whose three-quarter facing head of the nymph Arethusa was widely copied throughout the ancient world. A handful of ancient poleis adopted this style to represent their local nymph or goddess on their coins. A perfect example is the numerous coins of Larissa in Thessaly representing the local nymph of the same name. It is possible to assume then that the obverse of our coin might be another female deity other than Arethusa. A current opinion holds that the obverse represents Aphrodite, the goddess of love; and the reverse depicts Ares, the god of war. The two were known in ancient mythology as lovers, and commonly paired together on ancient coins. Of special note on this coin is the reverse: while most coins of this type display static male heads with little originality, the reverse die is probably from a special issue marked by superior style and executed with extreme delicacy. It has been suggested (Leu Auction 81, lot 317) that the head of Ares may be a disguised portrait of Pharnabazos himself.
Jason T
Tarsos.jpg
Cilicia, Tarsos. Tarkumuwa (Datames), Satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia. (Circa 378-372 BC)64 viewsAR Stater

23 mm, 10.28 g

Obverse: Diademed female head facing slightly to left, wearing pendant earrings and necklace.

Reverse: 𐡕𐡓𐡃𐡌𐡅 ('trkmw' in Aramaic) Bearded head of Ares (?) to left, wearing crested Attic helmet.

Casabonne type 1. SNG Levante 80. SNG Paris 276-277.

Datames (407-362 BC) served as a member of the Persian king's (Artaxerxes II - 405-359 BC) bodyguard before he became satrap of Cilicia and Cappadocia upon his father's death in battle in 384 BC. After many successes, the Persian king placed him in charge of the second war against Egypt, along with Pharnabazos and Tithraustes, satrap of Caria.

To pay their armies for these expeditions, both satraps minted near-identical coins, distinguished only by their inscriptions. The reverse of these coins may show a representation of Ares, the Greek god of war. The facing head of an unidentifiable female deity (Aphrodite, the wife of Ares?) on the obverse is clearly influenced by the famous representations of the nymph Arethusa created by the artist Kimon for the coins of Syracuse. Both designs were probably meant to appeal to the thousands of Greek mercenaries that each Persian satrap hired for their Egyptian campaigns.

Datames was first, however, detained by a local revolt in Kataonia, a territory within his satrapy. This time, his success incurred the king's jealousy, and he was removed both from his command of the Egyptian expedition as well as the rule of his satrapy. Refusing to relinquish his authority, Datames himself revolted and became a virtually independent ruler. His initial success in this endeavor prompted the revolt of other satraps across the empire. Datames' success, however, was short-lived. Distrust among the satraps rendered them unable to cooperate, their rebellion disintegrated, and Datames himself was assassinated in 362 BC.
3 commentsNathan P
nagidos.jpg
Cilicia. Nagidos AR Stater50 viewsCirca 400-385/4 BC. (24mm, 10.76 g, 11h). Casabonne Type 6; Lederer 23; SNG France 25 (same dies); SNG Levante –. Obverse: Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale, left arm around the shoulders of Eros, who stands left behind her, with his arms extended. Reverse: Dionysos standing left, holding grape bunches on vine and thyrsos; Π in exergue. Superb EF, lightly toned, a touch of die wear on obverse.

Ex CNG Inventory 93935 (c. Jan 1990-Jan 1993). Ex CNG Electronic Auction 347, Lot 252.

The prominence of Aphrodite on coins of Nagidos indicates that an important sanctuary must have existed in that ancient colony of Samos. It must be noted that there were two forms of Aphrodite in the ancient Greek pantheon (or at least in literature). The first was Aphrodite Ourania signifying the “heavenly” or “spiritual” as opposed to the more “earthly” aspect of her, better known as Aphrodite Pandemos “for all the people.” On the coins of Nagidos, she is paired with her son Eros, the god of earthly passion. The representation of the two deities together on the coins of Nagidos denotes that, even in ancient times, the Greeks already categorized the earthly, physical and carnal type of love (represented by Eros) to that of the celestial love of body and soul (Aphrodite Ourania). The subordination of Eros in the iconography of the coin, represented as a juvenile winged figure, under the guidance and protection of the goddess, tells us the superiority of the spiritual aspect of love over the physical representations of it.
1 commentsJason T
Cilicia_Satraps_Datames_SNG-France237.jpg
Cilician Satraps, Datames6 viewsDatames, satrap. 370 BC AR Stater (10.06 gm) of Tarsos.  Helmeted Athena seated l. on rocks, holding spear, resting on shield; olive tree to r. / Aphrodite (?) in chiton and wearing peplos around legs, kneeling l., tossing astragaloi; lotus plant to r. Legend: [TEPΣIKON]. gVF.  CNG 72 #837. SNG France 2 237; SNG Levante 64; SNG von Aulock 5915; Casabonne type K1; Traité II/2, 1374, pl. CXXXVII, 3.Christian T
Cilicia_Satraps_Tribazos_Mallos_SNG-Levante150.jpg
Cilician Satraps, Tribazos. 7 viewsTribazos, satrap. 386-380 BC. AR Stater (9.54 gm) of Mallos. Head of Aphrodite r., wearing earring and necklace, hair bound in ampyx and sphendone. / Bearded male head r., wearing Persian satrapal headdress, =Σ behind, ΜΑΡΛΛ r. VF.  Ponterio 136 #1774 Casabonne Series 2 Group Db; Franke-Hirmer 666; SNG France 391-4; SNG Levante 150-151. Christian T
IMG_9317.JPG
Cimmerian Bosporos, Phanagoreia14 viewsCIMMERIAN BOSPOROS, Phanagoreia (as Agrippia). Circa 14-12 BC. Veiled head of Aphrodite right, wearing stephanos / Prow of galley left; H (mark of value) to right, three pellets below. MacDonald 275/4; RPC I 1935; HGC 7, –.ecoli
City_of_Rome_Commemorative_AE18_Treveri_330-331_AD.jpg
City of Rome Commemorative AE18 Treveri 330-331 AD32 viewsBillon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 529, LRBC I 58, SRCV IV 16487, Cohen VII 17, Hunter V -, gVF, well centered, ragged flan, a few light scratches, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 2.249 grams, 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse VRBS ROMA, helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial mantle; reverse she-wolf standing left, head turned back right, suckling the infant twins Romulus and Remus, two stars above, TRS⚫ in exergue.

FORVM Ancient Coins. / From The Sam Mansourati Collection.


On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the `old` Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
Sam
1-corinto.jpg
Corinth - BMC 18410 viewsCorinth, circa 400-338 BC.
AR Drachm (2.3 gm).
Pegasos flying left /
Head of Aphrodite in sakkos.
xokleng
corinth_01.jpg
Corinth AR Drachm48 viewsObv: Pegasus with pointed wing flying to left; below, koppa.
Rev: Head of Aphrodite to left, wearing a pearl necklace and with her hair bound in a sakkos.
Cat #: SNG Lockett 2143 (similar)
Year: Circa 330 BC
1 commentsoa
Corinth_drachm.jpg
Corinth, Corinthia Drachm44 viewsAR Drachm
Size: 14 mm Weight: 2.41 grams Die axis: 6h

Corinth, Corinthia
350-300 BCE

Obverse: Pegasos with straight wings, flying to left, Q beneath.

Reverse: Head of Aphrodite to left, hair tied up elaborately, Δ behind neck.

Notes:
- A Corinthian drachm was practically the equivalent of an Aegiatic standard hemidrachm, as a stater was about equal to a didrachm.

Ex World Coins Japan, 2005
1 commentsPharsalos
corinth.jpg
Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 350 - 338 B.C.115 viewsSilver stater, BMC Corinth p. 22, 219, VF, pitting, Greece, Corinth mint, 8.224g, 22.1mm, 270o, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left wearing Corinthian helmet, wreath behind, A below.
ex Forvm
3 commentsAdrian S
Corinthdrachm.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth63 viewsAR Drachm (16mm, 2.42g)
c. 350-300 BC

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below
R: Head of Aphrodite left, wearing pendant earring and pearl necklace; Δ before, omphalos phiale behind

BCD -; BMC 304

1 commentsSalaethus
3395174.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth21 viewsAR Drachm (13mm, 2.71g)
350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite right, hair in sakkos; monogram behind, star before

BCD Corinth 174 var.
Salaethus
3395172.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth18 viewsAR Drachm (13mm, 2.38g)
350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left, hair in sakkos; monogram behind

BCD Corinth 162
Salaethus
3395171.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth22 viewsAR Drachm (13mm, 2.24g)
350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left, hair in sakkos; monogram behind

BCD Corinth 136 var (?)
Salaethus
3395169.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth21 viewsAR Drachm (14mm, 2.59g)
c. 350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left, her hair elaborately bound up, wearing earring and necklace; A behind

BCD Corinth 150 var.
Salaethus
3395168.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth21 viewsAR Drachm (16mm, 2.44g)
c. 350-300 B.C.E

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left; Δ within wreath to right

BCD Corinth 147; Weber 3736
Salaethus
3437696.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth28 viewsAR Drachm (14mm, 2.64g)
350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left, wearing earring and necklace, hair tied with ribbon and bound at top, falling loose behind; Δ-O across fields

BCD 150
Salaethus
3395175.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth29 viewsAR Drachm (14mm, 2.50g)
c. 350-300 B.C.E.

O: Pegasus flying left; Ϙ below

R: Head of Aphrodite left, hair bound in wide band; monogram behind

BCD Corinth -; SNG Copenhagen -; Pozzi 1716. Rare variety
1 commentsSalaethus
Coritnthia,_Corinth_AR_Drachm.jpg
CORINTHIA, CORINTH AR Drachm 21 viewsCirca 350-300 BC. (2,50 g. - 14-15 mm)
Vs: Pegasos flying left.
Rs: Head of Aphrodite. _6743
Antonivs Protti
88000251.jpg
CORINTHIA, CORINTH, 350-300 BC50 viewsDrachm, 13mm, 2.15 g, 9h

O - Pegasos flying left
R - Head of Aphrodite left, hair in sakkos; monogram before neck.

Cf. BCD Corinth 176 (same obv. die, different rev. type); SNG Copenhagen -; BMC -; SNG Lockett -; Pozzi -.
2 commentsrobertpe
Corinthia_Corinth_BCD-Corinth155.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth.12 viewsCorinthia, Corinth. 345-307 BC. AR Drachm (2.71 gm). Pegasos flying l., with pointed wing. Ϙ below. / Head of Aphrodite l., wearing sakkos. ΔΙ in lower fields. gVF. BCD Corinth 155; BMC 322; HGC 1869 (R1); cf SNG Cop 125; SNG Lockettt 2139; Winterthur 2110.Christian T
Corinth~1.jpg
Corinthia, Corinth. AR Drachm29 views Obv: Pegasus flying right, koppa (Ϙ) below
Rev: Head of Aphrodite right, wearing earring and necklace, hair in sakkos
14mm., 2.7gm.
ancientone
Corinthian_Stater_Silver.JPG
Corinthian Stater34 viewsCorinthian Stater
Leucas, Akarnania, Greece, 350 - 300 B.C.
Silver stater, BMC Corinth p. 133, 97 - 101 var (Λ behind neck and mast, monogram below), rough VF, Leucas mint, weight 8.132g, maximum
diameter 22.4mm, die axis 270o, 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying left, Λ below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite)
left wearing Corinthian helmet over a leather cap, mast with yard behind;

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
paphos_aphrodite_rose_b.jpg
CYPRUS, PAPHOS34 viewsca 350 - 320 BC
AE 15.5 mm 4.23 g
O: HEAD OF APHRODITE WEARING STEPHANE L
R: ROSE
BMC 49 (CYPRUS)
laney
cyprusAugustus.jpg
Cyprus, Paphos. Augustus AE16 Hemiobol24 viewsAugustus AE16 Hemiobol of Paphos, Cyprus.
Obv: DIVI F IMP CAESAR, head right.
Rev: A PLAVTIVS PRO COS, temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, containing conical xoanon, semicircular courtyard.
RPC 3906
ancientone
7FC4CB7B-41EC-4908-A40A-42B4BF28FEB6.jpeg
CYPRUS, Paphos. Augustus.6 viewsCYPRUS, Paphos. Augustus. 27 BC-AD 14. Æ A. Plautius, proconsul. Struck in or shortly after 21 BC. Bare head right / Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos containing conical xoanon; semicircular courtyard around. Amandry 2a; RPC I 3906. VFecoli
leukasdiobol.jpg
Diobol from Leukas, Akarnania.30 viewsLeukas, Akarnania.
Diobol. Ca. 400 - 375.
Obv.: Protome of Pegasus with raised wings flying left., below Delta.
Rev.: Head of Aphrodite(?) left.
About very fine. Little roughness.
dies axis 45°.
BMC Corinth 135,119 (same dies).
Ex BCD collection.
Very rare.
This is one of my new favourite coins, a real small beauty. And my first one with a pedigree, although that is not saying much.
1 commentshelcaraxe
corinth_drachm.jpg
Drachm; Pegasus/ Aphrodite30 viewsCorinthia, Corinth. ca. 350-306 BC. Drachm, 2.53 g, Obverse: Pegasus flying left. Reverse: head of Aphrodite wearing sphendone. Sear GCV I: 2634 var.
Note: the profile of Aphrodite and her hairdo is quite different from any other recent specimens online. I would be grateful to receive comments & a better literature reference to this coin.
3 commentsPodiceps
DYNAMIS.jpg
Dynamis, Queen of the Cimmerian Bosphorus?200 viewsBosphorus/Pontus. Agrippias Caesaria ( Phanagoria). AE 8 nummia (19mm, 4.4 g), late 1st century BC.
Obv: Veiled and draped female bust, right.
Rev: AGRIPPEWN, Prow left, mark of value H in field at right.
RPC 1934-5; BMC 1.

RPC lists three possibilities for the Bust on the obverse: Livia, Aphrodite Urania, and Queen Dynamis. Popular opinion seems to be that the bust is that of Livia.
EmpressCollector
EB0064b_scaled.JPG
EB0064 Lion / Aphrodite5 viewsKnidos, CARIA, AR Drachm circa 411-394 BC.
Obverse: Forepart of roaring lion right.
Reverse: Head of Aphrodite right, hair bound in sphendone decorated with flowers; within incuse square; A to left.
References: Cahn Series 92 (V45/R63); SNG Helsinki 138; SNG Copenhagen 252.
Diameter: 17mm, Weight: 6.113g.
EB
EB0076b_scaled.JPG
EB0076 Aphrodite / Dionysos8 viewsNagidos, CILICIA, AR Obol, 420-380 BC.
Obverse: Head of Aphrodite right.
Reverse: Bearded head of Dionysos right.
References: Sear 5583, SNG Frankreich 14-15.
Diameter: 10mm, Weight: 0.749g.
EB
EB0535_scaled.JPG
EB0535 Marcus Aurelius / Ares & Aphrodite14 viewsMarcus Aurelius AE 34 of Amasia, Pontus, 162 AD.
Obv: AY[T KAIC M AYΡ ANTΩNINΩ] CEB, Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: AΔΡ AMAC NΩK K MHT K [ΠΡΩ ΠON], year ЄT ΡΞΔ (year 164) in exergue; Ares, holding spear and shield set on ground, standing right, vis-à-vis Aphrodite, in a posture of modesty, standing left.
References: RPC Online -; Dalaison 67e (D28/R56 die match); cf. RG 18; SNG von Aulock 22 var. (date).
Diameter: 34mm, Weight: 25.2 grams.
EB
EB0557_scaled.JPG
EB0557 Gordian III / Aphrodite and Cupid13 viewsGordian III, AE 32 of Pisidia, Antioch, 238-244 AD.
Obv: IMP CAES M ANT GORDIANOVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: ANTIOCHIA COLONIA CAESAR, SR in exergue, Aphrodite enthroned right, hand on prow, holding palm branch; Cupid running before, towards her.
References: Fitz. III 8859 p 1320; Krzyzanovska I/2; SNG Copenhagen 72.
Diameter: 32.5mm, Weight: 25.09 grams.
EB
EB0701_scaled.JPG
EB0701 Julia Domna / Tyche8 viewsJulia Domna, CAESAREA CAPPADOCIA, AR drachm, year 5 = 196-197.
Obverse: IOYΛIA ΔOMNA CEBACTH, draped bust right.
Reverse: MHTPOPO KAICAΡIAC, Tyche standing left holding rudder and cornucopiae, ET-E across fields.
References: For CE not CEBACTH, see Syd 440 (Aphrodite not Tyche) and Syd 441 (ETE in exergue).
Diameter: 18mm, Weight: 2.937g.
EB
EB0705_scaled.JPG
EB0705 Vespasian / Temple of Aphrodite8 viewsVespasian 69-79, Koinon of Cyprus, AE 27, RY 8? (AD 75/6).
Obverse: OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOC, Laureate head right.
Reverse: ΚΟΙΝΟΝ ΚΥΠΡ - ΙΩΝ, Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, within which is conical xoanon between stars; candelabrum on each side of building; paved semicircular courtyard in foreground; [ΕΤΟΥC H?] date in legend.
References: Cf. RPC II 1821, cf. SNG Copenhagen 75.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 13.011g.
EB
EB0706_scaled.JPG
EB0706 Domitian / Temple of Aphrodite12 viewsDomitian, AE 29.
Obverse: [AUT KAISA]R DOMIT[IANOS SEB], Laureate head right.
Reverse: KOINON [ΚΥΠΡ? MAKEΔONΩN?], Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, [ΕΤΟΥC] H date in legend.
References: -.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 12.377g.

EB
18-ptol_III.jpg
EGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES15 viewsEGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES -- (246-221 BC) AE20. Paphos Mint, Cyprus, Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ , facing cult statue of Aphrodite. Reference: Svoronos 1007.
dpaul7
Faustina_II_44~0.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 164/165, Faustina II, Aphrodite 10 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: L Є = year 5 (AD 164/165 ), Aphrodite standing left, holding helm and shield set on column on which is inscribed ΔV/NA/MIC,
Billon, 13.55g, 23mm
Ref.: Geißen 2113, Dattari 3606
shanxi
AntoninusPius_Zodiac_VenusTaurus.jpg
Emmett 1450 - Antoninus Pius drachm alexandria, Zodiac Aphrodite (Venus) in Taurus51 viewsEGYPT, Alexandria. Antoninus Pius. AD 138-161. Æ Drachm (33mm, 23.27 g, 12h). Dated RY 8 (AD 144/5). Laureate head right / Star and diademed bust of Venus left above bull (Taurus) butting left; L H (date) in exergue. Köln 1492-3; Dattari (Savio) 2960; K&G 35.2801 commentsmattpat
ambrakia_SNGcop23.jpg
Epiros, Ambrakia, SNG Copenhagen 235 viewsAmbrakia, 238-168 BC
AE 18, 4.97g, 18.25mm, 30°
obv. Head of Dione, veiled and laureate, r.
rev. A - M / B - R
Obelisk of Apollo Agyeios with two-stage base and peak, all wizhin laurel wreath
ref. SNG Copenhagen 23; SNG München 525; SNG Evelpidis 1770; BMC Thessaly p.94, 5
F+, green patina, some corrosion

Dione was Aphrodite's mother.
Jochen
Lg3_quart_sm.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA / AVGVSTI PII FIL / Ӕ As or Dupontius (156-161 A.D.)20 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair arranged in a chignon (bun) behind the head / AVGVSTI PII FIL, Venus standing left holding Victory and leaning on shield set on a helmet, S-C across fields in the lower half

Ӕ, 22.5-24+mm, 9.56g, die axis 11h

There may be a countermark across the front part of the face on obverse, but due to its location it is difficult to be sure and identify it.

AVGVSTI PII FIL(ia) = daughter of August Antoninus Pius, points out to the ruling of Fausta's father Antoninus Pius rather than her husband Marcus Aurelius. Reverse: Unlike Greek Aphrodite, in addition to her other aspects Roman Venus was also a goddess of victory, this embodied in her representation as Venus Victrix (Victorious) or Victris (of Victory), like in this case: she offers a little winged representation of victory, resting on defensive military attributes (as a female goddess, she represented passive, defensive aspects of war, active ones being the domain of male Mars). SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious).

Of two Ӕ coins with the same legends and Venus with shield, RIC 1367 and 1389a, the first is a sestertius and its typical dimensions are characteristic of the type: 30+ mm and 20+g. This one is definitely smaller. Material seems reddish, so this one is more likely an as. Minted in Rome. Some sources give issue dates as 156-161 (the end of Faustina's father's reign), others as 145-146 (her marriage).

Annia Galeria Faustina Minor (Minor is Latin for the Younger), Faustina Minor or Faustina the Younger (born probably 21 September c. 130 CE, died in winter of 175 or spring of 176 CE) was a daughter of Roman Emperor Antoninus Pius and Roman Empress Faustina the Elder. She was a Roman Empress and wife to her maternal cousin Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius. She was held in high esteem by soldiers and her own husband and was given divine honours after her death. Faustina, named after her mother, was her parents' fourth and youngest child and their second daughter; she was also their only child to survive to adulthood. She was born and raised in Rome. Her great uncle, the emperor Hadrian, had arranged with her father for Faustina to marry Lucius Verus. On 25 February 138, she and Verus were betrothed. Verus’ father was Hadrian’s first adopted son and his intended heir; however, when Verus’ father died, Hadrian chose Faustina’s father to be his second adopted son, and eventually, successor. Faustina’s father ended the engagement between his daughter and Verus and arranged for Faustina's betrothal to her maternal cousin, Marcus Aurelius; Aurelius was also adopted by her father.

In April or May 145, Faustina and Marcus Aurelius were married, as had been planned since 138. Since Aurelius was, by adoption, Antoninus Pius' son, under Roman law he was marrying his sister; Antoninus would have had to formally release one or the other from his paternal authority (his patria potestas) for the ceremony to take place. Little is specifically known of the ceremony, but it is said to have been "noteworthy". Coins were issued with the heads of the couple, and Antoninus, as Pontifex Maximus, would have officiated. Marcus makes no apparent reference to the marriage in his surviving letters, and only sparing references to Faustina. Faustina was given the title of Augusta on 1 December 147 after the birth of her first child, Galeria Faustina (or Domitia? sources differ which of them was born in 147 and was the first child).

When Antoninus died on 7 March 161, Marcus and Lucius Verus ascended to the throne and became co-rulers. Faustina then became empress. Unfortunately, not much has survived from the Roman sources regarding Faustina's life, but what is available does not give a good report. Cassius Dio and the Augustan History accuse Faustina of ordering deaths by poison and execution; she has also been accused of instigating the revolt of Avidius Cassius against her husband. The Augustan History mentions adultery with sailors, gladiators, and men of rank; however, Faustina and Aurelius seem to have been very close and mutually devoted.

Faustina accompanied her husband on various military campaigns and enjoyed the love and reverence of Roman soldiers. Aurelius gave her the title of Mater Castrorum or ‘Mother of the Camp’. She attempted to make her home out of an army camp. Between 170–175, she was in the north, and in 175, she accompanied Aurelius to the east.

That same year, 175, Aurelius's general Avidius Cassius was proclaimed Roman emperor after the erroneous news of Marcus's death; the sources indicate Cassius was encouraged by Marcus's wife Faustina, who was concerned about her husband's failing health, believing him to be on the verge of death, and felt the need for Cassius to act as a protector in this event, since her son Commodus, aged 13, was still young. She also wanted someone who would act as a counterweight to the claims of Tiberius Claudius Pompeianus, who was in a strong position to take the office of Princeps in the event of Marcus’s death. The evidence, including Marcus's own Meditations, supports the idea that Marcus was indeed quite ill, but by the time Marcus recovered, Cassius was already fully acclaimed by the Egyptian legions of II Traiana Fortis and XXII Deiotariana. "After a dream of empire lasting three months and six days", Cassius was murdered by a centurion; his head was sent to Marcus Aurelius, who refused to see it and ordered it buried. Egypt recognized Marcus as emperor again by 28 July 175.

Faustina died in the winter of 175, after a somewhat suspicious accident, at the military camp in Halala (a city in the Taurus Mountains in Cappadocia). Aurelius grieved much for his wife and buried her in the Mausoleum of Hadrian in Rome. She was deified: her statue was placed in the Temple of Venus in Rome and a temple was dedicated to her in her honor. Halala’s name was changed to Faustinopolis and Aurelius opened charity schools for orphan girls called Puellae Faustinianae or 'Girls of Faustina'. The Baths of Faustina in Miletus are named after her.

In their thirty years of marriage, Faustina bore Marcus Aurelius thirteen children, of whom 6 reached adulthood and were significant in history. The best known are emperor Commodus and the closest to him sister Lucilla (both depicted in a very historically inaccurate movie "Gladiator" and, together with their parents, in a much more accurate 1st season "Reign of Blood" of the TV series "Roman Empire").
Yurii P
Julius_Caesar.jpg
Gaius Julius Caesar206 viewsFebruary-March 44 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.90 g, 5h). Rome mint. P. Sepullius Macer, moneyer. Laureate and veiled head right / Venus standing left, holding Victory and scepter; shield at base of scepter. Crawford 480/13; CRI 107d; Sydenham 1074; RSC 39. From the Jörg Müller Collection.

Alföldi arranges Crawford 480 series coins in (44 BC) month order as follows:

RRC 480/1, Buca - January
RRC 480/2, DICT QVART - early February
RRC 480/3/4/5, CAESAR IMP - late February
RRC 480/6/7/8/9/10/11/12/13/14, DICT PERPETVO - early to mid March
RRC 480/17/18, CAESAR IMPER - late March
RRC 480/19/20, PARENS PATRIAE - April
RRC 480/15/16, MARIDIANVS - April
RRC 480/21/22, CLEMENTIAE CAESARIS and Mark Antony - April

"Iconography, historical meaning:

The rev. can be understand easily: The Iulians ascribed their gens back to Aeneas who was the son of Venus (Aphrodite) and Anchises.Venus was the tutelary goddess of the gens Iulia and hence of Caesar. 46 BC Caesar has consecrated together with his new built forum also the temple of Venus Genetrix, the ancestress of his gens. On this denarius with Victory, spear and shield it is rather Venus Victrix.

The portrait on obv. is imposing by its realistic depiction. It was for the first time that a living ruler was pictured on a Roman coin. This too raised suspicion that Caesar - even if he wasn't acclaimed king - would behave as such.

Caesar's portrait attracts attention by the wreath he is wearing. It protrudes notable wide beyond his forehead. Furthermore it is padded and very ragged. This characteristic received too little attention until now. There is every indication that it is not a usual wreath but a corona graminea, a Grass or Blockade crown. This crown was dedicated by the army to that commander who has freed them from an encirclement and saved them from certain death. The crown was composed from flowers and tuft of grass which was plucked at the location of their liberation. This crown was regarded as the highest of all crowns! Pliny (nat. 22, 6) has known only of 8 persons with this honour:
1. Lucius Siccius Dentatus, tribunus plebis 454 BC
2. Publius Decius Mus, 343 BC, 1st Samnite War, dedicated even by 2 armies!
3. Marcus Calpurnius Flamma, 258 BC, at Carmina on Sicily
4. Quintus Fabius Maximus, after the departure of the Carthaginians from Italy, 203 BC
(dedicated by the Senate and the people of Rome, possibly posthumous)
5. Scipio Aemilianus Africanus
6. Gnaeus Petreius Atinas, centurio during the war against the Cimbri
7. Lucius Cornelius Sulla, during the Allied War at Nola 89 BC
8. Quintus Sertorius, 97 BC aa military tribune in Spain under Titu Ddius.
To Caesar and Augustus the crown was dedicated by the Senate!

The veil Caesar is wearing as Pontifex Maximus for lifetime.

DICTATOR PERPETVVS

During Republican times a dictator was designated when the state was in an emergency situation. His position was always temporally limited, yes, sometimes designated only for a single task. In the beginning Caesar too was dictator limited to 1 year and had to be designated again for the next year. Already 46 BC Caesar has been nominated dictator for 10 years but the title had to be renewed each year. So we know of coins with DICT, DICT ITER (= again, for the second time), IC TER (for the third time) and DICT QVART.

Since the proclamation as king has failed the title dictator disappeared from the denarii and were replaced by IMP. But soon behind Caesar's head appeares a star, a crescent, or Victory's spear stands on a star. These celestial signs - and that was understod by all - stand for divinity and should raise Caesar high above all Romans. Incompatible with the idea of a republican constituted Rome.

The point of culmination in this series is the legend DICT PERPETVO of this coin. Now the title of dictator was no more temporally limited but was valid like his office as Pontifex Maximus for all his life and it no more was necessary to confirm the title each year. That actually was a spectacular violation of the Roman constitution! The fact that he appeared at the Lupercalia on February 15. 44 BC in the ancient robe of kings strengthened the suspicion that he was looking for the kingship. In fact he has publicly
refused the royal crown that was offered to him by Marcus Antonius, but his authority to exert power was equal a king even without bearing the title of king. That was the most hateful title of the Roman Republic.

Now he has passed a line that his republican enimies couldn't tolerate any more if they still wanted to be taken seriously. So this coin actually led to his murder by the conspirators. So "The coin that kills Caesar" is by no means an exaggeration.

The planned Parthian War:

Caesar has planned a war against the Parthians. In March 44 BC he wanted to start for a campaign to the east. His assassination inhibited this intention. In science disputed are the goals which Caesar has had in mind with his war. They are reaching from a boundary adjustment, as Mommsen suggested, to world domination like Alexander the Great, as Plutarch is writing: According to him Caesar after the submission of the Parthians would go across Hyrcania at the Caspian Sea, then round the Black Sea via the Caucasus, invade the land of the Scyths, attack Germania and would finally return to Italy through the land of the Celts. In this way he would have conquered the world known to the Ancients and his limits were only the shores of the surrounding Okeanos.

Probably Sueton who was sitting directly at the sources was more realistic. And we know of the campaigns of Marcus Antonius and Augustus who surely have known Caesar's plans and have used them for their own purposes. It's clear that Caesar doesn't want to repeat the errors of Crassus who perished at Carrhae, and has tried to avoid he Parthian cavalry units. Therefore a route through Lesser Armenia is most probable. And there was hope that the Mesopotamian cities would raise against the Parthians. Caesar had gathered an army of 16(!) legions, a huge power that alone by its mere bigness would ensure the victory. Caesar was no gambler, rather a cautious and prudential commander.The famous "veni, vidi, vici" doesn't exist longer. What he actually had in mind we don't know. It's speculative. But there is every indication that it was a reorganisation of the east. And that rather by establishing client-kingdoms than creating new Roman provinces.

Probably the conspirators were afraid of Caesar's Parthian War, because a victory, which was possible or even probable, would have strengthen Caesar's position and has made him practically invulnerable." - Jochen
4 commentsNemonater
Gordian_temple.jpg
GORDIAN III. DEULTUM THRACE5 viewsGORDIAN III. DEULTUM THRACE AE 23 Cult statue of Aphrodite & vase within tetrastyle temple viewed in perspective. Varbanov 2277.Ancient Aussie
jarronprok.jpg
GREEK22 viewsAR hemidrachm. Prokonessos (Islands of Mysia). c 400-350 B.C. 2,46 grs. Head of Aphrodite left, hair tied with ribbon / Oinochoe. ΠPO-KON right and left.
SNG von Aulock 1437. SNG Copenhagen 551.
Pecunem 17, lot 82.
2 commentsbenito
bot7.jpg
GREEK, Cilicia, Nagidos AR Stater331 views(400-385 BC)
Obv.: Aphrodite seated, holding phiale over altar, Eros standing behind, crowning her with wreath.
Rev.: Dionysos holding grape bunch on vine and thyrsos, A in wreath to left.
Casabonne type 4, Lederer 26.
7 commentsMinos
Uncertain,_Cilicia,_4th_Century_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, Cilicia, uncertain mint. 4th Century B.C. 15 viewsCilicia, uncertain mint. 4th Century B.C. Silver obol, 0.649g, 12.6mm, aVF, double-struck. Obv: head of Aphrodite left. Rev: facing bust of Athena. RareBard Gram Okland
IMG_1827.JPG
head of Aphrodite109 viewsmuseum on PalatinJohny SYSEL
corinth_hemidrachm.jpg
Hemidrachm; Head of Aphrodite right/ forepart of Pegasos left; AR 1217 viewsCorinth, hemidrachm, 4th - 3rd century B.C. 12mm, 1.06g. Obverse: head of Aphrodite right. Reverse: forepart of Pegasos left. BMC 193. Ex Roland Müller collection. Ex areichPodiceps
incerti.jpg
Incerti. AR 10; 4th century B.C. Head of female facing/ Bust of Aphrodite5 viewsCilicia, Incerti. AR 10.4mm (0.71g), 4th century B.C. Head of female facing/
Bust of Aphrodite, waring taenia, earrings and necklace; hair in plaited queue
SNG Levante 218, SNG France -. ; aVF, porous. Ex Gert Boersema.
Podiceps
smyrna_tyche_nike.jpg
IONIA, SMYRNA14 views85 - 75 BC
(Magistrates Dionysios and Skamandros)
AE 21 mm; 4.70 g
c. 190 - 70 B.C.; obverse turreted head of Cybele (Tyche?) right;
R: ΣMYPNAIΩN / ∆IONYΣIO / ΣKAMAN∆, Aphrodite Stratonikis, standing facing, left arm resting on column, holding wreath bearing Nike in left, scepter in right
Ionia, Smyrna mint; cf SNG Cop 1197
(ex Forum)
laney
smyrna_tyche_nike~0.jpg
IONIA, SMYRNA24 views1st - 2nd Century BC.
Æ 17 mm, 4.25 g
magistrate
O: Turreted head of Tyche right.
R: ΣMΥΡNAIΩN Aphrodite Stratonikis standing facing, holding Nike with outstretched hand resting on short column; AΠΟΛΛΩNIΔΣ (magistrate's name) left; monogram in left field.
Ionia, Smyrna; cf. Milne, NC 1927, 202a. SNG Cop. 1187. Klein, KM 60, 466
laney
iosmyrOR.jpg
Ionia, Smyrna mint, SNG Kayhan 59683 viewsIonia, Smyrna mint, 105-95 B.C. AE, 19mm 4.48g, SNG Kayhan 596
O: Turreted head of Tyche r.; dotted border
R: to right, ZMΥΡNAIΩN to left, MOΣXOΣ, Aphrodite Stratonikis standing right, left hand on column, holding wreath bearing Nike
2 commentscasata137ec
smyrna_SNGcop1187var.jpg
Ionia, Smyrna, SNG Copenhagen 1187 var.22 viewsSmyrna, c.170-85 BC
AE 16, 4.29g, 16.3mm, 30°
struck under magistrate Heras
obv. Head of Kybele, wearing mural crown
rev. SMYRNAIWN / HRAS
Statue of Aphrodite Stratonikis, in long chiton and wearing kalathos, stg. r., resting with l.
arm on column with small Nike holding in raised r. hand wreath for crowning her; between
her and column a sceptre.
ref. SNG Copenhagen 1187 var.
F+/about VF, dark green patina

For more information take a look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
smyrna.jpg
Ionia, Smyrna. Tyche / Statue of Aphrodite Stratonikis21 viewsIonia, Smyrna. Circa 115-105 BC. Æ 15mm (5.06 gm).

Turreted head of Tyche right / Statue of Aphrodite Stratonikis right, elbow on short column, holding Nike; name of magistrate.BMC Ionia pg. 240, 23; SNG Copenhagen 1188.
ancientone
a40.jpg
IONIA. Phokaia. Ae (Circa 300 BC). Head of griffin.17 viewsObv: Female head (Aphrodite?) left, with hair in sphendone.
Rev: Head of griffin left.
1.9 g. 11 mm.
ancientone
IMG_2205.JPG
IONIA: Smyrna5 viewsIONIA, Smyrna. Circa 85-75 BC. Æ 17mm. Latimos and Hieronos, magistrates. Obv: Turreted head of Tyche right. Rev: Aphrodite Stratonikis standing facing, holding Nike with outstretched hand resting on short column. Milne, Autonomous 343; SNG Copenhagen 1195.Molinari
IMG_2966wp.jpg
Italy, Rome, Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, Hermaphrodite184 viewsPalazzo Massimo alle TermeJohny SYSEL
jdprov2337.jpg
Julia Domna, Cappadocia81 viewsCaesarea, Cappadocia
AR Drachm; 2.98g

IOULIA-DOMNA CE
Draped bust right, hair weaved in rows and tucked at back of head in weaved bun pattern

MHTPOPO-KAICAPIAC
Aphrodite standing right, apple in left hand, drawing robe over right shoulder with right hand
ET | E across fields (Dated year 5)

Sydenham 440; Sear GIC 2446; SNG von Aulock 6472
wildwinds example (this coin)
3 commentsarizonarobin
domna_cybele.jpg
Julia Domna, Cybele20 viewsJulia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D. Copper as, SRCV II 6645, RIC IV 883, Cohen 127, aVF, Rome mint, 10.130g, 25.1mm, 225o, 198 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse MATER DEVM S C, Cybele enthroned left between two lions, left elbow resting on drum, branch in extended right; scarce. Cybele was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. Heeding the Sibylline oracle, the senate brought her worship to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion. ex FORVM Podiceps
katane.jpg
Katane, c. 200 - 50 B.C. Bronze hexas, Dione/ Aphrodite Hyblaia standing left holding bird6 viewsSicily, Katane, c. 200 - 50 B.C. Bronze hexas, Calciati III 25, SNG ANS 1278, F, Katane mint, 3.113g, 17.1mm, 0o, obverse laureate and veiled head of Dione right; reverse “KATANAIWN”, Aphrodite Hyblaia standing left holding bird, mark of value II left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
1794__Savoca_3rd_Silver_Auction_#2.jpg
kidramos0021 viewsElagabalus
Kidramos, Caria

Obv: ΑVΤ ΚΑΙ Μ ΑV Α-ΝΤΩΝƐΙΝΟϹ ϹƐΒ, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from rear.
Rev: ΚΙ-ΔΡΑ →MHΝΩΝ (P and last N reversed), Emperor standing facing in military dress, looking left, holding long sceptre and patera, sacrificing over altar in front of cult statue of Aphrodite Aphrodisias standing facing; to right, male figure standing facing, looking left, wearing phrygian cap and holding patera.
36 mm, 31.01 gms

RPC Online 5392; Savoca Coins London, 3rd Silver Auction, Lot 106 (this coin)
Charles M
bosporus_ininthimeos_Anokhin769.jpg
Kingdom of Bosporus, Ininthimeus, Anokhin 76950 viewsIninthimeus, AD 234-238
AE 21 (double denar?), 7.08g
2nd issue, struck in his medium reign
obv. BACILEWC IN - INQIMEOV
Confronting busts of Ininthimeus, draped and diademed, r., and Aphrodite
Apertura (Urania), draped and veiled, wearing polos, l.
rev. Aphrodite Apertura (Urania), in long clothes, wearing polos, std. l., holding
patera (or apple?) in outstretched r. hand
Anokhin 769; MacDonald 599; BMC 5
rare, about VF

The name Ininthimeus is Sarmatian. He may have been a younger son of Cotys III. Whereas the elder sons usually bore the traditional dynastic names of Sauromates and Rhecuporis, a son born subsequently might be given a less familiar name, perhaps in honour of an influential member of the wife's family.
During his reign the intrusion of the Goths created great pressure on the Bosporan Kingdom. Because of that his coinage is generally crude in style and usually poorly preserved.
The coin of this series probably is a double denarius marked B*. Sometimes one of this two elements is omitted and probably the die-cutters have seen the * as symbol for the divine Apertura (MacDonald).
Jochen
bosporos_gepaepyris_Anokhin326var.jpg
Kingdom of Bosporus, Queen Gepaepyris, Anokhin 326 var.59 viewsGepaepyris, AD 37-39
AE 23 (12 nummi), 8.4g
obv. BACILICCHC GHPAIPYREWC
Bust, draped and diademed, r.
rev . Bust of Aphrodite Urania, wearing kalathos and veil, r.
IB before
MacDonald 306; RPC I, 1907 var., Anokhin 326 var.; (They all have IB behind!)
about VF, brown patina with some green highlights

The chief deity of the whole Bosporan kingdom was no doubt Aphrodite Urania: the centre of her worship was on the east side of the strait where she had a temple in Phanagoria and one called the Apatourou on the south side of Lake Corocondamitis: after this sanctuary she is described in inscriptions as Αpatourias or more often Apatorou Medousa [Minns 1913 p. 618].

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
Jochen
Ininthemius_double_denarius.jpg
Kingdom of the Bosporus - Ininthemius, double denarius, AD 234/5-238/930 viewsIninthimeus
Kingdom of the Bosporus
AE double denarius
AD 234/5-238/9
BACIΛEWC ININΘIMEOY
Diademed and draped bust of Ininthimeus right, vis-à-vis veiled and draped bust of Aphrodite Apatura
Aphrodite seated left, holding phiale or apple; B to left
MacDonald 599; Anokhin 679
Ardatirion
Knidos_Drachm.jpg
Knidos Drachm57 viewsDrachm of Knidos, Caria
330-250 BC
OBV: Head of Aphrodite, right, wearing stephane, earring and necklace: border of dots.
REV: AYTOKΡΑΤΗΣ, Forepart of Lion, right. KNI mintmark below.
BMI Caria, Cnidus 40, p. 90; SNG Keckman 174-5. BMC 40.
XF, 2.74g 16mm

Ex: Consul Weber Collection (Hirsch XXI, 1908, #3134 p.216);
Ex: Jameson Collection #1537;
Ex: von Aulock Collection #2607;
Ex: Kirk Davis #F98;
Revue Numismatique, 6e se'rie - Tome 154, 1999, #112, p.71, plate VIII;
NFA XXIX (1992), 145;
MMAG, FPL 383, (1976), 12
2 commentsgoldenancients
KnidosCaria.jpg
Knidos, Caria, c. 465 - 449 B.C59 viewsSilver drachm, Cahn 80 (V38/R53), SNG Keckman 132 (same dies), SNG Cop 232 (same dies), aVF, toned, Knidos mint, weight 6.057g, maximum diameter 16.5mm, die axis 270o, c. 465 - 449 B.C.; obverse forepart of roaring lion right; reverse archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia, within incuse square; ex Barry P. Murphy

CARIA, Knidos. Circa 465-449 BC. AR Drachm - 16mm (6.06 g). Obverse: forepart of roaring lion right; Reverse: archaic head of Aphrodite right, hair bound with taenia. Cahn 80 (V38/R53); SNG Helsinki 132 (same dies); SNG Copenhagen 232 (same dies). Toned, near VF, good metal. Ex Barry P. Murphy.

While this coin falls within the time frame that numismatists call "Classical" Greek coinage, I have chosen to place it in both the "Archaic" (coin 020a) and "Classical" Greek sections of my collection. This specimen is one of those wonderful examples of transition--it incorporates many elements of the "Archaic" era, although it is struck during the "Classical" Greek period and anticipates characteristics of the later period.

As noted art historian Patricia Lawrence has pointed out, "[this specimen portrays] A noble-headed lion, a lovely Late Archaic Aphrodite, and [is made from]. . . beautiful metal." The Archaic Aphrodite is reminiscent of certain portraits of Arethusa found on tetradrachms produced in Syracuse in the first decade of the 5th century BC.

Knidos was a city of high antiquity and as a Hellenic city probably of Lacedaemonian colonization. Along with Halicarnassus (present day Bodrum, Turkey) and Kos, and the Rhodian cities of Lindos, Kamiros and Ialyssos it formed the Dorian Hexapolis, which held its confederate assemblies on the Triopian headland, and there celebrated games in honour of Apollo, Poseidon and the nymphs.

The city was at first governed by an oligarchic senate, composed of sixty members, and presided over by a magistrate; but, though it is proved by inscriptions that the old names continued to a very late period, the constitution underwent a popular transformation. The situation of the city was favourable for commerce, and the Knidians acquired considerable wealth, and were able to colonize the island of Lipara, and founded a city on Corcyra Nigra in the Adriatic. They ultimately submitted to Cyrus, and from the battle of Eurymedon to the latter part of the Peloponnesian War they were subject to Athens.

In their expansion into the region, the Romans easily obtained the allegiance of Knidians, and rewarded them for help given against Antiochus by leaving them the freedom of their city.

During the Byzantine period there must still have been a considerable population: for the ruins contain a large number of buildings belonging to the Byzantine style, and Christian sepulchres are common in the neighbourhood.

Eudoxus, the astronomer, Ctesias, the writer on Persian history, and Sostratus, the builder of the celebrated Pharos at Alexandria, are the most remarkable of the Knidians mentioned in history.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cnidus

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
Trajan_Cyprus_Paphos.jpg
Koinon of Cyprus, Paphos22 viewsObv: Laureate and draped bust right.
Rev: Temple of Paphian Aphrodite, cone flanked by two stars within; two columns on either side, semi-circular court before.
BMC Cyprus p. 83, 39
26mm, 10.91g
klausklage
Korinthos.jpg
Korinthos - AR drachm93 views350-300 BC
Pegasus left
qoppa
head of Aphrodite or nymph Peirene left
K
SNG Vol: III 2129 Lockett Collection (2,28g)
SNG Vol: VIII 879 Blackburn Museum
SNG Cop - (cf 148), BMC - (cf 366), BCD - (cf 179)
1,83g 16-14mm

A very rare variant with only K in left field and no additional letter or monogramm in right field.
Typical weight for this type is around 2,5 g.

ex Divus Numismatik
1 commentsJohny SYSEL
wc8.jpg
Kotys III, Bosporan Kingdom, Pantikapaion20 viewsAE22 Double Denarius. Obverse: BACILEWS KOTYOC, bust of king right facing bust of Aphrodite left, veiled & wearing kalathos .
Reverse: Aphrodite seated left holding patera, B to left, star to right.
8.8 g., 22 mm
NORMAN K
Laodicea_(Phrygia),_AE11.jpeg
Laodicea, AE1111 viewsLaodicea (Phrygia), AE11. 11mm, 1.57g. Head of Aphrodite or Laodice right / Two cornucopiae?. Ex Roland Müller collection. Ex areich. Photo credit areichPodiceps
unknown4.jpg
Laodikeia, Phrygia. AE 1334 viewsHd Aphrodite r.
Aphrodite seated r dove in hand.
BMC 25
12.7 - 13.5 mm, 2.37 g
1 commentsPekka K
laodikeia.jpg
Laodikeia; Æ 17, Bust of Aphrodite right / Aphrodite standing left, holding dove; rose to left10 viewsLaodikeia, ca 2nd-1st cent B.C. AE17 (3.58g). Bust of Aphrodite right / Aphrodite standing left, holding dove; rose to left. Ex Sayles & Lavender. Podiceps
Lesbos,_Mytilene__(400-350_B_C_),_AR_Hemidrachm__BMC_12_,_Female_head_right_Q-001_0h_9,8-10mm_1,21g-s.jpg
Lesbos, Mytilene, (c. 400-350 B.C.), AR-Hemidrachm. BMC 12 , Female head right,113 viewsLesbos, Mytilene (400-350 B.C.), AR-Hemidrachm. BMC 12 , Female head right,
avers: Head of Apollo right
reverse: Female head (Aphrodite?) right, hair rolled.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 9,8-10,0 mm, weight: 1,21g, axes: 0 h,
mint: Lesbos, Mytilene, date: c. 400-350 B.C., ref: BMC 12.
Q-001
quadrans
salonina_saitta.jpg
Lydia, Saitta; Statue of Aphrodite within tetrastyle temple; AE 2510 viewsSalonina Augusta (254-268 AD) from Saitta, Lydia. AE 25mm, 8.13g. KOP SALONEINA, diademed and draped bust right / EP IOVL RHG ACIAPXA, CAITTHN/WN in exergue, statue of Aphrodite within tetrastyle temple. BMC Lydia pg. 226, 74 var. (reverse legend); SNG Copenhagen -; SNG von Aulock -. Podiceps
uranopolis_Lindgren1260.jpg
Makedonia, Uranopolis, quasi-autonom AMNG 366 viewsAE 15, 3.34g
struck under Alexarchos
obv. eight-ponted star, representing the sun, in dotted circle
rev. OYRANIDW - POLEWC (in straight lines from top to bottom)
Aphrodite Urania in sleeved chiton and cloak fixed on l. shoulder and enclosing
legs and l. l. arm, std. half l. on celestial globe, upper part of the body and
head turned facing. On the head she wears a conical cap ending in a star. Her
r. hand resting on a long staff which ends at the top in an oval shaped sun
disk.
SNG ANS 914ff.; BMC Macedonia, p.134, 2ff.; SNG Copenhagen 455-7; SNG Evelpidis 1363; Lindgren 1260; AMNG III, 3, pl.25, fig.4
very rare, F+, light-green patina

The name of the city and this type refer to Uranos, the devine personification of the city. The city was a foundation in the vicinity of the Athos mountain on the peninsula Aktos, the most east cape of the Chalkidike. It was founded c.316-300 BC by Kassander's youngest brother Alexarchos, who was half-mad and acquited himself for Helios, the sun.

For statisticians: This is the earlist depiction of the globe on a coin!
1 commentsJochen
nikopolis_julia_domna_AMNG1455.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 17. Julia Domna, HrHJ (2018) 8.17.15.01 (plate coin)35 viewsJulia Domna, died AD 217
AE 26, 10.90g, 26.48mm, 195°
struck under governor Aurelius Gallus
obv. IOVLIA DO - MNA CEBA
Bust, draped, r.; hair in seven horizontal waves and broad plate behind
rev. VPA AVR GALLOV - NIKOPOLITWN / PROC IC (OV ligate)
Aphrodite in attitude of the Capitoline Venus stg. facing: left beside her Eros, winged,
nude, stg. facing, head r., holding in lowered l. hand wreath and in r. hand torch
downwards
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1455, pl. XV, 33 (1 ex., St.Petersburg)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 2900 (R7, one of the rarest Domna coins of Nikopolis! Varbanov cites AMNG 1455 but calls the attributes of Eros
bow and patera.)
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.17.15.1 (plate coin)
rare (R6), about VF, nice green patina

Pick: The A on the rev. always looks like a Lambda. So it could well read VP L AVR. Doubtlessly this depiction of Aphrodite shows the pic of a statue. Probably copies of these statue were located in Nikopolis too.
Jochen
caracalla_nikopolis_cf AMNG1545.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 18. Caracalla, HrHJ (2018) 8.18.09.02 (plate coin)104 viewsCaracalla AD 198-217
AE 27, 12.7g, 26.99mm, 45°
struck under governor Aurelius Gallus
obv. AV.K.M.AVRHLI - ANTWNINOC
bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. VP AVR GALLOV - NIKO - POLITWN / PROC ICTR
Nike stg. l., leaning with l. ellbow on small column, holding long palm in her l. hand and wreath in lowered r. hand.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1545 (2 ex., Paris, Vaillant)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3080
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.18.9.2 (plate coin)
rare, about VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

Already Pick has suggested an I behind AVRHL.

One of the nicest Victory attitudes, a bit lascivious and reminding of Aphrodite.
3 commentsJochen
nikopolis_plautilla_HrHJ(2015)8_21_15_1.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 21. Plautilla, HrHJ (2018) 8.21.15.018 viewsPlautilla, AD 202-205
AE 26, 13.34g, 26.16mm, 210°
struck under governor Aurelius Gallus
obv. FOVL.PLAV - TILLA CEBAC
Bust, draped, wearing stephane, r.
rev. VPA AVR GALLOV - NEIKOPOLIT PR. / OC IC
Aphrodite Pudica, nude, stg. frontal, covering her private parts with her hands
ref. a) not in AMNG
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3202
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.21.15.1 (same dies)
rare (R6), S+

The statue of Aphrodite Pudica goes back to the statue of Aphrodite of Knidos by Praxiteles, created 350-340 BC. This motive was then taken up by the Capitoline Venus.
Jochen
nikopolis_macrinus_HJ8_23_7_2_#1.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 23. Macrinus, HrHJ (2018) 8.23.07.02 #271 viewsMacrinus, AD 217-218
AE 27, 13.42g, 26.82mm, 345°
struck under governor Marcus Claudius Agrippa
obv. AV K OPPEL CE - VH MAKRI NOC
laureate head r.
rev. [VP AG]RIPPA NIKOPOL - ITWN PROC IC
in l. and middle field TR - W
Apollo Sauroktonos, nude, with crossed legs, l. leg set behind r. leg, stg. r., l.
hand resting on tree-stump, in bent r. hand holding branch with which he touches
the tree
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1687, pl. XIV, 35 (5 ex.)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3372
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.23.7.2 (same dies)
d) Pat Lawrence obv. M, no.10 (gap between I and N on obv. not mentioned)
VF, dark green patina

Pick writes:"the left on a tree-stump from which a lizard(?) is jumping to him." But on this coin it is rather a branch with small round fruits.
Pat Lawrence (in 'The Pontianus and Agrippa Dies for Macrinus and Diadumenianus at Nicopolis ad Istrum"): Apollo Sauroktonos, so labeled by Pick (and Taf. XIV, 35) and earlier, though Postolakas at Athens: Achilles Postolakas, Catalogue of the Ancient Coins of Regions, Nations, Cities and Kingdoms, National Numismatic Museum, 1872, no.847, is at pains to describe what he sees: "...to one side and the other of Apollo, naked, stg. r., bending his l. knee, having his head laureate and holding with his r. hand a twig (or branch) slanting downwards, placing his raised l. hand on the little tree, stripped of its branches, stand in front of him." He, too, doubted wether we may read the elements between Apollo's torso and the tree trunk as a leaping lizard. Just as the 'Medici' Aphrodite of Agrippa's engraver is comically misconstrued, so is his Apollo Sauroktonos.
3 commentsJochen
nikopolis_diadumenian_Pick1799.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 25. Diadumenian, HrHJ (2018) 8.25.15.01 corr. #178 viewsDiadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 29, 10.59g, 28.97mm, 225°
struck under governor Marcus Claudius Agrippa
obv. K M OPPEL ANTWNI DIADOVMENIANOC
bare head, r.
rev. VP AGRIPPA NIKO - POLITWN PROC IC / TIW(sic!)
Aphrodite standing facing, head r., hair in bun, draped and with cloak,
holding puff of drapery in r. arm and l. hand before belly, flaming altar r.,
dolphin, standing vertical with head down, l.
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1799 corr., pl. XV, 34, same rev. die (3 ex., Bukarest, Turin, trade)
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3667
c) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.25.15.1 corr. (writes in ex. TRW)
rare, about VF, various patinas

Pick has written: in ex. TRW. But here as well on his pic it is clearly TIW. Directly at the right side of I a vertical die break, seen on Pick's specimen too.
3 commentsJochen
nikopolis_diadum_AMNG1799corr_#2.jpg
Moesia inferior, Nikopolis ad Istrum, 25. Diadumenian, HrHJ (2018) 8.25.15.01 corr. #240 viewsDiadumenian, AD 217-218
AE 27, 13.53g, 27.38mm, 210°
struck under governor Marcus Claudius Agrippa
obv. K M OPPEL ANTWNI DIADOVMENIANOC
bare head, r.
rev. VP AGRIPPA NIKO - POLITWN PROC IC / TIW(sic!)
Aphrodite in attitude of Venus Medici standing facing, head r., hair in bun, wearing palla,
holding puff of drapery in r. arm and l. hand before belly; r. flaming
altar, l. dolphin, standing vertical with head down
ref. a) AMNG I/1, 1799 corr., pl. XV, 34 (3 ex., Bukarest, Turin, traded), same rev. die
b) Varbanov (engl.) 3667 corr. (cites AMNG 1799)
d) Hristova/Hoeft/Jekov (2018) No. 8.25.15.1 corr. (writes in ex. TRW)
rare, about VF, as found

Pick has written: in ex. TRW. But here as well on his pic it is clearly TIW. Directly at the right side of the I a vertical die break, seen on Pick's specimen too.
Jochen
tomis_philippII_serapis_AMNG3591.jpg
Moesia inferior, Tomis, Philipp II & Serapis AMNG 359129 viewsPhilipp II AD 247-249
AE 26, 13.84g
obv. M IOVLIOC FILIPPOC / KAICAR
Confronting busts of Philipp I, draped and cuirassed, bare-headed, r., and Serapis, draped and wearing kalathos, l.
rev. MHTROP PONT - O - V TOMEWC
Hera, in chiton and himation, stg. l., holding patera in outstretched r. hand and sceptre in her l. hand
AMNG 3591 (1 ex. in Odessa)
rare, VF, circular traces of ancient flan smoothing, nice rev. depiction

On this coin Hera looks more like Aphrodite than the venerable Queen of Heaven. According to Pat Lawrence the reverse could depict a variant of the statue of the Hera Borghese. This statue too was discussed wether it shows Hera or Aphrodite.
Jochen
trajan_decius_sngparis_cf1294.jpg
Mysia, Lampsakos, Trajan Decius cf. SNG Paris 129440 viewsTrajan Decius AD 249-251
AE 21, 4.15g
obv. AYT KOI TRAIAN DEK[IOC]
bust, draped, laureate, r.
rev. LANYAKHN / [W]N - EPI APOLL[WN?] - ETOY
Priapos stg. l., draped from hips, showing Ithyphallos, holding Thyrsos l. and
Kantharos r.
cf. SNG Paris 1294 (thanks all for attribution!)
Very rare, F+/-VF
added to www.wildwinds.com

LAN erroneous for LAM, but there are some open questions too: KOI seems to be erroneous for KAI, magistrate APOLLONITOS couldn't be found until now.

PRIAPOS was born by Aphrodite in Lampsakos/Mysia. Therefore Lampsakos was the centre of warshipping of Priapos. Here his depiction was more like Dionysos who was said to be his father.
Jochen
pergam_boar_res.jpg
MYSIA, PERGAMON (BOAR)12 views440 BC - 350 BC
AE 10 mm 0.98 g
OBV: FEMALE HEAD (or APHRODITE? or APOLLO?) R
REV: PER[G]
HEAD OF BOAR, R
SQUIGGLE (SNAIL?) ABOVE SNOUT
MYSIA, PERGAMON
SLG WEBER 5158(1)
laney
Nagidos_in_Cilicia.jpg
NAGIDOS in CILICIA AR Stater15 viewsOBVERSE: Aphrodite seated left, holding patera over altar, crowned by Eros flying right above, rose and bud in left field, mouse under chair
REVERSE: NAΓIΔIKON, Dionysos, loins draped (long), standing left, holding bunch of grapes and thyrsos. EY ΔIO in left field.
Struck at Nagidos in Cilicia 356-333 BC
9.93g, 23 mm.
Lederer 64; Paris 809; Babelon Traite II-2 1524.8; SNG France II, 34
ex. Warren Esty
1 commentsLegatus
augustus_aspendos_statues.jpg
Pamphylia, Aspendos; Two cultus statues of Aphrodite.14 viewsAugustus Pamphylia Aspendos, 27 B.C.-14 A.D. AE 16.4mm, 2.76g; Obverse: Bust right. Reverse: Two cultus statues of Aphrodite. SNG Cop. 268, RPC 3382.Podiceps
MagydusMacrinus.JPG
Pamphylia, Magydus. Macrinus AE24. Aphrodite36 viewsObv: Macrinus bust r.
Rev: Aphrodite semi-nude, standing facing, head right, smoothing hair, bird at feet.
SNG Paris 311.
ancientone
paphos.jpg
Paphos dove7 viewsPaphos, Cyprus, late 4th Century B.C. Bronze AE 17, SGCV II 5785, BMC 6 var, F, Paphos mint, 3.811 g, 17.4 mm, 180o, obverse head of Aphrodite left; reverse Cypriot letters (=be pi-u), dove standing right on scepter, oval countermark in center; porous. ex FORVM

Podiceps
flower.jpg
Paphos, Cyprus, late 4th Century B.C. AE 13, Aphrodite/ flower4 viewsPaphos, Cyprus, late 4th Century B.C. Bronze AE 13, SGCV II 5788, BMC 49, Tzambazis 92, VF, Paphos mint, weight 2.078g, maximum diameter 12.9mm, die axis 0o, obverse head of Aphrodite left, wearing ornamented stephanos; reverse rose; An interesting issue. The flower is similar to the flower which appears on the Alexander the Great tetradrachm of both Paphos and Memphis. This little bronze helps make the connection between the two issues. Ex FORVMPodiceps
diadumenian_ byblos_rouvier699.jpg
Phoenicia, Byblos, Diadumenian, Rouvier 69968 viewsDiadumenian, Caesar, mid May 218 - 8. June 218
AE 24, 10.81g
obv. M OP DIADYMENIANOC KAI
bare head, bust, cuirassed, r.
rev. BYB - LOY / IERAC (in exergue)
distyle temple, covered by an arch decorated by shell-like swags, in which Astarte is standing r., with polos on head, spear in r. hand and foot on prow, crowned with wreath by Nike, standing on column r. before her.
BMC 40-43; Rouvier 699
scarce, about VF(?)
added to www.wildwinds.com

ASTARTE, a major Northwest-Semitic goddess, was cognate with the East-Semitic goddess Ishtar. She was connected with fertility, sexuality and war. She was accepted by the Greeks under the name of Aphrodite. Cyprus, one of Aphrodite's main cult centers supplied the name Cypris as Aphrodite's most common byname.

BYBLOS , one of her important cult centers and therefore called 'the Holy Byblos', in ancient times was the most important port of export for Egyptian papyros to Greece. Therefore Greek biblos = book, and The Holy Bible!

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
2 commentsJochen
caesarea_ad_libanum_sev_alex_BMC9.jpg
Phoenicia, Caesarea ad Libanum, Severus Alexander, BMC 948 viewsSeverus Alexander as Caesar, AD 221-222, struck under Elagabal
obv. [SEV ALEXA]NDROS CAESAR
Head, radiate, r.
rev. COL C - E - SA - RIA LIB
in ex. ITVR
Tetrastyle tripartite temple of Astarte. In the middle triptych under an arched roof Astarte stg. facing, holding standard in r. hand and l. foot set on prow, being crowned by Nike r. beside her stg. on cippus; beneath rivergod swimming r.; outside staircases leading to the side-wings; in the l. wing goddess with kalathos stg. facing between two animals, in the r. wing female figure stg. facing.
BMC 110, 9; Lindgren II, 1321, 2288
Rare, F/about VF, the sandpatina suggests an illumination from behind and thus the fascinating impression of a three-dimensional depiction!

The ancient name of Caesarea was Arka. Probably under Elagabal the City was raised to a Roman colonia under the name Colonia Caesarea Libani. Here Severus Alexander was born, cousin, adoptive son and successor of Elagabal. We know of an important Astarte cult in Caesarea. Wether the interesting triptych form of the temple was real we dont know. The two figures in the side wings can't be identified clearly; the goddess at the l. side matches iconographically the 'Mistress of Animals', Potnia theron, the r. figure possibly Aphrodite. ITVR in ex. points to the Ituraei, a nomad people in this region.

The ancient name of the river is unknown. Today his name is Nahr-el-Arqa.
Jochen
laodikeia.jpg
PHRYGIA, LAODIKEIA22 viewsca 189 - 133 BC
AE 14.5 mm 4.36 g
O: BUST OF APHRODITE R
R: LAOD[IKEWN]
APHRODITE SEATED R, HOLDING DOVE IN L HAND
SEAR GR. VOL. 2 #5155
laney
laod_cornu_cadu_b.jpg
PHRYGIA, LAODIKEIA14 viewsAfter 133 BC
AE 19 mm max. 5.55 g
O: Laureate, draped bust of Laodice or Aphrodite right.
R: LAODIKEWN, single cornucopiae, caduceus behind it to left
Phrygia, Laodikeia; cf SNG Cop 501-502; BMC 40-43; SNG Tuebingen
4127; SNG Munich 345-346
laney
IMG_2405.JPG
PHRYGIA: Laodikeia5 viewsLaodikeia, Phrygia, c. 2nd Century B.C. AE 14, Laodikeia mint. Obv: head of Aphrodite right; Rev: ΛAOΔI/KEΩN, tripod. BMC Phrygia p. 286, 44; Weber -; Hoover HGC 7, 741 (S).Molinari
amaseia_marc_aurel_SNG_aulock22.jpg
Pontos, Amaseia, Marcus Aurelius, SNG von Aulock 2228 viewsMarcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 34, 19.6g
struck AD 163/4
obv. AVT KAIC M AVR A - NTWNINOC CEB
Bust, draped and cuirassed, laureate, r.
rev. ADR AMAC NEWK.K.MHT K.PRW PONT / ET RZE (year 165)
Ares in military cloak and helmet, stg. frontal, head r., holding spear in r. hand
and resting with l. hand on shield set on ground, on the r. side Aphrodite, nude,
stg. l., covering with l. hand pudenda and with r. hand breasts
SNG von Aulock 22; Imhoof-Blumer G.M. 560, 3; Rec. Gen. cf.18a
rare, F+
Jochen
1308_Prokonnesos.JPG
Prokonnesos - AE8 viewsc. 340-330 BC
female head right (Aphrodite?) wearing laurel and sakkos
oinochoe right
ΠPO__KON
SNG v. Aulock 1438; SNG France 2424-9; SNG Copenhagen 558.
ex Savoca
Johny SYSEL
paphos_ptolemaiosIII_Svoronnos1008.jpg
Ptolemaic kingdom, Paphos, Ptolemaios III Euergetes, Svoronos 100821 viewsPtolemaios III Euergetes, 246-221 BC
AE - Dichalkon (AE 16), 2.44g, 16.43mm, 315°
obv. head of Zeus-Ammon, horned and with taenia, r.
rev. PTOLEMAIOV - BACILEWC
Cult statue of Aphrodite, wearing high polos, stg. frontal on base, r. hand before breast, holding
unknown object (girdle?) in lowered l. hand; braids bound in several thick knots and reaching to the
shoulders
ref. Svoronos 1008; SNG Copenhagen 647
about VF, black-green patina

This type is now assigned to Ptolemaios V Epiphanes and dated to about 204-201 BC (W. Weiser, Katalog Ptolemäischer Bronzemünzen der Sammlung ... Universität Köln, S. 70, Nr.111). Thanks to Arminius!

The famous Aphrodite Paphias was aniconical, probably a baetyl. So we have here another, probably Hellenistic, cult statue.
Jochen
ptol_soter_a.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I SOTER18 views367 - 283 BC
struck 310 - 306 BC
AE 20 mm 6.99 g
O: HEAD OF APHRODITE WEARING ORNAMENTED STEPHANOS, R
R: EAGLE WITH CLOSED WINGS STANDING L ON THUNDERBOLT
[PTO]LEMAI[OU] TO R
PAPHOS, CYPRUS
laney
a_114.jpg
Ptolemy III26 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-221 BC
Cyprus
Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ;Cultus-statue of Aphrodite standing facing

20.34mm 6.63gm

Svoronos 1007; Tziampazis p43- 32
maik
pic001.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Augustus, Cyprus, AE1844 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR DIVI F. Bare head of Augustus right.
Rev: A PLAVTIVS PRO COS. Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, containing cone shaped object; paved semicircular court in foreground.
16mm
GICV: 105; Cohen 163, 784
seaotter
Neoclaudiopolis Geta Aphr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Geta, Neoclaudiopolis (Paphlagonia)324 viewsAll the coins of this city are rare, and this one seems to be of an unpublished type. The reverse shows the seductive "apocalyptic" Aphrodite loosening her garment and holding an apple.
The obverse legend contains the rare (and so far unexplained?) KOM KECAP, also known on coins of Geta from Tavium in Galatia.
2 commentsBritannicus
Papia_combined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Papius, AR Serrate Denarius13 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Papius, 79 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin headdress tied at neck, facing right; control symbol (aplustre) behind.

Reverse: Griffon leaping right; control symbol (prow stem), below; L•PAPI in exergue.

References: Crawford 384/1 (symbol pair 134); Sydenham 773; BMCRR 2981 (symbol pair 5); Papia 1 (symbol pair 47).

Provenance: Ex Herbert & Aphrodite Rubin Collection [Goldberg 96 (14 Feb 2017) Lot 1963]; bought from Ariadne Galleries in 1980’s; The Numismatic Auction Ltd. (Tradart) 1 (13 Dec 1982) Lot 203.

Papius is only known through his coins. Juno Sospita was a deity who’s temple was in Lanuvium, a Latin town 32 kilometers southeast of Rome, and it’s likely that Papius came from that town.

These denarii have paired obverse and reverse control symbols, with almost all symbol pairs appearing on only one set of dies (N.B.: I'm aware of at least one pair that appears on multiple dies). Crawford counts 211 die pairs. The paired control symbols have some loose relationship to one another, i.e. the bow and stern of a galley on this coin. Sydenham argued that the symbols were propaganda for popularist trade guilds. However, because of the breadth and variety of symbol material, Crawford rules-out any intended meaning. This same control system of paired symbols would be re-used 20 years later by another Lanuvian, L. Roscius Fabatus.
1 commentsCarausius
Faustina_II_44.jpg
RPC - Egypt, Alexandria, AD 164/165, Faustina II, Aphrodite 7 viewsFaustina II
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right
Rev.: L Є = year 5 (AD 164/165 ), Aphrodite standing left, holding helm and shield set on column on which is inscribed ΔV/NA/MIC,
Billon, 13.55g, 23mm
Ref.: Geißen 2113, Dattari 3606
shanxi
RPC_II_1803_Vespasianus.jpg
RPC II 1803 Vespasianus48 viewsObv: AYTOKPATΩP OYECΠACIANOC KAICAP, Laureate head left
Rev: ETOYC NEOY IEPOY / H (in exergue), Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon
AR/Tetradrachm (23.99 mm 12.35 g 12h) Struck in Uncertain Cypriot mint 75-76 A.D.
RPC 1803, Prieur 1564, BMC 18-19
ex Artemide Auction 6E lot 6171
FlaviusDomitianus
RPC_II_1821_Vespasianus.jpg
RPC II 1821 Vespasianus34 viewsObv: OYECΠACIANOC CEBACTOC, Laureate head right
Rev: KOINON KIΠPIΩN ETOYC H, Temple of Aphrodite Paphia in which conical xoanon; semi-circular forecourt.
AE26 (26.29 mm 10.74 g 6h) Struck in Cyprus 75-76 A.D.
RPC 1821
ex Künker eLive Auction 31 lot 209
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RPC1803.jpg
RPC-1803-Vespasian54 viewsAR Tetradrachm, 12.09g
Antioch mint (for Cyprus), 75-76 AD
Obv: AYTOKPATΩP OYЄCΠACIANOC KAICAP; Head of Vespasian, laureate, l.
Rev: ЄTOYC NЄOY IЄPOY; Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which conical xoanon; in exergue, H
RPC 1803 (17 spec.).
Ex Pegasi Numismatics VAuctions 36, 23 May 2017, lot 324

Antioch struck a small issue of tetradrachms and didrachms for Cyprus in the mid 70s AD. The reverse types are typically ethnic, such as this coin's depiction of the Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos struck in 75 or 76. The famous temple figures prominently in Flavian lore as the place where Titus Caesar received a favourable oracle from the priest Sostratus prior to Vespasian's bid for the purple. The island experienced a devastating earthquake in late 77 or early 78 that destroyed three of her major cities. The temple shown on the coin was destroyed as well, but was soon lavishly rebuilt in a similar design.

A remarkable portrait in fine 'Antiochene' style.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
1192c.jpg
saitta001a4 viewsElagabalus
Saitta, Lydia

Obv: AV K MAV ANTΩNЄINOC, laureate draped cuirassed bust right.
Rev: ƐΠICOCXA-ΡIKΛЄ OVC AP X A T B CAI →TTHNΩΝ, tetrastyle temple with statue of Aphrodite, naked, standing within under central arch, looking left.
29 mm, 8.51 gms

BMC 50-51; SNG Leypold I, 1168; Waddington 5184; SNG Paris 1076.
Charles M
Salonina.jpg
Salonina Saitta19 viewsAE 27 (5.42g)
rev. KOR CALWNEINA CEB
draped bust right.
obv. EP CYLLA ARXON A CAITTHNWN
tetrastyle temple with Aphrodite
HG
2013-11-017.jpg
Salonina, Lydia25 viewsLydia, Saitla; Struck under Lul. Fesinus
Ae 27-29mm; 11.2g

(dot) CALWN (dot) XPY- COGONH (dot) C (dot)
draped bust right

EP (dot) IOVL (dot) THC-EINOY (dot) APX
Exergue: CAITTH/NWN
Tetra style temple with central arch, statue of Aphrodite

BMC 74
1 commentsRobin Ayers
severus_alexander_254~0.jpg
Severus Alexander RIC IV, 25450 viewsSeverus Alexander AD 222 - 235
AR - Denar, 3.35g, 18mm
Rome AD 232
Av.: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped and cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
Rv.: SPES PV - BLICA
Spes draped advancing l., holding flower r.,raising robe with l.
RIC IV/2, 254; C.546; BMCR.897
VF

Spes is pictured as a standard archaic maiden-figure or Kore (with the flower perhaps referencing Persephone not Aphrodite); Rome's first temple of Spes was archaic-era (477 BC according to Tameanko), so the figure of Spes on Imperial coins may be keyed to much earlier artistic and cultic tradition (Archivum)
Jochen
6F0173A9-02C1-4828-B2F6-71D857883D2F.jpeg
Sikyon, Peloponnesos, Greece, c. 100 - 60 B.C.9 viewsThe affectionate dove, the bird of love, was sacred to the goddess of love, Venus (Aphrodite). Doves were said to draw her heavenly chariot, and the Syrian Aphrodite Ashtarte was said to have been hatched from an egg and nursed by doves. The phrase attributed to Jesus, "Be ye therefore wise as serpents, and harmless as doves" (Matthew 10.16), was no random metaphor but a traditional Syrian invocation.
GS87458. Silver triobol, BCD Peloponnesos 344.1; BMC Peloponnesus p. 52, 197; HGC 5 217 (S), aVF, toned, off center, reverse double struck, die wear, porous, Sikyon mint, weight 2.158g, maximum diameter 15.5mm, die axis 135o, magistrate Olympiadas, c. 100 - 60 B.C.; obverse dove flying right, no control symbol; reverse large Σ, OΛYM/ΠI-A/∆AΣ in three horizontal lines, all within incuse square
1 commentsMark R1
smyrna_k.jpg
Smyrna, Ionia, Magistrate Hras4 viewsAE16, 4.7g, 12h; 105-95 BC
Obv.: Turreted bust of Tyche right.
Rev.: ZMYPNAIΩN HPAΣ; Aphrodite Stratonikis, wearing polos, standing facing, resting arm on column, holding Nike. monogram in lower left field.
Reference: Milne 289; SNG Cop 1191; Mionnet III 1075; Rhousopoulos 3778.
John Anthony
smyrna_augustus___Livia.jpg
Smyrna, Ionia. AE 19.1; busts of Augustus and Livia/ Aphrodite Stratonikis and dove31 viewsAugustus and Livia, Smyrna, Ionia. AE 19.1mm, 5.89g. ΣΕΒΑΣΤΩΙ ΖΜΥΡΝΑΙΟΙ, Jugate laureate head of Augustus and draped bust of Livia r. / ΛΕΟΝΤΙΣΚΟΣ ΙΠΠΟΜΕΔΟΝΤΟΣ, Aphrodite Stratonikis standing, holding sceptre and Nike, and leaning on column; to r., dove. RPC 2466. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
soloi.jpg
Soloi, AE27, winged gorgoneion/ ΣOΛEΩN, Aphrodite on horseback & owl6 viewsSoloi, Cilicia, AE27, ca. 100-30 B.C. 26-27mm, 16.46g. Obv: winged gorgoneion facing slightly right in the center of an aegis. Rev: ΣOΛEΩN, Aphrodite, turreted, on horseback, riding right; to right, owl standing right, head facing; two monograms above. SNG France 1199, SNG Levante 872. Ex Rutten & WielandPodiceps
severus_alexander_254.jpg
Spes281 viewsSeverus Alexander AD 222 - 235
AR - Denar, 3.35g, 18mm
Rome AD 232
Av.: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped and cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
Rv.: SPES PV - BLICA
Spes draped advancing l., holding flower r.,raising robe with l.
RIC IV/2, 254; C.546; BMCR.897
VF

SPES, hope, with near relations to Fortuna and Salus. Under the Principat part of the religion of loyality. Depicted like Aphrodite in the Greek art, holding flower, raising garment.
2 commentsJochen
gabala_Lindgren1186.jpg
Syria, Seleukis and Pieria, Gabala, Commodus, Lindgren 1186220 viewsCommodus, AD 177-192
AE 25, 12.18g
obv. AYT KAI - [KOMMODOC] (from upper r.)
Head, laureate, l.
rev. [...]AN[...]
City goddess (Tyche), in long garment and wearing kalathos, stg. frontal on piedestal, holding
bipennis in raised r. hand and shield in l. hand; at both side of base protome of a horse looking
outwards; on the r. side Tyche in long garment and with mural crown std. l. on throne, holding
rudder in l. hand.
H. Seyrig 'Cultes de Gabala, in RN (1964), p.22-27' cites 2 ex. in ANS and 2 ex. in Paris; Lindgren 1186
Very rare, VF, sandy brown patina
Pedigree:
ex coll J. Wagner
ex CNG Electronic Auction 201, lot 290

The attribution of the l. figure is difficult. Here are some suggestions:
CNG: deity
ANS: male figure with bipennis and sceptre
HN: Veiled cultus-statue of aSyrian goddess (Astarte or Aphrodite, accompanied by 2 sphinxes)
Imhoof-Blumer: Astarte or Aphrodite
R. Dussaud: Venus
S. Ronzevalle: flanked by 2 lions, Paredros of Jupiter Heliopolitanus (Atargatis)
H. Seyrig: hypothetical Astarte
Because of the horses I tend to Astarte
Jochen
tarku-obolo.jpg
Tarkumuwa obol50 viewsCILICIA, Tarsos. Tarkumuwa. Cilician grandee (syennesis?) as karanos charged to prepare egyptian campain , 378-372 BC. AR Obol (10mm, 0.65 g).
O: Female head (Aphrodite?) right, wearing necklace /
R: Bearded male head (Ares? Sanda?) right, wearing Attic style helmet. Tarkumuwa in aramaic.
Ref: SNG BN 278.

Provenance: Helios Numismatik GmbH
Caffaro
00ericina.jpg
TEMPLE, CONSIDIUS NONIANUS. Temple of Venus Erycina.218 viewsAR denarius. 56 BC. 3.92 g, 5h. Laureate bust of Venus Erycina right, wearing stephane. C.CONSIDI NONIANI behind.SC before. / Temple on summit of mountain,sorrounded with ramparts, ERVC above gateway in centre. Craw 424/1. RSC Considia 1. Smyth V/12.
"Eryx was a son of Aphrodite and Butas, a certain native king of Sikelia (Sicily) of very great fame, and he was admired by the natives because of his noble birth on his mother’s side and became king over a part of the island. He also founded a notable city which bore his name; it was set upon a lofty place, and on the highest point within the city he established a shrine of his mother, which he embellished not only with a beautifully built temple, but also with the multitude of his dedications.
The goddess, both because of the reverence which the inhabitants of the region paid to her and because of the honour which she received from the son whom she had borne, displayed an exceptional love for the city, and for this reason she came to be called Aphrodite Erykinia . . . After Eryx has bestowed upon it the honours we have described, Aeneas, the son of Aphrodite, when at a later time he was on his way to Italy and came to anchor off the island, embellished the sanctuary, since it was that of his own mother, with many votive offerings."
Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 4. 83. 1 .
1 commentsbenito
Thespiai_obol.jpg
Thespiai, Boeotia Obol48 viewsAR Obol
Size: 12 mm Weight: .80grams Die axis: 3h

Thespiai, Boeotia
Early-Mid 4th century BCE

Obverse: Boeotian shield decorated with crescent (crescent near worn off on this coin).

Reverse: Head of Aphrodite Melainis (the black) to right, Θ to right, EΣ to left, letters retrograde.

Notes:
- Thespiai was one of the few Boeotian cities to oppose the Persian invasion – they sent a force to fight at Thermopylae with Sparta and remained for the final battle. After the Persian victory, Thebes finally sided with the Persians, leaving only Thespiai and Plataea as Boetian states opposing the invasion. Both cities were burned by Xerxes, yet Thespiai still furnished hoplites for the Battle of Plataea.

Ex Classical Numismatics Group (CNG) eAuction 177, lot 74 (2007), Ex BCD Collection
2 commentsPharsalos
gordianIII_deultum.jpg
Thracia, Deultum, Gordian III Jurukova 26156 viewsGordian III AD 238-244
AE - AE 23, 6.42g
obv. IMP GORDIANVS PIVS FEL AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed(?), laureate, r.
rev. COL FL PAC / DEVLT
Cult statue of Aphrodite & vase within portico of tetrastyle temple viewed in perspective,
with two-stepped pedement, triangular pediment with pellet, acroteria decorated with
crosses.
Moushmov 3735; Jurukova 261 (attr. by Britannicus)
Rare; VF, nice blue-green patina
added to www.wildwinds.com

Aphrodite as 'pudica' standing in the pose of the Capitoline Venus (Pat Lawrence).

Deultum was founded by veterans of Vespasian's leg. VIII Augusta before AD 77 as Colonia Flavia Pacis Deultensia.

For more information look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'
1 commentsJochen
DOMNA-15.jpg
Three Graces, Goddesses of charm, beauty and culture.278 viewsJulia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, Augusta, 193-217 CE.
Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Æ (24mm, 8.6 gm).
Obv: IOLAIA DOMNA CEB, Draped bust right, hair in bun.
Rev: MARKIANOPOLITWN, Statuary group of the Three Graces side by side.
Sear Greek Imp. 2313; AMNG (Pick) 603; Moushmov 417.

The three Graces, named Euphrosyne, Aglaia and Thalia, were the attendants of Venus/Aphrodite. They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, nude and sometimes holding apples.
2 commentsEmpressCollector
cngele.jpg
Tiribazos type 2Dd stater (cilician siglos)85 viewsCILICIA, Mallos. Tiribazos-Orontes, 386-380 BC. Circa 385-375 BC. AR Stater (22mm, 9.84 g, 12h).
O: Head of Aphrodite right wearing earring and necklace, hair bound in ampyx and sphendone /
R: Head of satrap right, wearing Persian headdress. SNG Levante 151; SNG France 392; Casabonne type 2Dd.

Provenance: CNG
1 commentsCaffaro
Tempio_di_Afrodite_e_tetrapylon.JPG
Turkey, Aphrodisias - Aphrodite's temple with tetrapylon202 viewsMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Uranopolis~0.jpg
Uranopolis - AE7 views302-290? BC
sun with 8 rays
Aphrodite Urania sitting on globe* half left
ΟΥΡΑΝΙΔΩΝ / ΠOΛEΩΣ
SNG Cop 455 - 457; BMC Macedonia p. 134, 2 - 3,
ex Lucernae

* It's said to be the first depiction of round earth but sphere could also be depiction of skies what doesn't necessarily mean that author knew earth is round.
Johny SYSEL
ouran.jpg
Uranopolis26 viewsMacedonia Uranopolis 300 b.c
AE17
Obverse:Eight-rayed star
Reverse:Aphrodite Urania seated facing on globe,holding long sceptre,ΟΥΡΑΝΙΔΩΝ ΠΟΛΕΩΣ

17.06mm 3gm
SEAR 1475

Uranopolis founded on mount Athos


1 commentsmaik
Urianopolus.jpg
Uranopolis , Macedon. c. 300 B.C.8 viewsUranopolis , Macedon. Ae 15.8mm. 3.78g. c. 300 B.C. Obv: Star of eight rays. Rev: ΟΥΡΑΝΙΔΩΠΟΛΕΩΣ, Aphrodite Urania seated left on globe, holding sceptre.
SNG ANS 914-18.
ddwau
uranopolis.jpg
Uranopolis AE17, star with 8 rays/ Aphrodite Urania seated97 viewsMacedonia, Uranopolis AE17. ca 300 B.C. 3,2 g, 16 mm. Star with 8 rays / OVPANIΔΩΠΟΛΕΩΣ Aphrodite Urania seated left on globe, holding scepter. AMNG 3. Moushmov 6909.Podiceps
013~3.JPG
Uranopolis, Macedonia132 views300 B.C.
Bronze Æ 17
3.28 gm, 17 mm
Obv.: Eight pointed star representing the sun
Rev.: OΥΡANIΔΩN ΠOΛEΩΣ, Aphrodite Urania wearing chiton and peplos seated facing on globe, on her head a spike surmounted by a star, long scepter in right hand ending above in a circle
Sear 1475; BMC Macedonia p. 134, 2ff
2 commentsJaimelai
014~3.JPG
Uranopolis, Macedonia107 views300 B.C.
Bronze Æ 16
3.40 gm, 16 mm
Obv.: Eight pointed star representing the sun
Rev.: OΥΡANIΔΩN ΠOΛEΩΣ, Aphrodite Urania wearing chiton and peplos seated facing on globe, on her head a spike surmounted by a star, long scepter in right hand ending above in a circle
Sear 1475; BMC Macedonia p. 134, 2ff
Jaimelai
Uranopolis_Star_Aphrodite_AE16_2.8g.jpg
Uranopolis, star / Aphrodite, AE1627 viewsAE16, 2.8g
obv: eight pointed star
rev: OVPANIΔ []ΠOΛEΩC, Aphrodite Urania seated left on globe, holding sceptre in right hand.
SNG ANS 914ff; BMC Macedonia pg. 134, 2ff; SNG Copenhagen 455ff

ex. Numismatik Lanz (eBay)
areich
AE22-THRACIA-PAVTALIA-3Nymphen-Imhoof-Blumer_187-500.jpg
V-MARCUS AURELIUS -b- 001 AE22 THRACIA // PAUTALIA15 viewsAv) AVPHΛIOC OVHPOC KAICAP
Bare, draped bust left

Rv) ΠAVTAΛIATΩN
The three Graces standing dressed right

Weight:8,24g; Ø: 22mm; Reference: Imhoof-Blumer 187/500

Note: The three Graces, named Euphrosyne, Aglaia and Thalia, were the attendants of Aphrodite (Venus). They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, nude or nearly dressed and sometimes holding apples, but here they are completely dressed

sulcipius
VespCyprus.jpg
Vespasian / Temple of Aphrodite34 viewsCYPRUS, Koinon of Cyprus. (Antioch mint) Vespasian.AD 69-79. AR Tetradrachm (24mm, 12.59 g, 1h). Dated RY 8 (AD 75/6).
Obv: AYTOKPATΩP OYЄCΠACIANOC KAICAP; Laureate head of Vespasian left. c/m Head of Marcus Aurelius left within incuse circle.
Rev: ЄTOYC NЄOY IЄPOY; H in exergue, conical cult xoanon of Aphrodite of Paphos within central distyle tower, central crossbeam of tripartite entablature above; tristyle porticoes flanking; the entire structure set on low basis.
- RPC 1803; Tziambazis 16; Countermark: Howgego 844 i.
2 commentsNemonater
victoria_Brescia.jpg
Victoria Brescia35 viewsStatue of Victoria Brescia (Italian: Vittoria alata = winged Victory), found behind the Capitoline Temple of Brescia in 1826, now in the Santa Giulia Museum in Brescia.

Roman copy of a statue of Aphrodite of the 3rd century BC from a Greek City State. Wings added in 1st century BC to transform her in a winged Victory holding a shield to write on it (name of Victor?). The original Aphrodite (type of the Venus of Capua) was holding the shield of Ares to look at her face reflected on the inside of the shield.

The type of the Victoria of Brescia can be found on many Roman coins and on Trajan's column.
Jochen
 
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