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Search results - "Aemilius"
DenLepidusPaullus.jpg
34 viewsDenarius - 62 BC. - Mint of Rome
L. AEMILIVS LEPIDVS PAVLLVS - Gens Aemilia
Obv.: Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA around
Rev.:Aemilius Lepidus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left. TER above, PAVLVS in ex.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 18
Cr415/1, Sear RCV 366, Grueber 3373



Maxentius
commodus_aug_tria_b.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS--AUGUSTA TRAIANA37 views177 - 192 AD
struck 191-192 AD
AE 29.5 mm; 15.36 g
Magistrate: L. Aemilius Iustus (Legatus Augusti pro praetore provinciae Thraciae)
O: AV KAI [M] AV KOMOΔOC (or similar) Laureate bust right
R: ΗΓΕ Λ ΑΙΜ ΙΟVСΤ ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС City gate with 3 towers
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
cf RPC online 10823, citing a Freeman & Sear sale of 2005, without picture.
Note: (from C. Clay, 3.21.2015) "Governor Aem. Justus is rare at this mint, yours may be just the second specimen recorded. Not known to Varbanov, or to Stein in his 1926 monograph on Thracian officials. Apparently not in Schoenert-Geiss's Augusta Traiana corpus, or Varbanov would have known it from there."
d.s.
laney
0008~0.jpg
0008 - Denarius Aemilia 63 BC109 viewsObv/PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia r.
Rev/L Aemilius Paullus standing to r. of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left, PAVLVS in ex.

Ag, 19.1mm, 3.78g
Moneyer: L Aemilius Lepidus Paullus.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 415/1 [dies o/r: 240/267] - Syd.926 - RCV 297 - RSC Postumia 8 - Calicó 1216 - Cohen Postumia 7 - BMCRR 2839
ex-felixcuquerella (ebay)
2 commentsdafnis
0049~0.jpg
0049 - Denarius Aemilia 114-3 BC39 viewsObv/ Laureate female bust (Roma?) r., veiled and wearing diadem; before, ROMA; behind, crossed X.
Rev/ Three arches, on which stands equestrian status - horseman wears cuirass and wreath, and holds spear in r. hand; around, MN AEMILIO; between arches, L E P.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 3.85 g
Moneyer: Mn. Aemilius Lepidus
Mint: Rome
RRC 291/1 [dies o/r: 283/354 - BMCRR Italy 590
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 116, lot 3080
1 commentsdafnis
0087.jpg
0087 - Denarius Aemilia/Plautia 58 BC44 viewsObv/ M SCAVR / AED CVR Kneeling figure r., holding olive branch and reins of camel standing beside him; on either side, EX – S·C. In exergue, REX ARETAS.
Rev/ P HVPSAE / AED CVR Jupiter in quadriga l. holding reins in l. hand and hurling thunderbolt with r.; behind, CAPTV. Below, C HVPSAE COS / PREIVE.

Ag, 18.6 mm, 3.96 g
Moneyers: M. Aemilius Scaurus, P. Plautius Hypsaeus
Mint: Rome.
RRC 422/1b [dies o/r: 336/373] - Bab. Aemilia , Plautia 10 - Syd. 912
ex-CNG Coins, auction e-248, lot 350
dafnis
058_BC-_M_Aemilius_Scaurus_and_P_Plautius_Hypsaeus_AR_Denarius__King_Aretas_of_Nabataea,_Cr422-1b,_Syd_914,_Aemilia9a_Q-001_8h_17,5-18mm_3,73g-s.jpg
058 B.C., M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 422/1b, Jupiter in quadriga left, #1148 views058 B.C., M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 422/1b, Jupiter in quadriga left, #1
avers: King Aretas of Nabataea kneeling right by camel, offering the olive branch, M•SCAVR/AED CVR above, EX-S•C to sides, REX ARETAS in exergue.
reverse: Jupiter in quadriga left, scorpion beneath horses' forelegs, P•HVPSAE AED CVR above, C•HVPSAE COS PREIVE in exergue, CAPTV on right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,0mm, weight: 3,73g, axis: 8h,
mint: Rome, date: 58 B.C., ref: Crawford 422-1b, Sydenham 914,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
062_BC-L__Aemilius_Lepidus_Paullus_,_AR_Denarius__Cr_415-1,_Syd_926,_Aemilia10_Q-001_h_17,5-18mm_g-s.jpg
062 B.C., L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 415-1, L. Aemilius Paullus standing to the right of the trophy, #1140 views062 B.C., L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 415-1, L. Aemilius Paullus standing to the right of the trophy, #1
avers: PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right.
reverse: L. Aemilius Paullus standing to the right of the trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left; TER above, PAVLLVS in exergue.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,0mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 62 B.C., ref: Crawford 415-1, Sydenham 926, Aemilia 10,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Aemilia10.jpg
0ac Conquest of Macedonia13 viewsPaullus Aemilius Lepidus, moneyer
109-100 BC

Denarius

Veiled head of Concord, right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA
TER above trophy, L. Aemelius Lepidus on right, Perseus and his two sons as prisoners on left, PAVLLVS in ex.

Seaby, Aemelia 10

L. Aemelius Paullus defeated the Macedonians in 168 BC and brought Perseus and his sons to Rome to adorn his triumph.

Three days after the battle Perseus arrived at Amphipolis, and from that city he sent heralds with a caduceus to Paulus. In the meanwhile Hippias, Midon, and Pantauchus, the principal men among the king's friends who had fled from the field of battle to Beroea, went and made their surrender to the Roman consul. In the case of others also, their fears prompted them, one after another, to do the same. The consul sent his son Q. Fabius, together with L. Lentulus and Q. Metellus, with despatches to Rome announcing his victory. He gave the spoils taken from the enemy's army lying on the field of battle to the foot soldiers and the plunder from the surrounding country to the cavalry on condition that they were not absent from the camp more than two nights. The camp at Pydna was shifted to a site nearer the sea. First of all Beroea, then Thessalonica and Pella, and almost the whole of Macedonia, city by city, surrendered within two days.

Livy, History of Rome, 44.45
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114-113_BC_Man_Aemilius_Lepidus_Denarius_ROMA_M_N_AEMILIO_LEP_Cr291-1,_Syd_554_Aemilia_7_Q-001_9h_18,2-18,4mm_3,81g-s.jpg
114-113 B.C., Man Aemilius Lepidus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford-291-1, Rome, MN•AEMILIO•, equestrian statue, -/-//LEP, #1179 views114-113 B.C., Man Aemilius Lepidus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford-291-1, Rome, MN•AEMILIO•, equestrian statue, -/-//LEP, #1
avers: Laureate, diademed head of Roma right, ROMA before, * behind.
reverse: MN•AEMILIO• (MN ligate), The equestrian statue on the triumphal arch, L E P between the arches.
exergue: -/-//LEP, diameter: 18,2-18,4mm, weight: 3,81g, axis: 9h,
mint: Rome, date:114-113 B.C.,, ref: Crawford 291-1, Syd 554, Aemilia 7,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
0010-069d.jpg
1332 - L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, Denarius68 viewsRome mint, 62 BC
PAVLLUS LEPIDVS [CONCORDIA] diademed and draped bust of concordia right
Trophy with Lepidus Paullus on the right and three captives on the left (king Perseus of Macedon and his sons). TER above and PAVLLVS at exergue
4.00 gr
Ref : RCV # 366, RSC, Aemilia # 10
4 commentsPotator II
0010-071.jpg
1334 - L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, Denarius55 viewsRome mint, 62 BC
PAVLLUS LEPIDVS CONCORD, diademed and draped bust of concordia right
PVTEAL SCRIBON above and LIBO below the puteal scribonianum, ornamented with garland between two lyres and hammer
3,11 gr - 19/20 mm
Ref : RCV #368, RSC, Aemilia #11
From the E.E. Clain-Stefanelli collection
2 commentsPotator II
0010-075.jpg
1343 - M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus. Denarius74 viewsRome mint, 58 BC
M SCAVR AED CVR In two lines above camel, EX | SC, in exergue REX ARETAS, King Aretas of Nabataea, kneeling right beside a camel, holding an olive branch
P HVPSAEVS AED CVR in two lines, CAPTVM in the right field, C HVPSAE COS PREIVER in two lines, Jupiter driving a quadriga left, holding a thunderbolt
Ref : RCV #379
3 commentsPotator II
DSC06634-horz.jpg
18-01 - Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus (62 A.C)37 viewsAR Denarius 19 mm 3.9 gr

Este Magistrado Monetario era el hermano mayor de M. Aemilius Lepidus, que con posterioridad se convertiría en uno de los tres triúnviros junto a Octavio y Marco Antonio.
Esta emisión conmemora las victorias de L. Aemilius Paullus, supuesto ancestro del Magistrado Monetario. La palabra TER en el reverso, significa "Tertia", lo que referiría a los tres triunfos; en España en 190 A.C., Liguria en 181 A.C. y la famosa batalla de de Pydna en 168 A.C., donde los romanos extinguieron el reino independiente de Macedonia..

Anv: "PAVLLVS LEPIDVS - CONCORDIA", Busto de Concordia a der., vistiendo velo y diadema.
Rev: "TER" sobre, "PAVLLVS" en exergo. El ancestro del Magistrado, L. Aemilius Lepidus, vistiendo toga y estante a la izquierda de un trofeo de armas, a la derecha del mismo el Rey Perseo de Macedonia y sus dos hijos.
Este Rey y sus hijos fueron llevados a Roma, luego de su derrota, para hacerlos participar del desfile de la victoria.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #366 Pag.141 - Craw RRC #415/1 - Syd CRR #926 -BMCRR #3373 pl.43/8 - Harlan RRM 1p 1-10 - RSC Vol.1 Aemilia 10 Pag.11 - Babelon MRR Vol.1 #10 (Aemilia) Pag.122 - CDMR #126 - Albert MRR #1332 - Catalli #591
mdelvalle
MarcAntDenOctavian.jpg
1ae Marc Antony and Octavian43 viewsFormed the Second Triumvirate, 43-33 BC, , along with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus. Antony killed himself in 30 BC.

Denarius
41 BC

Marc Antony portrait, right, M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM BARBAT QP
Octavian portrait, right, CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR RPC

RSC 8

Plutarch described Antony thusly: Antony grew up a very beautiful youth, but by the worst of misfortunes, he fell into the acquaintance and friendship of Curio, a man abandoned to his pleasures, who, to make Antony's dependence upon him a matter of greater necessity, plunged him into a life of drinking and dissipation, and led him through a course of such extravagance that he ran, at that early age, into debt to the amount of two hundred and fifty talents. . . . He took most to what was called the Asiatic taste in speaking, which was then at its height, and was, in many ways, suitable to his ostentatious, vaunting temper, full of empty flourishes and unsteady efforts for glory. . . . He had also a very good and noble appearance; his beard was well grown, his forehead large, and his nose aquiline, giving him altogether a bold, masculine look that reminded people of the faces of Hercules in paintings and sculptures. It was, moreover, an ancient tradition, that the Antonys were descended from Hercules, by a son of his called Anton; and this opinion he thought to give credit to by the similarity of his person just mentioned, and also by the fashion of his dress. For, whenever he had to appear before large numbers, he wore his tunic girt low about the hips, a broadsword on his side, and over all a large coarse mantle. What might seem to some very insupportable, his vaunting, his raillery, his drinking in public, sitting down by the men as they were taking their food, and eating, as he stood, off the common soldiers' tables, made him the delight and pleasure of the army. In love affairs, also, he was very agreeable: he gained many friends by the assistance he gave them in theirs, and took other people's raillery upon his own with good-humour. And his generous ways, his open and lavish hand in gifts and favours to his friends and fellow-soldiers, did a great deal for him in his first advance to power, and after he had become great, long maintained his fortunes, when a thousand follies were hastening their overthrow.
1 commentsBlindado
FulviaQuinariusLion.jpg
1ae2 Fulvia45 viewsFirst wife of Marc Antony

ca 83-40 BC

AR Quinarius
Bust of Victory right with the likeness of Fulvia, III VIR R P C
Lion right between A and XLI; ANTONI above, IMP in ex

RSC 3, Syd 1163, Cr489/6

Fulvia was the first Roman non-mythological woman to appear on Roman coins. She gained access to power through her marriage to three of the most promising men of her generation, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Gaius Scribonius Curio, and Marcus Antonius. All three husbands were politically active populares, tribunes, and supporters of Julius Caesar. Fulvia married Mark Antony in 47 or 46 BC, a few years after Curio's death, although Cicero suggested that Fulvia and Antony had had a relationship since 58 BC. According to him, while Fulvia and Antony were married, Antony once left a military post to sneak back into Rome during the night and personally deliver a love letter to Fulvia describing his love for her and how he had stopped seeing the famous actress Cytheris. Cicero also suggested that Antony married Fulvia for her money. At the time of their marriage, Antony was an established politician. He had already been tribune in 49 BC, commanded armies under Caesar and was Master of the Horse in 47 BC. As a couple, they were a formidable political force in Rome, and had two sons together, Marcus Antonius Antyllus and Iullus Antonius.

Suetonius wrote, "[Antony] took a wife, Fulvia, the widow of Clodius the demagogue, a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief. So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress. He used to play all sorts of sportive, boyish tricks, to keep Fulvia in good-humour. As, for example, when Caesar, after his victory in Spain, was on his return, Antony, among the rest, went out to meet him; and, a rumour being spread that Caesar was killed and the enemy marching into Italy, he returned to Rome, and, disguising himself, came to her by night muffled up as a servant that brought letters from Antony. She, with great impatience, before received the letter, asks if Antony were well, and instead of an answer he gives her the letter; and, as she was opening it, took her about the neck and kissed her."

After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Antony became the most powerful man in Rome. Fulvia was heavily involved in the political aftermath. After Caesar's death, the senate realized his popularity and declared that they would pass all of Caesar's planned laws. Antony had attained possession of Caesar's papers, and with the ability to produce papers in support of any law, Fulvia and Antony made a fortune and gained immense power. She allegedly accompanied Antony to his military camp at Brundisium in 44 BC. Appian wrote that in December 44 and again in 41 BC, while Antony was abroad and Cicero campaigned for Antony to be declared an enemy of the state, Fulvia attempted to block such declarations by soliciting support on Antony's behalf.

Antony formed the second triumvirate with Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on 43 BC and began to conduct proscriptions. To solidify the political alliance, Fulvia's daughter Clodia was married to the young Octavian. Appian and Cassius Dio describe Fulvia as being involved in the violent proscriptions, which were used to destroy enemies and gain badly needed funds to secure control of Rome. Antony pursued his political enemies, chief among them being Cicero, who had openly criticized him for abusing his powers as consul after Caesar's assassination. Though many ancient sources wrote that Fulvia was happy to take revenge against Cicero for Antony's and Clodius' sake, Cassius Dio is the only ancient source that describes the joy with which she pierced the tongue of the dead Cicero with her golden hairpins, as a final revenge against Cicero's power of speech.

In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. According to Cassius Dio, Fulvia controlled the politics of Rome. Dio wrote that "the following year Publius Servilius and Lucius Antonius nominally became consuls, but in reality it was Antonius and Fulvia. She, the mother-in‑law of Octavian and wife of Antony, had no respect for Lepidus because of his slothfulness, and managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure."

Shortly afterwards, the triumvirs then distributed the provinces among them. Lepidus took the west and Antony went to Egypt, where he met Cleopatra VII. When Octavian returned to Rome in 41 BC to disperse land to Caesar's veterans, he divorced Fulvia's daughter and accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. Fulvia allied with her brother-in-law Lucius Antonius and publicly endorsed Mark Antony in opposition to Octavian.

In 41 BC, tensions between Octavian and Fulvia escalated to war in Italy. Together with Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions in Italy to fight for Antony's rights against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Fulvia fled to Greece with her children. Appian writes that she met Antony in Athens, and he was upset with her involvement in the war. Antony then sailed back to Rome to deal with Octavian, and Fulvia died of an unknown illness in exile in Sicyon, near Corinth, Achaea.
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Lepidus_Antony_Quinarius.jpg
1af Lepidus_214 viewsQuinarius

M LEP IMP, simpulum, aspergillum, axe (surmounted by wolf's head) & ape

M ANT IMP, lituus, capis (jug) and raven

Military mint with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus & Antony in Transalpine Gaul, 44-42 BC

Cr489/3, Syd 1158a

Lepidus was a member of the Second Triumvirate.

According to Plutarch's Life of Pompey: Sulla, however, was annoyed at seeing to what a height of reputation and power Pompey was advancing, but being ashamed to obstruct his career, he kept quiet. Only, when in spite of him and against his wishes Pompey made Lepidus consul, by canvassing for him and making the people zealously support him through their goodwill towards himself, seeing Pompey going off through the forum with a throng, Sulla said: "I see, young man, that you rejoice in your victory; and surely it was a generous and noble thing for Lepidus, the worst of men, to be proclaimed consul by a larger vote than Catulus, the best of men, because you influenced the people to take this course. Now, however, it is time for you to be wide awake and watchful of your interests; you have made your adversary stronger than yourself." But Sulla showed most clearly that he was not well-disposed to Pompey by the will which he wrote. For whereas he bequeathed gifts to other friends, and made some of them guardians of his son, he omitted all mention of Pompey. And yet Pompey bore this with great composure, and loyally, insomuch that when Lepidus and sundry others tried to prevent the body of Sulla from being buried in the Campus Martius, or even from receiving public burial honours, he came to the rescue, and gave to the interment alike honour and security.

Soon after the death of Sulla, his prophecies were fulfilled, and Lepidus tried to assume Sulla's powers. He took no circuitous route and used no pretence, but appeared at once in arms, stirring up anew and gathering about himself the remnants of faction, long enfeebled, which had escaped the hand of Sulla. His colleague, Catulus, to whom the incorrupt and sounder element in the senate and people attached themselves, was the great Roman of the time in the estimate set upon his wisdom and justice, but was thought better adapted for political than military leadership. The situation itself, therefore, demanded Pompey, who was not long in deciding what course to take. He took the side of the nobility, and was appointed commander of an army against Lepidus, who had already stirred up a large part of Italy and was employing Brutus to hold Cisalpine Gaul with an army.

Other opponents against whom Pompey came were easily mastered by him, but at Mutina, in Gaul, he lay a long while besieging Brutus. Meanwhile, Lepidus had made a hasty rush upon Rome, and sitting down before it, was demanding a second consulship, and terrifying the citizens with a vast throng of followers. But their fear was dissipated by a letter brought from Pompey, announcing that he had brought the war to a close without a battle. For Brutus, whether he himself betrayed his army, or whether his army changed sides and betrayed him, put himself in the hands of Pompey, and receiving an escort of horsemen, retired to a little town upon the Po. Here, after a single day had passed, he was slain by Geminius, who was sent by Pompey to do the deed. And Pompey was much blamed for this. For as soon as the army of Brutus changed sides, he wrote to the senate that Brutus had surrendered to him of his own accord; then he sent another letter denouncing the man after he had been put to death. The Brutus who, with Cassius, killed Caesar, was a son of this Brutus, a man who was like his father neither in his wars nor in his death, as is written in his Life. As for Lepidus, moreover, as soon as he was expelled from Italy, he made his way over to Sardinia. There he fell sick and died of despondency, which was due, as we are told, not to the loss of his cause, but to his coming accidentally upon a writing from which he discovered that his wife was an adulteress.
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AgrippinaObol.jpg
1aq Agrippina junior31 viewsMarried Claudius 49 AD

Diobol of Alexandria

Draped bust right, wreathed with corn, hair bound in plait behind, AGRIPPEINA CЄBACTH
Draped bust of Euthenia right, wreathed with corn, holding ears of corn, ЄYQH-NIA across fields, L-IB below

Milne 124

Agrippina the Younger, Julia Agrippina, or Agrippinilla (Little Agrippina) after 50 AD known as Julia Augusta Agrippina (c16 AD –59) was sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius and the mother of Nero. In 28, Tiberius arranged for Agrippina to marry her paternal second cousin Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus. Their only son was named Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, after Domitius’s recently deceased father. This child would become the Emperor Nero. In 39, Agrippina and her sister Livilla, with their maternal cousin, Drusilla’s widower, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, were involved in a failed plot to murder Caligula, and make Lepidus emperor. Lepidus was executed. Agrippina and Livilla were exiled by their brother to the Pontine Islands.

Suetonius says, "But it was Agrippina the Younger, his brother Germanicus’s daughter, who ensnared him, assisted by a niece’s privilege of exchanging kisses and endearments. At the next Senate meeting, he primed a group of Senators to propose that he ought to marry Agrippina, as it was in the public interest, and that such marriages between uncle and niece should from then on be regarded as lawful, and no longer incestuous. He married her (AD 49) with barely a day’s delay, but only one freedman and one leading centurion married their respective nieces, to follow suit. Claudius himself, with Agrippina, attended the centurion’s wedding."

The Euthenia reverse reminds one of "euthanasia." which is what some suspect she did to Claudius to elevate her son Nero to the purple.
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CommodusSestRoma.jpg
1bn Commodus29 views177-192

Sestertius

Laureate head, right, M COMMOD ANT P FELIX AVG BRIT PP

Roma seated left, ROM FEL PM TR P XVI COS VI

RIC 224

The Historia Augusta reports: As for Commodus himself, he was born, with his twin brother Antoninus, at Laiiuvium where his mother's father was born, it is said on the day before the Kalends of September, while his father and uncle were consuls. . . . Marcus tried to educate Commodus by his own teaching and by that of the greatest and the best of men. . . . However, teachers in all these studies profited him not in the least such is the power, either of natural character, or of the tutors maintained in a palace. For even from his earliest years he was base and dis- honorable, and cruel and lewd, defiled of mouth, moreover, and debauched. . . . While yet a child he was given the name of Caesar, along with his brother Verus. . . .

[After Marcus died], He abandoned the war which his father had almost finished and submitted to the enemy's terms, and then he returned to Rome. . . . After he had come back to Rome, he led the triumphal procession with Saoterus, his partner in depravity, seated in his chariot, and from time to time he would turn around and kiss him openly, repeating this same performance even in the orchestra. And not only was he wont to drink until dawn and squander the resources of the Roman Empire, but in the evening he would ramble through taverns and brothels. 6 He sent out to rule the provinces men who were either his companions in crime or were recommended to him by criminals. He became so detested by the senate that he in his turn was moved with cruel passion for the destruction of that great order, and from having been despised he became bloodthirsty. . . . He was called also the Roman Hercules, on the ground that he had killed 192 wild beasts in the amphitheatre at Lanuvium. . . . He engaged in gladiatorial combats, and accepted
the names usually given to gladiators 5 with as much pleasure as if he had been granted triumphal decorations. . . .

Because of these things but all too late Quintus Aemilius Laetus, prefect of the guard, and Marcia, his concubine, were roused to action and entered into a conspiracy against his life. First they gave him poison; and when this proved ineffective they had him strangled by the athlete with whom he was accustomed to exercise.
Blindado
Craw_415_1_Denario_Aemilius_Lepidus_Paullus.jpg
21-01 - Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus (62 A.C)21 viewsAR Denarius 19 mm 3.9 gr

Este Magistrado Monetario era el hermano mayor de M. Aemilius Lepidus, que con posterioridad se convertiría en uno de los tres triúnviros junto a Octavio y Marco Antonio.
Esta emisión conmemora las victorias de L. Aemilius Paullus, supuesto ancestro del Magistrado Monetario. La palabra TER en el reverso, significa "Tertia", lo que referiría a los tres triunfos; en España en 190 A.C., Liguria en 181 A.C. y la famosa batalla de de Pydna en 168 A.C., donde los romanos extinguieron el reino independiente de Macedonia..

Anv: "PAVLLVS LEPIDVS - CONCORDIA", Busto de Concordia a der., vistiendo velo y diadema.
Rev: "TER" sobre, "PAVLLVS" en exergo. El ancestro del Magistrado, L. Aemilius Lepidus, vistiendo toga y estante a la izquierda de un trofeo de armas, a la derecha del mismo el Rey Perseo de Macedonia y sus dos hijos.
Este Rey y sus hijos fueron llevados a Roma, luego de su derrota, para hacerlos participar del desfile de la victoria.

Ceca: Roma
Referencias: Sear RCTV Vol.1 #366 Pag.141 - Craw RRC #415/1 - Syd CRR #926 -BMCRR #3373 pl.43/8 - Harlan RRM 1p 1-10 - RSC Vol.1 Aemilia 10 Pag.11 - Babelon MRR Vol.1 #10 (Aemilia) Pag.122 - CDMR #126 - Albert MRR #1332 - Catalli #591
mdelvalle
coin244.JPG
307. Aemilian31 viewsMarcus Aemilius Aemilianus was born about AD 207 either on the island of Jerba in Africa, or somewhere in Mauretania.
His career saw him becoming senator and reaching the office of consul. In AD 252 he then became governor of Lower Moesia.

In the spring of AD 253 the Goths broke the treaty made with the emperor Trebonianus Gallus. Aemilian quickly drove them out of Moesia and then, crossed the Danube crushing the Gothic forces.

In a time when Rome suffered continuous setbacks his unexpected triumph made him an outstanding leader in the eyes of his men. So, in July or August AD 253 Aemilian was proclaimed emperor by his troops. The new emperor didn't waste time. Immediately he marched his troops into Italy, rapidly moving on Rome. Only fifty miles north of the capital, at Interamna, they were were approached by the much inferior army of unprepared emperor Gallus and with his son and co-emperor Volusianus. Their troops however, realizing themselves dead if they were sent to fight Aemilian's much larger and more experienced Danubian forces, turned on them and killed them, leaving Aemilian sole emperor.

The senate, having only recently declared Aemilian a public enemy under Gallus, immediately confirmed him as emperor and Aemilian's wife Gaia Cornelia Supera was made Augusta.

All the empire now lay at Aemilian's feet, but for one big problem. Publius Licinius Valerianus, called to aid by the late Trebonianus Gallus, was marching toward Rome. His emperor might have been dead, but his usurper was still alive, giving Valerian all the reasons needed to carry on towards the capital. In fact the soldiers of his Rhine armies now declared him emperor in place of Aemilian.

As Aemilian now moved north to face his challenger history repeated itself. His own soldiers not wanting to fight a army they thought superior to their own, turned on him near Spoletium and stabbed him to death (October AD 253). The bridge where he died was afterwards known as the pons sanguinarius, the 'bridge of blood'.

Aemilian had ruled for only 88 days.

Aemilian AR Antonininus. 253 AD. IMP AEMILIANVS PIVS FEL AVG, radiate draped bust right / VIRTVS AVG, Virtus standing left, foot on helmet, holding branch & spear. RSC 60. RIC 12. Ex-WCNC
ecoli
20140622_150256-horz.jpg
415/1 L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus31 viewsL. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, AR Denarius, Rome Mint. 62 BC. (3.75g; 18.77mm) Obv: [P]AVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right. Rev: Trophy; on right togate figure (L. Aemilius Paullus); on left, three captives (King Perseus of Macedon and his sons); above, TER; in ex. PAVLLV[S].
Crawford 415/1; Aemilia 10; Sydenham 926

Ex: J Pedersen Mynthandel

Paddy
Rex_Aretas,_Denarius.jpg
422/1b M. Aemilius Scaurus & P. Plautius Hypsaeus155 viewsRepublic. AR Denarius. 58 B.C. 3.93 g. Obv: M SCAVR AED CVR above, EX S C in fields, REX ARETAS below, King Aretas kneels right with palm branch in left hand, alongside camel. Rev: P HVPSAEVS AED CVR above, CAPTVM on right, C HVPSAE COS PREIVE in exergue, Jupiter drives quadriga left and hurls thunderbolt. Crawford 422/1b. Hendin 1441. Ex Amphora-catalog 98, item 96.

My absolute favorite coin thus far! Commemorating Scaurus' victory over Nabataea.
9 commentsLucas H
423-1_Servilia2.jpg
423/1. Servilia - denarius (57 BC)31 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 57 BC)
O/ Head of Flora right; lituus behind; FLORAL PRIMVS before.
R/ Two soldiers facing each other and presenting swords; C SERVEIL in exergue; C F upwards on right.
3.87g; 18mm
Crawford 423/1 (99 obverse dies/110 reverse dies)
- ROMA Numismatics, E-Sale 42, lot 484.
- Artemide Aste, 11-12 June 2016, lot 253.

* Gaius Servilius C.f. (Brocchus?):

The gens Servilia was originally patrician, but our moneyer was most likely a plebeian because at this time, the only remaining patrician branch of the gens was the Caepiones. The Servilii Gemini, likewise patricians at first, lost their status during the Second Punic War for an unknown reason and their descendants had erratic cognomina, making it difficult to reconstruct the genealogical tree of the gens. The one given by Crawford for RRC 239 is dubious, although possible.

Crawford also says that our moneyer was perhaps a brother of Marcus Servilius C.f., Tribune of the Plebs in 43 BC. He was possibly the Gaius Servilius Brocchus, son of Gaius, mentioned as Military Tribune by Flavius Josephus (Jewish Antiquities, xiv. 229), who tells that he served under the Consul L. Cornelius Lentulus Crus in Asia. It would match a career started in the 50, during which the Pompeian party was dominating, and continued as Pompey's supporter during the Civil War.

The meaning of his denarius has been debated. According to Crawford, the obverse legend refers to the priesthood of Flora, probably held by the gens, contradicting the view of Mommsen, who thought it was celebrating the establishment of the Ludi Florales in 173. This view has been in turn challenged by Robert Palmer, but without giving an explanation of his own*. It should also be mentioned that Pliny the Elder tells that there were statues of Flora, Triptolemus and Ceres by Praxiteles in the "Servilian gardens" (Natural History, xxxvi. 4), which obviously belonged to the gens, showing that Flora was of special importance for the Servilii.

The reverse reuses a common theme on Servilii's denarii: the duels of Marcus Servilius Pulex Geminus, Consul in 202, who was famous for his 23 victories in single combats (Plutarch, Aemilius Paullus, 31). The scene was depicted with variations on RRC 264 (horseback duel), RRC 327 (duel on foot), and RRC 370 (rider charging). It is also possible that RRC 239 shows another duel on horse, but disguised as the Dioscuri riding apart. The fact that our moneyer used this theme links him to the other direct descendants of Servilius Pulex Geminus, thus supporting Crawford's theory that he was a grandchild of Gaius Servilius, Praetor in 102.

* "Flora and the Sybil", in Ten Years of the Agnes Kirsopp Lake Michels Lectures at Bryn Mawr College, edited by Suzanne B. Faris, Lesley E. Lundeen, Bryn Mawr, 2006, pp. 58-70.
3 commentsJoss
Caesar~4.jpg
44 BC Julius Caesar Lifetime Portrait denarius437 viewsCAESAR DICT PERPETVO
laureate head of Julius Caesar right

L BVCA
Venus seated right holding Victory on extended right hand, transverse scepter in left

Struck Feb - Mar 14th, 44 BC.

3.58g

RCV 1410, RSC 24.

Venus seated' only appears on this one type of Caesar's 'lifetime' issues, on the remainder she is standing.

Lucius Aemilius Buca was a distant relative of the dictator Sulla. This coin was struck within a month of Caesar's murder.

Ex-Incitatus, Ex-CNG Electronic Auction 223, lot 393
6 commentsJay GT4
Scipio.jpg
47-46 BC Q. Caecilius Metellus Pius Scipio68 viewsQ METEL SCIPIO IMP
head of Africa right, laur. and clad in elephant's skin, corn-ear before, plough below

EPPIVS LEG F C

Naked Hercules standing facing right, hand on hip resting on club set on rock

North Africa
47-46 BC

Sear 1380/1

Born Publius Cornelius Scipio Nasica. He was adopted by his uncle by marriage and father's second cousin Quintus Caecilius Metellus Pius. He married Aemilia Lepida, daughter of Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus Livianus (son of the Censor Marcus Livius Drusus and wife Cornelia Scipio and adopted by Mamercus Aemilius Lepidus) and wife Claudia (sister of Appius Claudius Pulcher (Senior)), and was the father in law of Pompey the Great, married to his daughter Cornelia Metella, called Quinta Pompeia for being his fifth wife.

He was Tribune in 59 BC and became Consul with Pompey the Great in 52 BC. During Caesar's civil war, he served the party of Pompey and fought against Caesar and Marcus Antonius. In 49 BC he was sent as Proconsul to Syria and the following year he took part in the Battle of Pharsalus, where he commanded the center of the Republican battleline. After Pharsalus he fled to Africa were he commanded an army with Cato the Younger, losing in the Battle of Thapsus. After the defeat he tried to escape but was cornered by the fleet of Publius Sittius when he wrecked the ship as he tried to escape to the Iberian Peninsula, to continue to fight from there. He committed suicide by stabbing himself so he would not fall at the hands of his enemies.

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Lepidus.jpg
62 BC L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus 57 viewsPAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA

Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right

Rev. Togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus standing left touching trophy to left of which stand King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons as captives
TER above, PAVLLVS in ex.

Rome 62 BC

Sear 366

This moneyer was the elder brother of the triumvir M. Aemillius Lepidus

Sold!
Titus Pullo
Lepidus~0.jpg
62 BC L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus99 viewsPAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA

Veiled and diad. head of Concordia right

Rev. Togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus standing left touching trophy to left of which stand King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons as captives
TER above, PAVLLVS in ex.

Rome 62 BC

Sear 366

3.80g

Holed in antiquity

Ex-Canada Coins


This moneyer was the elder brother of the triumvir M. Aemillius Lepidus
2 commentsJay GT4
Bacchivs.jpg
A. Plautius72 viewsA. Plautius 54 BCE, denarius, 21mm., Rome mint. O: Turreted head of Cybele right, A PLAVTIVS before, AED CVR SC behind. R: Bacchius (Aristobulus II) kneeling right, extending olive branch, camel at side, BACCHIVS in exergue, IVDAEVS on right. Hendin 1443

The 'Bacchius the Jew' kneeling on the reverse is most likely Judah Aristobulus II, who usurped the throne of Judea from his brother John Hyrcanus II between 67 and 63 BC. In 63 BCE, Pompey the Great sided with Hyrcanus and subjected Jerusalem to a brutal siege and sacking, deposing Aristobulus II. Pompey went so far as to enter the Holy of Holies, defiling the sanctuary and marking the end of the great Hasmonean dynasty.

The Romans now had a foot in the door and were not about to remove it. Hyrcanus became a Roman ethnarch, one who ruled by the grace of the Romans, dependent on their goodwill and support to retain his throne.

Aristobulus was permitted to live as a hostage in Rome, but later escaped and tried to resume the throne, only to be defeated again by M. Aemilius Scaurus. This issue celebrates this unsuccessful attempt to regain control of Judaea.

Behind the scenes, a rich Idumaean chieftain named Antipater continued to manipulate Hyrcanus and to pander to Rome, building influence and power. This set the stage for the eventual rise to power of his infamous son, Herod the Great.

Except for the inscription, this coin is of the same reverse type as Hendin 1441.
2 commentsNemonater
AEMILIA10R1DR.jpg
AEMILIA 1031 viewsL. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus (BC 62)Rugser
AEMILIA20R1D+R.jpg
AEMILIA 2031 viewsM. Aemilius Lepidus (c. BC 61)Rugser
AEMILIA7R2D+R~1.jpg
AEMILIA 742 viewsMan. Aemilius Lepidus (c. BC 114/13)Rugser
AEMILIA7R1D+R.jpg
AEMILIA 7108 viewsM. Aemilius Lepidus (c. BC 114/113)3 commentsRugser
AEMILIA7R3D+R.jpg
AEMILIA 722 viewsM. Aemilius Lepidus (c. BC 114/113)Rugser
AEMILIA8R1D+R.jpg
AEMILIA 823 viewsM. Aemilius Scaurus and Pub. Plautius Hypsaesus (BC 58)Rugser
L__Aemilius_Lepidus_Paullus.jpg
Aemilius Lepidus Paullus - Aemilia-10153 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus. 62 BC. AR Denarius (18mm - 4.38 g). Rome mint. Diademed and veiled head of Concordia right / L. Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left. Unusually heavy flan. Crawford 415/1; Sydenham 926; Aemilia 10. RSC 366 Bud Stewart
Aretas.jpg
Aretas31 viewsAretas, denarius
M. Aemilius Scaurus & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus. 58 BC.
19mm, 3,99g.
Obv. M SCAVR AED CVR EX S C; King Aretas III of Nabatea kneeling beside camel in an attitude of supplication, holding olive-branch.
Rev. P HVPSAEVS AED CVR CAPTV C HVPSAE COS PREIVER; Jupiter in quadriga left, holding thunderbolt.
Cr422/1a
1 commentsMarsman
Aemilius_Iustus_Aug_Traiana_AE29_18_5g.JPG
Augusta Traiana Commodus Aemilius Iustus35 viewsCommodus

AE 29 18.5g

L. Aemilius Iustus

AV ∙ KAI | M ∙ AV KOM[OΔOC
Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right

HΓE Λ AIM IOVCTOV AΓOV (sic)
Ex: CTHC TPAI
AN[HC]
City gate with three turrets with battlements

Schönert-Geiss Die Münzpragung von Augusta Traiana und Traianopolis -; cf.Varbanov ( E) II 943 p. 85; BMC- Mionnet -; SNG Cop. -
Petrus Elmsley
0072.jpg
C. Servilius Vatia, Denar15 viewsC. Servilius Vatia, Denar

RRC 264/1
127 bc

AV: Helmeted head of Roma, r. lituus behind, * before
RV:Battle on horseback, C Serviel in exergue

"The reverse type of of the denarius probably refers to the propensity for single combat of the moneyer's ancestor M. Servilius Pulex Geminus, Cos 202"(Crawford)

"..He is said to have received wounds in twenty-three single combats and to have been victorious in all. (Plutarch,Paulus Aemilius, xxxi.)"(Grüber)

--
Ex Gorny & Mosch, Auction 247, Los 268
Norbert
coins340.JPG
Carinus17 viewsFelicitas was the goddess or personification of good luck and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire, and was frequently portrayed on coins. She was very closely associated with the imperial family.

Felicitas was unknown before the mid-2nd century BC, when a temple was dedicated to her in the Velabrum in the Campus Martius by Lucius Licinius Lucullus, using booty from his 151–150 BC campaign in Spain. The temple was destroyed by a fire during the reign of Claudius and was never rebuilt.

Another temple in Rome was planned by Julius Caesar and was erected after his death by Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on the site of the Curia Hostilia, which had been restored by Lucius Cornelius Sulla but demolished by Caesar in 44 BC. This temple no longer existed by the time of Hadrian, and its site probably lies under the church of Saints Luca and Martina.

The word felicitas, "luck", is also the source of the word and name felicity.

Carinus Billon Antoninianus. IMP CARINVS P F AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right / FELICIT PVBLICA, Felicitas standing left with cauduceus, leaning on column, TXXI in ex. RIC 295, Cohen 24.
1 commentsecoli
commodus_aug_tria_b~0.jpg
CITY-GATE, COMMODUS -- AUGUSTA TRAIANA75 views177 - 192 AD
struck 191-192 AD
AE 29.5 mm; 15.36 g
Magistrate: L. Aemilius Iustus (Legatus Augusti pro praetore provinciae Thraciae)
O: AV KAI [M] AV KOMOΔOC (or similar) Laureate bust right
R: ΗΓΕ Λ ΑΙΜ ΙΟVСΤ ΑVΓΟVСΤΗС ΤΡΑΙΑΝΗС City gate with 3 towers
Thrace, Augusta Traiana
cf RPC online 10823, citing a Freeman & Sear sale of 2005, without picture.
laney
Aemilia_10_dealer.jpg
Cr 415/1 - Aemilia 1045 viewsL Aemilius Lepidus Paullus
ROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius, 62 BC (3.7g)
Moneyer: L Aemilius Lepidus Paullus

Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA around / L Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left, PAVLVS in ex.

Cr415/1, Syd 926, Aemilia 10 VF

Ex Imperial Coins
RR0004
3 commentsSosius
432G407Aemilia.jpg
Cr 415/1 AR Denarius L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus10 views62 BCE Rome mint
o: Veiled and diademed head of Concord right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS- CONCORDIA around
r: L. Aemilius Paullus erecting trophy before three captives, PAVLLVS in ex., TE - R above
Crawford 415/1; Aemilia 10
3.99gg. (6h).
The reverse depicts King Perseus of Macedon and his sons, the non-winners at Paullus' victory at Pydna in 168 BCE, which ended the Macedonian dynasty and was not particularly healthy for the enslaved and looted cities, either.
The moneyer was likely engaged in a bit of counter-adoption, as the great general's agnate family technically died out upon his death.
PMah
Aemilia_8_Dealer_.jpg
Cr 422/1b - Aemilia 854 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC
AR Denarius, 58 BC (3.9g)
Moneyers: M Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus

M SCAVR AED CVR EX S C, Nabatean king Aretas kneeling before camel, REX ARETAS beneath camel / P HVPSAEVS AED CVR CAPTV C HVPSAE COS PREIVER, Jupiter in quadriga right; scorpion to left.

Cr422/1b, Syd 913, Aemilia 8 VF, worn dies

Ex Imperial Coins
RR0005
3 commentsSosius
11062v.jpg
Crawford 417/1a, Roman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC., AR Denarius.72 viewsRoman Republic, Rome mint, moneyers L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo, 62 BC.,
AR Denarius (18-20 mm / 3,72 g),
Obv.: [P]AVLLVS. LEPIDVS - CONCORD head of Concordia r., wearing veil and diadem.
Rev.: PVTEAL SCRIBON / LIBO , Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian well, the "Puteal Scribonianum" well in the Forum Romanum near the Arch of Fabius), decorated with garland and two lyres, hammer at base.
Crawf. 417/1a ; Syd. 927 ; Bab. / Seaby Aemilia 11 ; Kestner 3422 ; BMC Rome 3383 ; CNR Aemilia 62 .
Rare

A puteal was a classical wellhead, round or sometimes square, set round a well opening to keep people from falling in. Such well heads (putealia) might be of marble, enriched with bas-reliefs. - The puteal is on the reverse of the coin adorned with garlands and two lyres. It is generally stated that there were two putealia in the Roman forum; but C. F. Hermann, who has carefully examined all the passages in the ancient writers relating to this matter (Ind. Lect. Marburg. 1840), comes to the conclusion that there was only one such puteal at Rome. It was in the forum, near the Arcus Fabianus, and was dedicated in very ancient times either on account of the whetstone of the Augur Navius (cf. Liv. I.36), or because the spot had been struck by lightning. It was subsequently repaired and re-dedicated by Scribonius Libo, who had been commanded to examine the state of the sacred places. Libo erected in its neighbourhood a tribunal for the praetor, in consequence of which the place was, of course, frequented by persons who had law-suits, such as money-lenders and the like.

The Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian Puteal) or Puteal Libonis (Puteal of Libo), building in the Forum at Rome, dedicated or restored by a member of the Libo family, perhaps the praetor of 204 BC, or the tribune of the people in 149 BC. In its vicinity the praetor's tribunal, removed from the comitium in the 2nd century BC, held its sittings, which led to the place becoming the haunt of litigants, money-lenders and business people. According to ancient authorities, the Puteal Libonis was the name given to an erection (or enclosure) on a spot which had been struck by lightning; it was so called from its resemblance to the stone curb or low enclosure round a well (puteus) that was between the temples of Castor and Vesta, near the Porticus Julia and the Arcus Fabiorum (arch of the Fabii), but no remains have been discovered. The idea that an irregular circle of travertine blocks, found near the temple of Castor, formed part of the puteal is now abandoned. See Horace, Sat. ii.6.35, Epp. i.19.8; Cicero, Pro Sestio, 8; for the well-known coin of Lucius Scribonius Libo, representing the puteal of Libo, which rather resembles a cippus (sepulchral monument) or an altar, with laurel wreaths, two lyres and a pair of pincers or tongs below the wreaths (perhaps symbolical of Vulcan as forger of lightning), see C. Hulsen, The Roman Forum (Eng. trans. by J. B. Carter, 1906), p. 150.

L. Scribonius Libo, was the father-in-law of Sextus Pompey, the son of Pompey the Great. On the breaking out of the civil war in 49, he sided with Pompey, and was given command of Etruria. Shortly afterwards he accompanied Pompey to Greece, and was actively engaged in the war that ensued. On the death of Bibulus (48) he had the given command of the Pompeian fleet. In the civil wars following Caesar's death, he followed the fortunes of his son-in-law Sextus Pompey. In 40, Octavian married his sister Scribonia, and this marriage was followed by a peace between the triumvirs and Pompey (39). When the war was renewed in 36, Libo for a time supported Pompey, but, seeing his cause hopeless, he deserted him in the following year. In 34, he was consul with Mark Antony.

my ancient coin database
1 commentsArminius
Crawford_480_4.jpg
crw 480/4 . Julius Caesar. 44 B.C. AR denarius 64 viewsJulius Caesar. Rome mint, moneyer L. Aemilius Buca, lifetime issue c. mid Jan - Feb 44 B.C. ; AR denarius ( fragment ) .
14 mm, 1.26 g.
Obverse: Wreathed head of Julius Caesar right, CAESAR IMP before, P M divided by large crescent with horns up behind .
Reverse: Venus standing left, Victory in extended right, long scepter vertical behind in left, L AEMILIVS before, BVCA behind .
Crawford 480/4; HCRI 102; Sydenham 1060; RSC 22
Ex Moneta Numismatic Services
3 commentsVladislav D
Nsz75kQ8Ytt842LfcW69Hz4w6rnEiB.jpg
crw 489/5 . Mark Antony with M. Aemilius Lepidus AR quinarius – Fulvia (wife of M. Antony) as Victory . 43BC 51 viewsMark Antony with M. Aemilius Lepidus AR quinarius – Fulvia (wife of M. Antony) as Victory . 43BC
Lugdunum mint . 1.26g
Bust of Victory right
DVNI A XL LVGV, Lion standing right
Cr. 489/5. Syd.1160
Ex Romanorum
1 commentsVladislav D
Picture 357.jpg
Denarius of M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus21 viewshooverman
EB0360.JPG
EB0360, Mn Aemilius Lepidus, Brockage AR Denarius51 viewsMn Aemilius Lepidus, Brockage AR Denarius
Obv: Diademed, laureate bust of Roma R., ROMA before, star behind
Rev: Same incuse L.
References: Syd. 554?
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.78 g
2 commentsEB
GaiusRIC33.jpg
Gaius ("Caligula"), RIC 33, Sestertius from A.D.37-38 (three sisters)167 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.4g, Ø 33-34mm, 6h), Rome mint, struck AD 37-38
Obv.: C CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT, laurate head left
Rev.: AGRIPPINA - DRVSILLA - IVLIA (left, above and right) S C (ex.), Caligula's three sisters: Agrippina (Jr.), the eldest sister, as Securitas, leaning on column, holding cornucopiae, and placing left hand on Drusilla's shoulder; Drusilla, the middle sister, as Concordia, holding patera and cornucopiae; and Julia Livilla, the youngest, as Fortuna, holding rudder and cornucopiae.
RIC 33 (R); Mattingly (BMCRE) 36, 37; Cohen 4 (25 Fr.); Sear (Roman Coins & their Values) 1800
ex Harlan J. Berk, Buy/Bid Sale 130 (2002)

Addtional information from H.J. Berk: This specimen in the style of a provincial branch mint, apparently rarer than those in Rome-mint style. Very slightly granular.

This type was produced on two occasions, a first issue in 37-38, and a second in 39-40. This example belongs to the first, issued when the three women were all still alive. Drusilla, Caligula's favourite sister (the one with whom he is said to have had an incestuous relationship), died tragically on June 10, 38, nearly three months after the last coins of the first issue were struck. By the time the second issue was produced (beginning March 18, 39), Drusilla had been accorded the status of a goddess, providing the curious circumstance of a goddess being portrayed in the guise of a personification. Life in the palace worsened after Drusilla's death and Caligula's affection for his remaining two sisters declined.
Drusilla married to Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, who had also been Caligula's lover. At least after Drusilla died, Lepidus extended his sexual liaisons to include Agrippina and Julia Livilla, his former sisters-in-law. By late in 39 this web of relationships seems to have evolved into a failed plot by Lepidus against Caligula, who executed Lepidus and sent his two sisters into exile out of their suspected complicity. All of this palace intrigue occurred in the midst of the second issue of 'three sisters' sestertii, the production of which Caligula probably halted immediately since of the three sisters shown, one was dead and two were in exile for having plotted against his life. Examples of this second issue are excessively rare (RIC 41:R4).
3 commentsCharles S
1aretas.jpg
Gens Aemilia, denarius (58 a.C)10 viewsM. Aemilius Scaurus e P. Plautius, denario (Roma, 58 a.C.)
AR, 3.82 gr, 17 mm, qBB
D/ M SCAVR; EX – S C; AED CVR; REX ARETAS (in ex) un cammello e il re Aretas inginocchiato che offre un ramoscello d’olivo.
R/ P HVPSAE / AED CVR; C HVPSAE COS / PREIVE; CAPTVM; Giove, su quadriga, con saetta; sotto, uno scorpione.
Crawford 422/1b
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 13 dicembre 2017, numero catalogo 387); ex collezione Alessandro Vanni, Tinia numismatica (Follonica, Italia fino al dicembre 2017)
paolo
IMG_1576q.JPG
Italy, Rome, Pons Aemilius288 viewsthe oldest stone-bridge in Rome
bridge with six wholly stone arches was comleted in 142 BC
bridge was destroyd in 1598 AD by flood.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pons_Aemilius
3 commentsJohny SYSEL
bvca.jpg
Julius Caesar53 viewsJulius Caesar. 44 BC. AR Denarius. L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer.
Obverse: CAESAR D[CT PER]PETVO, laureate head right.
Reverse: L BVCA, winged caduceus and fasces in saltire; axe, globe, and clasped hands in angles.
Crawford 480/6; CRI 103; Sydenham 1063; RSC 25. 18mm - 2.90 g.
b70
image01789.jpg
Julius Caesar24 viewsJulius Caesar and L. Aemilius Buca. Denarius 44, AR 3.64 g. Wreathed head of Caesar r. Rev. Venus standing l., holding sceptre and Victory. B. Julia 35 and Aemilia 14. C 23. Sydenham 1061. Sear Imperators 105. Crawford 480/8.
2 commentsTLP
Aemilia_1a_img.jpg
L Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, denarius17 viewsObv:– PAVLLVS LEPIDVS – CONCORDIA, Diademed and draped bust of Concordia right
Rev:– TER Trophy; to right, togate figure (L. Aemilius Paullus) and to left, three captives (King Perseus of Macedon and his sons). In exergue, PAVLLVS
Minted in Rome from 62 B.C.
Reference:– Sydenham 926. Crawford 415/1. RSC I Aemilia 10
maridvnvm
00760.jpg
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus (RSC I Aemilia 10, Coin #760)4 viewsRSC I Aemilia 10, AR Denarius, Rome, 62 BC
OBV: PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA; Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right.
REV: TER PAVLLVS; Paullus on right, standing left, togate, touching trophy in center; on the left, three standing bound captives: King Perseus of Macedonia, his half-brother, and his son.
SIZE: 20.6mm, 3.90g
MaynardGee
Paulus_Lepidus.jpg
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus - AR denarius13 viewsRome
²67 BC
¹62 BC
Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right
PAVLLVS LEPIDVS_CONCORDIA
L Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left
TER
PAVLLVS
¹Crawford 415/1, SRCV I 366, RSC I Aemilia 10, Sydenham 926
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,84g 20-19,5mm

On reverse scene moneyer commemorates his ancestor L. Aemilius Paullus who had defeated Macedonian king Perseus in the battle of Pydna. TER stands for tertius since it was his third triumph.
Moneyer was elected consul in 50 BC and was bribed by Julius Caesar who need his support. Paullus had used money to reconstruction of basilica Aemilia on Roman Forum. Paullus opposed the second triumvirate and his brother Marcus Aemilius Lepidus order his death but he managed to escape and join Brutus. After Brutus' defeat he was pardoned and spend his remaining years at Miletus.
Johny SYSEL
Aemilia_L_Lepidus_Paullus_Cr415.jpg
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus - denarius66 viewsL. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus. 62 BC. AR Denarius, 3.68 g; obv. Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA around; rev. L Aemilius Paullus standing to right of trophy, Perseus and his two sons captive on the left, PAVLVS in ex. Crawford 415/1, Syd. 926.

2 commentsBartosz Awianowicz
Lepedus.jpg
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus 62b.c. Denarius17 viewsVeiled and diademed head of Concord right, PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA around. Reverse. TER above trophy, L Aemilius Paullus on right, Perseus and his two sons as prisoners on left., PAVLLVS in exergue.Philoromaos
aemilia.JPG
L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus. 62 BC. AR Denarius. Barbarous issue85 viewsL. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus. 62 BC. AR Denarius (3.80 g). Barbarous issue(Geto-Dacian imitation) with newly engraved dies, in good silver. PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right / TER above trophy; to left, three captives (King Perseus and his two sons) standing; to right, togate L. Aemilius Paullus, raising his hand. PAVLLVS in ex.1 commentsancientone
Aemilia_10.JPG
Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus 24 viewsObv: PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, veiled and diademed head of Concordia facing right.

Rev: TER, Lucius Aemilius Paullus, wearing a toga, on the right assembling a trophy, to the left are three captives, King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons; PAVLLVS in exergue.

Weight adjustment mark on face of Concordia

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 62 BC

3.9 grams, 19 x 17 mm, 90°

RSC Aemilia 10, S366
SPQR Coins
0062.jpg
Lucius Aemilius Lepidus Paullus, Denarius35 viewsRRC 415/1
62 b.c.

Obverse: Head of Concordia right, L PAUVLLVS LEPIDVS, CONCORDIA
Reverse: Trophy, togate figure (L Aemilius Paullus), the captives - King Perseus of Macedon and his sons; in exergue: PAVLLVS

The moneyer was a supporter of Cicero, the obverse concordia being represenation of the 'concordia ordinum', central to Ciceros politics in 63 (according to Crawford; Grüber gives a different interpretation, assumedly as he puts the coin into 71 b.c.) .

The reservse remembering the (assumed?) ancestor hailed 'imperator' three times.

Ex Numismatica Ars Classica, Auction 73, Lot 153, 18 November 2013
Ex Sotheby’s sale 1-2 December 1976, Eton College, 267.
Norbert
Saturninus_P.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
.
·P
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,66g 19-17mm

According Richard Schaefer it's the first known example of these dies. Dies differ from ·P thus there, most probably, is dot above P although unfortunately off flan.

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
Saturninus_T~0.jpg
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus - AR denarius18 viewsRome
²101 BC
¹104 BC
helmeted head of Roma left
Saturn in quadriga right holding harpa and reins
·T·
L·SATVRN
¹Crawford 317/3a, SRCV I 193, Sydenham 578, RSC I Appuleia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,44g 19,5-18,5mm

As quaestor Saturninus superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but had been removed by the Roman Senate (an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates. Standard view is that injustice of his dismissal drove him into the arms of the Populares. In 103 BC he was elected tribune. Marius, on his return to Rome after his victory over the Cimbri, finding himself isolated in the senate, entered into a compact with Saturninus and his ally Gaius Servilius Glaucia, and the three formed a kind of triumvirate, supported by the veterans of Marius and many of the common people. By the aid of bribery and assassination Marius was elected (100 BC) consul for the sixth time, Glaucia praetor, and Saturninus tribune for the second time. Marius, finding himself overshadowed by his colleagues and compromised by their excesses, thought seriously of breaking with them, and Saturninus and Glaucia saw that their only hope of safety lay in their retention of office. Saturninus was elected tribune for the third time for the year beginning December 10, 100, and Glaucia, although at the time praetor and therefore not eligible until after the lapse of 2 years, was a candidate for the consulship. Marcus Antonius Orator was elected without opposition; the other Optimate candidate, Gaius Memmius, who seemed to have the better chance of success, was beaten to death by the hired agents of Saturninus and Glaucia, while the voting was actually going on. This produced a complete revulsion of public feeling. The Senate met on the following day, declared Saturninus and Glaucia public enemies, and called upon Marius to defend the State. Marius had no alternative but to obey. Saturninus, defeated in a pitched battle in the Roman Forum (December 10), took refuge with his followers in the Capitol, where, the water supply having been cut off, they were forced to capitulate. Marius, having assured them that their lives would be spared, removed them to the Curia Hostilia, intending to proceed against them according to law. But the more impetuous members of the aristocratic party climbed onto the roof, stripped off the tiles, and stoned Saturninus and many others to death. Glaucia, who had escaped into a house, was dragged out and killed. (wikipedia)
Johny SYSEL
M__Aemilius_Sacurus_and_P__Plautius_Hypsaeus_(58_BC)_obv.jpeg
M Aemilius Sacurus and P Plautius Hypsaeus AR Denarius14 viewsM Aemilius Sacurus and P Plautius Hypsaeus (58 BC) AR denarius (3.77 g) Rome. Camel and kneeling figure right / Jupiter in quadriga left. Crawford 422/1b. Hendin 1414. VFOctopus Grabus
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M Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus Denarius 58 bc34 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV 379, Crawford 422/1b; Sydenham 913; RSC Aemilia 8, Rome mint, 58 B.C.; obverse Aretas, King of Nabatea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR / AED CVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in ex; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below, P HYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPTV on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVER in exergue.

M. Aemilius Scaurus, in 62 B.C., as questor to Pompey, was sent against King Aretas but withdrew when Aretas paid 300 talents. Aemilius was curule aedile when this coin was struck. This was the first time a moneyer publicized an event from his own career on coinage. Later he was praetor and propraetor, lost a campaign for Consul, and successfully defended Cicero. In 52 B.C., he was charged with bribery and went into exile.
Adrian S
M_Aemilius_1_opt.jpg
M. AEMILIUS Denarius Syd 912, POMPEY Victory v ARETAS 18 viewsOBV: M . SCAVR / AED CVR above king Aretas kneeling beside a camel r., EX on ,S . C on right, REX ARETAS in ex.
REV: HYPSAE (vs) / AED CVR above Jupiter in quadriga left, CAPTVM on right, c. HYPSAEVS cos PREIV (ER) in ex. scorpion below horses
3.1g, 17mm

Minted 58BC
M. Aemilius Scaurus & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus. When M. Aemilius was Governor of Syria, he repressed the incursions of the Nabathean Arabians, compelling their king, Aretas, to submit and pay a fine of 300 talents to Pompey. Pub. Plautius was curule aedile with him in B.C. 58.
Legatus
lepidus.jpg
M. AEMILIUS LEPIDUS 36 viewsAR denarius. 61 BC. 3,97 grs. Diademed head of female (Roma ?) right / Equestrian statue of M.Lepidus holding trophy. M.LEPIDUS in exergue.
Craw 119/1a. RSC Aemilia 21b.
1 commentsbenito
M_Aemilius_Scarus___Pub_Plautius_Hypsaeus_JPG_2.png
M. Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus – Aemilia-837 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC AR denarium (3.65g) M Aemilius Scarus & Pub Plautius Hypsaeus. 58 BC. M SCAVR AED CVR EX S C, Nabatean king Aretas kneeling before camel, REX ARETAS beneath camel / P HVPSAEVS AED CVR CAPTV C HVPSAE COS PREIVER, Jupiter in quadriga right; scorpion to left. Cr422/1b, Syd 913, Aemilia 8, RCV 379Bud Stewart
scaurus.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus & P. Plautius Hypsaeus25 viewsAR Denarius, 4g, 19mm, 6h; Rome, 58 BC.
Obv.: M SCAVR AED CVR, kneeling figure right (King Aretas of Nabataea), holding olive branch and reins of camel beside him; EX on left; S[C] on right; REX ARET[AS] in exergue.
Rev.: P HVPSAE AED CVR, Jupiter in quadriga left, holding reins in left hand and hurling thunderbolt with right; scorpion below horses; CAPTV on right; C HVPSAE COS PREIVE in exergue.
Reference: Babelon Aemilia 8 and Plautia 8; Sydenham 913; Crawford 422/1b.
Notes: sold to Sal, 11/15.
1 commentsJohn Anthony
Scaurus_k.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus & P. Plautius Hypsaeus6 viewsAR Denarius, 18mm, 3.8g, 6h; Rome, 58 BC.
Obv.: M SCAVR AED CVR, kneeling figure right (King Aretas of Nabataea), holding olive branch and reins of camel beside him; EX on left; SC on right; REX ARETAS in exergue.
Rev.: P HVPSAE AED CVR, Jupiter in quadriga left, holding reins in left hand and hurling thunderbolt with right; scorpion below horses; CAPTV on right; C HVPSAE COS PREIVE in exergue.
Reference: Babelon Aemilia 8 and Plautia 8; Sydenham 913; Crawford 422/1b.
John Anthony
1000-18-090.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus26 viewsIn 67 BCE, Hyrcanus II ascended to the throne of Judea. Scarcely three months later, his younger brother Aristobulus II incited a rebellion, successfully leading the uprising to overthrow Hyrcanus and take the offices of both King and High Priest. Hyrcanus was confined to Jerusalem, where he would continue to receive revenues of the latter office. However, fearing for his life, he fled to Petra and allied himself with Aretas, who agreed to support Hyrcanus after receiving the promise of having the Arabian towns taken by the Hasmoneans returned to Nabataea by Hyrcanus' chief advisor, Antipater the Idumaean.

Aretas advanced towards Jerusalem at the head of 50,000 men, besieging the city for several months. Eventually, Aristobulus bribed Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, deputy of the Roman general Gnaeus Pompeius Magnus. Scaurus ordered Aretas to withdraw his army, which then suffered a crushing defeat at the hands of Aristobulus on the journey back to Nabatea.

Despite the compliance of Aretas, in 62 BCE Scaurus marched on Petra. However, a combination of the rough terrain and low supplies, obliged Scaurus to seek the aid of Hyrcanus, now High Priest (not king) of Judea, who sent Antipater to barter for peace with Aretas. The siege was lifted in exchange for several hundred talents of silver (to Scaurus himself) and recognition of Roman supremacy over Nabatea. Aretas would retain all Nabataean territory and possessions, becoming a vassal of the Roman Empire.

M. Aemilius Scaurus & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus. 58 B.C. AR denarius (18.8 mm, 3.75 g, 3 h). Rome mint. M SCAVRV above, AED CVR in exergue, EX - SC on either side, REX ARETAS in exergue, King Aretas kneeling beside camel right, offering olive branch / P HVPSAEVS/AED CVR above, C·HVPSAE COS/PREIVER in exergue, CAPTV on right, Jupiter driving quadriga left. Crawford 422/1b; Sydenham 913; RSC Aemilia 8. Fine.
ecoli
Comb02022017093723.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus. 58 BC16 viewsObv. Camel r; before, Aretas kneeling , holding reins and olive-branch tied with fillet; above M. SCAVR. AED. CVR.; on either side, EX. S.C.; below, REX. ARETAS.
Rv. Jupiter in quadriga l., holding reins and hurling thunderbolt; above, P. HVPSAE. AED. CVR; below, C. HVPSAE. COS. PRIEVE; on r. CAPTV; below horses, scorpion.
17mm, 3.33grams.
Crawford 422/1b; Sydenham 913; Aemilia 8.
Canaan
scaurus.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus - Denarius12 viewsGinolerhino
m.aemilius.scaurus_Cr422.1b.jpg
M. Aemilius Scaurus, Crawford 422/1b55 viewsM. Aemilius Scaurus, gens Aemilia & Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus, gens Plautia
AR - denarius, 3.97g, 16mm
Rome, 58 BC
obv. above [M SCAVR] / AED CVR, in ex. REX ARETAS
The Nabatean king Aretas IV Philhellenos kneeling beside a dromedary,
holding reins with his l. hand and in his raised hand filleted olive-branch.
in field l. and r. EX - SC
rev. above P HYPSAEV[S] / AED CVR, r. CAPTV
in ex. C HYPSAE C[OS] / PREIVER
Jupiter in quadriga l., holding reins in l. hand and hurling thunderbolt in raised
r. hand; in front of the horses scorpion r.
Crawford 422/1b; Sydenham 913; Aemilia 8; Plautia 8; BMC 3878; Hendin 740
small scratch on l. rev. field, otherwise about EF; struck on small flan

This type commemorates the conquest of Privernum by C.Plautius in 329 BC and the success of Scaurus as legate of Pompeius in conquering Palestine and Arabia, and shows the submission of king Aretas in 62 BC.

1 commentsJochen
mac4.jpg
Macedonia, Philip V. 221-179 BC.19 viewsMACEDON, under Roman Rule. Time of Aemilius Paullus. Gaius Publilius. Quaestor, circa 168-167 BC. Æ Unit (21mm - 10.6 g). Helmeted head of Roma right / Three-line legend within oak wreath. MacKay pl. III, 1 var. (monogram); Touratsoglou, Macedonia 20; SNG Copenhagen 1318. Dino
mac6.jpg
Macedonia, Philip V. 221-179 BC.23 viewsMACEDON, under Roman Rule. Time of Aemilius Paullus. Gaius Publilius. Quaestor, circa 168-167 BC. Æ Unit (22mm - 10.5 g). Helmeted head of Roma right / Three-line legend within oak wreath. MacKay pl. III, 1 var. (monogram); Touratsoglou, Macedonia 20; SNG Copenhagen 1318. Dino
Man_Aemilius_Lepidus_Sear_168.jpg
Man Aemilius Lepidus Sear 16819 viewsMan Aemilius Lepidus - Moneyer, Denarius, 114 - 113 BC, 19mm, 3.68g, Sydenham 554, Aemilia 7, Crawford 291/1, Sear 168
OBV: no legend, Laureate, diademed head of Roma right, ROMA before, star behind.
REV: M N AEMILIO, Equestrian statue on three arches, L E P between the arches.
SRukke
Aemilia_Mn_Lepidus_114-3_Cr_291.jpg
Man. Aemilius Lepidus - denarius39 viewsMan. Aemilius Lepidus. 114-113 BC. AR Denarius, 3.77g; obv. laureate, diademed head of Roma right, ROMA before, * behind; rev. M N AEMILIO, equestrian statue on triumphal arch, L E P between the arches. Crawford 291/1, Syd. 554.

Notes: ex H. D. Rauch Auction.
2 commentsBartosz A
Aemilia_7.JPG
Manius Aemilius Lepidus 24 viewsObv: Laureate and diademed head of Roma facing right, XVI in monogram behind, ROMA (MA in monogram) before.

Rev: MN AEMILIO (MN in monogram), equestrian statue with the horseman holding a spear, set on a base formed by three arches containing the letters L - E - P

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 114 - 113 BC

3.8 grams, 19.2 mm, 90°

RSC Aemilia 7, S168
1 commentsSPQR Coins
00752.jpg
Marcus Aemilius Scaurus & Publius Plautius Hypsaeus (RSC I Aemilia 8, Coin #752)1 viewsRSC I Aemilia 8, AR Denarius, Rome, 58 BC
OBV: M SCAVR / AED CVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in exergue; Aretas, King of Nabataea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet.
REV: PHYPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPT on right, C HYPSAE COS / PREIVER in exergue; Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below.
SIZE: 21.9mm, 3.08g
MaynardGee
0063.jpg
Marcus Aemilius Scaurus & Publius Plautius Hypsaeus; Denarius20 viewsRRC 422/1b
58 b.c.

Obverse:M . SCAVR / AED CVR above king Aretas kneeling beside a camel right. EX on ,S . C on right, REX ARETAS in ex.
Reverse: HYPSAE/AED CVR above Jupiter in quadriga left, CAPTVM on right, C. HYPSAEVS cos PREIV (ER) in ex. scorpion below horses.

One of the first moneyers commemorating on his coins an event of own history. M. Aemilius, as the Governor of Syria, repressed the incursions of the Nabathean Arabians, compelling their king, Aretas, to submit and pay a fine of 300 talents to Pompey.
He also was one of the richest and most influential men of his time. Still failed to be elected consul in 54 after a bribery case he won with the help of his friend Cicero.

Pub. Plautius was curule aedile with him in B.C. 58.

Purchased from Numismatica Varesina at "World Money Fair" 08.02.2014; Berlin
1 commentsNorbert
Aemilius_Scaurus.jpg
Marcus Aemilius Scaurus and Publius Plautius Hypsaeus - AR denarius32 viewsRome
¹²58 BC
Aretas, king of Nabatea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet
M SCAVR / AED CVR
EX _ S C
REX ARETAS
Jupiter in quadriga left, holding reins and thunderbolt, scorpion right
P HYPSAE / AED CVR
CAPT
C HYPSAE COS / PREIVE
¹Crawford 422/1b, SRCV I 379, Crawford 422/1b, Sydenham 913, RSC I Aemilia 8
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Naumann

The moneyers were Curule aediles in 58 BC. Scaurus became praetor in 56 BC and Hypsaeus in 55 BC.

Scaurus lost his father when he was young. He was raised by Sulla as a step-son. He served as quaestor under Pompey and as proquaestor in the third Mithridatic war in 66-61 BC. In the same time conflict between Aristobulus II and Hyrcanus II broke out in Judea. Nabatean king Aretas III supported Hyrcanus and besieged Aristobulus in Jerusalem. Scaurus was send as intermediary. He sent Aretas back and settled the conflict in favour of Aristobulus. Later Pompey accused him of bribery and removed Aristobulus in 63 BC. Scaurus moved to Petra then he was called back after payment of 300 talent fine.

Hypsaeus also served as quaestor under Pompey. Reverse commemorates conquest of Volscian town Priverna by moneyer's ancestor Gaius Plautius Decianus Hypsaeus in 330-329 BC.

Scaurus was the first who depicted event from his own life on coins.
2 commentsJohny SYSEL
ScaurusHypsaeus.jpg
Marcus Aemilius Scaurus and Publius Plautius Hypsaeus, 58 B.C.61 viewsDenarius, Rome mint, 4.08g, 18mm, 58 B.C.; O: Aretas, King of Nabataea, kneeling beside camel raising olive branch with fillet, M SCAVR / AED CVR above, EX - S C at sides, REX ARETAS in ex; reverse Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, scorpion below, P HVPSAEVS / AED CVR above, CAPTVM on right, C HVPSAE COS / PREIVE in ex. Hendin 1441.

When M. Aemilius, was governor of Syria, this type was struck to commemorate the defeat of Aretas III by Pompey's general Marcus Scaurus. Pub. Plautius was curule aedile with M. Aemilius in 58 BCE.

By making territorial concessions to Aretas III, Hyrcanus II induced the Nabataean king to join with him in the battle against his brother Aristobulus II. Their combined forces besieged Aristobulus II in Jerusalem in 65 BCE. At about this same time, Pompey's armies, led by Scaurus marched into the East. The brothers appealed to Rome to settle the dispute. Initially Scaurus favored Aristobulus II, but, in 62 BCE, Pompey ruled that Hyrcanus was the rightful king.
2 commentsNemonater
legioxxiiLG.jpg
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.64 viewsMARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver legionary denarius. Legion XXIII. 18mm, 3.5g. Struck at a military mint, likely Patrae, 32-31 BC. Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley sailing. Reverse: LEG XXIII, eagle between standards. Ex Incitatus.

Legion XXII, the 22nd, is the second-last legion in the series and one of the scarcer types of the regular numbered legions.

Marcus Antonius (in Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) (January 14, 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Iulia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate.

The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

For anyone tempted to laud Marcus Antonius, to Antony's great shame read what Plutarch wrote about what Antony did to Cicero:

Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Lepidus.jpg
Mn Aemilius Lepidus Denarius 114bc59 viewsMn. Aemilius Lepidus

Denarius 4.0 g / 18 mm

Mint: Rome, struck 114 BC

Obv: ROMA, laureate, diademed and draped bust of Roma right; behind, X.

Rev: MN AEMILIO, equestrian statue on triumphal arch; between the arches, L E P B.

Reference: Albert 1074, Cr. 291/1, Sear 168, Sydenham 554, Aemilia 7

This issue reminds of the commencement of the Aqua Marcia 179 BC.

This coin has been stolen en route from Switzerland to the UK. If anyone sees it please let me or the Vcoins dealer ARC know. Thanks


2 commentsAdrian S
0058.jpg
Mn. Acilius Glabrio - Denarius32 viewsMn. Acilius Glabrio - Denarius -
RRC 442/1A
49 b.c.
Doublette - availabe for trade

Avers. Laureate head of Salus; Reverse: Valetudo left, resting left arm on column, holding snake.
According to Crawford the issue "seems reasonable to regard as a Ceaesarian issue".

Grüber identifies the moneyer as: "At the time of the issue of these coins there were several members of the Acilia gens with the praenomen Manius, but this moneyer is usually identified with Manius Acilius Glabrio, one of Caesar's lieutenants, and the son of Mn. Acilius Glabrio, consul B.C. 67, and Aemilia, daughter of M. Aemilius Scaurus, whom Sulla, in B.C. 82, compelled him to divorce."

For there reverse there in an intersting part in Mommsen: "Man erinnert,...dasz in Rom in der acilischen Gasse dem ersten nach Rom gekommenen griechischen Arzt von Staatswegen ein Laden angewiesen ward (Plinius)" -
---
Ex HD Rauch 12 Elektronische Live Auktion, 5-8.03.2013, LOT 324

described as:
49 v.Chr. Denarius, 4,08g Roma, Salus / Valetudo. Cr 442/1a, Albert 1376. Leichte Prägeschwäche am Rd. Sehr leichter Stempelglanz, zarte Tönung. vzgl.
Norbert
0059.jpg
Mn. Acilius Glabrio, Denarius13 viewsRRC 442/1b
49 b.c.

Avers. Laureate head of Salus; Reverse: Valetudo left, resting left arm on column, holding snake.
According to Crawford the issue "seems reasonable to regard is as a Ceaesarian issue".

Grüber identifies the moneyer as: "At the time of the issue of these coins there were several members of the Acilia gens with the praenomen Manius, but this moneyer is usually identified with Manius Acilius Glabrio, one of Caesar's lieutenants, and the son of Mn. Acilius Glabrio, consul B.C. 67, and Aemilia, daughter of M. Aemilius Scaurus, whom Sulla, in B.C. 82, compelled him to divorce."

For there reverse there is an intersting part in Mommsen: "Man erinnert,...dasz in Rom in der acilischen Gasse dem ersten nach Rom gekommenen griechischen Arzt von Staatswegen ein Laden angewiesen ward (Plinius)" -
------

Ex NAC Auction 72, lot 1226
The JD collection of Roman Republican Coins part II – session II

Described as:
Mn. Acilius Glabrio Denarius 49, AR 3.96 g. SALVTIS Laureate head of Salus r. Rev. MN·ACILIVS – III·VIR·VALETV Valetudo standing l., resting l. arm on column and holding snake in r. hand.

Babelon Acilia 8. Sydenham 922. Sear Imperators 16. Crawford 442/1b. Extremely fine Ex Hirsch sale 159, 1988, 1226.
Norbert
Mn__Aemilius_Lepidus.jpg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus - AR denarius6 viewsRome
²113 BC
¹114-113 BC
laureate, diademed and draped bust of Roma right
RO(MA)
(XVI)
equestrian statue on aquaduct right, holding vertical spear, standing on 3 archs of aquaduct (Aqua Marcia)
(MN)·AE_M_ILIO·
L-E-P
¹Crawford 291/1, SRCV I 168, Sydenham 554, RSC I Aemilia 7, BMC Italy 590
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Failla

At the beginning of construction of Aqua Marcia was moneyer's ancestor censor M. Aemilius Lepidus. Aqueduct was repaired and extended by Quintus Marcius Rex 144-140 BC after whom got its name.
Johny SYSEL
00757.jpg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus (RSC I Aemilia 7, Coin #757)1 viewsRSC I Aemilia 7, AR Denarius, Rome, 114-113 BC
OBV: ROMA; Laureate and draped bust of Roma right.
REV: MN·AEMILIO; Horseman holding vertical spear (equestrian statue) right, on triple-arch containing L-E-P.
SIZE: 19.5mm, 3.80g
MaynardGee
00758.jpg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus (RSC I Aemilia 7, Coin #758)3 viewsRSC I Aemilia 7, AR Denarius, Rome, 114-113 BC
OBV: ROMA; Laureate and draped bust of Roma right.
REV: MN·AEMILIO; Horseman holding vertical spear (equestrian statue) right, on triple-arch containing L-E-P.
SIZE: 18.2mm, 3.88g
MaynardGee
C312987A-800E-4894-8D5D-674100AB9821.jpeg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus AR Denarius. EF/EF-. Equestrian statue over acueduct41 viewsObverse: Laureate female bust right, in front ROMA behind star.
Reverse: MN AEMILIO. Equestrian statue on three arches, between arches L-E-P.

Nice exemplar of this interesting and uncommon issue, in EF/EF- condition, conserving full details in both sides, bold reliefs checkable at photo and a precious tone of silver.

Crawford 291/1. Rome mint, 114-113 b.C. 3,9 g - 18 mm
3 commentsMark R1
repaqeOR.jpg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus denarius, BMC Italy 59032 viewsMn. Aemilius Lepidus denarius, 114-113 B.C. AR, 3.76g 19mm, SRCV 168, Crawford 291/1, Sydenham 554, RSC Aemilia 7, BMC Italy 590
O: laureate and draped bust of Roma right, ROMA (MA in monogram) before, X (XVI in monogram) behind
R: MN•AEMILIO (MN in monogram), horseman holding vertical spear (equestrian statue) right, on triple-arch containing L-E-P

The triple-arch probably represents the Aqua Marcia, an aqueduct begun by M. Aemilius Lepidus and M. Fulvius Nobilior as Censors in 179 B.C.
casata137ec
rep_lep_pan.jpg
Mn. Aemilius Lepidus, 114 - 113 BC98 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV I 168, (Crawford 291/1); Rome mint, weight 3.6g, max. diameter 19.07mm, 114 - 113 B.C.; Obv. laureate, diademed, and draped bust of Roma right, ROMA (MA ligate) before, XVI ligature behind; Rev. MN·AEMILIO (MN in monogram), horseman holding vertical spear (equestrian statue) right, on triple-arch containing L-E-P. Attractive toning.

Ex. Roma Numismatics
Ex. Andrew McCabe

Historical background Courtesy;

Forvm Ancient Coins,
The triple-arch probably represents the Aqua Marcia, an aqueduct begun by M. Aemilius Lepidus and M. Fulvius Nobilior as Censors in 179 B.C.

Andrew McCabe,
Northumberland Smyth 1856:
This type is of interest, since it commemorates the construction of the celebrated Aemilian bridge by Manius Aemilius Lepidus, to whom a statue was erected, and who replaced the wooden bridge of Ancus Martius over the Tiber by a stone one. The arched neck of the horse is classic


6 commentsSteve E
0010.jpg
Mn.Aemilius Lepidus, Denarius25 viewsRRC 291/1
114/113 b.c.

Av.:belorb. weibl. Büste (Roma?) n.r., davor R.
Rv.: Drei Bögen eines Aquädukts, darauf Reiterstatuen.r., mit Speer i.d. Rechten.
ex HD Rauch 72, lot ?, 2003
2 commentsNorbert
CaesarBuca.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Julius Caesar, AR Denarius33 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Julius Caesar and Lucius Aemilius Buca, 44 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.77g; 21mm).
Rome Mint, Feb-Mar 44 BCE.

Obverse: CAESAR DICT- PERPETVO; wreathed head of Julius Caesar facing right.

Reverse: Fasces and winged caduceus in saltire; axe, globe, clasped hands and L BVCA in angles.

References: Crawford 480/6; HCRI 103; Sydenham 1063; BMCRR 4157-9; Julia 37; Alföldi, Type XIII, Plate XCVIII, No. 78.

Provenance: Ex Goldberg Auction #104 (12 Jun 2018) Lot 3248.

Caesar was granted the title of Dictator for Life in mid-February, 44 BCE, thus all coins bearing DICT PERPETVO inscriptions can be firmly dated to the final month of Caesar’s life. This was a period of massive coinage output because Caesar was preparing for a campaign against the Parthians for which a substantial war chest would be needed. To meet the production needs, the college of moneyers was expanded from 3 to 4 moneyers. Nevertheless, manufacturing stress is evident by the frequent poor strikes and off-struck coins that survive today from these final Caesar portrait issues.

The moneyer Lucius Aemilius Buca may have been a relative of Sulla. He does not appear to have struck coins after Caesar’s assassination. With its symbolism, the reverse of this coin suggests Caesar’s growing grasp on religious, military and political power.
2 commentsCarausius
LepidusCombined.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 495/2d55 viewsRome. The Imperators.
Marcus Aemilius Lepidus and Octavian, 42 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.70g; 20mm).
Military Mint in Italy.

Obverse: LEPIDVS· PONT· MAX· III· V· R· P· C; bare head of Lepidus facing right.

Reverse: C· CAESAR· IMP· III· VIR· R ·P· C; bare head of Octavian facing right.

References: Crawford 495/2d; HCRI 140a; Sydenham 1323var (rev legend); Aemilia 35var (rev legend); BMCRR (Africa) 29-31var (rev legend); Banti & Simonetti 7 (this coin illustrated).

Provenance: Ex Leu Numismatik Auction 8 (30 Jun 2019) Lot 949; Bank Leu 7 (9 May 1973) Lot 317; Joseph Martini Collection [Baranowsky (25 Feb 1931) Lot 1273] and [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (24 Feb 1930) Lot 1334]; Rodolfo Ratto Fixed Price List (1927) Lot 629; Dr. Bonazzi Collection a/k/a Riche Collection [Rodolfo Ratto Auction (23 Jan 1924) Lot 1352].

This reverse die differs from most of this denarius issue in that the inscription begins with the initial “C” for Octavian's first name (Caius), while the remainder of the issue begins, simply, "CAESAR." The coins appear to celebrate the formation of the Second Triumvirate, although it is unclear why Lepidus did not also strike coins with Antony’s portrait.

This particular example appeared in a remarkable number of important Roman Republican coin sales between 1924-1931, including sales of the collections of Dr. Bonazzi and Joseph Martini.
4 commentsCarausius
rrepde30-2.jpg
Roman Republic, 114 BC, Aemilia17 viewsAR Denarius (3.8g, 19mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck 114-113 BC.
ROMA before diademed, laureate, draped bust of Roma facing right, * behind;
MN·AEMILIO· [around] L E P [between arches] Equestrian statue r. on triumphal arch.
Seaby (RSC I.) Aemilia 7. Monneyer: Man. Aemilius Lepidus
1 commentsCharles S
lepidus_k.jpg
Roman Republic, L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus5 viewsAR Denarius, 19mm, 3.7g, 6h; Rome mint: 62 B.C.
Obv.: PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA; Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right.
Rev.: TER above trophy; to left, three captives: King Perseus of Macedon and his two sons, standing right; to right, L. Aemilius Paullus standing left // PAVLLVS
Reference: Crawford 415/1; Aemilia 10, sold Aleg.
John Anthony
aemilius-moeda1.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Aemilius Lepidus - 61 BC.12 viewsAR Denarius of M. Aemilius Lepidus - 61 BC.

Weight: 4.4gr
Ø: 18mm

Obv: Head of Roma right.

Rev: M. LEPIDVS encircling equestrian statue

EF/EF

Ref: Sear Mil #371 ? (similar)
Jorge C
Rare_Roman_Republic_Denarius.jpg
Roman Republic, M. Aemilius Lepidus, 61 B.C.55 viewsSilver denarius, RSC Aemilia 24, Sydenham 832, Crawford 419/2, RBW Collection -, F, rough, burnished, both sides off center, Rome mint, weight 3.435g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 180o, 61 B.C.; obverse head of Alexandria right, wearing turreted crown, ALEXANDREA below; reverse M. Lepidus, togate, standing facing, head left, crowning the young figure of Ptolemy V, standing facing, holding scepter, S·C above, TVTOR·REG downward on left, PONF·MAX· upward on right, M LEPIDVS in exergue; this is the first example of this rare type ever handled by Forum; rare;

This coin records an alleged guardianship of the moneyer's ancestor, Marcus Lepidus, over the young king of Egypt, Ptolemy V. Neither Polybius nor Livy make any mention of it. The story is likely an exaggeration, invented by the later Lepidi. In 201 B.C., Lepidus was sent to deliver the ultimatum to Philip ordering him to cease attacking his Greek neighbors, and return the Ptolemy's possessions. He was also a member of the embassy sent to Ptolemy V (and Antiochos III) to gain support should Rome and Macedonia declare war. But Lepidus was a junior member of the embassy, which included two ex-consuls, thus it is unlikely he would have been a guardian of the Ptolemaic king.

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
1 commentsSam
1962.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Aemilius Scarus and Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus, AR Denarius, 58BC19 viewsObv: M SCAVR AED CVR EX S C ; King Aretas III of Nabatea kneeling before camel in an attitude of supplication, holding reins and olive-branch tied with fillet.
Rev: P HVPSAEVS AED CVR CAPTV C HVPSAE COS PREIVER ; Jupiter in quadriga left, hurling thunderbolt, scorpion below horses.
ex: Eden Seminary Collection
Aemilia 8 (3.9 gm)

This denarius was struck to commemorate the defeat by Pompey's general Marcus Scaurus of Aretas III, supporter of John Hyrcanus II in his battles against his brother, Aristobulus II.
This is one of the earliest instances of a moneyer commemorating on his coins an event connected with his own history. When M. Aemilius, one of the most noted men of his time, was Governor of Syria, he repressed the incursions of the Nabathean Arabians.
FabiusMaximus
HypsaeusCombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, M. Aemilius Scaurus and Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus, AR Denarius8 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Aemilius Scaurus and Pub. Plautius Hypsaeus, 58 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.87g; 19mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: King Aretas kneeling right and extending olive branch in right hand and holding reins of camel in left hand; M SCAVR/AED CVR above; EX-SC on side; REX ARETAS in exergue.

Rev: Jupiter in fast quadriga galloping left; scorpion below horses’ feet; P HVPSAEVS/AED CVR, above; CAPTV on right; C HVPSAE COS PREIVER in exergue.

References: Crawford 422/1b; BMCRR 3879; Sydenham 913; Aemilia 8; Plautia 8-9.

Provenance: Ex SC Collection; Stack's Auction (14-15 Jun 1971), Lot 240.

Scaurus and Hypsaeus struck these coins as curule aediles, by Senatorial decree. Grueber states that lavish public games were the reason for the special issue, while Crawford suggests the corn dole and/or Caesar’s agrarian law were the more likely reasons. Scaurus, as governor of Syria, was victorious against the Nabataean king Aretas who surrendered and paid a fine of 300 talents to Pompey. It was this event that he chose to depict on the obverse of the coin. On the reverse, Hypsaeus refers to the capture of the Volscian town of Privernum by his ancestor, C. Plautius Decianus, consul in 329 BCE. Hypsaeus chose to repeat this reverse type on a denarius he struck as moneyer in ca. 57 BCE (Crawford 420). This issue has a large number of legend varieties and the scorpion is missing from some dies.
Carausius
4483606l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius - Crawford 419/1c20 viewsRome, The Republic.
M. Lepidus, 61 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.97g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Laureate and diademed female head, facing right; palm branch behind.

Reverse: Horseman advancing toward right with trophy over l shoulder; AN. XV. P.H.O.C.S. around; M.LEPIDVS in exergue.

References: Crawford 419/1c; Sydenham 830a; BMCRR 3644; Aemilia 22.

Provenance: Ex Fernandez Coll. [Aureo & Calico Alba Longa Auction (7 Nov 2018) Lot 85]; Leo Benz Collection [Lanz 88 (23 Nov 1988) Lot 118]; Künst und Münzen 18 (June 1978), Lot 250.

This coin was produced by Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, later triumvir with Octavian and Antony, during his early political career. The reverse celebrates the Second Punic War heroism of his ancestor, also named M. Aemilius Lepidus, who killed an enemy and saved a citizen at the age of 15 and in whose honor a statue was erected in Rome. That statue may be depicted on this coin. The reverse inscription abbreviates “AN[norum] XV PR[ogressus] H[ostem] O[ccidit], C[ivem] S[ervavit]” (Aged 15, he killed an enemy and saved a citizen.)
2 commentsCarausius
11120.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Mn. Aemilius Lepidus, AR Denarius12 viewsMn. Aemilius Lepidus. 114-113 B.C. AR denarius (18 mm, 3.89 g). Diademed and draped bust of Roma right / Equestrian statue standing right on triumphal arch.
Crawford 291/1; Sydenham 554; Aemilia 7.
Nicely toned VF.
FabiusMaximus
1681183l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, P. Plautius Hypsaeus, AR Denarius - Crawford 420/2a30 viewsRome, The Republic.
P. Plautius Hypsaeus, 57 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.96g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Draped bust of Leuconoe facing right; dolphin behind; P.YPSAE·S·C before.

Reverse: Jupiter driving quadriga left; C·YPSAE·COS / PRIV – CEPIT in exergue and behind.

References: Crawford 420/2a; RBW 1515 (this coin); Sydenham 911; Plautia 12.

Provenance: Ex NAC 84 (20 May 2015), Lot 807; RBW Collection [NAC 63 (2012), Lot 291]; Crédit de la Bourse (April 1995), Lot 1068; NAC 6 (11 Mar 1993), Lot 285.

This coin is a special issue by Senatorial decree (S.C.) for reasons unknown to history. The moneyer, P. Plautius Hypsaeus, struck coins individually, as moneyer, and jointly with M. Aemilius Scaurus as Curule Aedile. On both series, he used this reverse type, referring to the capture of the Volscian town of Privernum by his ancestor, C. Plautius Decianus, consul in 329 BCE. The obverse refers to the mythical descent of the Plautia gens from Leuconoe, the daughter of Neptune.

Crawford thought Hypsaeus’ individual series preceded his joint series as Curule Aedile with Scaurus; however, the individual coins were absent from the Mesagne Hoard, suggesting it must have post-dated the 58 BCE terminus of that large hoard. Accordingly, Hersh and Walker redated Hypsaeus’ individual series to 57 BCE.
2 commentsCarausius
Sydenham-927.jpg
Roman Republic: L. Aemilius Lepidus Paullus and L. Scribonius Libo (62 BCE) AR Denarius, Rome (Crawford 417/1a; Sydenham 927; Aemilia 11; RBW-1503)34 viewsObv: Veiled and diademed head of Concordia right; [P]AVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORD around
Rev: Puteal Scribonianum (Scribonian Well), decorated with garland and two lyres; hammer at base; PVTEAL•SCRIBON above; LIBO in exergue

1 commentsQuant.Geek
RRC554.jpg
RRC291/1 (Mn. Aemilius Lepidus) 43 viewsObv. Laureate, diademed head of Roma right, ROMA before, MA in ligate; mark of value behind
Rev. MN AE[M]ILIO, ligature on praenomen. Equestrian statue on arches, LEP between;
17 mm, 3.77 grams
Rome, 114-113 B.C.
Refs.: RRC 291/1, RSC Aemilia 7

Allusions: The head of Roma is not unusual, but the reverse is subject to some debate. Several propositions have been put forward: (1) A triumphal arch to a Mn. Aemilius Lepidus (the prateor of 213 B.C. or his son, consul of 158 B.C.). (2) the pons Aemilius, the oldest stone bridge in Rome, now Ponte Rotto, which connected the Cattle Market with the Transtiberim since the mid-3rd century. It may be then that a Mn. Aemilius had the original bridge built. Its stone form goes back to 179 B.C. under the auspices of the censors M.Aemilius Lepidus and M. Fulvius Nobilior. (3) The Aqua Marcia, formerly Aqua Aemilia Fulvia (Pliny 31.24 with emendation) and led over the Pons Aemilius. A similar coin issued by the Marcia family in 56 BC exists (Marcia 28, Syd. 919). The Marcii may have tried to counter the Aemilian claim to the aqueduct. In fact, the censors Aemilius and Fulvius had begun building the aqueduct, but never completed it, since M. Licinius Crassus refused to let it be built over his ground (Livy 40.51.7).

The moneyer: Unclear. He may have been the son of the consul of 126 B.C., and father of Mn. Aemilius Mn. f. Lepidus, the consul of 66 B.C. (Crawford);
1 commentsSyltorian
RRC415-1.jpg
RRC415/1 (L. Aemilius Paullus Lepidus) 93 viewsObv. PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, diademed and veiled head of Concordia facing right, graffito.
Rev. TER above trophy with togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus on right, three captives on left, PAVLLVS in exergue.
18-19 mm, 3,94 gr.
Rome, ca. 63/2 B.C.
References: RRC415/1, RSC Aemilia 10, Syd. 926, Sear 366

Motif: It has been suggested that L. Aemilius Paullus took up the watchword of Cicero's consulate during and after the Catilinarian conspiracy (63 B.C.): Concordia Ordinum. The reverse shows the general L. Aemilius Paullus (no direct relation to the moneyer), who defeated King Perseus in the Third Macedonian War, at the Batle of Pydna. Here, the Macedonian phalanx originally had the upper hand, but broke apart over rough ground, allowing the Romans to enter the gaps between the huge sarissas and cut the phalangites down with their Spanish swords. Paullus took Perseus and his sons, Philip and Alexander, prisoner, as well as their daughter (unnamed and unrepresented on the coin). They were paraded in his triumph. The people reacted badly to this, feeling sympathetic towards the children, but by 63 B.C., this does not seem to have mattered anymore. Paullus triumphed three times in his life, hence the "TER" above the trophy.

Moneyer: The moneyer was the brother of the later triumvir M. Lepidus, and would himself rise through the cursus honorum. Paullus would become quaestor (59 B.C.), praetor (53 B.C.) and reach the consulship (50 B.C.), before siding with Brutus and Cassius and ending up on the proscription list. He was pardonned after Philippi, but exiled himself to Miletus.
1 commentsSyltorian
RRC415-1_-_Graffito.jpg
RRC415/1 (L. Aemilius Paullus Lepidus), Graffito85 viewsObv. PAVLLVS LEPIDVS CONCORDIA, diademed and veiled head of Concordia facing right, graffito.
Rev. TER above trophy with togate figure of L. Aemilius Paullus on right, three captives on left, PAVLLVS in exergue.
17 mm, 3,79 gr.
Rome, ca. 63/2 B.C.
References: RRC415/1, RSC Aemilia 10, Syd. 926, Sear 366

It has been suggested that the moneyer, L. Aemilius Paullus, took up the watchword of Cicero's consulate during and after the Catilinarian conspiracy (63 B.C.): Concordia Ordinum. The reverse shows the general L. Aemilius Paullus (no direct relation to the moneyer), who defeated King Perseus in the Third Macedonian War, took him and his sons Philip and Aexander prisoner (what happened to the daughter is not recorded), and led them in his triumph. The people themselves did not apparently appreciate the introduction of children into the triumph, but by 63 B.C., this does not seem to have mattered anymore.

The moneyer was the brother of the later triumvir M. Lepidus, and would himself rise through the cursus honorum, to quaestor (59 B.C.), Praetor (53 B.C.) and Consul (50 B.C.), before siding with Brutus and Cassius and ending up on the proscription list. He was pardonned after Philippi, but exiled himself to Miletus.

This coin also bears graffito, spelling out HAEMI. The significance is unknown, and may indicate the owner; if the last latter is to be read as an O, it might be a dedication or a receiver.
Syltorian
RRC422-1.jpg
RRC422/1 (M. Aemilius Scaurus, P. Plautius Hypsaeus)89 viewsObv. King Aretas of Nabatea kneeling beside camel, raising olive branche with fillet; M SCAVR(VS) | AED CVR above, [E]X – SC at sides; [R]EX ARETAS in exergue
Rev. Jupiter in quadriga left, reins in right, hurling thunderbolt with left, horses trampling scorpion; P HYPSAEVS | AED CV(R) above, CAPTV[M] on right, C HYPSAE COS | PREIVER(NVM) in exergue
18 mm, 3.80 grams
Rome, 58 B.C.

Allusions: Scaurus refers to his own deed on the obverse, the first time a Roman dared to do so on a coin. In 62 B.C., he had defeated Haritha (Aretha) III of Nabatea, who was marching on Jerusalem, to help the rightful king John Hyrcanus II. Scaurus, a lieutenant of Pompey's, was bribed by Aristoboulos with 400 talents, then took another 300 from Aretas to spare the Nabetean capital of Petra (Josephus, BJ I.127, Ant. Jud. 14.2, 14.5). His colleague chose a more distant motive: C. Plautius Decianus had captured the Volscian city of Privernum (Piperno) in 329 B.C. Any direct relations between Hypsaeus and Decianus are most likely invented, however.

Moneyers: The moneyers of this coin were not the IIIViri Monetales, but the Curule Aediles of 58 B.C., M. Aemilius Scaurus and P. Plautius Hypsaeus. Both were Pompeian supporters ultimately dropped by their patron in 52 B.C. M. Scaurus, stepsone of Sulla, who had already battled in Judaea and Nabatea (where his massacred are mentioned in the Dead Sea Scrolls) would rise to be praetor in 56 B.C. and propraetor of Sardinia the following year. Accused of extortion, he was defended by Cicero and aquitted, only to be exiled on the charge of ambitus in 52. B.C. He was also the first major Roman collector of engraved gemstones, put together in a dactyliotheca exceeding even that of Mithridates of Pontus (Pliny, NH 37.5.11). Less is known about his colleague during his aedileship. P. Plautius Hypsaeus rose to the praetorship in 55 B.C. but was tried for bribery in 52 B.C. whilst standing for consul. He convicted and fled into exile.

On this issue: M. Aemilius Scaurus' aedileship is known and can be securely dated. It became famous for the unparalleled lavishness of its games. These included the construction of an artificial lake to show off crocodiles and hippopotamuses; Scaurus also brought a huge skeleton from Joppa, believed to be the monster to which Andromeda was to be sacrificed (Pliny NH 9.4.11). He also had a temporary theatre capable of holding 80,000 spectators built, standing for just one month, and adorned with all kinds of luxuries (Pliny, NH 36.2.5; 36.24.113ss). After the games, he had the huge marble columns transferred to his house, for which the sewer contractors demanded a hefty security fee, in case their weight caused the drains to cave in (ibid. 36.2.6). According to Pliny, the remains of the theatre alone were worth 30 million sesterces (or 7,500,000 denarii).
Syltorian
JC_portrait_k.jpg
The Caesarians. Julius Caesar. January-February 44 BC19 viewsAR Denarius, 19mm, 3.9 g, 9h; Rome mint. L. Aemilius Buca, moneyer.
Obv.: Wreathed head of Caesar right; CAESAR • IM downwards before, large crescent dividing P M upwards behind.
Rev.: Venus Victrix standing left, holding Victory on extended right hand and holding scepter in left; L • AEMILIVS • BVCA around.
Reference: Crawford 480/4; 17-34-910
1 commentsJohn Anthony
 
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