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Search results - "vespasian"
vespasian~0.jpg
48 viewssalem
VESPASas01D+R.jpg
49 viewsVespasianus - AE as.2 commentsRugser
Vespasas02C9D+R.jpg
34 viewsVespasianus - AE as
D/ IMP CAES VESP AVG PM TP COS IIII
R/ AEQVITAS AVGVST SC
Cohen 9, AD 72 or 73
Rugser
VESPASq01C348DaR.jpg
31 viewsVespasianus - quadrans
D/ IMP VESPASIAN AVG
R/ PM TRP P P COS VIII SC
Cohen 348, AD 77 or 78
Rugser
VESPASR01D+R.jpg
21 viewsVespasianus - DenariusRugser
VESPASR02D+R.jpg
23 viewsVespasianus - DenariusRugser
VespasR03C00DaR.jpg
83 viewsVespasianus - DenariusRugser
VESPASR04denplaD+R.jpg
95 viewsVespasianus - Denarius plaqued1 commentsRugser
Titus.jpg
105 viewsIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM Laur head of Titvs r.Rev.TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII PP Dolphin entwined around anchor. RIC 26(a)(Rome ad 80) weight 3,20 gr3 commentsspikbjorn
vespasian_denarius_sow_right_facing.jpg
84 viewsVESPASIAN. 69-79 AD. AR Denarius (19mm - 3.53 g). Rome mint. Struck 77-8 AD. CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / IMP XIX, Sow walking left with three piglets. RIC II 982; BMCRE 212; RSC 213.3 commentspaul1888
RIC_578A_Vespasianus.jpg
35 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS IIII CENS, Radiate head left
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST / S C (in field), Aequitas standing left, with scales and rod
AE/Dupondius (27.59 mm 12.479 gr 6h) Struck in Rome 73 A.D.
RIC-BMCRE-BNF unpublished
1 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
capricorn.jpg
39 viewsVespasian, 69-79
Denarius 79, AR 3.52 g. Laureate head r. Rev. Capricorn l; below, globe. C 554. RIC 1058.
Ex CNG 42, 1997 lot 860; Triton VI, January 14, 2003 lot 836, Numismatica Ars Classica NAC AG, Auction 92, May 23, 2016 lot 2140, Heritage Auction 3060, 1/16/2018 lot 33400, CNG Web Store (841947); NGC certification 4244139-018
5 commentspaul1888
Vespasian_Aureus_3.jpg
10 Vespasian Aureus38 viewsVespasian, 69-79 AD
AV aureus (19mm, 7.11 gm, 7h). Lugdunum Mint, AD 71.

O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P, laureate head right

R: COS III FORT RED, Fortuna Redux standing left, holding globe and caduceus.

Calico 613. RIC 1111. Nearly VF

Ex Heritage
RI0056
Sosius
Vesp_2-2.jpg
10 Vespasian AE As, 71 AD25 viewsVESPASIAN
AE As. 71 AD.

O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, laureate head right

R: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI S-C, Aequitas standing left with scales & palm.

Cohen 19, RIC 290

Very Rare reverse with Aequitas holding palm, VF/aVF
RI0068
Sosius
Vespasian_RIC_487.jpg
10 Vespasian AE As, 71 AD12 viewsVESPASIAN
AE As, Rome Mint, 71 A.D.;

O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, laureate head right

R: FORTVNAE REDVCI S C, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder on globe in right, cornucopia in left

RIC II 487
RI0059
Sosius
Vespasian_RIC_287_2.jpg
10 Vespasian AE As, 71 AD15 viewsVESPASIAN
AE As. , 71 AD.

O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, laureate head right

R: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI S-C, Aequitas standing left, holding scales & rod.

Cohen 13, RIC 287, Sear5 #2356
RI0057
Sosius
Vespasian_RIC_732.jpg
10 Vespasian AE As, 74 AD20 viewsVESPASIAN
AE As. 74 AD.

O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS, laureate head right

R: VICTORIA AVGVST S-C, Victory standing right on prow of galley, holding wreath and palm.

Cohen 638, RIC 732

Sadly, this coin suffered from bronze disease, and the patina was lost when the coin was treated.
RI0060
Sosius
63430q00.jpg
10 Vespasian and Titus29 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Antioch, Syria

Silver tetradrachm, Prieur 113, McAlee 336, RPC II 1947, Wruck 86, aVF, Antioch mint, weight 13.89g, maximum diameter 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 70 - 71 A.D.; obverse ΑΥΤΟΚΡΑΤ ΚΑΙΣΑ ΟΥΕΣΠΑΣΙΑΝΟΥ, laureate bust right; reverse ETOYC Γ IEPOY (Holy Year 3), eagle standing left on club, wings spread, palm frond left; ex CNG auction 149, lot 286; ex Garth R. Drewry Collection, ex Harmer Rooke (26-28 March 1973), lot 488 (part of).

Struck to pay Titus' legions during and after the First Jewish Revolt. RPC notes c. 320 different dies indicate 6,500,000 Syrian tetradrachms might have been minted. This was the quantity Titus would have needed to pay his four legions. Hoard evidence finds many of these types in Judaea confirming they were used to pay the legions.

Purchased from FORVM!
RI0002
Sosius
Vespasian_RPC_832.jpg
10 Vespasian AR Ephesus27 viewsVespasian
AR Denarius.
Ephesus Mint,
71 AD.

O: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, laureate head right

R: LIBERI IMP AVG VESPAS, Titus & Domitian standing, heads left, each holding a patera, EPHE monogram in ex.

RIC 1430c, RSC 250, RPC 832, sear5 #2401
RI0064
1 commentsSosius
Vespasian_RPC_1659.jpg
10 Vespasian AR of Caesarea14 viewsVESPASIAN
AR hemidrachm, Caesarea mint (1.7g), c. 69 - 79 A.D.

O: AYOKP KAICAP OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right

R: Nike advancing right holding wreath and palm

RPC II 1659, BMC p. 47, 17, VF
RI0063
Sosius
Vespasian_Judea_Den_RIC_2-sm2.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 69-70 Judea Capta42 viewsVespasian. A.D. 69-79. AR denarius (17.1 mm, 2.86 g, 6 h). Rome, A.D. 69-70. Ex-Hebrew College Museum. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / IVDAEA, captive Jewess seated right, hands tied before, trophy of captured arms behind. RIC 2; BMCRE 35; RSC 226. Fine, toned.
Ex-Hebrew College Museum.
Ex Agora Auctions #1 - Nov 2013
1 commentsSosius
Vespasian_RIC_29.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 70 AD36 viewsVESPASIAN
AR Denarius, 70 A.D.

O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head. r.

R: COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus.

Sear 2285, RIC 29, RSC 94h
RI0058
1 commentsSosius
Vespasian_RSC_387.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 73 AD11 viewsVESPASIAN
AR Denarius. 73 AD

O: IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS, laureate head right

R: PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding scepter & branch.

RSC 387, BMC 98, Sear 2305; Fine
Ex-Littleton Coin Co.
RI0065
Sosius
Titus_RIC_1252.jpg
11 Titus Æ Dupondius68 viewsTITUS
Æ Dupondius
(28mm, 13.13 g, 6h)
Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, under Vespasian, 77-78 AD

O: Laureate head right, globe at tip of neck

R: Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
RIC II 1252 (Vespasian); Lyon 107 (Vespasian). Good VF, natural green patina, minor cleaning marks.

Ex CNG
RI0054
6 commentsSosius
rjb_ves_02_07.jpg
69b44 viewsVespasian 69-79 AD
AR denarius
Obv "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG"
Laureate bust left
Rev "TR POT X COS VIIII"
Figure (Octavian?) on rostral column
Rome mint
RIC 120
1 commentsmauseus
VESPSE06-2.jpg
70 AD: Vespasian - Defeat of the Jewish revolt and fall of Jerusalem345 viewsSestertius (28.6g, 37mm, 6h). Roman mint. Struck AD 71.
IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM TR P P COS III laureate head right
IVDAEA CAPTA / S C [in ex.] Judaea seated, in attidue of sorrow, at the foot of a palm tree; behind Vespasian standing in military dress holding spear and parazonium; left foot on a helmet.
RIC 427 (scarce); BMC 543; Cohen 239
1 commentsCharles S
Titus01.jpg
RIC 0022 Titus denarius 96 viewsIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
Laureate head right

TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P
Ceres seated left with corn ears, poppy and torch

Rome, after July 1, 79 AD

3.19g

RIC 22 (C)

Ex-RM collection, Ex-Calgary Coin
6 commentsJay GT4
Vespasian_Eagle.jpg
RIC 0847 Vespasian denarius113 viewsIMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Laureate head right

COS VII
Eagle standding front on garlanded base, thunderbolt in claws, wings open, head left

Rome, 76 AD

3.5g

RIC 847 (C2)

Ex-RM collection, Ex-Calgary Coin
6 commentsJay GT4
Vespasian_Prow_star.jpg
RIC 0941 Vespasian denarius97 viewsIMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Laureate head right

COS VIII
Prow of galley right, star above.

Rome 77-8 AD

3.39g

RIC II 941 (C); BMCRE 210; RSC 136.

Rated common but tough to find on the market.

Ex-Ancient Treasures, Ex-ANE.

This reverse type copied from aurei and denarii of Ahenobarbus struck for Mark Antony in 40 BC, Crawford 521 .
7 commentsJay GT4
00073x00.jpg
27 viewsSPAIN, Oducia
PB Tessera (19mm, 3.95 g)
MF/OD within wreath (Municipium Flavium Oducensis)
Blank
Cf. Casariego, Cores, & Pliego 14b

The municipia Flavia were a series of small towns founded as part of Vespasian's reconstruction of Spain. These settlements are notable in that the civic laws are preserved in stone for many of the settlements.
Ardatirion
00004x00~5.jpg
61 viewsROME
PB Tessera (16mm, 2.53 g, 12h)
Victory standing right, foot on helmet, inscribing shield set on palm tree
Apex; palm frond to left
M. & B. Overbeck, “Romische Bleimarken als Zeugnis des Ersten Jüdischen Krieges,” in Helas und der Grechen Osten, p. 211-216, 1; Rostovtsev 1840, pl. VII, 37; BMC 802-4

The similarities between the obverse of this piece and the Judaea Capta issues of Caesarea Maritima cannot be overstated. This type, as well as a few others that bear the portrait of Vespasian or palm trees, undoubtedly played some role in the triumph that followed the conclusion of the First Jewish War.
2 commentsArdatirion
00037x00~0.jpg
30 viewsVespasian. AD 69-79.
Fourrée Denarius (18mm, 2.14 g, 7 h)
Copying a Rome mint issue of AD 77-78.
Laureate head right
Pair of oxen under yoke left
Cf. RIC II 943
1 commentsArdatirion
Retarrifed_Vespasian_as.jpg
105 viewsROME. Titus. As Caesar, AD 69-79.
Æ As (20mm, 9.84 g, 6 h)
Rome mint. Struck AD 77-78.
Retarrifed under by the Ostrogothic kingdom in Italy as 42 nummi, 6th century AD.
Laureate head left; XLII (= mark of value, 42 nummi) carved before bust
Spes standing left, holding flower and raising hem of skirt
For host coin:cf. RIC II 1101. For revaluation: cf. Morrisson, Re-use 19; cf. MEC 1, 76 (Vespasian)

Ex Giamba Collection (Classical Numismatic Group 82, 16 September 2009), lot 1139
3 commentsArdatirion
vespasian.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN39 views69 - 79 AD
(STRUCK 74 AD)
AE DUPONDIUS 27 mm 13.23 g
O: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM T COS V CENS
RAD. HEAD LEFT
R: FELICITAS PVBLICA S-C
FELICITAS STANDING FACING, HEAD L, HOLDING CADUCEUS & CORNUCOPIA
ROME

laney
VESPASIAN_03_08_2010_RES.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN33 views69 - 79 AD
AE DUPONDIUS 26 mm 8.51 g
STRUCK 73 AD
O: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS IIII CENS, radiate head left
R: FELICITASPVBLICA S-C, Felicitas standing left holding short caduceus & cornucopiae
RIC 539
laney
VESPASIAN_RED.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN47 viewsVESPASIAN
69 - 79 AD
AE As
26.89 MM, 9.8 g
O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII, Laureate head right
R: S C, Spes standing left holding flower and lifting hem
RIC II 583
1 commentslaney
VESP_AEQ_L_BLK.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN32 views69 - 79 AD
struck 74 AD
AE As 27 mm, 9.32 g
O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS V CENS, laureate head left
R: AEQVITAS AVGVST S-C, Aequitas standing left, holding scales & rod.
RIC 722
laney
VESP_AEQU_R_BLK.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN28 views69-79 AD
AE As 28 mm, 9.17 g
O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS__, laureate head right
R: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI/S-C Aequitas standingleft holding scales and rod
laney
vesp_eagle_globe_grylres.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN21 views69 - 79 AD
AE As 27.5 mm, 9.77 g
O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS [III or IIII?] Laureate head right
R: Eagle, head right, wings spread, perched on globe S-C
laney
vesp_fortuna.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN21 views69 - 79 AD
AE Dupondius 29 mm, 11.24 g
O: VESPASIAN AVG COS III radiate head right, small globe below point of neck
R: FO[RTVNAE]REDVCI/SC Fortune standing left holding branch and rudder on globe, and cornucopia
Lugdunum mint
laney
vespasian~0.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN28 views69 - 79 AD
struck 76 AD
AE 27.5 mm, 9.63 g
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII - Laurate head right
Reverse: SC - Spes advancing left holding flower left and raising skirt right
laney
vespas_judaea_cap_res.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN23 viewsJudaea Capta Issue
69 - 79 AD
Struck 71 AD
AE Sestertius 32.5 mm 21.75 g
O: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III, laureate head right
R: IVDAEA CAPTA, Emperor with spear standing left of palm tree; Judaea mourning to right; SC in exe
Rome RIC II 427
laney
vespasian_denarius_res.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN32 views69 - 79 AD
AR Denarius 19 mm, 3.1 g
O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG Laureate bust of Vespasian right
R: PON MAX TR P COS V Vespasian enthroned right, holding scepter and branch
Rome mint
RIC 76; Sear 2300
laney
vespasian_spes.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN12 views69 - 79 AD
Struck 76 AD
Æ As 27 mm max.; 10.55 g
O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII, laureate head of Vespasian right
R: S C, Spes standing left, holding a flower & raising hem of her skirt
Rome mint; cf RIC 894





laney
titus_domitian_aegae_b.jpg
(10) VESPASIAN (Titus and Domitian as Caesars)24 views69 - 79 AD
Reign of Vespasian
AE 19.5 mm; 3.05 g
O: laureate bust of Titus on left, confronted with bare-headed, draped bust of Domitian;
R: Apollo standing right wearing long chiton, taenia in right, laurel branch in left
Aegae, Aeolis. RPC II 968; BMC Aeolis p. 98, 22; SNG Cop 25. scarce;
d.s.
laney
titus_denarius_blk.jpg
(11) TITUS76 views79 - 81 AD
AR Denarius 19.18 mm, 3 g
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right
R: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VI, Slow quadriga left, containing ears of corn
RIC 12
(ex Ancient Imports)
2 commentslaney
titus_denar_b.jpg
(11) TITUS19 views79 - 81 AD
Struck 79/80 AD
AR Denarius 18 mm; 2.63 g
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M Laureate head right
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P Wreath on curule chair
Rome; RIC II 25a; RSC 318
laney
domitian.jpg
(12) DOMITIAN46 views(by Vespasian)
ca. 69 - 81 AD
AE 26 mm 11.31 g
O: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS III
LAUR HEAD R
R: PAX AVGVSTI S-C
PAX STANDING LEFT HOLDING BRANCH & AESUCEUS, LEANING ON CIPPUS
laney
Vespasian.jpg
*SOLD*33 viewsVespasian AR Denarius

Attribution: RIC II 43, RSC II 43, BMCRE II 50
Date: AD 71
Obverse: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head r.
Reverse: AVGVR (above), TRI POT (below), four priestly implements:
simpulum, aspergillum, jug & lituus
Size: 19.8 mm
1 commentsNoah
Titus.jpg
*SOLD*39 viewsTitus AR Denarius

Attribution: RIC 128, RSC 321, BMCRE 78
Date: AD 80
Obverse: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN P M, laureate head r.
Reverse: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, tripod surmounted by dolphin
Size: 18.2 mm
Weight: 3.074 grams
ex-Forvm
2 commentsNoah
Vespasian_1.jpg
*SOLD*10 viewsVespasian Orichalcum dupondius

Attribution: RIC II 1191, Lugdunum
Date: AD 72
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, radiate head r.,
globe at point of bust
Reverse: PAX AVG, Pax stg l., sacrificing with r. from patera over burning altar, caduceus and branch in l., S - C across fields
Size: 8 mm
Weight: 10.6 grams
ex-Forvm
Noah
001_vespasian_tet_14_8grams_feb-01-feb-02-2012_o-r.JPG
0 - a - Vespasian Silver Tetradrachm - 14.8 Grams - Antioch, Syria.74 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Antioch, Syria.
Silver Tetradrachm of Emperor Vespasian ( 69 - 79 AD )

(titles in Greek)
obv: Laureate bust of the Emperor facing right.
rev: Eagle, holding a laureate wreath in his beak, standing on club of Hercules facing left, palm branch to left in field.

Size: 28 - 29 mm
Weight: 14.8 Grams.
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~*~ CLICK PHOTO FOR FULLSIZE ~*~
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6 commentsrexesq
vespasian_winged-caduceus_03_200_1.JPG
00 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Winged Caduceus86 viewsEmperor Vespasian (AD 69 - 79)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint AD 74

obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANUS AUG - Laureate head right.

rev: PON MAX TR P COS V - Winged Caduceus.

RIC 703
4 commentsrexesq
vespasian_winged-caduceus_03.JPG
00 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Winged Caduceus.49 viewsEmperor Vespasian (AD 69 - 79)
Silver Denarius, Rome Mint AD 74

obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANUS AUG - Laureate head right.

rev: PON MAX TR P COS V - Winged Caduceus.

RIC 703

Note the detail on the heads of the snakes of the caduceus.
3 commentsrexesq
V539.jpg
00 Domitian as Caesar RIC 53991 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; cloak flying out behind, r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 539 (R). BMC 122. RSC 665. BNC -.
Acquired from NumisCorner, June 2018.

This is the first denarius struck at Rome for Domitian as Caesar. Fittingly, it commemorates Domitian's appearance at Vespasian and Titus' joint Jewish War Triumph - 'while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse' (Suetonius, Domitian, ii), which was the normal conduct for a young prince on such occasions. The type was struck in three variants: firstly, with a clockwise obverse legend and DOMITIAN fully spelled out, as we see here. Secondly, it was shortened to DOMIT, with the legend still running clockwise. Lastly, the legend direction was changed to counter clockwise with DOMIT. The first two variants are quite rare, the last relatively common. On this coin we see a cloak flying out from behind Domitian. This interesting detail only appears on a few coins from the first variant and does not show up on subsequent issues of the type. Most likely this variant with the cloak was the earliest version of the type which was then quickly simplified by dropping the cloak all together.

Well centred in good early style.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
vespasian_clasped-hands-caduceus-poppies-wheat_00.JPG
000 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Clasped Hands97 viewsVespasian Silver Denarius - Clasped Hands
Rome Mint, AD 73
obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII CEN - Laureled head right.

rev: FIDES PVBL - Clasped hands holding wheat ears, opium poppies and caduceus.
------------
A bit off-center, but a beautiful portrait of the Emperor, and great detail on the poppy heads.
------------
**
**More photos of this Vespasian Denarius below, in Alphabetical order...
4 commentsrexesq
vespasian_silver-denarius_clasped-hands-caduceus-poppies-wheat_obv_09_rev_08_95%.JPG
000 - Vespasian AR Denarius - Clasped Hands 30 viewsVespasian Silver Denarius - Clasped Hands
Rome Mint, AD 73
obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM COS IIII CEN - Laureled head right.

rev: FIDES PVBL - Clasped hands holding wheat ears, opium poppies and caduceus.
------------
A bit off-center, but a beautiful portrait of the Emperor, and great detail on the poppy heads.
------------
** These photos slightly bright and off-color due to lighting
**More photos of this Vespasian Denarius below, in Alphabetical order...
1 commentsrexesq
1__Vespasian.jpg
003.Vaspasian 69-79 AD17 viewsAR Denarius
Mint: Rome, Date: 74 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG,laureate head right.
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right on a curule chair, feet on stool with branch at left & scepter in right.
Size: 19mm; 3.2 gms
Ref: RIC II- 77
1 commentsbrian l
1_My_Titus.jpg
004.Titus 79-81 AD43 viewsAR Denarius
Mint: Rome, Date: 80 AD
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM,Laureate head of Titus right.
Rev: TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, Two captives seated left and right, back to back, between them, trophy composed of cuirass, helmet, and oblong shields,the captive on left is a woman, draped, hooded, and rests head on right hand; the captive on right is a man, naked,and has his hands bound behind his back.
Ref: RIC II-102
Possible Judea Capta type,Hendin-778;Meshorer TJC,Supplement 5,Type I
2 commentsBrian L
0053~0.jpg
0053 - Denarius Vespasian 77-8 AC32 viewsObv/(I)MP CAESAR VESPASIAN(VS AVG), Vespasian head laureate r.
Rev/Yoke of ochsen l., COS VIII in ex.

Ag, 17.5mm, 3.00g
Mint: Rome.
RIC II.1/107 [C] - RCV 2289 - BMCRE 206 - RSC 126
ex-Valencia Coin Fair, 29 feb 2008
dafnis
0054~0.jpg
0054 - Denarius Vespasian 71 AC16 viewsObv/IMP CAESAR VESP AVG PM, Vespasian laureate head r.
Rev/AVGVR TRI POT, l. to r. simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus (emblems of the augurate and potificate).

Ag, 18.9mm, 3.19g
Mint: Rome.
RIC II.1/356 [CC] - RCV 2282 - BMCRE 64 - RSC 45
ex-Numismática Craven (Valencia Coin Fair)
dafnis
010.jpg
009 VESPASIAN14 viewsEMPEROR: Vespasian
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: COS ITER T-R POT, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus
DATE: 70 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.47 g
RIC: II.29 (CC)
Barnaba6
vespasianaes~0.JPG
009. Vespasian, 68-79AD. AE Aes.57 viewsAE Aes. Rome mint.
Obv. Laureate head right IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III

Rev. Aequitas standing left holding patera and sceptre AEQVITAS AVGVSTI S-C

RIC 482. gVF.

Lovely patina.
LordBest
VespasianRSC366RIC90~0.jpg
009. Vespasian, 69-79AD. AR Denarius.61 viewsVespasian 69-79. Rome mint, AR Denarius. Struck in 75A.D.
Obv. Laureate head right IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Rev. Pax seated left, holding branch PON MAX TRP COS VI

19.5mm, 2.84g. RSC 366, RIC 90.

A very craggy Vespasianic portrait. Pax appears to be bared to the waist, unusual.
1 commentsLordBest
V541.jpg
00a Domitian as Caesar RIC 541338 viewsAR Denarius, 3.46g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 541 (R2). BMC 129 var. RSC 664. BNC 105 var.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, lot 701. = Helios, ebay, 29 November 2010 (A. Lynn Collection).

This is an extremely rare denarius of Domitian as Caesar, the second earliest minted at Rome. Here the legend is clockwise, the much more common Domitian on horseback type has the legend anticlockwise. The reverse may allude to Domitian's participation in Vespasian and Titus' joint triumph where he rode a 'magnificent' steed. The obverse is a die match with the RIC plate coin from Oxford.

The early portrait on this one is quite outstanding.
18 commentsDavid Atherton
V669a.jpg
01 Domitian as Caesar RIC 66927 viewsÆ As, 11.05g
Rome mint, 73-74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PAX AVGVST; S C in field; Pax stg. l., leaning on column, with caduceus and branch
RIC 669 (C). BMC -. BNC 699.
Acquired from Musa Numismatics, August 2019.

The propaganda value of Pax for the Flavian dynasty after the Civil War, the revolt of Civilis, and the Jewish War cannot be underestimated. In her various guises she is one of the most popular types on Vespasian's coinage and shows up quite frequently during the reign on the coins struck for both himself and his sons. This As struck for Domitian as Caesar shows Pax leaning on a column, which likely copies a well known cult image of the goddess.

Tellingly, less than a decade later, Pax would not feature so prominently on Domitian's own coinage as Emperor.

Fine style early portrait.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
016.jpg
010 TITUS36 viewsEMPEROR: Titus
DENOMINATION: Denarius
OBVERSE: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right
REVERSE: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, throne with back in form of a diadem
DATE: 80 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.31 g
RIC: II.24a (C)
1 commentsBarnaba6
titus.jpg
010. Titus, 79-81AD. AR Denarius.155 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint 80AD.
Obv. Laureate head right IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM

Rev. Tripod surmounted by dolphin TRP IX IMP XV COS VII PP

RIC II 27. Cohen 321. SEAR 2518.(VF $192 - XF $512). EF

5 commentsLordBest
coin317.JPG
010. Vespasian13 viewsSpes

In Roman mythology, Spes was the goddess of hope. She was traditionally defined as "the last goddess" (Spes, ultima dea), meaning that hope is the last resource available to men.
There was a temple to her in the Forum Holitorium. In art, Spes was depicted hitching her skirt while holding a cornucopia and flowers. Spes personified hope for good harvests, and for children, and was invoked at births, marriages, and other important times.

Her Greek equivalent was Elpis.

Vespasian Ae As REVERSE: Spes standing;

Check
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144286.jpg
010. Vespasian32 viewsVespasian. AD 69-79. AR Denarius (20mm, 2.96 g). Ephesos mint. Struck AD 71. Laureate head right / Turreted and draped female bust right. RIC II 327 var.; BMCRE 450 var. ; RPC II 828 var.; RSC 293a var. This issue is normally accompanied by a mint mark below the bust on the reverse. No mintmark can be seen on this specimen, but striking weakness could have prevented it from being fully struck in this area. The obverse portrait is almost certainly from the same hand as RPC II 828, an issue marked with a BY monogram. Ex-CNGecoli
coin12.JPG
010. Vespasian32 viewsVespasian AE Dupondius.

IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III, radiate head right / SECVRITAS AVGVSTI S-C, Securitas seated right, resting head on right hand, holding scepter in left, altar & torch before. Cohen 507.

Check
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coins118.JPG
010. Vespasian34 viewsVespasian Denarius. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / PON MAX TR P COS V, Winged caduceus. RSC 362. Ric 75
ecoli
T1342LG.jpg
010. VESPASIAN81 viewsAR denarius (18mm, 3.51g). Rome mint. Struck under Titus, AD 80-81.
DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS. Laureate head right / Two capricorns support shield inscribed S C, globe below. RIC II-1 357 (Titus). RSC 497.


3 commentsecoli
coin214.JPG
010. Vespasian 69 AD - 79 AD36 viewsVespasian

The character of this emperor showed very little, if anything, of the pagan tyrant. Though himself a man of no literary culture, he became the protector of his prisoner of war, the Jewish historian Josephus, a worshipper of the One God, and even permitted him the use of his own family name (Flavius). While this generosity may have been in some degree prompted by Josephus's shrewd prophecy of Vespasian's elevation to the purple, there are other instances of his disposition to reward merit in those with whom he was by no means personally sympathetic. Vespasian has the distinction of being the first Roman Emperor to transmit the purple to his own son; he is also noteworthy in Roman imperial history as having very nearly completed his seventieth year and died a natural death: being in feeble health, he had withdrawn to benefit by the purer air of his native Reate, in the "dewy fields" (rosei campi) of the Sabine country. By his wife, Flavia Domitilla, he left two sons, Titus and Domitian, and a daughter, Domitilla, through whom the name of Vespasian's empress was passed on to a granddaughter who is revered as a confessor of the Faith.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century. In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!"

Denarius. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / VES-TA to either side of Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & scepter. RSC 574
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coin212.JPG
012. Domitian 81-96 AD60 viewsDomitian

As emperor, Domitian was to become one of Rome's foremost micro managers, especially concerning the economy. Domitian's reach extended well beyond the economy. Late in A.D. 85 he made himself censor perpetuus, censor for life, with a general supervision of conduct and morals. The move was without precedent and, although largely symbolic, it nevertheless revealed Domitian's obsessive interest in all aspects of Roman life. While the military abilities of Vespasian and Titus were genuine, those of Domitian were not. Partly as an attempt to remedy this deficiency, Domitian frequently became involved in his own military exploits outside of Rome. He claimed a triumph in A.D. 83 for subduing the Chatti in Gaul, but the conquest was illusory.

as Caesar, AR Denarius. 76 AD. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / COS IIII, Pegasus walking right. RSC 47
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102155.jpg
012a. Domitia101 viewsDomitia, wife of Domitian. Augusta, 82-96 AD.

In 70, Domitia was married to Lucius Aelius Lamia, but she attracted the attention of Domitian, son of emperor Vespasian. Shortly afterwards she was taken from her husband and remarried with the future emperor. They had a son in the next year and a daughter in 74, both died young. Domitian was very fond of his wife and carried her in all his travels. In 83, Domitia Longina's affair with the actor Paris was disclosed. Paris was executed and Domitia received her letter of divorce from Domitian. She was exiled, but remained close to Roman politics and to Domitian.

CILICIA, Epiphanea. Æ 21mm (7.18 gm). Dated year 151 (83/84 AD). Draped bust right / Athena standing left, righ hand extended, left resting on shield; ANP (date) left. RPC I 1786; SNG Levante 1813; SNG France -; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, dark green patina, some smoothing. Very rare, only 1 specimen (the Levante specimen), recorded in RPC. Ex-CNG
ecoli73
0165.jpg
0165 - Denarius Titus 79 AC78 viewsObv/ T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, laureate head of T. r.
Rev/ TR POT VIII COS VII, Venus standing r., leaning on column, naked to waist, holding helmet and spear.

Ag, 18.7 mm, 3.42 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC II.1/1078 [C]
ex-Soler y Llach, auction feb 2012, lot 71 (Turrinus colln.)
1 commentsdafnis
0167.jpg
0167 - Denarius Vespasianus 69-70 AC26 viewsObv/IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head of Vespasian r.
Rev/Mourning Judaea, veiled and supporting head with l.h., seated r. on ground beside trophy; IVDAEA in ex.

Ag, 18.9mm, 3.28g
Mint: Rome.
RIC II.1/2 [C2] - BMCRE 35
ex-Morton & Eden, auction 59, lot #876 (ex-Jim E. Seaver colln.)
1 commentsdafnis
domitian as caesar horseback1.jpg
01a Domitian as Caesar RIC 680267 viewsAR Denarius, 3.15g
Rome mint, 73 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: No legend; Domitian on horse l.; r. hand raised, sceptre in l.
RIC 680 (C). BMC 129. RSC 664. BNC 105.
Ex Berk 146, 29 November 2005, lot 363.

A reverse type issued only for Domitian, most likely a reference to his part in the Judaean triumph of Vespasian and Titus.

"while taking part in the Judaean triumph, he rode on a white horse, the conventional mount for young princes on such occasions." (Suetonius, Domitian, ii)

A scarce coin of Domitian's part in a very important event in Flavian history. Nice portait with some of the beard still intact and a lively horse on the reverse!
1 commentsVespasian70
Personajes_Imperiales_2.jpg
02 - Personalities of the Empire58 viewsCalígula, Claudius, Britannicus , Agrippina jr., Nero, Galba, Otho, Vitellius, Vespasian, Domitila, Titus, Domitia and Julia Titi1 commentsmdelvalle
dom as caesar spes.jpg
02 Domitian as Caesar RIC 788157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 74 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVT; Spes, draped, advancing l., holding up flower in r. hand and with l. holding up her skirt.
RIC 788 (C). BMC 156. RSC 375. BNC 135.
Ex Harlan J Berk 155, 31 July 2007, lot 247.

During Vespasian's reign, Domitian was given the honorary title PRINCEPS IVVENTVT or 'Prince of Youth', celebrated here on this denarius from 74 AD. The title is one that was often given to young princes who were marked out as chosen heirs.

Spes, the personification of hope, is seen here on the reverse advacing left, holding a budding flower. The flower is a symbol of future well being.

Domitian's coinage during Vespasian's rule was unique. While Titus followed closely the types of his father, Domitian struck out on his own. One wonders how much of an input the young prince had on his own series.

A very likeable coin with a good portrait and excellent centring.


2 commentsVespasian70
Vespasianus-portrait.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Denarius, Portrait, 316 viewsVespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Denarius, Portrait, 3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-PM_T_R_I_POT-II-COS-III-Pxxx_RIC-II-_RIC-new-_C-_Rome_74-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_16,5mm_3,05g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0041, RIC (1962) 039, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT II COS III P P, Pax seated left, 285 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0041, RIC (1962) 039, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT II COS III P P, Pax seated left,
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-PM, Laureate head right.
revers:- TRI-POT-II-COS-III-P-P, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5 mm, weight: 3,05 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC 0041, RIC (1962) 039, S-2313, RSC 566, BMC 61
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M_TRI-POT_RIC-II-37_p-20_RIC-new-46_C-561_Rome_71-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_16,5-18mm_2,91g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0046, RIC (1962) 037, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT, Vesta seated left,129 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0046, RIC (1962) 037, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT, Vesta seated left,
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TRI-POT, Vesta seated left, holding a simpulum.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18mm, weight: 2,91g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 70-71 A.D., ref: RIC 0046, RIC (1962) 037, RSC 561, BMC 57,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESPA-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_CONCORDIA-AVGVSTI_RIC-II-_RIC-new-357_C-74_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_18mm_3,15g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0357, RIC (1962) -, Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, Concordia seated left, #1107 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0357, RIC (1962) -, Rome, AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, Concordia seated left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESPA-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- CONCORDIA-AVGVSTI, Concordia seated left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,15 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0357, RIC (1962) -, RSC-74 ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_TRI-POT_RIC-II-49_p-20_RIC-new-359_C-563_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_15,5-18mm_3,38g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0359, RIC (1962) 049, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT, Vesta seated left, #1149 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0359, RIC (1962) 049, Rome, AR-Denarius, TRI POT, Vesta seated left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- TRI-POT, Vesta seated left, holding a simpulum.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-18mm, weight: 3,38g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0359, RIC (1962) 049, RSC 563, BMC 70
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_VES-TA_RIC-II-50p-20_RIC-new-360_C-574_Rome_72-73AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17mm_3,26g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, Rome, AR-Denarius, VES TA, Vesta standing left, #1271 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, Rome, AR-Denarius, VES TA, Vesta standing left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- VES-TA, No legend - Vesta standing left, holding simpulum and scepter, VES TA across fields.
exe: - /-//--, diameter: 17 mm, weight: 3,26 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0360, RIC (1962) 050, C-574, BMC 71,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_VICTORIA-AVGVSTI_RIC-II-52_p-20_RIC-new-362_C-618_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_15,5-18mm_2,85g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, #1129 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- VICTORIA-AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right with palm, placing wreath on a standard set in the ground.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-18mm, weight: 2,85g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, C-618,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_VICTORIA-AVGVSTI_RIC-II-52_p-20_RIC-new-362_C-618_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-002_axis-xh_xx,xmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, #2147 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, Rome, AR-Denarius, VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, #2
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII, Laureate head right.
revers:- VICTORIA-AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, holding palm and about to place wreath on trophy.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 15-17mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC 0362, RIC (1962) 052, C-618,
Q-002
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES_VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII-CENS_FIDES-PVBL-RIC-II-55p-21_RIC-new-520_C-_Rome_-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5mm_2,98g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0520, RIC (1962) 055, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES PVBL, Clasped hands, 300 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0520, RIC (1962) 055, Rome, AR-Denarius, FIDES PVBL, Clasped hands,
avers:- IMP-CAES_VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII-CENS, Laureate head right.
revers:- FIDES-PVBL, Clasped hands holding caduceus, poppies and corn-ears.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5 mm, weight: 2,98g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 73 A.D., ref: RIC 0520, RIC (1962) 055, S 2291, C 164, BMC 86,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-CENS_PONTIF-MAXIM_RIC-546_RICnew-77_C-387_Rome_73-AD_Q-001_axis-1h_18-18,5mm_3,16g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONTIF MAXIM, Emperor seated right, 301 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONTIF MAXIM, Emperor seated right,
avers:- IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-CENS, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONTIF-MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding scepter and branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5 mm, weight: 3,16 g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 73 A.D., ref: RIC 0546, RIC (1962) 065, p-21, S-, C-387, BMC 98,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAESAR_VESP-AVG_PONT-MAX-TR-P-COS-V_RIC-II---_RIC-new-683_RSC-363_Rome_74-AD_Q-001_6h_18-19mm_3,25g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0683, RIC (1962) ---, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONT MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right, #1180 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0683, RIC (1962) ---, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONT MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right, #1
avers:- IMP CAESAR VESP AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONT-MAX-TR-P-COS-V, Vespasian seated right on curule chair, holding sceptre and branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 3,25g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 74 A.D., ref: RIC 0683, RIC (1962) ---, RSC-363, BMC 135,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_PONT-MAX-TRP-COS-V_RIC-II-77_RIC-new-702_C-364_Rome_74-AD_Q-002_axis-6h_19,5mm_3,14g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0702, RIC (1962) 077, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONT MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right, #1138 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0702, RIC (1962) 077, Rome, AR-Denarius, PONT MAX TR P COS V, Vespasian seated right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONT-MAX-TRP-COS-V, Vespasian seated right, holding scepter and branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,14g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 74 A.D., ref: RIC 0702, RIC (1962) 077, C-364,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-VI_RIC-(1962)-90_RIC-772_C-366_Rome_75-AD_Q-001_6h_18mm_3,11g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, #1203 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-VI, Pax seated left holding branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, RSC-366, BMC-161,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-VI_RIC-II-_RIC-new-_C-_Rome_-AD_Q-001_5h_19,5mm_3,23ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, #2118 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, #2
avers:- IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-VI, Pax seated left holding branch.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 3,23g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC 0772, Rome, RIC (1962) 090, RSC-366, BMC-161,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian,_RIC_777,_RIC(1962)_93,_AR-Denar,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPASIANVS_AVG,_PON_MAX_TR_P_COS_VI,_RSC_368,_BMC_166,_Rome_75_AD,_Q-001,_7h,_17-18,5mm,_3,19ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0777, RIC (1962) 0093, AR-Denarius, Rome, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Victory standing left on prow, #1129 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0777, RIC (1962) 0093, AR-Denarius, Rome, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Victory standing left on prow, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: PON MAX TR P COS VI, Victory standing left on prow of ship, holding wreath and palm.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,5 mm, weight: 3,19g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 75 A.D., ref: RIC 0777, RIC (1962) 0093, RSC 368, BMC 166,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS-VII_RIC-II-96_p-25_RIC-new-841_C-117_Rome_75-76-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_18,5-19mm_3,22g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0841, RIC (1962) 096, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Cow right, #1177 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0841, RIC (1962) 096, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Cow right, #1
avers:- IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS-VII, Cow advancing right.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19mm, weight: 3,22g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 75-76 A.D., ref: RIC 0841, RIC (1962) 096, C-117,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_COS-VII_RIC-xx_Q-001_18mm_3,30g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Eagle standing on an altar, head left, #1263 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VII, Eagle standing on an altar, head left, #1
avers:- IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend - Eagle standing on an altar, head left, COS VII across fields.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,30g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: -- A.D., ref: RIC 0847, RIC (1962) 099a, Sear 2287, RSC 121, BMC 180,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_COS-VIII-RIC-II-104_p-26_RIC-new-937_C-125_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-x02_axis-5h_17,5-19mm_2,99g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0937, RIC (1962) 103, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Rome standing left,179 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0937, RIC (1962) 103, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Rome standing left,
avers:- IMP-CAESAR-VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS-VIII, Mars standing left, holding spear and trophy.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-19 mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 0937, RIC (1962) 103, BMC 200, RSC 125,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_COS-VIII-RIC-II-104_RIC-new-940_C-125_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-h_17mm_3_43g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0939, RIC (1962) 104, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Rome standing left corn ear,199 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0939, RIC (1962) 104, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Rome standing left corn ear,
avers:- IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS-VIII, Mars standing left, holding spear and trophy, wheat ear at foot in the right side.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 3,43g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref:RIC 0939, RIC (1962) 104, C-125,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_COS-VIII-RIC-II-108_p-26_RIC-new-941_C-136_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-11h_16,5-17,5mm_2,79g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0941, RIC (1962) 108, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Prow right,127 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0941, RIC (1962) 108, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS VIII, Prow right,
avers:- IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS-VIII, Prow right, star of eight rays above.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-17,5 mm, weight: 2,79g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref:RIC 0941, RIC (1962) 108, C-136,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC-944_Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS-VIII_RIC-II-107_RIC-new-944_RSC-134a_BMCRE-209_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_6h_16,7-17,3mm_3,32g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//COS VIII, Cow right, #1126 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//COS VIII, Cow right, #1
avers: IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG, Laureate head left.
revers: COS-VIII, Pair of Oxen, under yoke left.
exerg: -/-//COS VIII, diameter: 16,7-17,3mm, weight: 3,32g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, RSC-134a, BMCRE-209,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
RIC-944_Vespasian_AR-Den_CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS-VIII_RIC-II-107_RIC-new-944_RSC-134a_BMCRE-209_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-002_6h_16,7-17,6mm_3,27g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//COS VIII, Cow right, #2109 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//COS VIII, Cow right, #2
avers: IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG, Laureate head left.
revers: COS-VIII, Pair of Oxen, under yoke left.
exerg: -/-//COS VIII, diameter: 16,7-17,6mm, weight: 3,27g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 0944, RIC (1962) 107, RSC-134a, BMCRE-209,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_IVDAEA_RIC-II-15_RIC-new-2_RSC-226_Rome_69-70-AD_Q-001_7h_16,5-18,5mm_2,81gx-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0002, RIC II(1962) 015D, AR-Denarius, Rome, IVDAEA, Captive Jewess seated right, #185 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0002, RIC II(1962) 015D, AR-Denarius, Rome, IVDAEA, Captive Jewess seated right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: IVDAEA, Captive Jewess seated right, hands tied before, a trophy of captured arms behind.
exergue: -/-//IVDAEA, diameter: 16,6-18,5mm, weight: 2,81g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 69-70 A.D., ref: RIC² 0002, RIC II(1962) 015D p-16, RSC 226, BMC 35,
Q-001
quadrans
RIC-027_Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP_CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS_ITER_TR_POT_RIC-II-9D_RIC-new-027_RSC-94g_BMC-21_Rome_69-70-AD_Q-001_6h_17,0-20,5mm_2,99g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0027, RIC II(1962) 009D, AR-Denarius, Rome, COS ITER TR POT, Pax standing left, #1127 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0027, RIC II(1962) 009D, AR-Denarius, Rome, COS ITER TR POT, Pax standing left, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: COS ITER TR POT, Pax, draped, standing left, holding branch extended in right hand and winged caduceus in the left hand.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-21,0mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 69-70 A.D., ref: RIC² 0027, RIC II(1962) 009D, p-16, RSC 94g, BMC 21,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS-ITER-T-R-POT_RIC-II-10_RIC-new-29_C-94h_Rome_70-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_16,5-18,5mm_3,28g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, #1141 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,28 g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 70 A.D., ref: RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, C-94h ,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_COS-ITER-TR-POT_RIC-II-10_RIC-new-29_C-94h_Rome_70-AD_Q-002_axis-5h_18mm_2,85g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, #283 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, Rome, AR-Denarius, COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, #2
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: COS ITER T R POT, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 2,85 g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 70 A.D., ref: RIC² 0029, RIC II(1962) 010, C-94h ,
Q-002
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M_AVG_V-R_PON-MAX_RIC-II-29_p-_RIC-new-42_C-_Rome_71-AD_Q-001_7h_16,5-18mm_3,25ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0042, RIC II(1962) 029, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVR/PON MAX, Sacrificial implements, #1179 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0042, RIC II(1962) 029, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVR/PON MAX, Sacrificial implements, #1
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: AVGVR/ PON MAX, Sacrificial implements: simpulum, aspergillum, jug and lituus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18mm, weight: 3,25g, axes:7h,
mint: Rome, date: 70-72 A.D., ref: RIC² 0042, RIC II(1962) 029, RSC 42, BMC 48,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M_AVG_V-R_TRI-POT_RIC-II-30_p-_RIC-new-43_C-_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_7h_18-18,5mm_3,21ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0043, RIC II(1962) 030, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVR/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #197 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0043, RIC II(1962) 030, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVGVR/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #1
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: AVGVR/ TRI POT, Sacrificial implements: simpulum, aspergillum, jug, and lituus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-18,5mm, weight: 3,21g, axes:7h,
mint: Rome, date: 70-72 A.D., ref: RIC² 0043, RIC II(1962) 030, RSC-43, BMCRE- 50
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-Sest_IMP-CAES_VESPAS-AVG-P-M-TR-P-P-P-COS-III_PAX-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-437old-243new_C-327_71-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_32mm_27,52g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, S-C, Pax standing left,322 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, Rome, AE-Sestertius, PAX AVGVSTI, S-C, Pax standing left,
avers: IMP CAES VESPAS AVG P M TR P P P COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: PAX AVGVSTI, Pax standing left, holding olive branch and cornucopiae, S C across fields.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 32,0mm, weight: 27,52g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0243, RIC II(1962) 437, C-327,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-As_IMP-CAES_VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-III_AEQVITAS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-482old-287new_C-13_71-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_25-25,5mm_8,42g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #1355 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #1
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25-25,5mm, weight: 8,42g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, C-13, BMC 600, Sear 2356,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-As_IMP-CAES_VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-III_AEQVITAS-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-II-482old-287new_C-13_71-AD_Q-002_6h_27-28mm_9,79g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #2154 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, #2
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 27,0-28,0mm, weight: 9,79g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0287, RIC II(1962) 482, C-13, BMC 600, Sear 2356,
Q-002
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_AVG_V-R-TRI-POT_RIC-II-42_p-19_RIC-new-356_C-45_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_15,5-16mm_3,13g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #1197 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #1
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right.
reverse: AVG V R/ TRI-POT, Sacrificial implements: simpulum, aspergillum, jug, and lituus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 15,5-16mm, weight: 3,13g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, RSC-45,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-COS-IIII_AVG_V-R-TRI-POT_RIC-II-42_p-19_RIC-new-356_C-45_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-002_axis-6h_16-18mm_3,55g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #2114 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #2
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right.
reverse: AVG V R/ TRI-POT, Sacrificial implements: simpulum, aspergillum, jug, and lituus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,55g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, RSC-45,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAES_VESP_AVG_P_M_COS_IIII,_AVG_V_R_TRI_POT,_RIC-II-42_p-19_RIC-new-356_C-45_Rome_72-73-AD_Q-001_7h_16,0-17mm_3,23g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #3107 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, Rome, AR-Denarius, AVG V R/TRI POT, Sacrificial implements, #3
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right.
reverse: AVG V R/ TRI-POT, Sacrificial implements: simpulum, aspergillum, jug, and lituus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,0-17,0mm, weight: 3,23g, axes: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0356, RIC II(1962) 042, RSC-45,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-Dup_IMP-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-IIII_CONCORDIA-AVGVSTI_S-C_RIC-391_C-_72-3-AD_R_Q-001_6h_26,7-27,6mm_13,89ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0391, RIC II(1962) --, Rome, AE-Dupondius, CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, S-C, Concordia seated left, Rare !153 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0391, RIC II(1962) --, Rome, AE-Dupondius, CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, S-C, Concordia seated left, Rare !
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right.
reverse: CONCORDIA AVGVSTI, S C below, Concordia seated left, holding patera and cornucopiae.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 26,7-27,6mm, weight: 13,89g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0391, RIC II(1962) --, C--, Rare!
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-Dup_IMP-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-COS-IIII_ROMA_VICTRIX_S-C_RIC-II-742-RIC-New-397_C-430_72-3_AD_Q-001_7h_27,0-27,7mm_12,12g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, Rome, AE-Dupondius, -/-//SC, ROMA VICTRIX, Roma seated left, 164 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, Rome, AE-Dupondius, -/-//SC, ROMA VICTRIX, Roma seated left,
avers: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right.
reverse: ROMA VICTRIX, S C below, Roma seated left, holding Victory and spear.
exergue: -/-//SC, diameter: 27,0-27,7mm, weight: 12,12g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 72-73 A.D., ref: RIC² 0397, RIC II(1962) 742, C-430,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-V_RIC-II-75_p-23_RIC-new-703_C-362_Rome_74-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5-19mm_3,16g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #1136 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: PON MAX TR P COS V, Winged caduceus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-19,0 mm, weight:3,16 g, axes: 6 h,
mint: Rome, date: 74 A.D., ref: RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, p-23, C-362,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-V_RIC-II-75_p-23_RIC-new-703_C-362_Rome_74-AD_Q-002_axis-6h_17,5-19mm_3,16ga-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #2162 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #2
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: PON MAX TR P COS V, Winged caduceus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-19,0 mm, weight:3,16 g, axes: 6 h,
mint: Rome, date: 74 A.D., ref: RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, p-23, C-362,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPSIANVS-AVG_PON-MAX-TR-P-COS-V_RIC-II-75_p-23_RIC-new-703_C-362_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_5h_18-18,5mm_2,97g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #3193 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, Rome, AR-Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS V, #3
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: PON MAX TR P COS V, Winged caduceus.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-18,5 mm, weight:2,97g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 74 A.D., ref: RIC² 0703, RIC II(1962) 075, p-23, C-362,
Q-003
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AE-Dup_IMP-CAES_VESP-AVG-P-M-T_P-COS-VII_FELICITAS-PVBLICA_S-C_RIC-578old-887new_C-155_76-AD__Q-001_27mm_13,00g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, Rome, AE-Dupondius, FELICITAS PVBLICA, S-C, Felicitas standing left,319 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, Rome, AE-Dupondius, FELICITAS PVBLICA, S-C, Felicitas standing left,
avers: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M T P COS VII, Radiate head right.
reverse: FELICITAS PVBLICA, S C across fields; Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus and cornucopia.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 27,0mm, weight: 13,00g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC² 0887, RIC II(1962) 578, C-155,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
020_RIC_II_890,_Vespasian,_AE-As,_IMP_CAES_VESPASIAN_AVG_COS_VII,_AEQVITAS_AVGVST,_S-C,_RIC_II_580-old,_C-4,_76_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_25-25,5mm,_11,20g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 5802, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, #168 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 5802, Rome, AE-As, S/C//--, AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPA AVG COS VII, Laureate head right.
reverse: AEQVITAS AVGVST, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter, S C across fields.
exergue: S/C//--, diameter: 25-25,5mm, weight: 11,20g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 0890, RIC II(1962) 580, C , BMC , Sear ,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_ANNONA-AVG_RIC-II-131b_RIC-new-964_C-29_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_18mm_3,15g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0964, RIC II(1962) 131b, Rome, AR-Denarius, ANNONA AVG, Annona seated left,110 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0964, RIC II(1962) 131b, Rome, AR-Denarius, ANNONA AVG, Annona seated left,
avers: CAESAR VESPSIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: ANNONA AVG, Annona seated left holding a bundle of corn ears in her lap.
exrgue: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,15g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref:RIC 0964, RIC² 0964, RIC II(1962) 131b,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_IMP-XIX_RIC-II-110RIC-new-980_C-216_Rome_77-78AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17mm_3,06g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0980, RIC II(1962) 110, Rome, AR-Denarius, IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears, #1290 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0980, RIC II(1962) 110, Rome, AR-Denarius, IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears, #1
avers: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0mm, weight: 3,06g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC² 0980, RIC II(1962) 110, C-216,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_CAESAR_VESPSIANVS-AVG_IMP-XIX_RIC-II-110_RIC-new-981_C-216_Rome_77-78AD_Q-001_axis-6h_xxmm_3,xxgx-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0981, RIC II(1962) 110var, Rome, AR-Denarius, IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears, #1169 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 0981, RIC II(1962) 110var, Rome, AR-Denarius, IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears, #1
avers: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head left.
reverse: IMP XIX, Modius with grain ears.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC² 0981, RIC II(1962) 110var, C-216,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_T-R-POT-X-COS-VIIII_RIC-II-_RIC-new-1065_C-_Rome_-AD_Q-002_6h_18-19mm_3,26g.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on rostral column, #2219 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on the rostral column, #2
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on the rostral column, holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,0mm, weight: 3,26 g, axis:6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, C-559, BMC-254,
Q-002
3 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Den_IMP-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS-AVG_T-R-POT-X-COS-VIIII_RIC-II-_RIC-new-_C-_Rome_-AD_Q-001_axis-7h_18mm_3,15g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on the rostral column, #1133 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, Rome, AR-Denarius, TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on the rostral column, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR POT X COS VIIII, Radiate figure standing on the rostral column, holding scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0mm, weight: 3,15 g, axis:7h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC² 1065, RIC II(1962) 119, C-559, BMC-254,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_II_TR_P_P_P,_CONCORDIA_AVG,_BY,_RIC-2_1416,_RPC_II_824,_Ephesus,_Byzantium,-AD,_Q-001,_6h,_19mm,_3,6g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1416, Ephesus (Byzantium), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA AVG, Ceres, #1104 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1416, Ephesus (Byzantium), AR-Denarius, CONCORDIA AVG, Ceres, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS II TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: CONCORDIA AVG, Ceres, enthroned left, holding grain ears and a cornucopiae, BY (monogram) mintmark for Byzantium in the exergue.
exergue: -/-//BY(monogram, mintmark for Byzantium), diameter: 17,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,60 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Ephesus (Byzantium), date: A.D., ref: RIC² 1416, RPC II 824, Sear/RCV 2266var., RSC 66a,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
020_Vespasian,_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_VESPAS_AVG_COS_III_TR_P_P_P,_PACI_AVGVSTAE,_EPHE,_RIC_1431,_BMC_457,_RSC_276,_RPC_833,_Ephesos_71_AD_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,41g-s.jpg
020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #169 views020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² 1431, Ephesus, AR-Denarius, PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, #1
avers: IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III TR P P P, Laureate head right.
reverse: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory, draped, advancing right, holding wreath extended in right hand and palm over the left shoulder. EPHE lower right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,41 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Ephesus, date: 71 A.D., ref: RIC² 1431, RPC II 833, BMC 457, RSC 276,
Q-001
5 commentsquadrans
0209_RICII_1_115.jpg
0209 - Denarius Titus 80 AC39 viewsObv/ IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate bust of T. r.
Rev/ TR P XI IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant with cuirass l.

Ag, 18.2 mm, 2.90 g
Mint: Roma
RIC II.I/115 [C2] – BMCRE II/43
ex-Solidus Numismatik, auction e7, lot 227
3 commentsdafnis
Vespasian,_RIC_357,_RIC(1962)_63__(Titus),_AR-Denar,_DIVVS_AVGVSTVS_VESPASIANVS,_two-Capricorn,_Large_shield,_RSC_497,_BMC_129,_Rome_80-81_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,5-18,5mm,_3,33g-s.jpg
020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Large shield version!, SC, #1183 views020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Large shield version!, SC, #1
avers: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
reverse: No legend, Shield reading SC held by two capricornii, globe below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 3,33g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC² (Titus) 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063 p-123, RSC 497, BMC 129, BM-129, Paris 101,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Vespasian_AR-Denar_DIVVS-AVGVSTVS-VESPASIANVS_two-Capricorn_RIC-II-063_RIC-new-357_C-497_Rome_80-81-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5mm_2,98g-s.jpg
020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Small shield version!, SC, #1250 views020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063, AR-Denarius, Rome, Two Capricornus, Small shield version!, SC, #1
avers: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
reverse: No legend, Shield reading SC held by two capricornii, globe below.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5 mm, weight: 2,98g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC² (Titus) 0357, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0063 p-123, RSC 497, BMC 129, BM-129, Paris 101,
Q-001
quadrans
Vespasian,_RIC_359a,_RIC(1962)_62__(Titus),_AR-Denar,_DIVVS_AVGVSTVS_VESPASIANVS,__E-X,_SC,_RSC_149,_Rome_80-81_AD,_Q-001,_5h,_17,0-18,0mm,_3,24g-s.jpg
020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0359a, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0062, AR-Denarius, Rome, E-X, SC on round shield set on the column, #165 views020b Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RIC² Titus 0359a, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0062, AR-Denarius, Rome, E-X, SC on round shield set on the column, #1
avers: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
reverse: E-X, SC on round shield set on the column, upon which an urn sits, laurel branch to each side.
exergue: E/X//SC, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,24g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 80-81 A.D., ref: RIC² (Titus) 0359a, RIC II(1962) (Titus) 0062 p-123, RSC 149, BMC 125,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
020-Vespasian_Billon-Tetradrachm,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS-SEBA-OYESPASIANOY_LB_POMH-Roma-left_K-G-20_15_Q-001_0h_25mm_12,69g-s~0.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-278, D-365, Egypt, Alexandria, AR-Tetradrachm, PΩMH, Roma standing left,73 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-278, D-365, Egypt, Alexandria, AR-Tetradrachm, PΩMH, Roma standing left,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, laureate head of Vespasianus right, LB before.
revers:- PΩMH, Roma standing left, holding spear and shield.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,69g, axis: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: Year (LB) 2 = 69-70 A.D., ref: Geissen-278, Dattari-365, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.15-p-68, RPC-2413, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
020-Vespasian_Billon-Tetradrachm,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS_SEBA-OYESPASIANOY,_L-Gamma_Isis-head-right_K-G-20_29_Q-001_axis-0h_23-25mm_12,14g-s~0.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-287, D-379, Egypt, Alexandria, AR-Tetradrachm, LΓ, Isis bust right,77 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-287, D-379, Egypt, Alexandria, AR-Tetradrachm, LΓ, Isis bust right,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, laureate head of Vespasianus right.
revers:- LΓ, Isis bust right.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,14g, axis: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: Year (LΓ) 3 = 70-71 A.D., ref: Geissen-287, Dattari-379, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.29-p-69, RPC-2430, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
020-Vespasian_AE-25,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS_SEBA-OYESPASIANOY,_LS-Y-6-73-74_Serapis-r__K-G-20_45,RPC-2441_Q-001_0h_23,8-25,3mm_8,15g-s~0.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-300, D-401, Egypt, Alexandria, AE-25, LS, Serapis bust right,141 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), G-300, D-401, Egypt, Alexandria, AE-25, LS, Serapis bust right,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, Laureate head of Vespasianus right.
revers:- LS, Serapis bust right.
exe: -/-//LS, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,14g, axis: 0h,
mint: Alexandria, date: Year (LS) 6 = 73-74 A.D., ref: Geissen-300, Dattari-401, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.45-p-70, RPC-2441, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
020_Vespasian_(69-79_AD),_Lydia,_Sardis,_AE-21_T__Fl__Eisigonos,_strategos_,_RPC_II_1312_1,_Q-001,_6h,_20-21mm,_6,97g-s.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1312, Lydia, Sardis, AE-21, Men standing left, holding pine cone and scepter,118 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1312, Lydia, Sardis, AE-21, Men standing left, holding pine cone and scepter,
avers: AYTOK KAIC OYЄCΠACIANΩ, Laureate head of Vespasian right.
reverse: ЄΠI ΦΛ ЄICΓONOV CAPΔIANΩN, Men standing left, holding pine cone and scepter, to left, monogram above lighted altar.
T. Fl. Eisigonos, strategos.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20,0-21,0mm, weight: 6,97g, axis: 6h,
mint: Lydia, Sardis, date: 69-79 A.D., ref: RPC II 1312, Waddington 5248,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Cappadocia,_Caesarea-Eusebia,_020p_Vespasian,_RPC_II_1659,_AR-Hemidrachm,_Laur_b_r_,_Nike_r_,_69-79_AD,_Q-001,_0h,12,9-13,9mm,_1,54g-s.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1659, Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebia, AR-Hemidrachm, Nike advancing right, #172 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1659, Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebia, AR-Hemidrachm, Nike advancing right, #1
avers: AYTOKP KAICAP OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBA Laureate head of Vespasian to right.
reverse: Nike advancing right, holding wreath in her right hand and palm frond over her left shoulder.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,9-13,9mm, weight: 1,54g, axis: 0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebia, date: 69-79 A.D.,
ref: RPC II 1659, Sydenham 94, Metcalf 17, SGI 735,
Q-001
quadrans
Troas,_Ilion,_020_Vespasian,_AE-,_Vespasian,_Titus,_Domitian_,_Athena,_RPC_II_893,_Bellinger_T197,_69-79_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_19,5-21mm,_8,25g-s.jpg
020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), Troas, Ilion, RPC II 0893, AE-21, Confronted, laureate and draped busts of Titus right and Domitian left #187 views020p Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), Troas, Ilion, RPC II 0893, AE-21, Confronted, laureate and draped busts of Titus right and Domitian left #1
avers: (AYTOK K CEBAC) OYECPACIANOC, Laureate head of Vespasian right
reverse: TITω KAICAP I ΔOMITIANΩ KA IΛI, Confronted, laureate and draped busts of Titus right and Domitian left. Between them, cult image of Athena, standing on a low base, turned half left, brandishing spear and resting a hand on the shield.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5-21,0mm, weight: 8,25g, axis: 0h,
mint: Troas, Ilion, date: 69-79 A.D.,
ref: RPC II 0893, Bellinger T197,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
CAPPADOCIA__Caesarea__Vespasian_with_Titus_(69-79)__Didrachm__RPC_II_1650,_Sydenham_102__Q-001,_0h,_19mm,_6,73g-s.jpg
020p Vespasian with Titus (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1650, Cappadocia, Caesarea, AR-Didrachm, Laureate head of Titus right,104 views020p Vespasian with Titus (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1650, Cappadocia, Caesarea, AR-Didrachm, Laureate head of Titus right,
avers: AYTOKPA KAICAP OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOC, Laureate head of Vespasian right.
reverse: AYTO KAI OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOY YIOC, Laureate head of Titus right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0-20,0mm, weight: 6,73g, axis: 0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea, date: 69-79 A.D., ref: RPC II 1650, Sydenham 102.,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
21.jpg
021 Vespasian. AR Denarius 3.5gm48 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN laur. head r.
rev: SPQR inside oak wreath
4 commentshill132
22.jpg
022 Titus. AR Denarius 3.5gm24 viewsobv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN laur. head r.
rev: PONTIF TR P COS IIII Pax seated l. holding olive branch
1 commentshill132
0223_RICII_1_1068.jpg
0223 - Denarius Vespasian 79 AC42 viewsObv/ Laureate bust of V. r., around IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG.
Rev/ Victory standing l., togate and placing shield over trophy, with captive at its feet; around, TR POT X COS VIIII.

Ag, 18.5 mm, 3.36 g
Mint: Roma
RIC II.1/1068 [C] – BMCRE III/246
ex-NAC, auction 101, lot 195
4 commentsdafnis
Titus_AE-Dup_T-CAES-VESPAS-dot-IMP-dot-P-dot-TRP-COS-II_S-C_ROMA_RIC-xx_C-xx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_axes-h_27mm_3,28g-2-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !, 497 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), AE-Dupondius, RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), Roma, S-C, ROMA, Roma seated left, Not listed in RIC !!!, Rare !,
avers:- T CAES VESPAS•IMP•P•TRP COS II, Radiate head right.
revers:- Roma seated left, holding wreath and parazonium, S-C across the field, ROMA in exergo.
exerg: S/C//ROMA, diameter: 27mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 72 A.D., ref: RIC Not in !!!, RIC II(1962) Not in !!! (Vespasian), C-Not in !!!,
Q-001

"Titus' coins with obverse legend T CAES VESPAS IMP P TR P COS II were struck in year 72, first issue.No ROMA reverse is listed in RIC for Titus in this issue, so you may have found a new type! "by FlaviusDomitianus. Thank you FlaviusDomitianus.
""Titus' issue of bronze coins with COS II and the abbreviations CAES VESPAS is altogether rare. RIC 411-417 only lists two sestertius types, R2 and R3; one dupondius type, FELICITAS PVBLICA, R2, unfortunately not illustrated, it would be nice to compare the obverse die with your coin; and four As types, all R2.

The same ROMA reverse die of your coin was apparently also used for dupondii with other obverse legends:

RIC 396, pl. 31, Vespasian COS IIII.

RIC 438, pl. 34, Titus CAES VESPASIAN P TR P COS II; also pl. 34, RIC 436 (rev. only), which should have ROMA around edge and SC in exergue, but in fact has ROMA in exergue and S - C in field, so seems to be another example of RIC 438.

Titus CAES VESPASIAN PON TR POT (instead of P TR P) COS II: my collection ex G. Hirsch 229, 2003, lot 2219; not in RIC."" by Curtis Clay, Thank you Curtis.
5 commentsquadrans
Titus_AE-AS_T-CAES_VESPASIAN-IMP-P-TR-P-COS-II_FIDES-PVBLICA_S-C_RIC-619old-444new_C-89_72-AD__Q-001_axis-6h_25-26mm_11,08g-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0444, RIC II(1962) 0619 (Vespasian), AE-As, Roma, FIDES PVBLICA, -/-//SC, Clasped hands, Rare!, #1159 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0444, RIC II(1962) 0619 (Vespasian), AE-As, Roma, FIDES PVBLICA, -/-//SC, Clasped hands, Rare!, #1
avers:- T-CAES-VESPASIAN-IMP•P•TR•P-COS-II, laurate head right,
revers:- FIDES-PVBLICA, S-C, in exergo, Clasped hands holding caduceus and two corn-ears,
exe: -/-//SC, diameter: 25-26mm, weight: 11,08g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 72 A.D., ref: RIC 0444, RIC II(1962) 0619 (Vespasian) p-87, C-89, R!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RICa_0783,RIC_II(1962)0185(Vesp_),_022_Titus_(69-79_A_D_Cae_79-81ADAug),_AR-Den_T-CAESAR-IMP-VESPASIANVS,_PONTIF_TR_P_COS-IIII,_Rome_75-AD_Q-001_6h_18,5-19,5mm_3,24g-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0783, RIC II(1962) 0185 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, PONTIF TR P COS IIII, Pax seated left, #1181 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0783, RIC II(1962) 0185 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, PONTIF TR P COS IIII, Pax seated left, #1
avers:- T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- PONTIF TR P COS IIII, Pax seated left, holding olive branch.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,5mm, weight: 3,24g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 75 A.D., ref: RIC 0782, RIC II(1962) 0185 (Vespasian) p-36, RSC 162, BMC 172,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
RICa_0874,_RIC_II(1962)_0176(Vesp_),_022_Titus_(69-79_A_D__Caes__79-81_A_D__Aug_),_AR-Den_T-CAESAR-IMP-VESPASIANVS,_IOVIS_CVSTOS,_Rome_76-AD_Q-001_6h_18,5-19,0mm_3,04g-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0874, RIC II(1962) 0176 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IOVIS CVSTOS, Jupiter standing facing, #1155 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0874, RIC II(1962) 0176 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IOVIS CVSTOS, Jupiter standing facing, #1
avers:- T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- IOVIS CVSTOS. Jupiter standing facing, sacrificing from patera over lit altar to left and holding scepter.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5-19,0mm, weight: 3,04g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC 0874, RIC II(1962) 0176 (Vespasian) p-36, RSC 106, BMC 305,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_T-CAESAR-IMP-VESPASIANVS_COS-VI_RIC-II-198_p-38_RIC-new-_C-68_Rome_77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_17-19mm_2,90g-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0950, RIC II(1962) 0198 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, COS VI, Prow right, Scarce!, #1133 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0950, RIC II(1962) 0198 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, COS VI, Prow right, Scarce!, #1
avers:- T-CAESAR-IMP-VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- COS-VI, Prow right above star.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17-19mm, weight: 2,90g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 0950, RIC II(1962) 0198 (Vespasian) p-38, RSC 68,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_T-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS_IMP-XIII_RIC-xx_C-xxx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_19mm_3,31g-s.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IMP-XIII, Pig, Scarce!, #1,187 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IMP-XIII, Pig, Scarce!,
avers:- T-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend Exe: IMP-XIII - Pig and three piglets standing left.
exe: -/-//IMP XIII, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,31g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 78-79 A.D., ref: RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian) p-39, RSC-104,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_T-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS_IMP-XIII_RIC-new_V986_RIC-II-220_C-104_Rome_78-79-AD__Q-002_18-19mm_3,26g-m.jpg
022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IMP-XIII, Pig, Scarce!, #2,118 views022a Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Roma, IMP-XIII, Pig, Scarce!, #2,
avers:- T-CAESAR-VESPASIANVS, Laureate head right.
revers:- No legend Exe: IMP-XIII - Pig and three piglets standing left.
exe: -/-// IMP XIII, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,26g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 78-79 A.D., ref: RIC 0986, RIC II(1962) 0220 (Vespasian) p-39, RSC-104,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TRP-VIIII-IMP-XIIII-COS-VII-P-P_RIC-new-5_RIC-II-7D_C-280_Rome_79-AD__Q-001_axis-5h_17,5mm_3,38g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0019, RIC II(1962) 0013D, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Capricornus, #1200 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0019, RIC II(1962) 0013D, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Capricornus, #1
avers:- IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Capricornus over globe to left.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 3,38g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC 0019, RIC II(1962) 0013D p-117, C-280,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TRP-VIIII-IMP-XIIII-COS-VII-P-P_RIC-new-25_RIC-II-_C-280_Rome_79-AD__Q-001_5h_18-18,5mm_2,90g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0025, RIC II(1962) 0012, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Quadriga left, #1638 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0025, RIC II(1962) 0012, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Quadriga left, #1
avers: IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers: TR-P-VIIII-IMP-XIIII-COS-VII-P-P, Quadriga left with corn ears in car.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,90g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC 0025, RIC II(1962) 0012 p-117, RSC-278, BMC 18, BN 15, C 277,
Q-001
7 commentsquadrans
RICa_030,_RIC_II(1962)_011,_022_Titus,_AR-Den_IMP_TITVS_CAES_VESPASIAN_AVG_P_M,_TR_P_VIIII_IMP_XIIII_COS_VII_P_P,_Rome_79_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17,5-19,5mm,_3,46g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0030, RIC II(1962) 0011, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Male captive kneeling right, #1135 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0030, RIC II(1962) 0011, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Male captive kneeling right, #1
avers: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
reverse: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P, Male captive kneeling right at the base of the trophy.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-19,5mm, weight: 3,46g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC 0030, RIC II(1962) 0011, BMC 15, RSC 274,
Q-001
6 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-PM_TR-P-VIIII-IMP-XV-COS-VII-P-P_RIC-new-46__RIC-II-16a_C-289_Rome_79-AD_Q-001_7h_17mm_2,74g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0046, RIC II(1962) 0016a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P, Figure on column, #181 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0046, RIC II(1962) 0016a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P VIIII IMP XV COS VII P P, Figure on column, #1
avers:- IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Radiate figure on rostral column, holding spear.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 2,74g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0046, RIC II(1962) 0016a p-118, RSC-289,
Q-001
quadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-25a_C-318_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_18mm_3,28g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #1195 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Two curule chairs; wreath atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD p-119, RSC-318, BMC 66,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-25a_C-318_Rome_80-AD__Q-002_axis-5h_16,5-18mm_2,96g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #2113 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Two curule chairs, #2
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Two curule chairs; wreath atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18mm, weight: 2,96g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0108, RIC II(1962) 0025aD p-119, RSC-318, BMC 66,
Q-002
quadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RICnew-112_RIC-II-26a_C-309_Rome_80-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_18mm_3,33g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor, #1264 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor, #1
avers:- IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Dolphin coiled around anchor.
exe: -/-//-- , diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,33g, axis: 0 h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0112, RIC II(1962) 0026a p-119, RSC 309, BMC 72,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-xx_C-xxx_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_20mm_3,20g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1300 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Elephant walking left.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 20mm, weight: 3,20g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a p-119, RSC 303, BMC 43,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RICnew-115_RIC-II-22a_C-303_Rome_80-AD__Q-002_19mm_3,25g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1143 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a, AR-Denarius, Roma, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Elephant, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Elephant walking left.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,25g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0115, RIC II(1962) 0022a p-119, RSC 303, BMC 43,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Denar_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-new-119_RIC-II-23a_C-316_Rome_80-AD__Q-001_18mm_3,28g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt on draped table, #1176 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Thunderbolt on draped table, #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Thunderbolt (wingless) on draped table or chair with one, two or no crossbars.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,28g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0119var., RIC II(1962) 0023a p-119, RSC 316, BMC 51,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-242_p-119_RIC-new-122_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-001_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #1163 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #1
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Throne with curved back decorated with three floral ornaments; below, fringed seatcover and strut.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0122, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-24a_p-119_RIC-new-124a_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-003_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #3183 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #3
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Draped throne with triangular back; grain ears atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0124a, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
Titus_AR-Den_IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M_TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P_RIC-II-24a_p-119_RIC-new-124c_C-313_Rome_80-AD_Q-002_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xxg-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #2150 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a, AR-Denarius, Rome, TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Throne #2
avers:- IMP-TITVS-CAES-VESPASIAN-AVG-P-M, Laureate head right.
revers:- TR-P-IX-IMP-XV-COS-VIII-P-P, Draped throne with triangular back; grain ears atop.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 0124c, RIC II(1962) 0024a p-119, RSC-313, BMC 58,
Q-002
quadrans
Vespasian_AE-Sest_IMP-T-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-TR-P-P-P-COS-VIII_PROVIDENT-AVGVST_S-C_RIC-II-_C--AD_Q-001_6h_32-33mm_23,95g-s.jpg
022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0162, RIC II(1962) 0098, AE-Sestertius, Roma, PROVIDENT AVGVST, -/-//SC, Vespasian and Titus, Scarce!, #1245 views022b Titus (69-79 A.D. Caesar, 79-81 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0162, RIC II(1962) 0098, AE-Sestertius, Roma, PROVIDENT AVGVST, -/-//SC, Vespasian and Titus, Scarce!, #1
avers:- IMP-T-CAES-VESP-AVG-P-M-TR-P-P-P-COS-VIII, Laurate head left.
revers:- PROVIDENT-AVGVST, Vespasian standing right, presenting a globe to Titus, who stands left, SC in exergue.
exe: -/-//SC, diameter: 32-33 mm, weight: 23,95 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC 0162, RIC II(1962) 0098 p-128, C 179, BMC 180,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
0232_Vesp_RIC_II_2_16.jpg
0232 - Denarius Vespasian 70 AC10 viewsObv/ Laureate bust of V. r., around IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG.
Rev/ Confronted heads of Titus to r., and Domitian to l.; around, CAESAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR.

Ag, 18.9 mm, 3.34 g
Mint: Roma
RIC II.2/16 [R] – BMCRE II/3
ex-CNG, auction e438, lot 491
1 commentsdafnis
Domitian_AR-Den_CAESAR_AVG-F-DOMITIANVS-_COS-IIII_Roma-RIC-238-new-921-76-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_19-20mm_2,99g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #1449 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #1
avers: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, Laureate head of Domitian right.
reverse: COS IIII, Pegasus walking right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0-20,0mm, weight: 2,99g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC-II-(1962)-0238,p-42, RIC-New-0921(Vespasian), RSC 47, BMC 193,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_CAESAR_AVG-F-DOMITIANVS_COS-IIII_Roma-RIC-II-238-p-42_new-918_76-AD_Q-002_6h_18,0-19,5mm_3,21g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #2163 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #2
avers: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, Laureate head of Domitian right.
reverse: COS IIII, Pegasus walking right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18,0-19,5mm, weight: 3,21g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC-II(1962)-0238, p-42, RIC-New-0921 (Vespasian), RSC 47, BMC 193,
Q-002
2 commentsquadrans
RICa_0921,_RIC_II(1962)_0238(Vesp_),_024_Domitian_(69-81_A_D__Caes__81-96_A_D__Aug_),_AR-Den,_IMP_CAESAR_AVG_F_DOMITIANVS,_COS_IIII,_Roma,_76-AD,_Q-003,_6h,_17,5-18mm,_3,11g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #3164 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0921, RIC II(1962) 0238(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS IIII, Pegasus, Scarce!, #3
avers: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, Laureate head of Domitian right.
reverse: COS IIII, Pegasus walking right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,0mm, weight: 3,11g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 76 A.D., ref: RIC-II(1962)-0238, p-42, RIC-New-0921 (Vespasian), RSC 47, BMC 193,
Q-003
5 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_CAESAR_AVG-F-DOMITIANVS-_COS-V_RIC-II-242Vesp_new-957_C-49_Roma_78-79-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_17mm_3,18g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0957, RIC II(1962) 0242(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, Horseman, Scarce!, #1154 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0957, RIC II(1962) 0242(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, Horseman, Scarce!, #1
avers:- CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIANVS, Laurate head right.
revers:- COS V, Horseman helmeted right hand raised.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17mm, weight: 3,18g, axes: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 78-79 A.D., ref: RIC 0957, RIC II(1962) 0242(Vespasian) p-43, RSC 49, BMC 234,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Dom-x01a-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, She-wolf, #1178 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, She-wolf, #1
avers:- CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIANVS, Laurate head right.
revers:- COS V, She-wolf and twins left, boat below.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian) p-43, RSC 51, BMC 240,
Q-001
quadrans
024_Domitian_(69-81_A_D__Caesar,_81-96_A_D__Augustus),_AR-Denarius,_RIC_II_241,_RIC-New_961,_Rome,_COS_V,_She-wolf,Q-002_6h_17,5-18,5mm_2,88g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, She-wolf, #2132 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, COS V, She-wolf, #2
avers:- CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIANVS, Laurate head right.
revers:- COS V, She-wolf and twins left, boat below.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 17,5-18,5mm, weight: 2,88g, axes: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC 0961, RIC II(1962) 0241(Vespasian) p-43, RSC 51, BMC 240,
Q-002
quadrans
Domitian_AE-AS_CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIAN-COS-V_No-legend_S-C_RIC-II-723Vesp_RIC-New-Vesp_C-_Rome-77-78-AD_Q-001_axis-6h_25,5-27,5mm_9,74g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Spes left, #1233 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian), AE-As, Rome, No legend, S-C, Spes left, #1
avers:- CAESAR-AVG-F-DOMITIAN-COS-V, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- No legend, Spes walking left, in right holding flower, with left raising fold of robe, S-C across the field.
exe: S/C//--, diameter: 25,5-27,5mm, weight: 91,74g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome ???, date: 77-78 A.D., ref: RIC 1053, RIC II(1962) 0723(Vespasian) p-99,
Q-001
quadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_CAESAR_AVG-F-DOMITIANVS-COS-VI_PRINCEPS-IVVENTVTIS_Roma-RIC-246-new-45D-80-AD_Q-001_axis-5h_18,5mm_3,18g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1081, RIC II(1962) 0246D (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Clasped hands, #1315 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1081, RIC II(1962) 0246D (Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Clasped hands, #1
avers:- CAESAR_AVG-F-DOMITIANVS-COS-VI, Laureate head of Domitian right.
revers:- PRINCEPS-IVVENTVTIS, Clasped hands holding a legionary eagle on prow.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: 3,18g, axis: 5h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 A.D., ref: RIC 1081, RIC II(1962) 0246D (Vespasian), RSC 393, BMC 269,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RICa_1084,_RIC_II(1962)_0243(Vesp_),_024_Domitian_AR-Den,_CAESAR_AVG_F_DOMITIANVS_COS_VI,_PRINCEPS_IVVENTVTIS,_Roma,_79-AD,_Scarce,_Q-001,_6h,_17-18mm,_3,17g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1084, RIC II(1962) 0243(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, Scarce!, #1134 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1084, RIC II(1962) 0243(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, Scarce!, #1
avers: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, Laureate head of Domitian right.
reverse: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, leaning on column and feeding snake.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-18,0mm, weight: 3,17g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC 1084, RIC II(1962) 0243(Vespasian) p-43, C 384, BMC 265,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RICc_1087,_RIC_II(1962)_0244(Vesp),_024_Domitian,_AR-Den,_CAESAR_AVG_F_DOMITIANVS_COS_VI,_PRINCEPS_IVVENTVTIS,_Roma,_79-AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17-17,5mm,_2,89g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1087, RIC II(1962) 0244(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, Scarce!, #1139 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1087, RIC II(1962) 0244(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Rome, PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, Scarce!, #1
avers: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, Laureate head of Domitian right.
reverse: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, holding palladium and sceptre.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-17,5mm, weight: 2,89g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 A.D., ref: RIC 1087, RIC II(1962) 0244(Vespasian) p-43, C 378, BMC 262,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Domitian_AR-Den_DOMITIANVS-CAESAR-AVG_PACI-AVGVSTAE_EPHE_Ephesos-RIC-II-349-p56-new-_71-AD_Rare_Q-001_axis-6h_18mm_3,09g-s.jpg
024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1447, RIC II(1962) 0349(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Ephesos, PACI AVGVSTAE, EPHE, Victory advancing right, Rare!!!622 views024a Domitian (69-81 A.D. Caesar, 81-96 A.D. Augustus), RIC 1447, RIC II(1962) 0349(Vespasian), AR-Denarius, Ephesos, PACI AVGVSTAE, EPHE, Victory advancing right, Rare!!!
avers:- DOMITIANVS-CAESAR-AVG,
revers:- PACI-AVGVSTAE/EPHE, Victory advancing right,
exerg:-/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,09g, axes: 6h,
mint: Ephesos, date: 71 A.D. , ref: RIC 1447, RIC II(1962) 0349 p-56, RPC 848,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
V633.jpg
02a Domitian as Caesar RIC 79149 viewsAR Quinarius (Broken), 1.04g
Rome mint, 75 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVSTI; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 791 (C). BMC 158. RSC 634. BNC 136.
Acquired from GB Collection, June 2016

Quinarii were struck under Vespasian for Domitian Caesar from 73 onwards. This common piece dates to 75 when the largest quinarius issue of the reign was produced.

Broken, but enough of the major devices remain to identify it properly. I think I got the better half.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
V920sm.jpg
03 Domitian as Caesar RIC 920102 viewsAR Denarius, 2.96g
Rome mint, 76-77AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Minerva stg. r. on prow, with spear and shield; to r., owl
RIC 920 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1947. RSC 45b. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

The first appearance of Minerva on a denarius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian. His devotion to the goddess came early in life, so it comes as no surprise he wished to honour her on the coins minted in his name. This denarius is a clear indication Domitian had some say in what reverse types were struck for him under Vespasian. The Minerva on prow is an early prototype of one of the four standard Minerva types (M2) Domitian would later extensively strike on his own denarii as Augustus. An extremely rare type for him as Caesar.

A pleasing coin with a Vespasian-like portrait.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
RI 030f img.jpg
030 - Vespasian AS - RIC 52851 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Laureate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– S - C, Eagle on globe with head right
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 72-73
References:– Cohen 481. RIC II 528
maridvnvm
RI_030s_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - COS ITER FORT RED15 viewsDenarius
Obv:- IMP CAESAR VESPASIANS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:- COS ITER FORT RED, Fortuna standing left, resting right hand on prow and holding cornucopiae in left
maridvnvm
RI_030n_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 06536 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESP AVG CENS, Laureate head right
Rev:– PONTIF MAXIM, Vespasian seated right, holding sceptre and branch.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 73
Reference:– BMC 98. RIC II 65. RSC 387.

Weight 3.21g. 20.15mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 030a img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 090384 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate Head Right
Rev:– PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left, holding olive branch, left hand at side
Reference RIC 90
7 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 030b img.jpg
030 - Vespasian denarius - RIC 10350 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head left
Rev:– COS VIII, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak round waist, standing left, holding spear slanting upwards in right hand and trophy on left shoulder
Minted in Rome. A.D. 77-78
Reference:– BMC 202. RIC 103. RSC 126.
maridvnvm
RI_030m_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 10732 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– COS VIII in exergue, yoke of oxen left.
Minted in Rome. A.D. 77 - 78
Reference:– BMC 206. RIC II 107. RSC 133a.

Weight 3.36g. 18.88mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_030l_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 26637 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– IVDEA, Judean captive seated right, at base of trophy
Minted in Rome. A.D. 69 - 70
Reference:– RIC II 266. RSC 226.

Weight 3.30g. 18.24mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_030p_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC 36129 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, Laureate head right
Rev:– NEP RED, Neptune, naked, standing left, right foot on globe, right knee bent, holding acrostolium in right hand, which rests on right knee, and vertical sceptre in left hand
Minted in Antioch. A.D. 72
Reference:– BMC 506. RPC 1928. RIC II (old) 361. RIC II (new) 1555. RSC 274.
maridvnvm
RI 030e img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC ???54 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG TR P, Laureate head right
Rev:– LIBERTAS [PVBLICA], Libertas standing left, holding pileus and staff
Minted in Uncertain mint in Spain. A.D. 70-71
References:– Cohen -. RIC II ???

SOLD
maridvnvm
RI_030t_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Denarius - RIC II (New) 2320 viewsDenarius
Obv:- IMP CAESAR VESPASIANS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:- COS ITER TR POT, Mars walking right, carrying spear and aquila
Minted in Rome. A.D. 70 (January to June and maybe later?)
Reference:- RIC II (New) 23 (Rated C).
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_030q_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian denarius - RIC II (New) 3935 viewsObv:- IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, Laureate head right
Rev:- TRI POT II COS III P P, Mars, helmeted, naked except for cloak round waist, advancing right, holding spear in right, and aquila over left shoulder
Minted in Rome January - June A.D. 71 (RIC II (New) dating)
Reference:- RIC II (New) 39 (Rated R). RIC II (Old) 38 corr. (Rated C) (doesn't mention aquila)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
GI_030a_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Didrachm, Cappadocia, Caesarea - Nike34 viewsObv:– AVTOKPA KAICAP OVECPACIANOC CEBACTOC, Laureate head right
Rev:– NIKH CEBACTH, Victory walking right, holding wreath and palm
Minted in Cappadocia, Caesarea. A.D. 77 - 78

Weight 7.23g. 20.30mm.
maridvnvm
GI_030b_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Didrachm, Cappadocia, Caesarea - Sydenham, Caesarea 10234 viewsObv:– AVTOKPA KAICAP OVECPACIANOC CEBACTOC, Laureate head right
Rev:– AVTO KAI OVECPACIANOC CEBACTOV VIOC, Laureate head of Titus right
Minted in Cappadocia, Caesarea. A.D. 76 - 77
Reference:– Sydenham, Caesarea 102; Metcalf, Caesarea 4. RPC 1650.

Weight 7.05g. 19.38mm.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 030j img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 48130 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– VICTORIA NAVALIS S - C, Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath and palm
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 70-71
References:– Cohen 633. RIC II 481
maridvnvm
RI 030g img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 481 var.73 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– VICTORIA NAVALIS S - C, Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath and palm
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 70-71
References:– Cohen -. RIC II 481 var (Not listed in RIC with this bust and legend combination)

Additional comments coutesy of Curtis Clay:-

“A coin like yours, from the same obv. die, was in M&M's Voirol Sale of 1968, lot 385, ex Hall Sale, 1950, lot 1203. A second spec. from that same die pair is publ. by Giard, Lyon, 42/1a, pl. XLIII, Coll. Gricourt.
BMC 809 pl. 38.7 has obv. CAESAR not CAES and a broader portrait on shorter neck.
Paris doesn't have this type on a COS III dup. of Vesp. at Lugdunum, but their As, Paris 812 pl. LXVII, is from the same rev. die as your dupondius!
Obviously quite a scarce item, and an attractive specimen!”
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_030o_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 73928 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right
Rev:– FORTVNAE REDVCI, S-C, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 72-73
Reference:– RIC II old 739. II new 1187

Weight 11.75g. 28.78mm.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 030k img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 74028 viewsObv:– IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG COS IIII, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– PAX AVG S - C, Pax standing left sacrificing out of patera over altar and holding caduceus and branch
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 72-73
References:– RIC II 740
maridvnvm
RI 030h img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 753a34 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, Radiate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– FIDES PVBLICA S - C, Fides standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 77-78
References:– Cohen 166. RIC II 753a
maridvnvm
RI 030c img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 753b36 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, Laureate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– FIDES PVBLICA S - C, Fides standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 77-78
References:– Cohen -. (Cohen 187 is Radiate but Cohen doesn’t list a laureate version). RIC II 753b
maridvnvm
RI 030d img.jpg
030 - Vespasian Dupondius - RIC 754b25 viewsObv:– IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII P P, Laureate head right, globe on neck
Rev:– FORTVNAE AVGVSTI S - C, Fortuna standing left, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 77-78
References:– Cohen -.(Cohen 166 is Radiate but Cohen doesn’t list a laureate version). RIC II 754b
maridvnvm
RI_030r_img.jpg
030 - Vespasian, Denarius, Ephesus, RIC 1457 48 viewsObv - IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P P P; Head of Vespasian, laureate, right
Rev - PACI AVGVSTAE; Victory adv. right, with wreath and palm; at lower right, star; annulet beneath
Minted in Ephesus, A.D. 74
References:- RIC 1457. BMCRE 475. RSC 277.
Dimensions:- 22.04 mm x 19.07 mm

Severely double struck.

It looks like there was a very off-centre initial strike and the coin was re-struck with a central strike.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Titus_1.JPG
033 - Titus (79-81 AD), denarius - RIC 10878 viewsObv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, curule chair, wreath above.
Minted in Rome 80 AD.
3 commentspierre_p77
RI 033a img.jpg
033 - Titus denarius - RIC 21889 viewsObv:– T CAESAR VESPASIANVS, Laureate Head Right
Rev:– ANNONA AVG, Annona seated left, leaning elbow on seat and raising drapery
Reference RIC 218

(SOLD)
maridvnvm
RI_033d_img.jpg
033 - Titus Denarius - RIC II new 728 viewsObv:– IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P VIIII IMP XIIII - COS VII, Capricorn left on globe
Minted in Rome. After 1 July, 79, Group II
Reference:– RIC II new 7

Notes from an example sold by H. J. Berk: "Rare without P P in reverse legend. Titus must have accepted the title Pater Patriae quite soon after the beginning of his ninth tribunician year on 1 July 79 AD. Cohen 280 cites this coin 'with or without P P' as being in the Paris collection, but in fact Paris lacks the denarius of this type without P P, though it possesses the corresponding aureus (Paris-3). Cohen must have seen the denarius without P P in another collection. We had another specimen in our Catalogue 125, 2002, 374; none in Reka Devnia hoard."
maridvnvm
RI_033c_img.jpg
033 - Titus Denarius - RIC II new p. 206, 12421 viewsObv:– IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right
Rev:– TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, Draped throne with triangular back on which are corn ears
Minted in Rome A.D. 80
Reference:– RIC II new p. 206, 124

Weight 3.33g. 17.59mm.
maridvnvm
RI 035c img.jpg
035 - Domitian Copper As - 791a51 viewsObv:– CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS V, Laureate head right with globe at point of bust
Rev:– S-C, Spes advancing left holding flower & hem of skirt
Minted in Lugdunum. A.D. 77-78
Reference:– RIC II (Vespasian) 791a. BMC 873. Cohen 454.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_035f_img.jpg
035 - Domitian Denarius (as Caesar under Vespasian) - RIC II (Old) 24430 viewsObv:– CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, Laureate head right
Rev:– PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, holding Palladium and sceptre
Minted in Rome. A.D. 79
Reference:– RIC II (old) 244. RSC 378
maridvnvm
RI_035n_img.jpg
035 - Domitian denarius - RIC II new p. 128, 958 (Vespasian)37 viewsObv:- CAESAR AVG F [D]OMITIANV[S], Laureate head of Domitian to left
Rev:- Horseman galloping to right, right hand raised; below, COS V
Minted in Rome. A.D. 77-78
Reference:– RIC II new p. 128, 958 (Vespasian) (R3)

Rare with left facing portrait.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Vespasian-RIC-15.jpg
035. Vespasian.39 viewsDenarius, 69-71 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG / Laureate bust of Vespasian.
Reverse: IVDAEA / Jewish woman captive seated on ground, mourning; trophy behind her.
3.44 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #15; Sear #2296.

When the Jewish Revolt began in 66 AD, Nero appointed Vespasian supreme commander in the East to put down the uprising. In 69 AD Vespasian made his own bid for the throne and left his son Titus to finish up the Jewish War -- which he did in 70 AD by capturing Jerusalem and destroying the Temple. This victory of Vespasian and Titus was the major military event of the reign, and numerous coins were issued to commemorate it.
2 commentsCallimachus
Vespasian-RIC-90.jpg
037. Vespasian.10 viewsDenarius, 75 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG / Laureate bust of Vespasian.
Reverse: PON MAX TR P COS VI / Pax seated, holding branch.
3.34 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #90; Sear #2301.
Callimachus
IMG_4171~0.jpg
038. Vespasian (69-79 A.D.)39 viewsAv.: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS III
Rv.: ROMA / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø34 / 26.5g
RIC 190 (C3) Rome (old RIC II 443), Cohen 419
Juancho
Titus-RIC-211.jpg
039. Titus.21 viewsDenarius, 75-79 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS / Laureate bust of Titus.
Reverse: IOVIS CVSTOS / Jupiter standing, sacrificing out of patera over altar, holding sceptre.
3.35 gm., 18.5 mm.
RIC #211; Sear #2444.
1 commentsCallimachus
dom as caesar pegasus.jpg
03a Domitian as Caesar RIC 921166 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 921 (C2). BMC 193. RSC 47. BNC 169.
Acquired from Nilus Coins, March 2007.

The reverse copies an Augustan one and might possibly allude to Domitian's foray into poetry. (BMCRE xl)

Unlike most of the crude Domitian portraits of the time from the Rome mint, this one has a great beauty and nobility to it that few of his contemporary denarii strive to achieve. Was it a minor slight that most of the better die engravers were used for Vespasian and Titus' coins? Thankfully one slipped through to create a wonderful portrait of the young caesar.

Despite some minor flaws, this is a wonderful coin that I'm happy to add to my collection.
2 commentsVespasian70
V922aaa.jpg
03b Domitian as Caesar RIC 922101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome mint, 76-77 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS IIII; Pegasus, standing r.
RIC 922 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Marc Walter, May 2018. Ex Künker eLive Auction 37, 20 October 2015, lot 152.

A rare obverse legend variant of the Pegasus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. Here we have 'CAES' instead of the much more common 'CAESAR'. No reverse die links between the two different obverses have been found, perhaps suggesting the 'CAES' issue came slightly later. Out of 240 Domitian Pegasus denarii on acsearch, only 6 have the 'CAES' obverse. The reverse copies a denarius struck for Augustus (RIC 297). Mattingly speculates it refers to Domitian's poetic aspirations.

Curtis Clay's comments concerning this variant - 'I had forgotten about this variety, but find that I had written into my BMC 193: Var. CAES for CAESAR, CNG Website 6247, May 2001 (2.78g). RIC new ed. 922 calls it R2 and cites examples in Glasgow (ill. pl. 10) and Oxford.'

Struck in the very finest of styles.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
V932.jpg
03c Domitian as Caesar RIC 93260 viewsÆ As, 10.65g
Rome mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS IIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Spes stg. l., with flower
RIC 932 (C). BMC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Ken Dorney, January 2019.

Spes, the goddess of hope, is seen here as an 'heir apparent' type. She is represented on Roman coins as a young girl, reminiscent of earlier Greek statures depicting Elpis. H. Mattingly in BMCRE II says 'the flower held by Spes is an opening bud, she is raising her skirt in order to hasten forward'. Spes occurs quite commonly throughout the Flavian coinage and is frequently paired up with the young Domitian Caesar, likely expressing a hope or expectation for future dynastic success. It is very Ironic that Spes is often associated with Domitian Caesar on the coinage, considering he would later be the family member most responsible for the dynasty's downfall in 96. Surprisingly, this common Spes type is not in the BM.

The obverse features a quintessential Flavian portrait - unflattering hook nose with full and heavy facial features. Pleasant dark green patina.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
domitian as caesar rider on horse.jpg
04 Domitian as Caesar RIC 957159 viewsAR Denarius, 3.44g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V; Horseman, helmeted, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, on horse prancing r., with r. hand thrown upwards and back
RIC 957 (C2). BMC 234. RSC 49. BNC 207.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, September 2007.

Issued at a time when Domitian was aspiring to an Eastern command against the Alani, Mattingly attributes this type to that cause: The rider is Mars calling Rome to the field of battle.

Other theories suggest the rider is either Domitian or a soldier. Curtis Clay has also proposed the idea that this type may well be of a commemorative nature, since much of Vespasian's coinage are copies of past popular types.

A lovely coin in hand, the portrait was the reason this one found a home in my collection.
1 commentsVespasian70
V958.jpg
04a Domitian as Caesar RIC 958143 viewsAR Denarius, 3.12g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: COS V; Horseman, helmeted, in military dress, cloak floating behind him, on horse prancing r., with r. hand thrown upwards and back
RIC 958 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, September 2015.

Second known specimen of this type with left facing portrait. A die match with the unique RIC plate coin. Left facing portraits of Domitian are quite rare and highly prized by collectors.

In fine style with honest wear. The portrait is outstanding!
8 commentsDavid Atherton
domitian as caesar wolf and twins.JPG
05 Domitian as Caesar RIC 961149 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Rome Mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: COS V; She-wolf and twins l. : in ex., boat
RIC 961 (C2). BMC 240. RSC 51. BNC 208.
Ex eBay, February 2007.

The first instance of the she-wolf and twins reverse as a type on Roman Imperial coins. Domitian Caesar, unlike Titus Caesar, used different reverse types than his father Vespasian. The she-wolf and twins is unique to Domitan's coinage. One wonders how much leverage Domitian had for choosing his own reverse designs.

A wonderful coin with good metal and a pleasing portrait. The picture does not reflect this very well however.

2 commentsVespasian70
Bar-Kochba-Hendin-734.jpg
053. 2'nd Jewish (bar Kokhba) Revolt.16 viewsZuz (denarius), attributed to Year 3 (134-35 AD).
Obverse: (Shim'on) / Bunch of Grapes.
Reverse: (For the Freedom of Jerusalem) / Lyre with three strings.
3.19 gm., 18.5 mm.
Mildenberg #205.19 (this coin); Hendin #734.

This coin likely started out as a denarius of one of the Roman emperors between Vespasian and Hadrian. Many coins of the Second Jewish Revolt show traces of the earlier Roman coin. This coin is no exception, and traces of the previous coin can be seen on the obverse in and around the bunch of grapes.

The bunch of grapes on the obverse is an ancient symbol of blessing and fertility. As such it occasionally appears on ancient coins of other areas besides this series. Given the messianic nature of the Bar Kokhba revolt, the bunch of grapes takes on added significance because in Jewish prophetic literature, grapes (and the vine or vineyard) are often symbolic of the restoration of Israel, or even symbolic of Israel itself.

The lyre on the reverse is associated with temple worship, as are trumpets, which are also found on coins of the Bar Kokhba Revolt. King David is mentioned as playing a lyre, and there are numerous Biblical references to praising the Lord with the lyre and trumpets. (The word "kinnor," sometimes translated as "harp," is really a type of lyre.) Even today the lyre is an important Jewish symbol and the state of Israel has chosen to portray it on the half New Israeli Sheqel coin.
Callimachus
V976.jpg
05a Domitian as Caesar RIC 97684 viewsAR Denarius, 3.35g
Rome mint, 77-78 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CERES AVGVST; Ceres stg. l., with corn ears and poppy and sceptre
RIC 976 (C). BMC 323. RSC 30. BNC 285.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, December 2014.

Vespasian and Titus normally shared reverse types, but rarely with Domitian. Unusually this Ceres type was struck for all three. It possibly was part of an agrarian themed series Vespasian issued towards the end of his reign. These later issues of Vespasian have neat small portrait heads.

The coin features a pleasant looking Domitian with his trademark protruding upper lip, struck on a large flan.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_as_caesar_legionary_standard.jpg
06 Domitian as Caesar RIC-1081113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.45g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Clasped hands holding legionary eagle set on prow
RIC 1081 (C2). BMC 269. RSC 393. BNC 240.
Acquired from Beast Coins, April 2007.


The reverse represents 'Concordia Militum', harmony of the troops. Domitian quite possibly was plotting against Titus after Vespasian's death by appealing to the troops with a double donative. This coin might provide numismatic evidence of such. Suetonius states: " On the death of his father he hesitated for some time whether to offer a double largess to the soldiers, and he never had any compunction about saying that he had been left a partner in the imperial power, but that the will had been tampered with."

A nice coin with average wear and an interesting history behind it.


Vespasian70
VesII496.jpg
069-079 AD - Vespasian - RIC II 496 - Temple Reverse37 viewsProbable Emperor: Vespasian (r. 69-79 AD)
Date: 71 AD
Condition: Mediocre
Denomination: As

Obverse: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III
Imperator Caesar Vespasian Emperor Consul Third Term
Head right; laureate

Reverse: (no legend)
"S - C" in field.
Hexastyle temple of Jupiter Capitolinus.

Rome mint
RIC II Vespasian 496
7.55g; 27.6mm; 180°
Pep
dom_as_caesar_salus_and_snake.jpg
07 Domitian as Caesar RIC-108486 viewsAR Denarius, 3.28g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1084 (C2). BMC 265. RSC 384. BNC 237.
Acquired from Aegean Numismatics, July 2008.

A most puzzling reverse type issued during the last months of Vespasian's reign before he died on June 24th. Perhaps a reference to Vespasian's illness and his hopeful recovery.

Worn and average with a good portrait.
vespasian70
V1085.jpg
07b Domitian as Caesar RIC 108588 viewsAR Denarius, 3.08g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 1085 (R2). BMC p. 47 note. RSC 385. BNC 238.
Acquired from eBay, 10 June 2018.

A rare left portrait variant of the common Salus type struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian. The reverse may be an illusion to Vespasian's ill health preceeding his death on 24 June 79. No specimens in the BM's collection, citing the Paris collection. A double die match with the RIC plate coin.

Good style and well centred.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
domit_as_caesar_vesta_lg.jpg
08 Domitian as Caesar RIC-108778 viewsAR Denarius, 3.54g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 1087 (C2). BMC 262. RSC 378. BNC 233.
Acquired from Amphora Coins, July 2008.

Vesta is supposed to be holding a palladium in her right hand, but on this example the legend covers up the palladium completely. It is barely visible (if at all) under the legend. Most examples of the type clearly show it in her out-stretched hand. A note for an aureus of the type in the BM (#261) notes - 'palladium hardly visible, sceptre nearly vertical'. There is no illustration of the specimen, so I'm guessing mine is similar.
vespasian70
V1088.jpg
08a Domitian as Caesar RIC-108886 viewsAR Denarius, 3.14g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta std. l., with Palladium and sceptre
RIC 1088 (R3). BMC p. 46 note. RSC 379. BNC -.
Ex Den of Antiquity (eBay), October 2012.

A very rare (4th known) left facing portrait of the common Vesta and Palladium reverse. It is listed in Cohen as 379 (citing lot 784 of the de Moustier Sale of 1872) , although the new RIC states it is unverified (?). The lone example cited by RIC is in G. Mazzini's Monete imperiali romane, vol. 1. Also, Curtis Clay has a specimen, same die pair as mine. Left facing portraits of Domitian are extremely rare, especially those as Caesar.

Worn but all the major devices are visible.

Thanks to Curtis Clay for additional attribution help!
David Atherton
V1089sm.jpg
08b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1089181 viewsAR Quinarius, 1.46g
Rome Mint, 79 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST; Victory std. l., with wreath and palm
RIC 1089 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 243.

An extremely rare quinarius struck for Domitian Caesar in 79. RIC records only one example in Paris (BNC 243) and lists the rarity as 'unique', this specimen then is the second known example. Domitian's COS VI coins most likely date towards the end of Vespasian's reign and the beginning of Titus' rule, indicating the issue was struck uninterrupted after Vespasian's death in June.

Struck in good metal in neat and fine style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
Vespasian 1.jpg
09 Vespasian55 viewsDenarius. IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN, laureate head right / SALVS AVG, Salus seated left holding patera. RIC 67, RSC431. Weight 3.34 g. Die Axis 6 hr.
2 commentsmix_val
Vitellius_RIC_I_81.jpg
09 01 Vitellius RIC I 8167 viewsVitellius 69 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. Late April-Dec 20, 69 A.D. (2.91g, 18.8mm, 5h). Obv: A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P, laureate head right. Rev: LIBERTAS RESTITVTA, Libertas, draped, standing facing, head right, r. holding pileus, l. scepter. RIC I 81, RSC 48. Ex CNG 258, Lot 367.

In the year of 4 emperors, Vitellius assumed the throne after his German legions proclaimed him emperor, marched on Rome, and murdered Otho. Vitellius only ruled for mere months before Vespasian’s eastern legions arrived and murdered him in turn. He was known for his gluttony. I have a Vitellius denarius, but couldn't help picking up this nice example from a reputable dealer for a reasonable price.
2 commentsLucas H
dom_1445.jpg
09 Domitian as Caesar RIC-1445121 viewsAR Denarius, 3.01g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: DOMITIANVS CAESAR AVG F; Bust of Domitian, cuirassed, seen from front, Medusa head on breast of cuirass, fold of cloak on left shoulder, head bare, r.
Rev: AVG and EPHE in oak wreath
RIC 1445 (R). BMC 469. RSC 22. RPC 846 (4 spec.). BNC 362.
Ex CNG E88, 14 September 2011, lot 1302.

Minted in 71 AD, this denarius is part of the first series ever issued for Domitian. The draped and cuirassed bust type chosen here is unusual for the Flavian era...one wonders why it was used only for Domitian and not Vespasian or Titus. The reverse is a standard type shared with Vespasian and Titus at Ephesus.

I'm not sure why it has taken me so long to obtain a Domitian as Caesar denarius from Ephesus, these are wonderful coins.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
09_Vespasian_RIC_75_(C)Black.jpg
09 Vespasian RIC 75 (C)40 viewsVespasian 69-79 AD. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 74 A.D. (3,2 g, 17 mm) Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right. Rev: PON MAX TR P COS V, winged caduceus.

RIC 75 (C); RSC 362; BMC 138.

Ex: Aeternitas Numismatics
2 commentsPaddy
13451109_10153868296659011_1483308958_n.jpg
09 Vespasian RIC 81830 viewsVespasian 69-79 AD. AE Dupondius. Rome Mint. 75 AD. (12.00g; 26.5mm) Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M P P COS VI, Radiate head right. Rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA S-C, Felicitas standing left, holding caduceus & cornucopiae.
RIC 818; C 154

Ex: Naville Numismatics
1 commentsPaddy
Vitellius_RIC_I_105.jpg
09 Vitellius RIC I 10581 viewsVitellius. Jan. 2-Dec. 20 69 AD. AR Denarius (2.71 g, 17.6m, 5h). Rome mint. Struck circa April-December AD 69. Obv: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right. Rev: LIBERTAS RESTITVTA, Libertas, draped, standing facing holding pileus & long rod. RIC I 105; RSC 47.

With the same devices as RIC I 81, the difference on this coin is the abbreviated title GERM. Vitellius was commander of the legions in Germania Inferior when the Rhine legions declared him emperor in 69 A.D. He would have resigned as emperor, but was not allowed to do so when Vespasian’s eastern legions marched on Rome, and was ultimately killed and Vespasian was installed as emperor ending the Year of Four Emperors.
Lucas H
v3689~0.JPG
090 Vespasian 40 viewsVespasian AE As. 74 AD. IMP CAES VESP AVG PM T P COS V CENS, laureate head right / PAX AVGVST S-C, Pax standing left leaning on column, holding caduceus & branch. Cohen 308. RIC 727Randygeki(h2)
00_003.JPG
090 Vespasian37 views"Looks like Vespasian, first issue of 71 with full name VESPASIANVS:

IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M T P P P COS III, bust laureate r. resting on globe and with aegis on shoulder

FIDES EXERCITVVM, S C in ex. , clasped hands before legionary eagle on prow.

The obverse die is A23 in Colin Kraay's unpublished Oxford dissertation, the rev. die P75. Kraay didn't know this die combination, but it is recorded by RIC 70 from a single specimen in the Termopolio Hoard from Pompeii, published in 1997.

These are rare types: only one other obv. die of the issue shows this combination of aegis and globe for the bust, and this is the only rev. die of the FIDES EXERCITVVM type used in the issue, though a second such die was used later in the year with Vespasian's name abbreviated VESPASIAN (no -VS).

To see what your dies looked like before the corrosion, see RIC pl. 18, 117 and pl. 16, 71 for the obv. and rev. respectively! These are the same two dies on well preserved specimens in other die combinations."

thanks for the help Curtislclay !

New pic
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
111_036.JPG
090 Vespasian86 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.
Silver denarius, RIC II part 1, 362; SRCV I 2317, BMCRE II 74, F, 2.879g, 17.2mm, 195o, Rome mint, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTI, Victory advancing right, crowning legionary standard with wreath with right, palm across shoulder in left.

"This type likely refers to the victory in Judaea but does not specifically identify that victory."
5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
V1446dark.jpg
09a Domitian as Caesar RIC 1446113 viewsAR Denarius, 3.04g
Ephesus mint, 71 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: DOMITIANVS CAESAR AVG F; Bust of Domitian, cuirassed, seen from front, Medusa head on breast of cuirass, fold of cloak on left shoulder, head bare, r.
Rev: CONCORDIA AVG; Ceres std. l., on ornate high-backed chair, with corn ears and poppy and cornucopiae; in exergue, EPHE
RIC 1446 (C). BMC 470. RSC 38. RPC 847 (10 spec.). BNC 363.
Acquired from Lucernae, eBay, January 2015.

In Domitian's first imperial coinage issue he was given special treatment regarding the bust type chosen. The engravers at Ephesus depicted him cuirassed with a cloak draped over his left shoulder. Vespasian and Titus were not engraved so elaborately (although at Antioch Titus' bust is draped). Why this is so is a mystery. Unusually Domitian shares the same reverse types as Vespasian and Titus in this series, unlike at Rome where he largely had his own unique types. This Ceres reverse is probably the most common of his Ephesus denarii.

A worn coin to be sure, but the handsome bust shines through the wear.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
V1492.jpg
09b Domitian as Caesar RIC-1492112 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS IIII across field; Eagle stg. facing on garlanded base, wings open, head r.
RIC 1492 (R). BMC 487. RSC 45c. RPC 1466 (3 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Gemini X, 13 January 2013, Harry N. Sneh Collection, group lot 806.

A delightful Domitian as Caesar denarius from the rare 'o' mint. RIC speculates the mysterious mint is Ephesus based on the use of the 'o' mint mark which was also used at that mint in its last known series in 74.

This reverse type of Eagle on garlanded base is known from Rome for Vespasian and Titus. A wonderful portrait accompanies this large flan specimen.


5 commentsDavid Atherton
V1494a.jpg
09c Domitian as Caesar- RIC 1494126 viewsAR Denarius, 2.81g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS IIII above; Pegasus r.
RIC 1494 (R2). BMC 488 bis. RSC 47 var. RPC 1465 (1 spec.). BNC -.
Ex G&N, eBay, 27 August 2015.

An unknown eastern mint struck a spate of denarii in 76 which copied many contemporary types from Rome. Both RIC and RPC speculate it possibly could be Ephesus, citing a similar style with a previous Ephesian issue from 74 and the use of an annulet as a mint mark. The issue is extremely rare. This denarius copies the much more common Pegasus type struck at Rome for Domitian. Domitian's connection to this unusual type perhaps can be explained by Pegasus' association with Athena/Minerva, Domitian's patron goddess. These eastern denarii are understandably confused with the issues from Rome, however, they can be distinguished by style and the annulet (if visible) below the bust.

A fine styled, nicely toned denarius.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
V1495.JPG
09d Domitian as Caesar- RIC 1495125 viewsAR Denarius, 3.26g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: FIDES PVBL; Hands clasped over caduceus, two poppies and two corn ears
RIC 1495 (R). BMC 491. RSC -. RPC 1467 (4 spec.). BNC -.
Ex Solidus, eBay, 29 November 2013.

In 76 AD a mysterious series of denarii appeared in Asia Minor for Vespasian and his sons two years after Ephesus stopped minting denarii. The reverse types were copied from those contemporaneously produced at Rome and featured many mules and blundered legends. Often an 'o' mint mark is visible below the busts, giving rise to the theory that these may be the product of Ephesus. The style is also similar to the last series known from that mint.

Here is a rare reverse type for Domitian as Caesar. At Rome this type is only known for Vespasian and Titus. BMC 491 is listed as no mint mark below bust. A fine style portrait struck on a large flan. Same obverse die as my V1492.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
V1496lg.jpg
09e Domitian as Caesar-RIC 1496110 viewsAR Denarius, 3.17g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD (Vespasian)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: PON MAX TR P COS IIII; Winged caduceus
RIC 1496 (R2). BMC 489. RSC 369. RPC 1469 (2 spec.). BNC 377.
Acquired from Britaly Coins, April 2016.

The small series struck under Vespasian this coin comes from is quite mysterious. The mint is not known for certain, although Ephesus is a prime suspect. K. Butcher and M. Ponting in The Metallurgy of Roman silver Coinage analysed the Ephesian and 'o' mint series and their data shows both issues are made from the same bullion. Not definitive proof the two series are from the same mint, but good evidence of a strong link. Unlike the Ephesian series, the 'o' issue is full of blundered legends and mules. This denarius struck for Domitian Caesar has a PON MAX reverse legend, an impossible title for the young prince. However, what the mint masters lacked in competency, the engravers made up for in their stylish portraits.

A wonderful portrait struck on a large flan. An obverse die match with my RIC V1494.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
Titus~0.jpg
10 Titus33 viewsDenarius. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, throne with back in form of a diadem with corn ears upon it. RIC 24a, RSC 313, BMC 58. Weight 3.25 g. Die Axis 6 hr. Max Dia 17.1 mm.

mix_val
my-vespasian.jpg
10 - Vespasian19 viewsVespasian AR Denarius. Rome, 77-78 A.D. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head right. / COS VIII, Mars standing facing, head left, holding spear and trophy. RIC 103; Cohen 125Holding_History
10_Titus_RIC_II_25Black.jpg
10 Titus RIC II 2552 viewsTitus 79-81 A.D. Rome Mint. 79 A.D. (19mm, 3.21 g, 5h). Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, Laureate head right. Rev: TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII, Slow quadriga left, bearing grain ears.
RIC II 25; RSC 276.

Ex: CNG Auction
1 commentsPaddy
Vespasian_RIC_980.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius15 viewsVESPASIAN
AR Denarius, Rome Mint
18.75mm, 2.7g

O: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, Laureate head r.

R: IMP-XIX, modius with corn-ears

Sear 2293, RIC 980, RSC 215, BMC 218; aF
RI0062
Sosius
Vespasian_RSC_574.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 72 AD8 viewsROMAN IMPERIAL
Vespasian
AR Denarius, struck 72-73 AD

O: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right

R: VES-TA to either side of Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & scepter.

RSC 574, BMC 71.

Fine
RI0067
Sosius
Vespasian_RIC_938.jpg
10 Vespasian Denarius, 77 AD11 viewsVESPASIAN
AR Denarius.
77-78 AD.

O: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head left

R: COS VIII, Mars standing left, holding spear & trophy.

RSC 126, RIC 938, Sear5 #2288

Fine/aFine
RI0061
Sosius
vespasiancomb.jpg
10. VESPASIAN31 views69 - 79 AD
AE As
26.89 MM, 9.8 g
O: IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII, Laureate head right
R: S C, Spes standing left holding flower and lifting hem
RIC II 583
2 commentslaney
IMG_3033.JPG
100 Titus 20 viewsTitus
Denarius. 79 AD. IMP T CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / CERES AVGVST, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears with poppy and sceptre.

RSC 31a RIC 3
Sear 2504
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
coin219.JPG
105. Marcus Aurelius41 viewsMarcus Aurelius

The joint succession may have been motivated by military exigency. During his reign Marcus Aurelius was almost constantly at war with various peoples outside the Empire. Germanic tribes and other peoples launched many raids along the long European border, particularly into Gaul — Germans, in turn, may have been under attack from more warlike tribes farther east. In Asia, a revitalized Parthian Empire renewed its assault. A highly authoritative figure was needed to command the troops, yet the emperor himself could not defend both fronts at the same time. Neither could he simply appoint a general to lead one assault; earlier popular military leaders like Julius Caesar and Vespasian had used the military to overthrow the existing government and install themselves as supreme leaders.

Marcus Aurelius solved the problem by sending Verus to command the legions in the East. He was authoritative enough to command the full loyalty of the troops, but already powerful enough that he had little incentive to overthrow Marcus. The plan succeeded — Verus remained loyal until his death on campaign in 169. This joint emperorship was faintly reminiscent of the political system of the Roman Republic, which functioned according to the principle of collegiality and did not allow a single person to hold supreme power. Joint rule was revived by Diocletian's establishment of the Tetrarchy in the late 3rd century.

Virtus

In Roman mythology, Virtus was the god of bravery and military strength. His Greek equivalent was Arete. The word, "Virtus" is commonly used in mottos of universities and other entities.

Marcus Aurelius, as Caesar, Denarius. 155-156 AD. AVRELIVS CAES ANTON AVG PII F, bare head right / TR POT X COS II, Virtus, helmeted, standing left, holding parazonium & spear. RSC 703. RIC 468
ecoli
titus-denarius.jpg
11 - Titus17 viewsTitus as Caesar, AR Denarius. T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS, Laureate bust right / COS IV, Mars standing left holding spear and trophy. RIC (Vespasian) 948, RSC 65Holding_History
IMG_3081.JPG
110 Dimitian4 viewsDomitian Denarius. CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II, laureate head right / Domitian riding horse left, raising hand & holding scepter surmounted by a human head. RIC 680 (RIC [1962] 232) (Vespasian), RSC 664, BMC 129Randygeki(h2)
12_caes_portraits_coll_res_lt.jpg
12 CAESARS PORTRAITS164 viewsObverse images from my collection.
R 1: Julius, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula
R 2: Claudius, Nero, Galba, Otho
R 3: Vitellius, Vespasian, Titus, Domitian
2 commentslaney
antpius_RIC143d.jpg
138-161 AD - ANTONINUS PIUS AR denarius - struck 158-159 AD64 viewsobv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP (laureate head right)
rev: TEMPLVM DIV AVG REST COS IIII (octastyle temple [8 columns] in which the statues of Augustus and Livia reside)
ref: RIC III 143D (R), Cohen 809 (8frcs)
3.01 gms, 18mm,
Rare

History: The Temple of Divus Augustus was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design (see my Caligula sestertius). During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus.
It was restored again in the late 150s by Antoninus Pius, who was perhaps motivated by a desire to be publicly associated with the first emperor. The exact date of the restoration is not known, but the restored temple was an octostyle design with Corinthian capitals and two statues - presumably of Augustus and Livia - in the cella. The pediment displayed a relief featuring Augustus and was topped by a quadriga. Two figures stood on the eaves of the roof, that on the left representing Romulus and the one on the right depicting Aeneas leading his family out of Troy, alluding to Rome's origin-myth. The steps of the temple were flanked by two statues of Victory.
1 commentsberserker
Denario VESPASIANO RIC 6.jpg
18-03 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)54 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS ITER TR POT" - Marte caminando a derecha, portando lanza en mano derecha y aguila sobre su hombro izquierdo.

Acuñada 70 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #6D Pag.15 - RIC2 #23 - BMCRE #11/2/3 - Cohen Vol.1 #87 Pag.375 - DVM #18/1 Pag.100 - RSC Vol. II #87 Pag.40 - CBN #12/3
mdelvalle
RIC_6_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-03 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)25 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS ITER TR POT" - Marte caminando a derecha, portando lanza en mano derecha y aguila sobre su hombro izquierdo.

Acuñada 70 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #6D Pag.15 - RIC2 #23 - BMCRE #11/2/3 - Cohen Vol.1 #87 Pag.375 - DVM #18/1 Pag.100 - RSC Vol. II #87 Pag.40 - CBN #12/3
mdelvalle
Denario VESPASIANO RIC10D.jpg
18-05 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)46 viewsAR Denario 17.5 x 16 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR [VESPA]SIANVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS ITER [T]R POT" - Pax (Paz) sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano derecha y Caduceo en izquierda.

Acuñada 69 - 71 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C3

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #10D Pag.16 - RIC2 #29 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2285 Pag.435 - BMCRE #26 - DVM #18/5 Pag.100 - CBN #18 - RSC Vol. II #94h Pag.41
mdelvalle
RIC_10_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-05 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)21 viewsAR Denario 17.5 x 16 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR [VESPA]SIANVS AVG" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS ITER [T]R POT" - Pax (Paz) sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano derecha y Caduceo en izquierda.

Acuñada 69 - 71 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #10D Pag.16 - RIC2 #29 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2285 Pag.435 - BMCRE #26 - DVM #18/5 Pag.100 - CBN #18 - RSC Vol. II #94h Pag.41
mdelvalle
Vespasiano_denario_VICTORIAE_Efesos.jpg
18-06 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)27 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PACI AVGVSTAE" - Victoria avanzando a derecha, portando corona de laureles y Palma. "EPE" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 71 D.C.
Ceca: Ephesus
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #333 Pag.54 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2270 Pag.433 - BMCRE #457 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #38 Pag.101 - CBN #351 - RSC Vol. II #276 Pag.44
mdelvalle
Denario_Vespasiano_RIC_15_Judea_Capta.jpg
18-07 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)49 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: " IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: Judea en actitud de duelo y congoja, sentada en el suelo hacia la derecha, detrás suyo un trofeo de armas. "JVDAEA" en el exergo.

Este tipo de reverso celebra el éxito de Vespasian y Titus sofocando la primera Revuelta Judía.

Acuñada: 69 - 70 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia ó Tarraco España
Rareza: Común ó Rara (Según la ubicación de la ceca)

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #15D Pag.16 (Roma) ó #266 Pag.46 (Tarraco) - RIC2 #4 (Roma) ó #1316 (Tarraco) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2296 Pag.436 - BMCRE Vol.2 #35, 359 y 370 - Cohen Vol.1 #226 Pag.384 - DVM #32 Pag.101 - CBN #23 - RSC Vol. II #226 Pag.43 – Hendin #759 Pag.319
mdelvalle
RIC_15_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-07 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: " IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: Judea en actitud de duelo y congoja, sentada en el suelo hacia la derecha, detrás suyo un trofeo de armas. "JVDAEA" en el exergo.

Este tipo de reverso celebra el éxito de Vespasian y Titus sofocando la primera Revuelta Judía.

Acuñada: 69 - 70 D.C.
Ceca: Roma Italia ó Tarraco España
Rareza: Común ó Rara (Según la ubicación de la ceca)

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #15D Pag.16 (Roma) ó #266 Pag.46 (Tarraco) - RIC2 #4 (Roma) ó #1316 (Tarraco) - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2296 Pag.436 - BMCRE Vol.2 #35, 359 y 370 - Cohen Vol.1 #226 Pag.384 - DVM #32 Pag.101 - CBN #23 - RSC Vol. II #226 Pag.43 – Hendin #759 Pag.319
mdelvalle
RIC_39_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-09 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)15 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.98 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES VESP AVG PM" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "TRI POT II COS III P P" - Pax (Paz) sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano derecha y Caduceo en izquierda.

Acuñada 72 - 73 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #39D Pag.19 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2313 Pag.438 - BMCRE #61 y 364 - DVM #56 Pag.102 - CBN #222 - Cohen I #566 Pag.412 - RSC Vol. II #566 Pag.48
mdelvalle
Denario VESPASIANO RIC 90.jpg
18-10 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)59 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PON MAX TR P COS VI" - Pax (Paz) (Emperador s/Cohen) sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano der.

Acuñada 75 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #90 Pag.24 - RIC2 #772 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2301 Pag.436 - BMCRE #161/2/3/4 - Cohen Vol.1 #366 Pag.395 - DVM #43/1 Pag.101 - CBN #139/40 - RSC Vol. II #366 Pag.46
mdelvalle
RIC_75_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-10 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES VESP AVG CENS" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PONTIF MAXIM" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Emperador sedente a derecha, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano der. y largo cetro vertical en izq.

Acuñada 73 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #65 Pag.21 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2305 Pag.437 - BMCRE #98 - Cohen Vol.1 #387 Pag.397 - DVM #45/2 Pag.102 - CBN #86 - RSC Vol. II #387 Pag.46
mdelvalle
RIC_76_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-11 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)20 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.74 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESP AVG" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PON MAX TR P COS V" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Emperador sedente a derecha en silla curule, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano der. y largo cetro vertical en izq.

Acuñada 74 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #76 Pag.23 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2300 Pag.436 - BMCRE #135 - Cohen Vol.1 #363 Pag.395 - DVM #42/3 Pag.101 - CBN #109 - RSC Vol. II #363 Pag.46
mdelvalle
Denario_Vespasiano_Proa_RIC_941_Fourree.jpg
18-12 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)35 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA
Denario Forrado 19 mm 2.6 gr.

Anv: " IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" Leyenda en sentido anti-horario - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "COS – VIII" – Proa de galera hacia la derecha, gran estrella de ocho rayos largos y ocho cortos, arriba.
Este reverso es copia originalmente de la emisión triunviral de Marco Antonio acuñada en el 41/40 A.C. en conmemoración de su reconciliación con Ahenobarbus.

Acuñada Con posterioridad al 77-78 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #108 Pag.26 – RIC2 #941 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2290 Pag.435 - BMCRE Vol.2 #210 - Cohen Vol.1 #136 Pag.377/8 - DVM #24/3 Pag.101 - CBN #187 - RSC Vol. II #136 Pag.42
mdelvalle
RIC_90_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-13 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)16 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 2.7 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PON MAX TR P COS VI" - Pax (Paz) (Emperador s/Cohen) sentada a izquierda, sosteniendo rama de olivo en mano der.

Acuñada 75 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #90 Pag.24 - RIC2 #772 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2301 Pag.436 - BMCRE #161-4 - Cohen Vol.1 #366 Pag.395 - DVM #43/1 Pag.101 - CBN #139/40 - RSC Vol. II #366 Pag.46
mdelvalle
Denario_Vespasiano_RIC_114_2_Judaea_Capta.jpg
18-14 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)35 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: " IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" Leyenda en sentido anti-horario - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[T]R POT X – COS VIIII" – Victoria avanzando a izquierda y atando un escudo sobre un trofeo de armas, en cuya base se encuentra un acongojado prisionero Judío sentado a izquierda.

Este reverso puede referirse a la victoria en Judea o, alternativamente, puede asociarse con las actividades en el norte de Bretaña del famoso Gobernador Gnaus Julius Agricola, suegro del historiador Tácitus.

Acuñada 79 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #114D Pag.27 - RIC2 #1068 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2309 Pag.437 - BMCRE Vol.2 #246 - Cohen Vol.1 #552 Pag.411 - DVM #53/4 Pag.102 - CBN #216 - RSC Vol. II #552 Pag.48 - Hendin #767 Pag.321
mdelvalle
RIC_114_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-15 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)18 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: " IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG" Leyenda en sentido anti-horario - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[T]R POT X – COS VIIII" – Victoria avanzando a izquierda y atando un escudo sobre un trofeo de armas, en cuya base se encuentra un acongojado prisionero Judío sentado a izquierda.

Este reverso puede referirse a la victoria en Judea o, alternativamente, puede asociarse con las actividades en el norte de Bretaña del famoso Gobernador Gnaus Julius Agricola, suegro del historiador Tácitus.

Acuñada 79 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: Comun

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #114D Pag.27 - RIC2 #1068 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2309 Pag.437 - BMCRE Vol.2 #246 - Cohen Vol.1 #552 Pag.411 - DVM #53/4 Pag.102 - CBN #216 - RSC Vol. II #552 Pag.48 - Hendin #767 Pag.321
mdelvalle
RIC_333_Denario_Vespasiano.jpg
18-18 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)17 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS III" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PACI AVGVSTAE" - Victoria avanzando a derecha, portando corona de laureles y Palma. "EPE" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 71 D.C.
Ceca: Ephesus
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #333 Pag.54 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2270 Pag.433 - BMCRE #457 - Cohen Vol.1 #276 Pag.388 - DVM #38 Pag.101 - CBN #351 - RSC Vol. II #276 Pag.44
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AS VESPASIANO RIC 482.jpg
18-20 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)38 viewsAE AS 23 mm 11.7 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CAES VE]SPASIAN AVG COS III" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[AEQVITAS] AVGVSTI - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y un largo cetro o vara en izquierda.

Acuñada 71 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #482 Pag.73 - RIC2 #286 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 Pag.445 - BMCRE #600/1/2 - Cohen Vol.1 #13 Pag.369 - DVM #91 var Pag.103 - CBN #575
mdelvalle
RIC_482_AS_Vespasiano.jpg
18-20 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)18 viewsAE AS 23 mm 11.7 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CAES VE]SPASIAN AVG COS III" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[AEQVITAS] AVGVSTI - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y un largo cetro o vara en izquierda.

Acuñada 71 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #482 Pag.73 - RIC2 #286 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 Pag.445 - BMCRE #600/1/2 - Cohen Vol.1 #13 Pag.369 - DVM #91 var Pag.103 - CBN #575
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AS VESPASIANO RIC 528.jpg
18-23 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)54 viewsAE AS 26 mm 10.9 gr.

Anv: "[IM]P CAESAR VESPASIAN AV[G COS IIII]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Aguila parada sobre un globo de frente con sus alas desplegadas y su cabeza girada hacia la derecha.

Acuñada 72 - 73 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #528a Pag.77 - RIC2 #1202 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2362 var Pag.446 - Cohen Vol.1 #481 Pag.405 - BMCRE #1935-4-4-35 - Lyon #72
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RIC_580a_AS_Vespasiano.jpg
18-23 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)18 viewsAE AS 26 mm 7.5 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CAESA]R VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS [AV]GVST - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y cetro en izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #580a Pag.83 - RIC2 #890 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #724 - Cohen Vol.1 #4 Pag.369 - DVM #91 Pag.103 - BNC #755/6
mdelvalle
RIC_580a_AS_Vespasiano_1.jpg
18-24 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)19 viewsAE AS 25 x 27 mm 9.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS AVGVST - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y cetro en izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #580a Pag.83 - RIC2 #890 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #724 - Cohen Vol.1 #4 Pag.369 - DVM #91 Pag.103 - CBN #755/6
mdelvalle
AS VESPASIANO RIC 580a.jpg
18-25 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)54 viewsAE AS 26 mm 7.5 gr.

Anv: "[IMP CAESA]R VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS [AV]GVST - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y cetro en izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #580a Pag.83 - RIC2 #890 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #724 - Cohen Vol.1 #4 Pag.369 - DVM #91 Pag.103 - BNC #755/6
mdelvalle
AS VESPASIANO RIC 580a_1.jpg
18-26 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)49 viewsAE AS 25 x 27 mm 9.6 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS AVGVST - S C" - Aequitas (Equidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo balanza en mano derecha y cetro en izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #580a Pag.83 - RIC2 #890 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2356 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #724 - Cohen Vol.1 #4 Pag.369 - DVM #91 Pag.103 - CBN #755/6
mdelvalle
RIC_583a_AS_Vespasiano.jpg
18-26 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)20 viewsAE AS 25 mm 10.5 gr.

Anv: "I[MP] CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Spes (La esperanza) de pié a izquierda sosteniendo una flor en la mano derecha y el faldón de su capote con la izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #583a Pag.83 - RIC2 #894 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2361 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #725/6 - Cohen Vol.1 #457 Pag.402 - DVM #95 Pag.104 - CBN #757
mdelvalle
AS VESPASIANO RIC 583a.jpg
18-28 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)44 viewsAE AS 25 mm 10.5 gr.

Anv: "I[MP] CAESAR VESP AVG COS VII" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Spes (La esperanza) de pié a izquierda sosteniendo una flor en la mano derecha y el faldón de su capote con la izquierda.

Acuñada 76 - 78 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #583a Pag.83 - RIC2 #894 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2361 var Pag.445 - BMCRE #725/6 - Cohen Vol.1 #457 Pag.402 - DVM #95 Pag.104 - CBN #757
mdelvalle
RIC_747_AS_Vespasiano.jpg
18-28 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)20 viewsAE AS 26 mm 10.9 gr.

Anv: "[IM]P CAESAR VESPASIAN AV[G COS IIII]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "S C" - Aguila parada sobre un globo de frente con sus alas desplegadas y su cabeza girada hacia la derecha.

Acuñada 72 - 73 D.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum/Lyon
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #747 Pag.102 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2362 var (Leyenda) Pag.446 - Cohen Vol.1 #481 Pag.405
mdelvalle
RIC_539a_Dupondio_Vespasiano.jpg
18-29 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)16 viewsAE Dupondius 28 mm 10.4 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES VESP AVG PM T P COS IIII CENS" - Busto radiado viendo a izquierda.
Rev: "FELICITAS PVBLICA - S C" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo Caduceo en mano izquierda y Cornucopia en derecha.

Acuñada 73 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #539a Pag.78 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2346 var. Pag.443 - BMCRE #661 - Cohen Vol.1 #151 Pag.379 - DVM #83 Pag.103
mdelvalle
Tetradracma VESPASIANO RPC 1970-3_1.jpg
18-30 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)52 viewsAR Tetradracma (Provincial) 25 x 23 mm 13.6 gr.

Anv: "AYTOK[PAT ΩP KAICAP CEBATOC OYECIIACIANOC]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ETOY [NEOY IEPOY A ó B ó Γ]" - Aguila parada de frente con su cabeza a izquierda, sobre un garrote con sus alas extendidas y corona de laureles en el pico.

Acuñada 69 - 71 D.C.
Ceca: Syria - Seleucis and Pieria - Antiochia ad Orontem

Referencias: Sear GICTV #736 Pag.70 - BMC Vol.20 #227 Pag.178 - RPC (#1970 =Año 1, #1971=Año 2 ó #1973=Año 3) Grupo 7 - Prieur Syro-Phoenician tatradrachms (2000) pag.20 #132 Grupo 9
mdelvalle
RIC_555_AS_Vespasiano.jpg
18-30 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)19 viewsAE Dupondius 26 mm 9.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP CAES VESP AVG PM T P COS V CENS" - Busto radiado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELICITAS PVBLICA - S C" - Felicitas (La Felicidad) de pié a izq. sosteniendo Caduceo en mano izquierda y Cornucopia en derecha.

Acuñada 74 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #555 Pag.80 - Sear RCTV Vol.I #2346 Pag.443 - BMCRE #698 - Cohen Vol.1 #152 Pag.379 - DVM #83 Pag.103 - CBN #714
mdelvalle
RPC_1970_Tetradracma_Antioquia_Vespasiano.jpg
18-40 - VESPASIANO (69 - 79 D.C.)22 viewsAR Tetradracma (Provincial) 25 x 23 mm 13.6 gr.

Anv: "AYTOK[PAT ΩP KAICAP CEBATOC OYECIIACIANOC]" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "ETOY [NEOY IEPOY A ó B ó Γ]" - Aguila parada de frente con su cabeza a izquierda, sobre un garrote con sus alas extendidas y corona de laureles en el pico.

Acuñada 69 - 71 D.C.
Ceca: Syria - Seleucis and Pieria - Antiochia ad Orontem

Referencias: Sear GICTV #736 Pag.70 - BMC Vol.20 #227 Pag.178 - RPC (#1970 =Año 1, #1971=Año 2 ó #1973=Año 3) Grupo 7 - Prieur Syro-Phoenician tatradrachms (2000) pag.20 #132 Grupo 9
mdelvalle
RIC_13_Denario_TITO.jpg
19-01 - TITO (79 - 81 D.C.)30 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: " TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P" - Capricornio a der sobre un globo. Reverso basado en acuñaciones de Augusto.

Acuñada posterior a Julio/79 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias:Referencias: RIC Vol.II #13D Pag.117 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2510 Pag.465 - BMCRE #35 - Cohen Vol.1 #280 Pag.452 - DVM #30/6 var Pag.106 - CBN #32 - RSC Vol. II #280 Pag.57
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Denario_de_Tito.jpg
19-01 - TITO (79 - 81 D.C.)35 viewsAR Denario 18 mm 3.2 gr.

Anv: "IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: " TR P VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P" - Capricornio a der sobre un globo. Reverso basado en acuñaciones de Augusto.

Acuñada posterior a Julio/79 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #13D Pag.117 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2510 Pag.465 - BMCRE #35 - Cohen Vol.1 #280 Pag.452 - DVM #30/6 var Pag.106 - CBN #32 - RSC Vol. II #280 Pag.57
mdelvalle
RIC_24a_Denario_TITO.jpg
19-03 - TITO (79 - 81 D.C.)21 viewsAR Denario 19 mm 3.0 gr.

Anv: "IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M" (Leyenda de der. a izq.) - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: " TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P" - Trono con diadema triangular ornamentada.

Acuñada 79-80 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II #24aD Pag.119 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2515 Pag.466 - BMCRE #61 - Cohen Vol.1 #313 Pag.455 - DVM #32/2 var Pag.106 - CBN #49 - RSC Vol. II #313a Pag.58
mdelvalle
AS_Tito_AEQVITAS_AVG_RIC_618.jpg
19-04 - TITO Como Cesar y Co-Emperador de su Padre (69 - 79 D.C.)20 viewsComo Cesar de su Padre Vespasiano.
AE AS 26 mm 10.8 gr.

Anv: " T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS AVGUSTI - S C" - Aequitas (La Equidad) de pié a izquierda portando balanza (escala) en mano derecha y bastón largo vertical en izquierdo.

Acuñada 72 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Vespasian) #618 Pag.87 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2473 Pag.461 - Cohen Vol.I #6 Pag.430 - DVM #50 Pag.107 - CBN #631
mdelvalle
RIC_618_AS_TITO.jpg
19-04 - TITO Como Cesar y Co-Emperador de su Padre (69 - 79 D.C.)15 viewsComo Cesar de su Padre Vespasiano.
AE AS 26 mm 10.8 gr.

Anv: " T CAES VESPASIAN IMP P TR P COS II" - Busto laureado viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AEQVITAS AVGUSTI - S C" - Aequitas (La Equidad) de pié a izquierda portando balanza (escala) en mano derecha y bastón largo vertical en izquierdo.

Acuñada 72 D.C.
Ceca: Roma
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.II (Vespasian) #618 Pag.87 - Sear RCTV Vol.1 #2473 Pag.461 - Cohen Vol.I #6 Pag.430 - DVM #50 Pag.107 - CBN #631
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VitelliusDenVesta.jpg
1av Vitellius42 views69

Denarius
Portrait, right, A VITELLIVS GERMAN IMP TR P
Vesta std., PONT MAX

RIC 107

According to Suetonius: Lucius’s son Aulus, the future emperor, was born on the 24th of September 15AD, or according to some authorities on the 7th, during the consulship of Drusus Caesar and Norbanus Flaccus. . . . His boyhood and early youth were spent on Capreae (Capri) among Tiberius’s creatures, he himself being marked by the nickname of ‘Spintria’ (sex-token) throughout his life, and suspected of having secured his father’s first promotion to office by surrendering his own chastity. As he grew older, though contaminated by every kind of vice, Vitellius gained and kept a prominent place at court, winning Caligula’s friendship by his devotion to chariot-racing and Claudius’s by his love of dice. With Nero he was even closer. . . .

Honoured, as these emperors’ favourite, with high office in the priesthood, as well as political power, he governed Africa (under Nero, in 60/61AD) as proconsul, and was then Curator of Public Works (in 63AD), employing a contrasting approach, and with a contrasting effect on his reputation. In his province he acted with outstanding integrity over two successive years, since he served as deputy also to his brother who succeeded him (61/62AD) yet during his administration of the City he was said to have stolen various temple offerings and ornaments, and substituted brass and tin for the gold and silver in others. . . .

Contrary to all expectations, Galba appointed Vitellius to Lower Germany (in 68AD). Some think it was brought about by Titus Vinius, whose influence was powerful at that time, and whose friendship Vitellius had previously won through their mutual support for the ‘Blues’ in the Circus. But it is clear to everyone that Galba chose him as an act of contempt rather than favour, commenting that gluttons were among those least to be feared, and Vitellius’s endless appetite would now be able to sate itself on a province. . . .

He entered Rome to the sound of trumpets, surrounded by standards and banners, wearing a general’s cape, sword at his side, his officers in their military cloaks also, and the men with naked blades. With increasing disregard for the law, human or divine, he then assumed the office of High Priest on the anniversary of the Allia (18th July), arranged the elections for the next ten years, and made himself consul for life. . . .

Vitellius’s worst vices were cruelty and gluttony. . . . By the eighth month of his reign (November 69AD) the legions in Moesia and Pannonia had repudiated Vitellius, and sworn allegiance to Vespasian despite his absence, following those of Syria and Judaea who had done so in Vespasian’s presence. . . .

The vanguard of Vespasian’s army had now forced its way into the Palace, unopposed, and the soldiers were ransacking the rooms, in their usual manner. They hauled Vitellius, unrecognised, from his hiding place, asked his name and where the Emperor might be. He gave some lying answer, but was soon identified, so he begged for safe custody, even if that meant imprisonment, claiming he had important information for Vespasian regarding his security. However his arms were bound behind him and a noose flung over his head, and he was dragged along the Sacred Way to the Forum, amid a hail of mockery and abuse, half-naked, with his clothes in tatters. His head was held back by the hair, like a common criminal and, with a sword-point under his chin so that he was forced to look up and reveal his face, he was pelted with filth and dung, denounced as arsonist and glutton, and taunted with his bodily defects by the crowd. For, Vitellius was exceptionally tall, and his face was usually flushed from some drinking bout. He had a huge belly, too, and one thigh crippled by a blow from a four-horse chariot which struck him when he was in attendance on Caligula who was driving. At last, after being tormented by a host of cuts from the soldiers’ swords, he was killed on the Gemonian Stairs, and his body dragged with a hook to the Tiber.
1 commentsBlindado
VespDenSalus.jpg
1aw Vespasian44 views69-79

Denarius
Laureate head, right, IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN
Salus seated left with patera, SALVS AVG

RIC 513 (C2)

Suetonius wrote: The Flavians seized power, and the Empire, long troubled and adrift, afflicted by the usurpations and deaths of three emperors, at last achieved stability. True they were an obscure family, with no great names to boast of, yet one our country has no need to be ashamed of. . . . Vespasian was born in the Sabine country, in the little village of Falacrinae just beyond Reate (Rieti), on the 17th of November 9 AD in the consulship of Quintus Sulpicius Camerinus and Gaius Poppaeus Sabinus, five years before the death of Augustus. He was raised by his paternal grandmother Tertulla on her estate at Cosa. . . .

Under Claudius, he was sent to Germany (in 41 AD) to command a legion, thanks to the influence of Narcissus. From there he was posted to Britain (in 43 AD), where partly under the leadership of Aulus Plautius and partly that of Claudius himself, he fought thirty times, subjugating two powerful tribes, more than twenty strongholds, and the offshore island of Vectis (the Isle of Wight). This earned him triumphal regalia, and a little later two priesthoods and the consulship (in 51 AD) which he held for the last two months of the year. . . . He won, by lot, the governorship of Africa (in 63 AD), ruling it soundly and with considerable dignity. . . .

An ancient and well-established belief became widespread in the East that the ruler of the world at this time would arise from Judaea. This prophecy as events proved referred to the future Emperor of Rome, but was taken by the Jews to apply to them. They rebelled, killed their governor, and routed the consular ruler of Syria also, when he arrived to restore order, capturing an Eagle. To crush the rebels needed a considerable force under an enterprising leader, who would nevertheless not abuse power. Vespasian was chosen, as a man of proven vigour, from whom little need be feared, since his name and origins were quite obscure. Two legions with eight divisions of cavalry and ten cohorts of auxiliaries were added to the army in Judaea, and Vespasian took his elder son, Titus, along as one of his lieutenants. . . .

Yet Vespasian made no move, though his follower were ready and eager, until he was roused to action by the fortuitous support of a group of soldiers unknown to him, and based elsewhere. Two thousand men, of the three legions in Moesia reinforcing Otho’s forces, despite hearing on the march that he had been defeated and had committed suicide, had continued on to Aquileia, and there taken advantage of the temporary chaos to plunder at will. Fearing that if they returned they would be held to account and punished, they decided to choose and appoint an emperor of their own, on the basis that they were every bit as worthy of doing so as the Spanish legions who had appointed Galba, or the Praetorian Guard which had elected Otho, or the German army which had chosen Vitellius. They went through the list of serving consular governors, rejecting them for one reason or another, until in the end they unanimously adopted Vespasian, who was recommended strongly by some members of the Third Legion, which had been transferred to Moesia from Syria immediately prior to Nero’s death. . . .

Vespasian, an unheralded and newly-forged emperor, as yet lacked even a modicum of prestige and divine majesty, but this too he acquired. . . . Returning to Rome (in 70 AD) attended by such auspices, having won great renown, and after a triumph awarded for the Jewish War, he added eight consulships (AD 70-72, 74-77, 79) to his former one, and assumed the censorship. He first considered it essential to strengthen the State, which was unstable and well nigh fatally weakened, and then to enhance its role further during his reign. . . .
2 commentsBlindado
TitusProv.jpg
1ax Titus96 views79-81

AE, Ankyra, Galatia
Laureate head, right AY KAICAP TITOC CEBASTO. . .
Man standing, left, SEBASTHNWN TEKTOSAGWN

RPC 1620

By Suetonius' account: Titus, surnamed Vespasianus like his father, possessed such an aptitude, by nature, nurture, or good fortune, for winning affection that he was loved and adored by all the world as Emperor. . . . He was born on the 30th of December AD41, the very year of Caligula’s assassination, in a little dingy room of a humble dwelling, near the Septizonium. . . .

He was handsome, graceful, and dignified, and of exceptional strength, though of no great height and rather full-bellied. He had an extraordinary memory, and an aptitude for virtually all the arts of war and peace, being a fine horseman, skilled in the use of weapons, yet penning impromptu verses in Greek and Latin with equal readiness and facility. He had a grasp of music too, singing well and playing the harp pleasantly and with ability. . . .

As military tribune in Germany (c57-59AD) and Britain (c60-62), he won an excellent reputation for energy and integrity, as is shown by the large number of inscribed statues and busts of him found in both countries. . . . When his quaestorship ended, he commanded one of his father’s legions in Judaea, capturing the strongholds of Tarichaeae and Gamala (67AD). His horse was killed under him in battle, but he mounted that of a comrade who fell fighting at his side. . . . [Upon] Vespasian’s accession, his father left him to complete the conquest of Judaea, and in the final assault on Jerusalem (70AD) Titus killed twelve of the defenders with as many arrows. . . .

From then on, he acted as his father’s colleague and even protector. He shared in his Judaean triumph (of AD 71), the censorship (AD 73), the exercise of tribunicial power, and in seven of his consulships (AD 70, 72, 74-77, 79). . . .

He died at the same villa as his father, Vespasian, on the 13th of September AD81, at the age of forty-one, after a reign of two years, two months, and twenty days. The people mourned his loss as if he were a member of their own family.
2 commentsBlindado
DomitianAsMoneta.jpg
1az Domitian20 views81-96

As

Laureate head right, IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XV CENS PER P P
Moneta std, MONETA AVGVSTI S C

RIC 708

Suetonius wrote: Domitian was born on the 24th of October AD51, a month before his father Vespasian took up office as consul. . . . When Vespasian died, Domitian considered granting his soldiers twice the bounty offered by his brother Titus, and had no qualms in claiming that his father’s will had been tampered with, since he had been due a half-share of the Empire. From then on, he plotted continually against his brother, openly and in secret. When Titus was gripped by his fatal illness, Domitian ordered him to be left for dead, before he had actually breathed his last. . . .

He governed inconsistently, displaying a mixture of virtue and vice, but after some time his virtues too gave way to vice, since he seems to have been made avaricious through lack of funds, and cruel through fear, contrary to his natural disposition. . . . Domitian was diligent and conscientiousness in his administration of justice, often holding special sittings on the tribunal in the Forum. . . . [I]n his private life, and even for some time after becoming Emperor, he was considered free of greed and avarice; and indeed often showed proof not only of moderation, but of real generosity. . . . His moderation and clemency however were not destined to last, his predilection to cruelty appearing somewhat sooner than his avarice. . . . In this way he became an object of terror to all, and so hated that he was finally brought down by a conspiracy of his companions and favourite freedmen, which also involved his wife, Domitia Longina.

Domitian was tall, and of a ruddy complexion, with large rather weak eyes, and a modest expression. He was handsome and attractive when young, his whole body well-made except for his feet with their short toes. Later, he lost his hair, and developed a protruding belly, while his legs became thin and spindly after a long illness. . . . He found exercise intolerable, seldom walked when in Rome and while travelling and on campaign rarely rode but used a litter. Weaponry in general held no interest for him, though he was exceptionally keen on archery. There are plenty of witnesses to his killing a hundred wild creatures or more at a time on his Alban estate, bringing them down with successive arrows planted so deftly as to give the effect of horns. . . .

At the beginning of his reign, he had the libraries, which had been damaged by fire, restored at great expense, instituting a search for copies of lost works, and sending scribes to Alexandria to transcribe and edit them. Yet he himself neglected liberal studies, and never bothered to interest himself in history or poetry, or even to acquire a decent writing style.
Blindado
BOTLAUREL_2012.JPG
201241 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
2015_highlights.jpg
2015 Highlights56 viewsHere are a few of my favorite acquisitions from 2015. To see detailed descriptions of each coin, click on a title below. Thanks for checking out my gallery and may everyone have a happy and safe New Year!

Lucius Marcius Philippus, RSC Marcia 28
Vespasian, RIC 1558
Domitian, RIC Vesp 957
Trajan, RIC 212
Trajan, RIC 222
Hadrian, RIC 129c
Hadrian, RIC 247i
Marcus Aurelius, RIC 291
Septimius Severus, RIC 494
Caracalla, RIC 120
Elagabalus, RIC 88
Severus Alexander, RIC 178
Volusian, McAlee 1192/1193 variety

Matt Inglima
BOTLAUREL_2019.JPG
201937 viewsTHIS YEAR'S WINNERS
CLICK ON A COIN FOR ITS DETAILS

*Alex
207-1_Decimia.jpg
207/1. Decimia or Flavia? - denarius (150 BC)10 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 150 BC)
O/ Helmeted head of Roma right; X behind.
R/ Luna in biga right, holding whip & reins; FLAVS below; ROMA in exergue.
3.95g; 19mm
Crawford 207/1 (61 obverse dies/76 reverse dies)
- Collection of Frederick Sydney Clark (1923-2016), British collector in East Sussex.
- Toovey's, 01/11/2017, Lot 701.

* Decimius Flavus or Gaius Flavius Fimbria:

This issue has been given to a member of the plebeian gens Decimia, of Samnite origin. The gens was relatively new at the time since its first identified member Numerius Decimius distinguished himself during the Second Punic War (Livy, xxii. 24), and probably received the Roman citizenship as a result. Two Decimii used the cognomen Flavus: a military tribune in 207 named Gaius Decimius Flavus (Livy, xxvii. 14), and his probable son of the same name, who was Urban Praetor in 184, but died immediately after his election (Livy, xxxix. 38).

Three other Decimii are then known: Marcus, Gaius, and Lucius, all ambassadors in Greece in 172-171 (Livy, xlii. 19, 35, 37 respectively). They were possible sons of the Praetor of 184, in which case our moneyer was the son of one of them, although nothing is known of him. However, none of them had a cognomen and Flavus simply meant "blond hair", a rather common cognomen unlikely to feature alone on a coin.

So the name could refer to another gens; it is indeed possible to read it as FLAVIVS. This name, widespread during the Empire after Vespasian, was nevertheless uncommon in the second century and therefore distinctive enough so that the moneyer did not need to add the rest of his name. Besides, only one Flavius is known in this century: the Popularis Gaius Flavius C.f. Fimbria, Consul in 104 alongside Marius. Fimbria was therefore born no later than 146 (the Consulship was reserved to men aged at least 42 years old), a date which would remarkably fit with his father moneyer in 150 and therefore in his 20s. As Fimbria was a novus homo, the moneyership held by his father would testify the ascension of the family before him.
Joss
Denario_Domit-Vesp-Tito_Fourree.jpg
21-01 - DOMICIANO (81 - 96 D.C.) 50 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA
Híbrido realizado con cuños pertenecientes el anverso a Domiciano y el del reverso a su padre Vespasiano ó a su hermano Tito.
Denario Forrado 18x16 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII" Leyenda en sentido anti-horario - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
El cuño del anverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (COS VII – Cónsul por Séptima vez) ya avanzado el 80 D.C.
Rev: "PON MAX – TR P COS VI" – Pax (La Paz) sentada en un trono a izquierda, portando una rama de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido.
El cuño del reverso puede pertenecer a monedas emitidas por Vespasiano en el 75 D.C. o por Tito en 77-78 D.C. años en los cuales los mencionados ostentaban el título de Cónsul por sexta vez respectivamente.

Acuñada Con posterioridad al 80 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Anverso copiado de los utilizados en las emisiones correspondientes al año 80 D.C., y el reverso imitando al RIC Vol.II #90 (Vespasianus) Pag.24, Cohen #366 ó al RIC Vol.II #200 (Titus) Pag.38, Cohen #154
mdelvalle
RIC_90-200_Denario_Forrado_Domiciano.jpg
21-01 - DOMICIANO (81 - 96 D.C.) 17 viewsFALSIFICACIÓN ANCIANA
Híbrido realizado con cuños pertenecientes el anverso a Domiciano y el del reverso a su padre Vespasiano ó a su hermano Tito.
Denario Forrado 18x16 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII" Leyenda en sentido anti-horario - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
El cuño del anverso se puede datar por los títulos del Emperador (COS VII – Cónsul por Séptima vez) ya avanzado el 80 D.C.
Rev: "PON MAX – TR P COS VI" – Pax (La Paz) sentada en un trono a izquierda, portando una rama de olivo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido.
El cuño del reverso puede pertenecer a monedas emitidas por Vespasiano en el 75 D.C. o por Tito en 77-78 D.C. años en los cuales los mencionados ostentaban el título de Cónsul por sexta vez respectivamente.

Acuñada Con posterioridad al 80 D.C.
Ceca: No oficial

Referencias: Anverso copiado de los utilizados en las emisiones correspondientes al año 80 D.C., y el reverso imitando al RIC Vol.II #90 (Vespasianus) Pag.24, Cohen #366 ó al RIC Vol.II #200 (Titus) Pag.38, Cohen #154
mdelvalle
SNG_Cop_379_AE_Lydia_DOMICIA.jpg
22-20 - Philadelphia en Lydia - DOMICIA (81 - 96 D.C.)13 viewsAE15 - 1/2 Assarión (Provincial)
14 mm 2,86 gr 0 hr.

Anv: Busto a derecha
Rev: EΠI ΛAΓETA ΦIΛAΔEΛΦ,-[EWN], Racimo de uvas.

Domicia Longina (siglo I) fue una emperatriz romana, esposa del emperador Domiciano a quien dio en 73 D.C. su primer hijo Vespasiano, muere joven.
El emperador la repudia al enterarse de que mantenía relaciones con un comediógrafo de nombre Paris, pero sin embargo años más tarde la vuelve a llamar a su lado y tienen un segundo hijo, en el 90 D.C., al que también llaman Vespasiano, lamentablemente muere muy tempranamente, a los cinco años de edad.
Tras la muerte de este segundo hijo, Domicia encabezó la conjura que acabó con la vida de su marido y llevó al poder a Nerva. Domicia murió en tiempos de Trajano. (Fuente Wikipedia)

Acuñada 82 - 96 D.C.
Ceca: Philadelphia en Lydia - Lagetas Magistrado

Referencias: RPC II #1336; SNG München -; SNG Copenhagen # 379; BMC Lydia # 64 pag. 198,
mdelvalle
22114.jpg
22114 Domitian/Pegasus19 viewsDomitian/Pegasus struck under Vespasian 76-77 AD
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS
Head of Domitian, laureate, right
Rev: COS IIII
Pegasus standing right, left foreleg raised, wings curling up on back
Mint: Rome 18mm., 3,24g
RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Vespasian 921-922
Ex Savoca Auctions 16th Blue Auction
2 commentsBlayne W
22115.jpg
22115 Vespasian/Tri Pot Reverse18 viewsVespasian/Vesta Denarius 72-73 AD
Obv: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M
Head of Vespasian, laureate, right
Rev: TRI POT
Vesta, draped, veiled, seated left, holding simpulum in extended right hand, left hand at side
Mint: Rome 18mm., 2,97g.
RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Vespasian 46 Sear 2312
Ex Savoca Auctions 16th Blue Auction
1 commentsBlayne W
22116.jpg
22116 Domitian/Vesta Reverse16 viewsDomitian/Vesta struck under Vespasian 79 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI
Head of Domitian, laureate, right
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Vesta, draped, hooded, seated left on throne, holding palladium in ext right hand and transverse sceptre in left
Mint: Rome 17mm., 3,14g
RIC II, Part 1 (second edition) Vespasian 1087
Ex: Savoca Auction 16th Blue Auction
1 commentsBlayne W
IMG_891.JPG
3.021 Vespasian63 viewsIMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII PP
laureate bust right, globe below bust
26 mm
Zam
IMG_0909.JPG
3.022 Vespasian - Victory69 viewsVICTORIA AVGVSTI S - C
Victory advancing left, holding wreath

commemorates Vespasian's great victory over Judaea, a motif of Flavian coins
Zam
aa_1_b~0.JPG
3.3 Vespasian IUDAEA denarius123 views69 - 70 AD
Rome Mint
rev. IVDAEA, captive Jew seated below a trophy
commemorates the reconquest of Judaea by Vespasian and Titus, after the four year revolt against Rome.
3 commentsZam
3d_1_b.JPG
3.4 Vespasian IVDAEA denarius85 views69 - 70 AD
Rome Mint
rev. IVDAEA captive Jew seated at the base of a Roman trophy
commemorates Vespasian and Titus' conquest of the rebellious Jewish state following an four year uprising.
This was the springboard for Vespasian in his ambition for the throne. It made him very popular, and this Judaea Capta series was meant to cement that popularity.

i had been looking for one for quite a while!
Zam
agrippa cmk as.jpg
37-41 AD - AGRIPPA memorial AE dupondius - struck under Caligula (by RIC)76 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III (head left wearing rostral crown)(with Vespasian countermark)
rev: - / S.C. (Neptune holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left)
ref: RIC58(Gaius), BMC(Tib)161
10.51gms, 28mm
Rare with this cmk

The capricorn originally a sign related to Augustus, it became a symbol of Vespasian' reign also. This countermark often attributed to Vespasian during the civil war, mostly found on eastern provincial coins. A similiar countermark exists on regular roman coinage from Claudius, likely applied in the balkan region. The emblem beneath could be variously interpreted as a plough or a globe with ships rudder, or maybe instrument. This Agrippa coin with Vespasian cmk was found in the balkan region, too. Top of the picture is the original counterstamp-mint.
berserker
706Hadrian_RIC389.jpg
389B Hadrian Denarius Roma 138 AD Eagle standing24 viewsReference.
RIC 389B; RSC 271;

Obv. DIVVS HADRIANVS AVG
Head of Divus Hadrian, bare, right

Rev. CONSECRATIO
Eagle standing front on globe, head turned left, wings spread

3.04 gr
18 mm
6h

Note.
From the estate of Thomas Bentley Cederlind.

Consecratio was the apotheosis of the dead Roman emperors, which however was only bestowed on those who were judged worthy of her by the Senate or by their successors.
However, it is well known, how generous people in Rome with this honor mishandled. Even empresses enjoyed after their death the privilege of consecratio. After their consecratio they got the nickname of Divi or Divae. Several ceremonies at the funeral went to the consecratio advance. In burning the corpse on the pyre rose include becoming an eagle from the flames to heaven. The emperors and empresses thus become the god had their own temples, priests and parties. They were so entirely assimilated to the gods.

The emperors themselves have mocked their deification. In the Historia Augusta is sick of Vespasian told that he says "I feel to be a God." In his famous poem "Animula vagula blandula" Hadrian doubt his deification.
okidoki
Antony,_IV.jpg
544/17 Marc Antony, Legion IV, Scythica116 viewsMarcus Antonius (Marc Antony). AR Denarius. Struck 32-31 BC. Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, praetorian galley. Rev: LEG IV, eagle between standards. 17mm, 3.7g. Crawford 544/17.

In his youth, future emperor Vespasian served in this legion.
1 commentsLucas H
titus dup.jpg
69-79 AD - TITUS (Caesar) AE dupondius - struck 74 AD36 viewsobv: T CAESAR IMP COS III CENS (radiate head right)
rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA / S.C. (Felicitas standing left with caduceus & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC II 665[Vespasian], C.81 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
12.08gms, 26mm
berserker
titus RIC208.jpg
69-79 AD - TITUS (Caesar) AR denarius - struck 1Jan-23June 79 AD91 viewsobv: T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS (laureate head right)
rev: TR POT VIII COS VII (captive kneeling right in front of trophy of arms)
ref: RIC II 208(Vespasian) (S), C.334(6 francs)
3.32gms, 18mm
Rare

This reverse probably commemorating another Agricola's victory in Britannia or reminder of the successful Jewish War. I think it's belong to the Judea Capta series, because the captive wearing a typical jewish cap, and in ancient times both jewish men and women are wearing dresses covering most of their body (arms and legs). Celtic warriors had a long hair to scary the enemy (and they wearing pants).
4 commentsberserker
titus den-.jpg
69-79 AD - TITUS (Caesar) AR denarius - struck 72 AD40 viewsobv: T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT (laureate head right)
rev: NEP RED (Neptune standing right, foot on globe, holding acrostolium & scepter)
ref: RIC II 155 (Vespasian), C.121 (3frcs)
mint: Rome
3.00gms, 17mm

The reverse of this coin celebrates the return of Titus from Jerusalem with a depiction of Neptune, god of the sea, characterized in the coin's legend as the Returner. He holds his usual attributes, a trident (here scepter) and an acrostolium or bow ornament of a ship.
berserker
vespa as-.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE as - struck 71 AD47 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III (laureate head right)
rev: VICTORIA NAVALIS / S.C. (Victory with wreath on prow right)
ref: RIC II-503, C.632
mint: Rome
8.36gms, 24mm

The legend "Victoria Navalis" probably commemorate Vespasian' pursuit of the Jews at Tarichæa on rafts, and the same circumstance doubtless explains why Titus brought a large number of ships with him when he entered Rome in triumph.
berserker
vespa as.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE as - struck 76 AD63 viewsobv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN COS VIII (laureate head left)
rev: VICTORIA AVGVST / S.C. (Victory standing right on prow, holding wreath & palm)
ref: RIC II 584v, C.605(2fr.)
mint: Rome
10.89gms, 27mm

Vespasian and Titus naval victory was considered of such importance that it was commemorated at a later period. (In RIC only right head)
berserker
vespa judea capta.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE dupondius - struck 71 AD44 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG C[OS ?] (radiate head right)
rev: [IVDEA.CAPTA] / S.C. (mourning Jew captive seated right under palm tree)
ref: RIC - , C.-
12.22gms, 25mm
Rare, not in RIC
The Judea Capta coin testifies to the great importance the Romans attached to quelling the revolt in Judea and capturing Jerusalem. This image was designed and circulated to send a message of Judea's defeated revolt to all the provinces of the Roman Empire and served as constant reminder of the fate of rebellious provinces.
berserker
vespa dup2.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE dupondius - struck 74 AD51 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM TR COS V CENS (radiate head left)
rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA / S.C. (Felicitas standing left holding caduceus & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC II 555, C.152 (2frcs), BMC698
mint: Rome
11.42gms, 26mm
1 commentsberserker
vespa dup.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE dupondius - struck 75 AD29 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESP AVG PM TP COS VI (radiate head right)
rev: FELICITAS PVBLICA / S.C. (Felicitas standing left holding caduceus & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC II 567, C.154 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
13.04gms, 26.5mm
berserker
vespa sest.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AE sestertius - struck 71 AD38 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM TR PPP COS III (laureate head right)
rev: PAX AVGVSTI / S.C. (Pax standing left holding branch & cornucopiae)
ref: RIC II 437; Cohen 327 (4frcs)
mint: Rome
23.43gms, 33mm
berserker
vespa denar02-.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 69-71 AD89 viewsobv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG (laureate bust of Vespasian right)
rev: CAESAR.AVG.F.COS.CAESAR.AVG.F.PR (heads of Titus & Domitian facing each other)
ref: RIC 2.1 [2008] 16, (RIC II [1962] 2), RSC-, BMC 2
mint: Rome
2.61gms, 17mm
Rare

This important dynastic issue shows early on Vespasian's intent that "either his sons would succeed him, or no one would." (Suet. Vesp. 25)
berserker
vespa den01-.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 69-71 AD40 viewsobv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG (laureate head right)
rev: COS ITER TR POT (Aequitas standing left, holding scales & scepter)
ref: RIC II 5, RSC-
mint: Rome
3.34gms, 18mm
berserker
vespa denar01-.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 73 AD37 viewsobv: IMP CAES VESP AVG CEN (laureate head right)
rev: SPQR in oak wreath
ref: RIC II 66, C.516 (6frcs)
mint: Rome
Scarce

'...as the usual appointed time when he must distribute subsistence money to the soldiers was now come, he [Titus] gave orders that the commanders should put the army into battle-array, in the face of the enemy, and then give every one of the soldiers their pay. So the soldiers, according to custom, opened the cases wherein their arms before lay covered, and marched with their breastplates on, as did the horsemen lead their horses in their fine trappings. Then did the places that were before the city shine very splendidly for a great way; nor was there any thing so grateful to Titus's own men, or so terrible to the enemy, as that sight.' Flavius Josephus: The wars of the Jews; book V
berserker
vespasian denar-.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 73 AD44 viewsobv: IMP.CAES.VESP.AVG.P.M.COS.IIII.CEN (Laureate head right)
rev: FIDES PVBL (Clasped hands holding corn-ears, poppy and caduceus)
ref: RIC II 55, RSC 164 (5frcs), BMC 86
mint: Rome
3.32gms, 19mm

The two united hands were meant to symbolize the good faith and fidelity of soldiers and people to the reigning prince - and not to represent Fides in her quality of goddess. Vespasian was censor from 1st July 73 AD- (with Titus).
1 commentsberserker
vespasian denar.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 75 AD45 viewsobv: IMP.CAESAR.VESPASIANVS.AVG (laureate head right)
rev: PON.MAX.TR.P.COS.VI (Pax seated left holding branch)
ref: RIC II 90, RSC 366 (2frcs), BMC 161
mint: Rome
2.70gms, 19mm
berserker
vespasian RIC120.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR denarius - struck 79 AD72 viewsobv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG (laureate bust left)
rev: TR POT X COS VIIII (radiate Sol, nude but for chlamys, holding sceptre in his right hand, standing on rostral column)
ref: RIC II 120 (C), RSC560 (6frcs)
mint: Rome
3.07gms, 18mm
Rare

ex Sebastian Sonderman Ancient Numismatics
2 commentsberserker
vespasian quinar RIC125.jpg
69-79 AD - VESPASIAN - AR quinar - struck 75-79 AD47 viewsobv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG (laureate head right)
rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (Victory seated left, holding wreath and palm)
ref: RIC II 125, C.594 (20frcs)
1.42gms, 15mm
Rare
1 commentsberserker
Vespasian r103.jpg
69-79 AD Vespasian RIC-103106 viewsIMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG - Laureate head left
COS VIII - Mars standing holding spear and trophy, victory on right shoulder

Pleasing portrait on a scarce coin
1 commentsjimwho523
Nero AE Sestertius.jpg
706a, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D.73 views6, Nero, 13 October 54 - 9 June 68 A.D. AE setertius, Date: 66 AD; RIC I 516, 36.71 mm; 25.5 grams; aVF. Obverse: IMP NERO CAESAR AVG PONT MAX TR POT PP, Laureate bust right; Reverse: S C, ROMA, Roma seated left, exceptional portrait and full obverse legends. Ex Ancient Imports.

NERO (54-68 A.D.)

It is difficult for the modern student of history to realize just how popular Nero actually was, at least at the beginning of his reign. Rome looked upon her new Emperor with hope. He was the student of Seneca, and he had a sensitive nature. He loved art, music, literature, and theatre. He was also devoted to horses and horse racing—a devotion shared by many of his subjects. The plebs loved their new Emperor. As Professor of Classics Judith P. Hallett (University of Maryland, College Park) says, “It is not clear to me that Nero ever changed or that Nero ever grew-up, and that was both his strength and his weakness. Nero was an extraordinarily popular Emperor: he was like Elvis” (The Roman Empire in the First Century, III. Dir. Margaret Koval and Lyn Goldfarb. 2001. DVD. PBS/Warner Bros. 2003).

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Introduction and Sources
The five Julio-Claudian emperors are very different one from the other. Augustus dominates in prestige and achievement from the enormous impact he had upon the Roman state and his long service to Rome, during which he attained unrivaled auctoritas. Tiberius was clearly the only possible successor when Augustus died in AD 14, but, upon his death twenty-three years later, the next three were a peculiar mix of viciousness, arrogance, and inexperience. Gaius, better known as Caligula, is generally styled a monster, whose brief tenure did Rome no service. His successor Claudius, his uncle, was a capable man who served Rome well, but was condemned for being subject to his wives and freedmen. The last of the dynasty, Nero, reigned more than three times as long as Gaius, and the damage for which he was responsible to the state was correspondingly greater. An emperor who is well described by statements such as these, "But above all he was carried away by a craze for popularity and he was jealous of all who in any way stirred the feeling of the mob." and "What an artist the world is losing!" and who is above all remembered for crimes against his mother and the Christians was indeed a sad falling-off from the levels of Augustus and Tiberius. Few will argue that Nero does not rank as one of the worst emperors of all.

The prime sources for Nero's life and reign are Tacitus' Annales 12-16, Suetonius' Life of Nero, and Dio Cassius' Roman History 61-63, written in the early third century. Additional valuable material comes from inscriptions, coinage, papyri, and archaeology.


Early Life
He was born on December 15, 37, at Antium, the son of Cnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbusand Agrippina. Domitius was a member of an ancient noble family, consul in 32; Agrippina was the daughter of the popular Germanicus, who had died in 19, and Agrippina, daughter of Agrippa, Augustus' closest associate, and Julia, the emperor's daughter, and thus in direct descent from the first princeps. When the child was born, his uncle Gaius had only recently become emperor. The relationship between mother and uncle was difficult, and Agrippina suffered occasional humiliation. But the family survived the short reign of the "crazy" emperor, and when he was assassinated, it chanced that Agrippina's uncle, Claudius, was the chosen of the praetorian guard, although there may have been a conspiracy to accomplish this.

Ahenobarbus had died in 40, so the son was now the responsibility of Agrippina alone. She lived as a private citizen for much of the decade, until the death of Messalina, the emperor's wife, in 48 made competition among several likely candidates to become the new empress inevitable. Although Roman law forbade marriage between uncle and niece, an eloquent speech in the senate by Lucius Vitellius, Claudius' closest advisor in the senatorial order, persuaded his audience that the public good required their union. The marriage took place in 49, and soon thereafter the philosopher Seneca [[PIR2 A617]] was recalled from exile to become the young Domitius' tutor, a relationship which endured for some dozen years.

His advance was thereafter rapid. He was adopted by Claudius the following year and took the name Tiberius Claudius Nero Caesar or Nero Claudius Caesar Drusus Germanicus, was preferred to Claudius' natural son, Britannicus, who was about three years younger, was betrothed to the emperor's daughter Octavia, and was, in the eyes of the people, the clear successor to the emperor. In 54, Claudius died, having eaten some poisoned mushrooms, responsibility for which was believed to be Agrippina's, and the young Nero, not yet seventeen years old, was hailed on October 13 as emperor by the praetorian guard.


The First Years of Rule
The first five years of Nero's rule are customarily called the quinquennium, a period of good government under the influence, not always coinciding, of three people, his mother, Seneca, and Sextus Afranius Burrus, the praetorian prefect. The latter two were allies in their "education" of the emperor. Seneca continued his philosophical and rhetorical training, Burrus was more involved in advising on the actualities of government. They often combined their influence against Agrippina, who, having made her son emperor, never let him forget the debt he owed his mother, until finally, and fatally, he moved against her.

Nero's betrothal to Octavia was a significant step in his ultimate accession to the throne, as it were, but she was too quiet, too shy, too modest for his taste. He was early attracted to Poppaea Sabina, the wife of Otho, and she continually goaded him to break from Octavia and to show himself an adult by opposing his mother. In his private life, Nero honed the musical and artistic tastes which were his chief interest, but, at this stage, they were kept private, at the instigation of Seneca and Burrus.

As the year 59 began, Nero had just celebrated his twenty-first birthday and now felt the need to employ the powers which he possessed as emperor as he wished, without the limits imposed by others. Poppaea's urgings had their effect, first of all, at the very onset of the year, with Nero's murder of his mother in the Bay of Naples.

Agrippina had tried desperately to retain her influence with her son, going so far as to have intercourse with him. But the break between them proved irrevocable, and Nero undertook various devices to eliminate his mother without the appearance of guilt on his part. The choice was a splendid vessel which would collapse while she was on board. As this happened, she swam ashore and, when her attendant, having cried out that she was Agrippina, was clubbed to death, Agrippina knew what was going on. She sent Nero a message that she was well; his response was to send a detachment of sailors to finish the job. When she was struck across the head, she bared her womb and said, "Strike here, Anicetus, strike here, for this bore Nero," and she was brutally murdered.

Nero was petrified with fear when he learned that the deed had been done, yet his popularity with the plebs of Rome was not impaired. This matricide, however, proved a turning point in his life and principate. It appeared that all shackles were now removed. The influence of Seneca and Burrus began to wane, and when Burrus died in 62, Seneca realized that his powers of persuasion were at an end and soon went into retirement. Britannicus had died as early as 55; now Octavia was to follow, and Nero became free to marry Poppaea. It may be that it had been Burrus rather than Agrippina who had continually urged that Nero's position depended in large part upon his marriage to Octavia. Burrus' successor as commander of the praetorian guard, although now with a colleague, was Ofonius Tigellinus, quite the opposite of Burrus in character and outlook. Tigellinus became Nero's "evil twin," urging and assisting in the performance of crimes and the satisfaction of lusts.


Administrative and Foreign Policy
With Seneca and Burrus in charge of administration at home, the first half-dozen years of Nero's principate ran smoothly. He himself devoted his attention to his artistic, literary, and physical bents, with music, poetry, and chariot racing to the fore. But his advisors were able to keep these performances and displays private, with small, select audiences on hand. Yet there was a gradual trend toward public performance, with the establishment of games. Further, he spent many nights roaming the city in disguise, with numerous companions, who terrorized the streets and attacked individuals. Those who dared to defend themselves often faced death afterward, because they had shown disrespect for the emperor. The die was being cast for the last phases of Nero's reign.


The Great Fire at Rome and The Punishment
of the Christians
The year 64 was the most significant of Nero's principate up to this point. His mother and wife were dead, as was Burrus, and Seneca, unable to maintain his influence over Nero without his colleague's support, had withdrawn into private life. The abysmal Tigellinus was now the foremost advisor of the still young emperor, a man whose origin was from the lowest levels of society and who can accurately be described as criminal in outlook and action. Yet Nero must have considered that he was happier than he had ever been in his life. Those who had constrained his enjoyment of his (seemingly) limitless power were gone, he was married to Poppaea, a woman with all advantages save for a bad character the empire was essentially at peace, and the people of Rome enjoyed a full measure of panem et circenses. But then occurred one of the greatest disasters that the city of Rome, in its long history, had ever endured.

The fire began in the southeastern angle of the Circus Maximus, spreading through the shops which clustered there, and raged for the better part of a week. There was brief success in controlling the blaze, but then it burst forth once more, so that many people claimed that the fires were deliberately set. After about a fortnight, the fire burned itself out, having consumed ten of the fourteen Augustan regions into which the city had been divided.

Nero was in Antium through much of the disaster, but his efforts at relief were substantial. Yet many believed that he had been responsible, so that he could perform his own work comparing the current fate of Rome to the downfall of Troy. All his efforts to assist the stricken city could not remove the suspicion that "the emperor had fiddled while Rome burned." He lost favor even among the plebs who had been enthusiastic supporters, particularly when his plans for the rebuilding of the city revealed that a very large part of the center was to become his new home.

As his popularity waned, Nero and Tigellinus realized that individuals were needed who could be charged with the disaster. It so happened that there was such a group ready at hand, Christians, who had made themselves unpopular because of their refusal to worship the emperor, their way of life, and their secret meetings. Further, at this time two of their most significant "teachers" were in Rome, Peter and Paul. They were ideal scapegoats, individuals whom most Romans loathed, and who had continually sung of the forthcoming end of the world.

Their destruction was planned with the utmost precision and cruelty, for the entertainment of the populace. The venue was Nero's circus near the Mons Vaticanus. Christians were exposed to wild animals and were set ablaze, smeared with pitch, to illuminate the night. The executions were so grisly that even the populace displayed sympathy for the victims. Separately, Peter was crucified upside down on the Vatican hill and Paul was beheaded along the Via Ostiensis. But Nero's attempt, and hope, to shift all suspicion of arson to others failed. His popularity even among the lower classes was irrevocably impaired.

[For a detailed and interesting discussion of Nero’s reign please see http://www.roman-emperors.org/nero.htm]

The End - Nero's Death and its Aftermath
Nero's and Tigellinus' response to the conspiracy was immediate and long-lasting. The senatorial order was decimated, as one leading member after another was put to death or compelled to commit suicide. The year 66 saw the suicides of perhaps the most distinguished victims of the "reign of terror," Caius Petronius and Thrasea Paetus. Petronius, long a favorite of Nero because of his aesthetic taste, had been an able public servant before he turned to a life of ease and indolence. He was recognized as the arbiter elegantiae of Nero's circle, and may be the author of the Satyricon. At his death, he left for Nero a document which itemized many of the latter's crimes. Thrasea, a staunch Stoic who had been for some years an outspoken opponent of Nero's policies, committed suicide in the Socratic manner. This scene is the last episode in the surviving books of Tacitus' Annals.

In the year 68, revolt began in the provinces. . . the end of Nero's reign became inevitable. Galba claimed the throne and began his march from Spain. Nero panicked and was rapidly abandoned by his supporters. He finally committed suicide with assistance, on June 9, 68, and his body was tended and buried by three women who had been close to him in his younger days, chief of whom was Acte. His death scene is marked above all by the statement, "Qualis artifex pereo," (What an artist dies in me.) Even at the end he was more concerned with his private life than with the affairs of state.

The aftermath of Nero's death was cataclysmic. Galba was the first of four emperors who revealed the new secret of empire, that an emperor could be made elsewhere than in Rome. Civil war ensued, which was only ended by the victory of the fourth claimant, Vespasian, who established the brief dynasty of the Flavians. The dynasty of the Julio-Claudians was at an end.

Nero's popularity among the lower classes remained even after his death.

. . . .

It is not excessive to say that he was one of the worst of Rome's emperors in the first two centuries and more of the empire. Whatever talents he had, whatever good he may have done, all is overwhelmed by three events, the murder of his mother, the fire at Rome, and his savage treatment of the Christians.

Precisely these qualities are the reasons that he has remained so well known and has been the subject of many writers and opera composers in modern times. These works of fiction particularly merit mention: Henryk Sienkiewicz's Quo Vadis, one of the finest works of the 1907 Nobel Laureate in Literature, and John Hersey's The Conspiracy. Nero unquestionably will always be with us.

Copyright (C) 2006, Herbert W. Benario.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
roman_emperor_otho.jpg
708a, Otho64 viewsOtho (69 A.D.)
John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction
In January 69 Otho led a successful coup to overthrow the emperor Galba. Upon advancing to the throne, he hoped to conciliate his adversaries and restore political stability to the Empire. These ambitions were never to be realized. Instead, our sources portray a leader never fully able to win political confidence at Rome or to overcome military anarchy abroad. As a result, he was defeated in battle by the forces of Vitellius, his successor, and took his own life at the conclusion of the conflict. His principate lasted only eight weeks.
Early Life and Career
Marcus Salvius Otho was born at Ferentium on 28 April 32 A. D. His grandfather, also named Marcus Salvius Otho, was a senator who did not advance beyond the rank of praetor. Lucius Otho, his father, was consul in 33 and a trusted administrator under the emperors Tiberius, Gaius and Claudius. His mother, Albia Terentia, was likely to have been nobly born as well. The cognomen "Otho" was Etruscan in origin, and the fact that it can be traced to three successive generations of this family perhaps reflects a desire to maintain a part of the Etruscan tradition that formed the family's background.
Otho is recorded as being extravagant and wild as a youth - a favorite pastime involved roving about at night to snare drunkards in a blanket. Such behavior earned floggings from his father, whose frequent absences from home on imperial business suggest little in the way of a stabilizing parental influence in Otho's formative years. These traits apparently persisted: Suetonius records that Otho and Nero became close friends because of the similarity of their characters; and Plutarch relates that the young man was so extravagant that he sometimes chided Nero about his meanness, and even outdid the emperor in reckless spending.
Most intriguing in this context is Otho's involvement with Nero's mistress, Poppaea Sabina, the greatest beauty of her day. A relationship between the two is widely cited in the ancient sources, but the story differs in essential details from one account to the next. As a result, it is impossible to establish who seduced whom, whether Otho ever married Poppaea, and whether his posting to Lusitania by Nero should be understood as a "banishment" for his part in this affair. About the only reliable detail to emerge is that Otho did indeed become governor of Lusitania in 59, and that he assumed the post as a quaestor, a rank below that of praetor or consul, the minimum usually required for the office. From here he would launch his initial thrust towards the imperial throne.
Overthrow of Galba
Nero's suicide in June 68 marked the end of the Julio-Claudian dynasty and opened up the principate to the prerogatives of the military beyond Rome. First to emerge was Servius Sulpicius Galba, governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, who had been encouraged to revolt by the praetorians and especially by Nymphidius Sabinus, the corrupt and scheming praetorian prefect at Rome. By this time Otho had been in Spain for close to ten years. His record seems to have been a good one, marked by capable administration and an unwillingness to enrich himself at the expense of the province. At the same time, perhaps seeing this as his best chance to improve his own circumstances, he supported the insurrection as vigorously as possible, even sending Galba all of his gold and his best table servants. At the same time, he made it a point to win the favor of every soldier he came in contact with, most notably the members of the praetorian guard who had come to Spain to accompany Galba to Rome. Galba set out from Spain in July, formally assuming the emperorship shortly thereafter. Otho accompanied him on the journey.
Galba had been in Rome little more than two months when on 1 January 69 the troops in Upper Germany refused to declare allegiance to him and instead followed the men stationed in Lower Germany in proclaiming their commander, Aulus Vitellius, as the new ruler. To show that he was still in charge Galba adopted his own successor, Lucius Calpurnius Piso Frugi Licinianus, an aristocrat completely without administrative or military experience. The choice meant little to the remote armies, the praetorians or the senate and particularly angered Otho, who had hoped to succeed Galba. Otho quickly organized a conspiracy among the praetorians with promise of a material reward, and on 15 January 69 they declared him emperor and publicly killed Galba; Piso, dragged from hiding in the temple of Vesta, was also butchered. On that same evening a powerless senate awarded Otho the imperial titles.
Otho's Principate in Rome
It is not possible to reconstruct a detailed chronology of Otho's brief eight and a half weeks as princeps in Rome (15 January-15 March). Even so, Galba's quick demise had surely impressed upon Otho the need to conciliate various groups. As a result, he continued his indulgence of the praetorian guard but he also tried to win over the senate by following a strict constitutionalist line and by generally keeping the designations for the consulship made by Nero and Galba. In the provinces, despite limited evidence, there are some indications that he tried to compensate for Galba's stinginess by being more generous with grants of citizenship. In short, Otho was eager not to offend anyone.
Problems remained, however. The praetorians had to be continually placated and they were always suspicious of the senate. On the other hand, the senate itself, along with the people, remained deeply disturbed at the manner of Otho's coming to power and his willingness to be associated with Nero. These suspicions and fears were most evident in the praetorian outbreak at Rome. Briefly, Otho had decided to move from Ostia to Rome a cohort of Roman citizens in order to replace some of Rome's garrison, much of which was to be utilized for the showdown with Vitellius. He ordered that weapons be moved from the praetorian camp in Rome by ship to Ostia at night so that the garrison replacements would be properly armed and made to look as soldierly as possible when they marched into the city. Thinking that a senatorial counter-coup against Otho was underway, the praetorians stormed the imperial palace to confirm the emperor's safety, with the result that they terrified Otho and his senatorial dinner guests. Although the praetorians' fears were eventually calmed and they were given a substantial cash payment, the incident dramatically underscored the unease at Rome in the early months of 69.
Otho's Offensive against Vitellius
Meanwhile, in the Rhineland, preparations for a march on Rome by the military legions that had declared for Vitellius were far advanced. Hampered by poor intelligence gathering in Gaul and Germany and having failed to negotiate a settlement with Vitellius in early 69, Otho finally summoned to Italy his forces for a counterattack against the invading Vitellian army. His support consisted of the four legions of Pannonia and Dalmatia, the three legions of Moesia and his own imperial retinue of about 9,000. Vitellius' own troops numbered some 30,000, while those of his two marshals, Aulus Caecina Alienus and Fabius Valens, were between 15,000 and 20,000 each.
Otho's strategy was to make a quick diversionary strike in order to allow time for his own forces to assemble in Italy before engaging the enemy. The strategy worked, as the diversionary army, comprised of urban cohorts, praetorians and marines all from Rome or nearby, was successful in Narbonese Gaul in latter March. An advance guard sent to hold the line on the Po River until the Danubian legions arrived also enjoyed initial success. Otho himself arrived at Bedriacum in northern Italy about 10 April for a strategy session with his commanders. The main concern was that the Vitellians were building a bridge across the Po in order to drive southward towards the Apennines and eventually to Rome. Otho decided to counter by ordering a substantial part of his main force to advance from Bedriacum and establish a new base close enough to the new Vitellian bridge to interrupt its completion. While en route, the Othonian forces, strung out along the via Postumia amid baggage and supply trains, were attacked by Caecina and Valens near Cremona on 14 April. The clash, know as the Battle of Bedriacum, resulted in the defeat of the Othonian forces, their retreat cut off by the river behind them. Otho himself, meanwhile, was not present, but had gone to Brixellum with a considerable force of infantry and cavalry in order to impede any Vitellian units that had managed to cross the Po.
The plan had backfired. Otho's strategy of obtaining victory while avoiding any major battles had proven too risky. Realizing perhaps that a new round of fighting would have involved not only a significant re-grouping of his existing troops but also a potentially bloody civil war at Rome, if Vitellius' troops reached the capital, Otho decided that enough blood had been shed. Two weeks shy of his thirty-seventh birthday, on 16 April 69, he took his own life.
Assessment
To be sure, Otho remains an enigma - part profligate Neronian wastrel and part conscientious military commander willing to give his life for the good of the state. Our sources are at a loss to explain the paradox. Perhaps, like Petronius, he saw it was safer to appear a profligate in Nero's court? In the final analysis, Otho proved to be an organized and efficient military commander, who appealed more to the soldier than to the civilian. He also seems to have been a capable governor, with administrative talents that recalled those of his father. Nevertheless, his violent overthrow of Galba, the lingering doubts that it raised about his character, and his unsuccessful offensive against Vitellius are all vivid reminders of the turbulence that plagued the Roman world between the reigns of Nero and Vespasian. Regrettably, the scenario would play itself out one more time before peace and stability returned to the empire.
Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue
Edited by J.P.Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
VitelliusARdenariusVesta.jpg
709a, Vitellius, 2 January - 20 December 69 A.D.42 viewsVITELLIUS AR silver denarius. RSC 72, RCV 2200. 19mm, 3.2 g. Obverse: A VITELLIVS GERM IMP AVG TR P, laureate head right; Reverse - PONT MAXIM, Vesta seated right, holding scepter and patera. Quite decent. Ex. Incitatus Coins. Photo courtesy of Incitatus Coins.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Vitellius (69 A.D.)

John F. Donahue
College of William and Mary


It is often difficult to separate fact from fiction in assessing the life and reign of Vitellius. Maligned in the ancient sources as gluttonous and cruel, he was also a victim of a hostile biographical tradition established in the regime of the Flavians who had overthrown him. Nevertheless, his decision to march against Rome in 69 was pivotal, since his subsequent defeat signalled the end of military anarchy and the beginning of an extended period of political stability under Vespasian and his successors.

Early Life and Career

Aulus Vitellius was born in September, 15 AD, the son of Lucius Vitellius and his wife Sestilia. One of the most successful public figures of the Julio-Claudian period, Lucius Vitellius was a three-time consul and a fellow censor with the emperor Claudius. Aulus seems to have moved with equal ease in aristocratic circles, successively winning the attention of the emperors Gaius, Claudius, and Nero through flattery and political skill.

Among his attested public offices, Vitellius was a curator of public works, a senatorial post concerned with the maintenance and repair of public buildings in Rome, and he was also proconsul of North Africa, where he served as a deputy to his brother, perhaps about 55 A. D. In addition, he held at least two priesthoods, the first as a member of the Arval Brethren, in whose rituals he participated from 57 A.D., and the second, as one of the quindecemviri sacris faciundis, a sacred college famous for its feasts.

With respect to marriage and family, Vitellius first wed a certain Petroniana, the daughter of a consul, sometime in the early to mid thirties A.D. The union produced a son, Petronianus, allegedly blind in one eye and emancipated from his father's control as a result of being named his mother's heir. Tradition records that Vitellius killed the boy shortly after emancipation amid charges of parricide; the marriage soon ended in divorce. A second marriage, to Galeria Fundana, daughter of an ex-praetor, was more stable than the first. It produced another son, who was eventually killed by the Flavians after the overthrow of Vitellius, as well as a daughter. Galeria is praised by Tacitus for her good qualities, and in the end it was she who saw to Vitellius' burial.

Rise to Power and Emperorship

Without doubt, the most fortuitous moment in Vitellius' political career was his appointment as governor of Lower Germany by the emperor Galba late in 68. The decision seemed to have caught everybody by surprise, including Vitellius himself, who, according to Suetonius, was in straitened circumstances at the time. The choice may have been made to reduce the possibility of rebellion by the Rhine armies, disaffected by Galba's refusal to reward them for their part in suppressing the earlier uprising of Julius Vindex. Ironically, it was Vitellius' lack of military achievement and his reputation for gambling and gluttony that may have also figured in his selection. Galba perhaps calculated that a man with little military experience who could now plunder a province to satisfy his own stomach would never become disloyal. If so, it was a critical misjudgement by the emperor.

The rebellion began on January 1, 69 ("The Year of the Four Emperors"), when the legions of Upper Germany refused to renew their oath of allegiance to Galba. On January 2, Vitellius' own men, having heard of the previous day's events, saluted him as emperor at the instigation of the legionary legate Fabius Valens and his colleagues. Soon, in addition to the seven legions that Vitellius now had at his command in both Germanies, the forces in Gaul, Britain, and Raetia also came over to his side. Perhaps aware of his military inexperience, Vitellius did not immediately march on Rome himself. Instead, the advance was led by Valens and another legionary general, Aulus Caecina Alienus, with each man commanding a separate column. Vitellius would remain behind to mobilize a reserve force and follow later.

Caecina was already one hundred fifty miles on his way when news reached him that Galba had been overthrown and Otho had taken his place as emperor. Undeterred, he passed rapidly down the eastern borders of Gaul; Valens followed a more westerly route, quelling a mutiny along the way. By March both armies had successfully crossed the Alps and joined at Cremona, just north of the Po. Here they launced their Batavian auxiliaries against Otho's troops and routed them in the First Battle of Bedriacum. Otho killed himself on April 16, and three days later the soldiers in Rome swore their allegience to Vitellius. The senate too hailed him as emperor.

When Vitellius learned of these developments, he set out to Rome from Gaul. By all accounts the journey was a drunken feast marked by the lack of discipline of both the troops and the imperial entourage. Along the way he stopped at Lugdunum to present his six-year-old son Germanicus to the legions as his eventual successor. Later, at Cremona, Vitellius witnessed the corpse-filled battlefield of Otho's recent defeat with joy, unmoved by so many citizens denied a proper burial.

The emperor entered Rome in late June-early July. Conscious of making a break with the Julio-Claudian past, Vitellius was reluctant to assume the traditional titles of the princes, even though he enthusiastically made offerings to Nero and declared himself consul for life. To his credit, Vitellius did seem to show a measure of moderation in the transition to the principate. He assumed his powers gradually and was generally lenient to Otho's supporters, even pardoning Otho's brother Salvius Titianus, who had played a key role in the earlier regime. In addition, he participated in Senate meetings and continued the practice of providing entertainments for the Roman masses. An important practical change involved the awarding of posts customarily held by freedmen to equites, an indication of the growth of the imperial bureaucracy and its attractiveness to men of ambition.

In other matters, he replaced the existing praetorian guard and urban cohorts with sixteen praetorian cohorts and four urban units, all comprised of soldiers from the German armies. According to Tacitus, the decision prompted a mad scramble, with the men, and not their officers, choosing the branch of service that they preferred. The situation was clearly unsatisfactory but not surprising, given that Vitellius was a creation of his own troops. To secure his position further, he sent back to their old postings the legions that had fought for Otho, or he reassigned them to distant provinces. Yet discontent remained: the troops who had been defeated or betrayed at Bedriacum remained bitter, and detachments of three Moesian legions called upon by Otho were returned to their bases, having agitated against Vitellius at Aquileia.

Flavian Revolt

The Vitellian era at Rome was short-lived. By mid-July news had arrived that the legions of Egypt under Tiberius Julius Alexander had sworn allegiance to a rival emperor, Titus Flavius Vespasianus, the governor of Judaea and a successful and popular general. Vespasian was to hold Egypt while his colleague Mucianus, governor of Syria, was to invade Italy. Before the plan could be enacted, however, the Danube legions, former supporters of Otho, joined Vespasian's cause. Under the leadership of Antonius Primus, commander of the Sixth legion in Pannonia, and Cornelius Fuscus, imperial procurator in Illyricum, the legions made a rapid descent on Italy.

Although his forces were only half of what Vitellius commanded in Italy, Primus struck first before the emperor could muster additional reinforcements from Germany. To make matters worse for the Vitellians, Valens was ill, and Caecina, now consul, had begun collaborating with the Flavians. His troops refused to follow his lead, however, and arrested him at Hostilia near Cremona. They then joined the rest of the Vitellian forces trying to hold the Po River. With Vitellius still in Rome and his forces virtually leaderless, the two sides met in October in the Second Battle of Bedriacum. The emperor's troops were soundly defeated and Cremona was brutally sacked by the victors. In addition, Valens, whose health had recovered, was captured while raising an army for Vitellius in Gaul and Germany; he was eventually executed.

Meanwhile, Primus continued towards Rome. Vitellius made a weak attempt to thwart the advance at the Apennine passes, but his forces switched to the Flavian side without a fight at Narnia in mid-December. At Rome, matters were no better. Vespasian's elder brother, Titus Flavius Sabinus, the city prefect, was successful in an effort to convince Vitellius to abdicate but was frustrated by the mob in Rome and the emperor's soldiers. Forced to flee to the Capitol, Sabinus was set upon by Vitellius' German troops and soon killed, with the venerable Temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus set ablaze in the process. Within two days, the Flavian army fought its way into Rome. In a pathetic final move, Vitellius disguised himself in dirty clothing and hid in the imperial doorkeeper's quarters, leaning a couch and a mattress against the door for protection. Dragged from his hiding place by the Flavian forces, he was hauled off half-naked to the Forum, where he was tortured, killed, and tossed into the Tiber. The principate could now pass to Vespasian.

Assessment

Vitellius has not escaped the hostility of his biographers. While he may well have been gluttonous, his depiction as indolent, cruel, and extravagant is based almost entirely on the propaganda of his enemies. On the other hand, whatever moderating tendencies he did show were overshadowed by his clear lack of military expertise, a deficiency that forced him to rely in critical situations on largely inneffective lieutenants. As a result he was no match for his Flavian successors, and his humiliating demise was perfectly in keeping with the overall failure of his reign.

Copyright (C) 1999, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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VespasianPax_RICii10.jpg
710a, Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D.134 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II, 10, aVF, 3.5 g, 18mm, Rome mint, 69-71 AD; Obverse: IMP CAESA[R] VESPASIANV[S AV]G - Laureate head right; Reverse: COS ITER [T]R POT - Pax seated left holding branch and caduceus. Ex Imperial Coins.


De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 69-79)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Introduction

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (b. A.D. 9, d. A.D. 79, emperor A.D. 69-79) restored peace and stability to an empire in disarray following the death of Nero in A.D. 68. In the process he established the Flavian dynasty as the legitimate successor to the Imperial throne. Although we lack many details about the events and chronology of his reign, Vespasian provided practical leadership and a return to stable government - accomplishments which, when combined with his other achievements, make his emperorship particularly notable within the history of the Principate.

Early Life and Career

Vespasian was born at Falacrina near Sabine Reate on 17 November, A.D. 9, the son of T. Flavius Sabinus, a successful tax collector and banker, and Vespasia Polla. Both parents were of equestrian status. Few details of his first fifteen years survive, yet it appears that his father and mother were often away from home on business for long periods. As a result, Vespasian's early education became the responsibility of his paternal grandmother, Tertulla. [[1]] In about A.D. 25 Vespasian assumed the toga virilis and later accepted the wearing of the latus clavus, and with it the senatorial path that his older brother, T. Flavius Sabinus, had already chosen. [[2]] Although many of the particulars are lacking, the posts typically occupied by one intent upon a senatorial career soon followed: a military tribunate in Thrace, perhaps for three or four years; a quaestorship in Crete-Cyrene; and the offices of aedile and praetor, successively, under the emperor Gaius. [[3]]

It was during this period that Vespasian married Flavia Domitilla. Daughter of a treasury clerk and former mistress of an African knight, Flavia lacked the social standing and family connections that the politically ambitious usually sought through marriage. In any case, the couple produced three children, a daughter, also named Flavia Domitilla, and two sons, the future emperors Titus and Domitian . Flavia did not live to witness her husband's emperorship and after her death Vespasian returned to his former mistress Caenis, who had been secretary to Antonia (daughter of Marc Antony and mother of Claudius). Caenis apparently exerted considerable influence over Vespasian, prompting Suetonius to assert that she remained his wife in all but name, even after he became emperor. [[4]]

Following the assassination of Gaius on 24 January, A.D. 41, Vespasian advanced rapidly, thanks in large part to the new princeps Claudius, whose favor the Flavians had wisely secured with that of Antonia, the mother of Germanicus, and of Claudius' freedmen, especially Narcissus. [[5]] The emperor soon dispatched Vespasian to Argentoratum (Strasbourg) as legatus legionis II Augustae, apparently to prepare the legion for the invasion of Britain. Vespasian first appeared at the battle of Medway in A.D. 43, and soon thereafter led his legion across the south of England, where he engaged the enemy thirty times in battle, subdued two tribes, and conquered the Isle of Wight. According to Suetonius, these operations were conducted partly under Claudius and partly under Vespasian's commander, Aulus Plautius. Vespasian's contributions, however, did not go unnoticed; he received the ornamenta triumphalia and two priesthoods from Claudius for his exploits in Britain. [[6]]

By the end of A.D. 51 Vespasian had reached the consulship, the pinnacle of a political career at Rome. For reasons that remain obscure he withdrew from political life at this point, only to return when chosen proconsul of Africa about A.D. 63-64. His subsequent administration of the province was marked by severity and parsimony, earning him a reputation for being scrupulous but unpopular. [[7]] Upon completion of his term, Vespasian returned to Rome where, as a senior senator, he became a man of influence in the emperor Nero's court. [[8]] Important enough to be included on Nero's tour of Greece in A.D. 66-67, Vespasian soon found himself in the vicinity of increasing political turbulence in the East. The situation would prove pivotal in advancing his career.

Judaea and the Accession to Power

In response to rioting in Caesarea and Jerusalem that had led to the slaughter in the latter city of Jewish leaders and Roman soldiers, Nero granted to Vespasian in A.D. 66 a special command in the East with the objective of settling the revolt in Judaea. By spring A.D. 67, with 60,000 legionaries, auxiliaries, and allies under his control, Vespasian set out to subdue Galilee and then to cut off Jerusalem. Success was quick and decisive. By October all of Galilee had been pacified and plans for the strategic encirclement of Jerusalem were soon formed. [[9]] Meanwhile, at the other end of the empire, the revolts of Gaius Iulius Vindex, governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, and Servius Sulpicius Galba , governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, had brought Nero's reign to the brink of collapse. The emperor committed suicide in June, A.D. 68, thereby ensuring chaos for the next eighteen months, as first Galba and then Marcus Salvius Otho and Aulus Vitellius acceded to power. Each lacked broad-based military and senatorial support; each would be violently deposed in turn. [[10]]

Still occupied with plans against Jerusalem, Vespasian swore allegiance to each emperor. Shortly after Vitellius assumed power in spring, A.D. 69, however, Vespasian met on the border of Judaea and Syria with Gaius Licinius Mucianus, governor of Syria, and after a series of private and public consultations, the two decided to revolt. [[11]] On July 1, at the urging of Tiberius Alexander, prefect of Egypt, the legions of Alexandria declared for Vespasian, as did the legions of Judaea two days later. By August all of Syria and the Danube legions had done likewise. Vespasian next dispatched Mucianus to Italy with 20,000 troops, while he set out from Syria to Alexandria in order to control grain shipments for the purpose of starving Italy into submission. [[12]] The siege of Jerusalem he placed in the hands of his son Titus.

Meanwhile, the Danubian legions, unwilling to wait for Mucianus' arrival, began their march against Vitellius ' forces. The latter army, suffering from a lack of discipline and training, and unaccustomed to the heat of Rome, was defeated at Cremona in late October. [[13]] By mid-December the Flavian forces had reached Carsulae, 95 kilometers north of Rome on the Flaminian Road, where the Vitellians, with no further hope of reinforcements, soon surrendered. At Rome, unable to persuade his followers to accept terms for his abdication, Vitellius was in peril. On the morning of December 20 the Flavian army entered Rome. By that afternoon, the emperor was dead. [[14]]

Tacitus records that by December 22, A.D. 69, Vespasian had been given all the honors and privileges usually granted to emperors. Even so, the issue remains unclear, owing largely to a surviving fragment of an enabling law, the lex de imperio Vespasiani, which conferred powers, privileges, and exemptions, most with Julio-Claudian precedents, on the new emperor. Whether the fragment represents a typical granting of imperial powers that has uniquely survived in Vespasian's case, or is an attempt to limit or expand such powers, remains difficult to know. In any case, the lex sanctioned all that Vespasian had done up to its passing and gave him authority to act as he saw fit on behalf of the Roman people. [[15]]

What does seem clear is that Vespasian felt the need to legitimize his new reign with vigor. He zealously publicized the number of divine omens that predicted his accession and at every opportunity he accumulated multiple consulships and imperial salutations. He also actively promoted the principle of dynastic succession, insisting that the emperorship would fall to his son. The initiative was fulfilled when Titus succeeded his father in A.D. 79.[[16]]

Emperorship

Upon his arrival in Rome in late summer, A.D. 70, Vespasian faced the daunting task of restoring a city and a government ravaged by the recent civil wars. Although many particulars are missing, a portrait nevertheles emerges of a ruler conscientiously committed to the methodical renewal of both city and empire. Concerning Rome itself, the emperor encouraged rebuilding on vacated lots, restored the Capitol (burned in A.D. 69), and also began work on several new buildings: a temple to the deified Claudius on the Caelian Hill, a project designed to identify Vespasian as a legitimate heir to the Julio-Claudians, while distancing himself from Nero ; a temple of Peace near the Forum; and the magnificent Colosseum (Flavian Amphitheatre), located on the site of the lake of Nero 's Golden House. [[17]]

Claiming that he needed forty thousand million sesterces for these projects and for others aimed at putting the state on more secure footing, Vespasian is said to have revoked various imperial immunities, manipulated the supply of certain commodities to inflate their price, and increased provincial taxation. [[18]] The measures are consistent with his characterization in the sources as both obdurate and avaricious. There were occasional political problems as well: Helvidius Priscus, an advocate of senatorial independence and a critic of the Flavian regime from the start, was exiled after A.D. 75 and later executed; Marcellus Eprius and A. Alienus Caecina were condemned by Titus for conspiracy, the former committing suicide, the latter executed in A.D. 79.
As Suetonius claims, however, in financial matters Vespasian always put revenues to the best possible advantage, regardless of their source. Tacitus, too, offers a generally favorable assessment, citing Vespasian as the first man to improve after becoming emperor. [[19]] Thus do we find the princeps offering subventions to senators not possessing the property qualifications of their rank, restoring many cities throughout the empire, and granting state salaries for the first time to teachers of Latin and Greek rhetoric. To enhance Roman economic and social life even further, he encouraged theatrical productions by building a new stage for the Theatre of Marcellus, and he also put on lavish state dinners to assist the food trades. [[20]]

In other matters the emperor displayed similar concern. He restored the depleted ranks of the senatorial and equestrian orders with eligible Italian and provincial candidates and reduced the backlog of pending court cases at Rome. Vespasian also re-established discipline in the army, while punishing or dismissing large numbers of Vitellius ' men. [[21]]
Beyond Rome, the emperor increased the number of legions in the East and continued the process of imperial expansion by the annexation of northern England, the pacification of Wales, and by advances into Scotland and southwest Germany between the Rhine and the Danube. Vespasian also conferred rights on communities abroad, especially in Spain, where the granting of Latin rights to all native communities contributed to the rapid Romanization of that province during the Imperial period. [[22]]

Death and Assessment

In contrast to his immediate imperial predecessors, Vespasian died peacefully - at Aquae Cutiliae near his birthplace in Sabine country on 23 June, A.D. 79, after contracting a brief illness. The occasion is said to have inspired his deathbed quip: "Oh my, I must be turning into a god!" [[23]] In fact, public deification did follow his death, as did his internment in the Mausoleum of Augustus alongside the Julio-Claudians.

A man of strict military discipline and simple tastes, Vespasian proved to be a conscientious and generally tolerant administrator. More importantly, following the upheavals of A.D. 68-69, his reign was welcome for its general tranquility and restoration of peace. In Vespasian Rome found a leader who made no great breaks with tradition, yet his ability ro rebuild the empire and especially his willingness to expand the composition of the governing class helped to establish a positive working model for the "good emperors" of the second century.

Bibliography

Since the scholarship on Vespasian is more comprehensive than can be treated here, the works listed below are main accounts or bear directly upon issues discussed in the entry above. A comprehensive modern anglophone study of this emperor is yet to be produced.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Flaviani, 2 vols. Rieti, 1983.

Atti congresso internazionale di studi Vespasianei, 2 vols. Rieti, 1981.

Bosworth, A.B. "Vespasian and the Provinces: Some Problems of the Early 70s A.D." Athenaeum 51 (1973): 49-78.

Brunt, P. A. "Lex de imperio Vespasiani." JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

D'Espèrey, S. Franchet. "Vespasien, Titus et la littérature." ANRW II.32.5: 3048-3086.

Dudley, D. and Webster, G. The Roman Conquest of Britain. London, 1965.

Gonzalez, J. "The Lex Irnitana: A New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

Grant, M. The Roman Emperors: A Biographical Guide to the Rulers of Rome, 31 B.C. - A.D. 476. New York, 1985.

Homo, L. Vespasien, l'Empereur du bons sens (69-79 ap. J.-C.). Paris, 1949.

Levi, M.A. "I Flavi." ANRW II.2: 177-207.

McCrum, M. and Woodhead, A. G. Select Documents of the Principates of the Flavian Emperors Including the Year of the Revolution. Cambridge, 1966.

Nicols, John. Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae. Wiesbaden, 1978.

Scarre, C. Chronicle of the Roman Emperors. The Reign-by-Reign Record of the Rulers of Imperial Rome. London, 1995.

Suddington, D. B. The Development of the Roman Auxiliary Forces from Caesar to Vespasian, 49 B.C. - A.D. 79. Harare: U. of Zimbabwe, 1982.

Syme, R. Tacitus. Oxford, 1958.

Wardel, David. "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol." Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

Wellesley, K. The Long Year: A.D. 69. Bristol, 1989, 2nd ed.


Notes

[[1]] Suet. Vesp. 2.1. Suetonius remains the major source but see also Tac. Hist. 2-5; Cass. Dio 65; Joseph. BJ 3-4.

[[2]] Suetonius (Vesp. 2.1) claims that Vespasian did not accept the latus clavus, the broad striped toga worn by one aspiring to a senatorial career, immediately. The delay, however, was perhaps no more than three years. See J. Nicols, Vespasian and the Partes Flavianae (Wiesbaden, 1978), 2.

[[3]] Military tribunate and quaestorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3; aedileship: ibid., 5.3, in which Gaius, furious that Vespasian had not kept the streets clean, as was his duty, ordered some soldiers to load him with filth;,they complied by stuffing his toga with as much as it could hold. See also Dio 59.12.2-3; praetorship: Suet. Vesp. 2.3, in which Vespasian is depicted as one of Gaius' leading adulators, an account consistent with Tacitus' portrayal (Hist 1.50.4; 2.5.1) of his early career. For a more complete discussion of these posts and attendant problems of dating, see Nicols, Vespasian, 2-7.

[[4]] Marriage and Caenis: Suet. Vesp. 3; Cass. Dio 65.14.

[[5]] Nicols, Vespasian, 12-39.

[[6]] Suet. Vesp. 4.1 For additional details on Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see D. Dudley and G. Webster, The Roman Conquest of Britain (London, 1965), 55 ff., 98.

[[7]] Concerning Vespasian's years between his consulship and proconsulship, see Suet. Vesp. 4.2 and Nicols, Vespasian, 9. On his unpopularity in Africa, see Suet. Vesp. 4.3, an account of a riot at Hadrumentum, where he was once pelted with turnips. In recording that Africa supported Vitellius in A.D. 69, Tacitus too suggests popular dissatisfaction with Vespasian's proconsulship. See Hist. 2.97.2.

[[8]] This despite the fact that the sources record two rebukes of Vespasian, one for extorting money from a young man seeking career advancement (Suet. Vesp. 4.3), the other for either leaving the room or dozing off during one of the emperor's recitals (Suet. Vesp. 4.4 and 14, which places the transgression in Greece; Tac. (Ann. 16.5.3), who makes Rome and the Quinquennial Games of A.D. 65 the setting; A. Braithwaite, C. Suetoni Tranquilli Divus Vespasianus, Oxford, 1927, 30, who argues for both Greece and Rome).

[[9]] Subjugation of Galilee: Joseph. BJ 3.65-4.106; siege of Jerusalem: ibid., 4.366-376, 414.

[[10]] Revolt of Vindex: Suet. Nero 40; Tac. Ann. 14.4; revolt of Galba: Suet. Galba 10; Plut. Galba, 4-5; suicide of Nero: Suet. Nero 49; Cass. Dio 63.29.2. For the most complete account of the period between Nero's death and the accession of Vespasian, see K. Wellesley, The Long Year: A.D. 69, 2nd. ed. (Bristol, 1989).

[[11]] Tac. Hist. 2.76.

[[12]] Troops in support of Vespasian: Suet. Vit. 15; Mucianus and his forces: Tac. Hist. 2.83; Vespasian and grain shipments: Joseph. BJ 4.605 ff.; see also Tac. Hist. 3.48, on Vespasian's possible plan to shut off grain shipments to Italy from Carthage as well.

[[13]] On Vitellius' army and its lack of discipline, see Tac. Hist. 2.93-94; illness of army: ibid., 2.99.1; Cremona: ibid., 3.32-33.

[[14]] On Vitellius' last days, see Tac. Hist. 3.68-81. On the complicated issue of Vitellius' death date, see L. Holzapfel, "Römische Kaiserdaten," Klio 13 (1913): 301.

[[15]] Honors, etc. Tac. Hist. 4.3. For more on the lex de imperio Vespasiani, see P. A. Brunt, "Lex de imperio Vespasiani," JRS (67) 1977: 95-116.

[[16]] Omens: Suet. Vesp. 5; consulships and honors: ibid., 8; succession of sons: ibid., 25.

[[17]] On Vespasian's restoration of Rome, see Suet. Vesp. 9; Cass. Dio 65.10; D. Wardel, "Vespasian, Helvidius Priscus and the Restoration of the Capitol," Historia 45 (1996): 208-222.

[[18]] Suet. Vesp. 16.

[[19]] Ibid.; Tac. Hist. 1.50.

[[20]] Suet. Vesp. 17-19.

[[21]] Ibid., 8-10.

[[22]] On Vespasian's exploits in Britain, see esp. Tac., Agricola, eds. R. M. Ogilvie and I. A. Richmond (1967), and W. S. Hanson, Agricola and the Conquest of the North (1987); on the granting of Latin rights in Spain, see, e.g., J. Gonzalez, "The Lex Irnitana: a New Copy of the Flavian Municipal Law." JRS 76 (1986): 147-243.

[[23]] For this witticism and other anecdotes concerning Vespasian's sense of humor, see Suet. Vesp. 23.

Copyright (C) 1998, John Donahue. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, an Online Encyplopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/vespasia.htm
Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.





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711a, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D. 110 viewsTITUS AUGUSTUS AR silver denarius. Struck at Rome, 80 AD. IMP TITVS CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head right. Reverse - TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant walking left. Fully legible legends, about Very Fine, nice golden toning. Commemmorates the completion and dedication of the Colosseum and the opening of games. SCARCE. RCV 2512, valued at $544 in EF. 17mm, 3.1g. Ex Incitatus.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 79-81)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was born on December 30, 39 A.D. He was the oldest of the three children of the founder of the Flavian Dynasty, Vespasian. Beginning in the year 70 Titus was named Cæsar and coregent; he was highly educated and a brilliant poet and orator in both Latin and Greek. He won military fame during the Jewish Revolt of 69-70. In April, 70, he appeared before the walls of Jerusalem, and conquered and destroyed the city after a siege of five months. He wished to preserve the Temple, but in the struggle with the Jews who rushed out of it a soldier threw a brand into the building. The siege and taking of the city were accompanied by barbarous cruelties. The next year Titus celebrated his victory by a triumph; to increase the fame of the Flavian dynasty the inscription on the triumphal arch represented the overthrow of the helpless people as a heroic achievement. Titus succeeded his father as Emperor in 79.

Before becoming emperor, tradition records that Titus was feared as the next Nero, a perception that may have developed from his association with Berenice, his alleged heavy-handedness as praetorian prefect, and tales of sexual debauchery. Once in office, however, both emperor and his reign were portrayed in universally positive terms. The suddenness of this transformation raises immediate suspicions, yet it is difficult to know whether the historical tradition is suspect or if Titus was in fact adept at taking off one mask for another. What is clear, however, is that Titus sought to present the Flavians as the legitimate successors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Proof came through the issuing of a series of restoration coins of previous emperors, the most popular being Augustus and Claudius. In A.D. 80 Titus also set out to establish an imperial cult in honor of Vespasian. The temple, in which cult (the first that was not connected with the Julio-Claudians) was housed, was completed by Domitian and was known as the Temple of Vespasian and Domitian.
Legitimacy was also sought through various economic measures, which Titus enthusiastically funded. Vast amounts of capital poured into extensive building schemes in Rome, especially the Flavian Amphitheater, popularly known as the Colosseum. In celebration of additions made to the structure, Titus provided a grand 100-day festival, with sea fights staged on an artificial lake, infantry battles, wild beast hunts, and similar activities. He also constructed new imperial baths to the south-east of the Amphitheater and began work on the celebrated Arch of Titus, a memorial to his Jewish victories. Large sums were directed to Italy and the provinces as well, especially for road building. In response to the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, Titus spent large sums to relieve distress in that area; likewise, the imperial purse contributed heavily to rebuilding Rome after a devastating fire destroyed large sections of the city in A.D. 80. As a result of these actions, Titus earned a reputation for generosity and geniality. For these reasons he gained the honourable title of "amor et deliciæ generis humani" (the darling and admiration of the human race). Even so, his financial acumen must not be under-estimated. He left the treasury with a surplus, as he had found it, and dealt promptly and efficiently with costly natural disasters. The Greek historian of the third-century A.D., Cassius Dio, perhaps offered the most accurate and succinct assessment of Titus' economic policy: "In money matters, Titus was frugal and made no unnecessary expenditure." In other areas, the brevity of Titus' reign limits our ability to detect major emphases or trends in policy. As far as can be discerned from the limited evidence, senior officials and amici were well chosen, and his legislative activity tended to focus on popular social measures, with the army as a particular beneficiary in the areas of land ownership, marriage, and testamentary freedom. In the provinces, Titus continued his father's policies by strengthening roads and forts in the East and along the Danube.

Titus died in September, A.D. 81 after only 26 months in office. Suetonius recorded that Titus died on his way to the Sabine country of his ancestors in the same villa as his father. A competing tradition persistently implicated his brother and successor, Domitian, as having had a hand in the emperor's demise, but the evidence is highly contradictory and any wrongdoing is difficult to prove. Domitian himself delivered the funeral eulogy and had Titus deified. He also built several monuments in honor of Titus and completed the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, changing the name of the structure to include his brother's and setting up his cult statue in the Temple itself.

Titus was the beneficiary of considerable intelligence and talent, endowments that were carefully cultivated at every step of his career, from his early education to his role under his father's principate. Cassius Dio suggested that Titus' reputation was enhanced by his early death. It is true that the ancient sources tend to heroicize Titus, yet based upon the evidence, his reign must be considered a positive one. He capably continued the work of his father in establishing the Flavian Dynasty and he maintained a high degree of economic and administrative competence in Italy and beyond. In so doing, he solidified the role of the emperor as paternalistic autocrat, a model that would serve Trajan and his successors well. Titus was used as a model by later emperors, especially those known as the Five Good Emperors (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius).

Copyright (C) 1997, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14746b.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Titus_Colosseum_Commem_AR_denarius.jpg
711a, Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.136 viewsTitus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D. AR denarius, RCV 2512, aVF, struck at Rome, 80 A.D., 17.5mm, 3.4g. Obverse: IMP TITVS CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG PM, laureate head right; Reverse: TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant walking left. Fully legible legends; nice golden toning. This coin was struck in order to commemorate the completion and dedication of the Flavian Amphitheatre (the Colosseum) and its opening games. Very scarce. Ex Incitatus; photo courtesy Incitatus.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Vespasianus (A.D. 79-81)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was born on December 30, 39 A.D. He was the oldest of the three children of the founder of the Flavian Dynasty, Vespasian. Beginning in the year 70 Titus was named Cæsar and coregent; he was highly educated and a brilliant poet and orator in both Latin and Greek. He won military fame during the Jewish Revolt of 69-70. In April, 70, he appeared before the walls of Jerusalem, and conquered and destroyed the city after a siege of five months. He wished to preserve the Temple, but in the struggle with the Jews who rushed out of it a soldier threw a brand into the building. The siege and taking of the city were accompanied by barbarous cruelties. The next year Titus celebrated his victory by a triumph; to increase the fame of the Flavian dynasty the inscription on the triumphal arch represented the overthrow of the helpless people as a heroic achievement. Titus succeeded his father as Emperor in 79.

Before becoming emperor, tradition records that Titus was feared as the next Nero, a perception that may have developed from his association with Berenice, his alleged heavy-handedness as praetorian prefect, and tales of sexual debauchery. Once in office, however, both emperor and his reign were portrayed in universally positive terms. The suddenness of this transformation raises immediate suspicions, yet it is difficult to know whether the historical tradition is suspect or if Titus was in fact adept at taking off one mask for another. What is clear, however, is that Titus sought to present the Flavians as the legitimate successors of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. Proof came through the issuing of a series of restoration coins of previous emperors, the most popular being Augustus and Claudius. In A.D. 80 Titus also set out to establish an imperial cult in honor of Vespasian. The temple, in which cult (the first that was not connected with the Julio-Claudians) was housed, was completed by Domitian and was known as the Temple of Vespasian and Domitian.
Legitimacy was also sought through various economic measures, which Titus enthusiastically funded. Vast amounts of capital poured into extensive building schemes in Rome, especially the Flavian Amphitheater, popularly known as the Colosseum. In celebration of additions made to the structure, Titus provided a grand 100-day festival, with sea fights staged on an artificial lake, infantry battles, wild beast hunts, and similar activities. He also constructed new imperial baths to the south-east of the Amphitheater and began work on the celebrated Arch of Titus, a memorial to his Jewish victories. Large sums were directed to Italy and the provinces as well, especially for road building. In response to the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, Titus spent large sums to relieve distress in that area; likewise, the imperial purse contributed heavily to rebuilding Rome after a devastating fire destroyed large sections of the city in A.D. 80. As a result of these actions, Titus earned a reputation for generosity and geniality. For these reasons he gained the honourable title of "amor et deliciæ generis humani" (the darling and admiration of the human race). Even so, his financial acumen must not be under-estimated. He left the treasury with a surplus, as he had found it, and dealt promptly and efficiently with costly natural disasters. The Greek historian of the third-century A.D., Cassius Dio, perhaps offered the most accurate and succinct assessment of Titus' economic policy: "In money matters, Titus was frugal and made no unnecessary expenditure." In other areas, the brevity of Titus' reign limits our ability to detect major emphases or trends in policy. As far as can be discerned from the limited evidence, senior officials and amici were well chosen, and his legislative activity tended to focus on popular social measures, with the army as a particular beneficiary in the areas of land ownership, marriage, and testamentary freedom. In the provinces, Titus continued his father's policies by strengthening roads and forts in the East and along the Danube.

Titus died in September, A.D. 81 after only 26 months in office. Suetonius recorded that Titus died on his way to the Sabine country of his ancestors in the same villa as his father. A competing tradition persistently implicated his brother and successor, Domitian, as having had a hand in the emperor's demise, but the evidence is highly contradictory and any wrongdoing is difficult to prove. Domitian himself delivered the funeral eulogy and had Titus deified. He also built several monuments in honor of Titus and completed the Temple of Vespasian and Titus, changing the name of the structure to include his brother's and setting up his cult statue in the Temple itself.

Titus was the beneficiary of considerable intelligence and talent, endowments that were carefully cultivated at every step of his career, from his early education to his role under his father's principate. Cassius Dio suggested that Titus' reputation was enhanced by his early death. It is true that the ancient sources tend to heroicize Titus, yet based upon the evidence, his reign must be considered a positive one. He capably continued the work of his father in establishing the Flavian Dynasty and he maintained a high degree of economic and administrative competence in Italy and beyond. In so doing, he solidified the role of the emperor as paternalistic autocrat, a model that would serve Trajan and his successors well. Titus was used as a model by later emperors, especially those known as the Five Good Emperors (Nerva, Trajan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius).

Copyright (C) 1997, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Catholic Encyclopedia, http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14746b.htm

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
3 commentsCleisthenes
DomitianARDenariusHorseman.jpg
712a, Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.157 viewsDomitian, as Caesar, AR Denarius. 77-78 AD; RIC 242, VF, 18mm, 3.18grams. Obverse: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIA[NVS], laureate head right ; Reverse: COS V below man with hand raised out behind him on horse prancing right. RSC 49a. Scarce. Ex Zuzim Judaea.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Titus Flavius Domitianus(A.D. 81-96)

John Donahue
College of William and Mary

Domitian was born in Rome on 24 October A.D. 51, the youngest son of Vespasian, Roman emperor (A.D. 69-79) and Domitilla I, a treasury clerk's daughter. Little is known about Domitian in the turbulent 18 months of the four (five?) emperors, but in the aftermath of the downfall of Vitellius in A.D. 69 he presented himself to the invading Flavian forces, was hailed as Caesar, and moved into the imperial residence.

As emperor, Domitian was to become one of Rome's foremost micromanagers, especially concerning the economy. Shortly after taking office, he raised the silver content of the denarius by about 12% (to the earlier level of Augustus), only to devaluate it in A.D. 85, when the imperial income must have proved insufficient to meet military and public expenses.

Domitian's reach extended well beyond the economy. Late in A.D. 85 he made himself censor perpetuus, censor for life, with a general supervision of conduct and morals. The move was without precedent and, although largely symbolic, it nevertheless revealed Domitian's obsessive interest in all aspects of Roman life. An ardent supporter of traditional Roman religion, he also closely identified himself with Minerva and Jupiter, publicly linking the latter divinity to his regime through the Ludi Capitolini, the Capitoline Games, begun in A.D.86. Held every four years in the early summer, the Games consisted of chariot races, athletics and gymnastics, and music, oratory and poetry.

Beyond Rome, Domitian taxed provincials rigorously and was not afraid to impose his will on officials of every rank. Consistent with his concern for the details of administration, he also made essential changes in the organization of several provinces and established the office of curator to investigate financial mismanagement in the cities. Other evidence points to a concern with civic improvements of all kinds, from road building in Asia Minor, Sardinia and near the Danube to building and defensive improvements in North Africa.

While the military abilities of Vespasian and Titus were genuine, those of Domitian were not. Partly as an attempt to remedy this deficiency, Domitian frequently became involved in his own military exploits outside of Rome. He claimed a triumph in A.D. 83 for subduing the Chatti in Gaul, but the conquest was illusory. Final victory did not really come until A.D. 89. In Britain, similar propaganda masked the withdrawal of Roman forces from the northern borders to positions farther south, a clear sign of Domitian's rejection of expansionist warfare in the province.

Domitian's autocratic tendencies meant that the real seat of power during his reign resided with his court. The features typically associated with later courts - a small band of favored courtiers, a keen interest in the bizarre and the unusual (e.g., wrestlers, jesters, and dwarves), and a highly mannered, if somewhat artificial atmosphere, characterized Domitian's palace too, whether at Rome or at his Alban villa, some 20 kilometers outside of the capital.

On 18 September, A.D. 96, Domitian was assassinated and was succeeded on the very same day by M. Cocceius Nerva, a senator and one of his amici. The sources are unanimous in stressing that this was a palace plot, yet it is difficult to determine the level of culpability among the various potential conspirators.
In many ways, Domitian is still a mystery - a lazy and licentious ruler by some accounts, an ambitious administrator and keeper of traditional Roman religion by others. As many of his economic, provincial, and military policies reveal, he was efficient and practical in much that he undertook, yet he also did nothing to hide the harsher despotic realities of his rule. This fact, combined with his solitary personality and frequent absences from Rome, guaranteed a harsh portrayal of his rule. The ultimate truths of his reign remain difficult to know.

Copyright (C) 1997, John Donahue.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Perhaps the reverse of this Domitian/Horseman specimen depicts Domitian as he rode a white horse behind his father, Vespasian, and his brother, Titus, during their joint triumph celebrating their victory over Judaea (see: Suetonius. The Twelve Caesars. Trans. Robert Graves. London: Penguin, 2003. 304).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
titus denar RIC21a.jpg
79-81 AD - TITUS AR denarius - struck Jan.-July 80 AD60 viewsobv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM (laureate head right)
rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P (trophy with a captive on either side)
ref: RIC 21a (C), RSC 306 (3frcs), BMC 37
3.30gms, 18mm
mint: Rome
Scarce

History: Gnaeus Julius Agricola, the eleventh governor of Roman Britain in AD78 defeated the Ordovices tribe in north Wales and conquered the Druid stronghold of Mona (Anglesey). In AD79 consolidated the north-west of England by forts and garissons. As a result of these events Titus received the title of imperator for the fifteenth time from the beginning of AD 80.
Note: Legio II Adiutrix (later served in Aquincum, Pannonia) fought against the tribe of the Ordovices and occupied the Isle of Mona.
1 commentsberserker
titus-r12.jpg
79-81 AD Titus RIC-12239 viewsIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIANVS AVG PM - Laureate head right
TRP VIIII IMP XIIII COS VII P P - Quadriga with modius of grain

First issue after july AD 79. This is the same year that Vesuvius erupted!
jimwho523
domitian RIC232(vespa).jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AR denarius - struck 73 AD109 viewsobv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II (laureate head right)
rev: - (Domitian riding horse left, raising hand & holding scepter surmounted by a human head)
ref: RIC 232 (Vespasian) (C), RSC 664 (5frcs), BMC 129
mint: Rome
3.27gms, 18-19mm
Scarce
1 commentsberserker
domitian_RIC243a(Vespa).jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AR denarius - struck 79 AD48 viewsobv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI (laureate bust right)
rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS (Salus standing right, leaning on column and with legs crossed, feeding snake)
ref: RIC 1084 [RIC II 243a (Vespasian) (C)], C 384 (2frcs)
mint: Rome
3.14gms, 19mm

A scarcer denarius of Domitian
berserker
domitian_RIC96.jpg
81-96 AD - DOMITIAN AR denarius - struck 82 AD54 viewsobv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M (laureate head right)
rev: TR POT COS VIII P P (dolphin twined around anchor)
ref: RIC Vol 2.1 (2008) 96, RSC 593 (2frcs), not too common issue
mint: Rome
2.81gms, 18.5mm

This reverse reminds me of Legio II Adiutrix. This legion was formed in (early March?) 70 by the emperor Vespasian. Its soldiers were marines from the Ravenna navy, who had sided with Vespasian during his war against the emperor Vitellius.
berserker
aegaeVesp.jpg
Aeolis, Aegae. Vespasian AE18.22 viewsObv: Laureate head right. OYHECΠACIANOC KAICAP.
Rev: Apollo standing right, taenia in right, laurel branch in left. EΠI AΠOΛΛΩNIOΥ NEMEONIKOΥ AIΓAEΩN.
RPC II 966.
ancientone
aigai_vespa.jpg
Aigai, Aeolis, AE 18, Apollo standing right22 viewsVespasian; Aegae, Aeolis, AE 18mm; 
ΟΥΕΣΠΑΣΙΑΝΟΣ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ 
Head of Vespasian laureate r. 
ΑΙΓΑΕΩΝ ΕΠΙ ΑΠΟΛΛΟΝΙΟΥ ΝΕΜΕΟΗΙΚΟΥ 
Apollo standing r. 
RPC 965. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
1~2.jpg
Alexandria Egypt13 viewsVespasian 69-79 A.D
Billon tetradrachm year 2 69-70 A.D
Obverse:AYTOK KAIS SEB OYESPASIANOY; Laureate head right LB; before
Reverse:EIPHNH; Eirene standing left, holding corn and poppies in right hand, caduceus in left.

24.82mm 5.35gm

Dattari 357

maik
Vespasian~0.jpg
Alexandria Vespasian13 viewsVespasianvs , mint of Alexandria, Diobol, Year 1 (68 / 59 CE)

Rev. Head of Sarapis at r.

Geissen 272 ; Dattari 396
Tanit
vespasianAlexandria.JPG
Alexandria. Vespasian AE24 diobol25 viewsObv: Laureate bust of Vespasian r.
Rev: Draped bust of Alexandria r. wearing elephant skin headdress.
ancientone
Vespasianike.jpg
Alexandria. Vespasian AE35 Drachm. Winged bust of Nike66 viewsWinged bust of Nike. L IB. Emmett 208ancientone
Vespasian,_Antioch,_AE23.JPG
Antioch, AE2313 viewsVespasian, Antioch, AE23, 7.2g. Obverse: IMP CAESAR VESPASIAN AVG, laureate head left. Reverse: large S C within laurel wreath composed of eight sets of leaves. McAlee 363b. ex areich, photo credit areich2 commentsPodiceps
Augustus_temple_(800x387).jpg
Antoninus Pius 7 viewsAntoninus Pius Sestertius temple of Augustus and Livia
Catalog: Temple of Divus Augustus
weight 28,6gr. | bronze Ø 32mm.
obv. Laureate head right ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P XXII
rev. Octastyle temple of Divus Augustus, containing cult-statues of Augustus
and Livia TEMPLVM DIVI AVG REST COS IIII S C

The Temple of Divus Augustus was a major temple originally built to commemorate the deified first Roman emperor, Augustus. It was built between the Palatine and Capitoline Hills, behind the Basilica Julia, on the site of the house that Augustus had inhabited before he entered public life in the mid-1st century BC. The temple′s construction took place during the 1st century AD, having been vowed by the Roman Senate shortly after the death of the emperor in AD 14. It is known from Roman coinage that the temple was originally built to an Ionic hexastyle design. However, its size, physical proportions and exact site are unknown. During the reign of Domitian the Temple of Divus Augustus was destroyed by fire but was rebuilt and rededicated in 89/90 with a shrine to his favourite deity, Minerva. The temple was redesigned as a memorial to four deified emperors, including Vespasian and Titus. It was restored again in the mid 150s by Antonius Pius, and that was the reason for this coinage. The last known reference to the temple was on 27 May 218 | at some point thereafter it was completely destroyed and its stones were presumably quarried for later buildings. Its remains are not visible and the area in which it lay has never been excavated.

Cohen 805 | RIC 1004 | BMC 2063 | Sear 4235 R
vf
1 commentsAncient Aussie
12_Caesar_portraits.jpg
Antony & The 12 Caesars257 viewsA variation on my other virtual coin trays. This one includes a lifetime portrait of Julius Caesar. It's difficult choosing which coin to include in this set, in some cases I only had one (Galba, Otho) but others I had many more to choose from. I do have better portraits of some but I thought these had more interesting reverse types or portrait styles:

Marcus Antonius denarius
Julius Caesar denarius
Augustus denarius
Tiberius denarius
Caligula AE As
Claudius AE As
Nero Dupondius
Galba AE As
Otho Tetradrachm
Vitellius denarius
Vespasian denarius
Titus denarius
Domitian denarius

Image is clickable for larger size.
To see the coins individually see them in my gallery.
9 commentsJay GT4
LEGIIIIB.jpg
Antony LEG IIII44 viewsMARK ANTONY. 32-31 BC. AR Legionary Denarius. Patrae(?) mint.
O: Galley right
R: LEG IIII, legionary aquila between two standards.
- Crawford 544/16; CRI 353; Sydenham 1220; RSC 29.

A young man named Titus Flavius Vespasianus was in the Fourth Legion and the legion sided with him years later during the Civil Wars.
2 commentsNemonater
arch of Titus.jpg
arch of Titus59 viewsPart of the Arch of Titus showing the spoils from the destruction of the Temple in JerusalemTitus Pullo
Vespasian_As_Tarraco.jpg
As for Vespasian from (probably) Tarraco123 viewsAs for Vespasian. Probably Tarraco mint. 70 AD.
14.7 grs.
Observe : IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG P M TR P. Laureate head right.
Reverse : IMP V P P COS II DESIG III. Aequitas standing left, holding scales & scepter.
RIC 1329.
Rarity : R2
Fairly unusual portrait of Vespasian with quite curly hair.
3 commentslabienus
vespa~0.jpg
As, AEQVITAS AVGVSTI S C9 viewsVespasian Æ As. Rev. AEQVITAS AVGVSTI S C, Aequitas standing left holding scales and sceptre. 11.3 g 27 mm RIC 482, RCV 2356Podiceps
vespa.jpg
As, PROVIDENT, altar20 viewsVespasian As, PROVIDENT, 28 mm, ca. 10 g
Obverse: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III; laureate head right
Reverse: PROVIDENT; large altar. References: Sear RCV 2360. Patina on obverse artificial. ex areich

Podiceps
Vespasian_07.jpg
Asia Minor, Lydia, Hierocaesarea, Vespasian, stag 16 viewsLydia. Hierocaesaraea
Vespasian
Bronze, AE 20
Obv.: OYECΠACIANOC KAICAP CEBA, laureate head of Vespasian right
Rev: IEPOKAICAPEΩN, stag standing right.
Æ, 20mm, 3.85g
Ref.: RPC II, 955
shanxi
replicas.jpg
Assortment of replica Biblical coins345 viewsI'm told that these were made in the 50's for use in Sunday schools. 7 coins encased in a slab of plastic. From smallest to largest they are as follows:

Lepton of Caponius 6 AD
Lepton of Pontius Pilate 29 AD
Herod Antipas 29 AD
Denarius of Tiberius14-37 AD
Harod the Great 37 BC
Shekel of Tyre 126 BC
Vespasian 72 AD

Quality is not as good as modern replicas but it makes a nice addition to my desk. I don't think these coins would fool anyone! :D
Titus Pullo
augustus_comme.jpg
Augustus Commemorative minted by Tiberius, Countermarked by Vespasian14 viewsAugustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Commemorative minted by Tiberius, Countermarked by Vespasian. Copper as, RIC I Tiberius 81, Pangerl 94, coin Fair, countermark Fine, Rome mint, 8.935g, 28.8mm, 0o, c. 22 - 30 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS PATER, radiate head left, capricorn in rectangular countermark right; reverse PROVIDENT S C, altar with double panelled door, ornaments on top. Vespasian used the Capricorn countermark, as had Augustus. It was his birth-sign too. ex FORVMPodiceps
0521175.jpg
Augustus silver denarius RIC 4325 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II, part 1, 43; RSC II 43; BMCRE II 50;
BnF III 36; Hunter I 21, weight 3.3 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm,
Rome mint, Jul - Dec 71 CE.
Obverse: IMP CAES VESP AVG P M, laureate head right.
Reverse simpulum, sprinkler, jug and lituus, AVGVR above, TRI POT below
Roman emperor Vespasian was most famous for building the Flavian
Amphitheater, also known as the Colosseum. Like many Roman emperors,
Vespasian rose in prominence because of his military skills and work ethics.
Following his ten year rule, he left behind a record of restored order,
stability and good government. He was succeeded by his son Titus in 79 CE,
who had been sent to quell the Jewish revolt of 66-70 CE.
2 commentsNORMAN K
vespasian_capta.jpg
BCC j659 viewsRoman Imperial - Judaean
AR Denarius - Judaea Capta
Vespasian 69-79 C.E.
OBV:IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG
Laureate head of Vespasian right
REV: IVDAEA Judaea seated right, leaning forward,
hands unbound; behind, trophy of war.
17.5mm. 3.08gm. Axis:180
Hendin 759 Judaea Capta series
v-drome
Askelon_rgp37.jpg
BCC rgp3730 viewsRoman Greek Provincial
Ascalon - Judaea
Autonomous 72/73CE
Under Vespasian
Obv: Bust of Tyche right
Rev: ςOP AΣ (year 176 )
Galley to right, date in field.
AE 15mm. 4.11gm. Axis:0
cf. SNG 6-681?
v-drome
BCC_RGP50_sidon.jpg
BCC RGP5017 viewsRoman Greek Provincial
Phoenicia Sidon
Autonomous 72/73CE
Under Vespasian
Obv: Bust of Tyche right
star and crscent to right.
Rev: ΣΙΔΩΝΟΣ ΘΕΑΣ
Galley to left, date above:
ΗΠΡ (188 = 77/78CE)
AE 14.75mm. 3.58gm. Axis:0
poss. ref: RPC II 2055
v-drome
Vespasian_Sow_BCC_RI23.jpg
BCC RI2319 viewsRoman Imperial
Vespasian 69-79 C.E.
AR Denarius
Obv:[CAESAR] VESPASIANVS AVG
Laureate head of Vespasian right.
Rev:IMP XIX
Sow with piglets, walking left.
17.25mm. 2.85gm. Axis:180
RIC 982 Rome Mint
v-drome
Amphitheatre 1.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Amphitheatre42 viewsThe Amphitheatre at Caerleon is the best preserved in Britain. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300. Isca is still used today and has been mutated into Usk, which is the name of a town and river in the local area.maridvnvm
Amphitheatre 2.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Amphitheatre32 viewsThe Amphitheatre at Caerleon is the best preserved in Britain. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300. maridvnvm
Amphitheatre 5.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Amphitheatre30 viewsThe Amphitheatre at Caerleon is the best preserved in Britain. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300. maridvnvm
Amphitheatre 4.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Amphitheatre33 viewsThe Amphitheatre at Caerleon is the best preserved in Britain. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300. maridvnvm
Amphitheatre 3.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Amphitheatre36 viewsThe Amphitheatre at Caerleon is the best preserved in Britain. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300. maridvnvm
Inscription.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Inscription to Gaius Valerius Victor - Standard Bearer67 viewsA plaque with inscription found at Caerleon. Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300.

D M
G VALERIVS G F
GALERIA VICTOR
LVGDVNI SIG LEG II AVG
STIP XVII ANNOR XLV CV
RAI AGENT ANNIO PERPETVO H

DIS MANIBVS
GAIVS VALERIVS GAI FILLVS
GALERIA (TRIBV) VICTOR
LVGDVNI SIGNIFER LEGIONIS II AVGVSTAE
STRIPENDIORVM XVII ANNORVM XLV CV-
RAIM AGENTE ANNIO PERPETVO HEREDE

"To the spirits of the departed; Gaius Valerius Victor, son of Gaius, of the Galerian voting tribe, from Lugdunum, standard-bearer of the Second Augustan Legion, of 17 years; service, Aged 45, set up under the charge of Annius Perpetuus, his heir."
maridvnvm
Decoration.jpg
Britain, Caerleon, Isca Silurum, Wall Section48 viewsA section of interior wall found at Caerleon and decorated to attempt to illustrate how it may have looked.

Caerleon, (known as Isca Sulla to the Romans) was founded by Vespasian and was the headquarters for Legio II Augusta from about A.D. 75 to A.D. 300.
maridvnvm
Cappadocia,_Caesaraea-Eusebia,_020p_Vespasian,_RPC_II_1659,_AR-Hemidrachm,_Laur_b_r_,_Nike_r_,_69-79_AD,_Q-001,_0h,12,9-13,9mm,_1,54g-s~0.jpg
Cappadocia, Caesarea, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1659, AR-Hemidrachm, Nike advancing right, #182 viewsCappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebia, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1659, AR-Hemidrachm, Nike advancing right, #1
avers: AYTOKP KAICAP OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBA Laureate head of Vespasian to right.
reverse: Nike advancing right, holding wreath in her right hand and palm frond over her left shoulder.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 12,9-13,9mm, weight: 1,54g, axis: 0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea-Eusebia, date: 69-79 A.D.,
ref: RPC II 1659, Sydenham 94, Metcalf 17, SGI 735,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
CAPPADOCIA__Caesarea__Vespasian_with_Titus_(69-79)__Didrachm__RPC_II_1650,_Sydenham_102__Q-001,_0h,_19mm,_6,73g-s~0.jpg
Cappadocia, Caesarea, 020 Vespasian with Titus (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1650, AR-Didrachm, Laureate head of Titus right75 viewsCappadocia, Caesarea, 020 Vespasian with Titus (69-79 A.D.), RPC II 1650, AR-Didrachm, Laureate head of Titus right,
avers: AYTOKPA KAICAP OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOC, Laureate head of Vespasian right.
reverse: AYTO KAI OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOY YIOC, Laureate head of Titus right.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0-20,0mm, weight: 6,73g, axis: 0h,
mint: Cappadocia, Caesarea, date: 69-79 A.D., ref: RPC II 1650, Sydenham 102.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
capric.JPG
Capricorns42 viewsVespasian (by Titus) Van Meter 102Ghengis_Jon
capric2007.jpg
Capricorns220 viewsVespasian by TitusGhengis_Jon
Durotriges.JPG
Celtic Britain, Durotriges (Circa 58 BC-45 AD)17 viewsStater, Abstract (Cranborne Chase) type

5.26g

Obverse: Devolved head of Apollo right

Reverse: Disjointed horse left; pellets above, [pellet below], pellet in lozenge above tail, [zigzag and pellet pattern between two parallel exergue lines].

Van Arsdell 1235-1; BMC 2525-54.

The Durotriges ("dwellers by the water" or, perhaps, "water-rat kings") were well known for their continental trade and hill forts. They were the only tribe who did not add inscriptions to their coins, perhaps indicative of decentralized rule among multiple hill-fort based tribes using a common currency, and the only tribe to strike a stater in silver.

The history of the Durotriges can be divided into two broad phases, an early phase, roughly 100-60 B.C. and a late phase from 60 B.C. until the Roman conquest. The early phase was a time of rapid development brought about by overseas trade, while the late phase was a time of retraction, isolation and economic impoverishment. The economic decline is dramatically portrayed by the progressive debasement of their coinage, particularly when you compare the magnificent white-gold Craborne Chase staters of ca. 50-40 B.C. with the crude cast bronze Hengistbury coins of ca. A.D. 10-43.

The Durotriges resisted Roman invasion in AD 43, and the historian Suetonius records some fights between the tribe and the second legion Augusta, then commanded by Vespasian. By 70 AD, the tribe was already Romanised and securely included in the Roman province of Britannia.
2 commentsNathan P
Cilicia.JPG
Cilicia13 viewsCilicia Trachea became the haunt of pirates, who were subdued by Pompey in 67 BC following a Battle of Korakesion (modern Alanya), and Tarsus was made the capital of the Roman province of Cilicia. Cilicia Pedias became Roman territory in 103 BC first conquered by Marcus Antonius Orator in his campaign against pirates, with Sulla acting as its first governor, foiling an invasion of Mithridates, and the whole was organized by Pompey, 64 BC, into a province which, for a short time, extended to and included part of Phrygia. It was reorganized by Julius Caesar, 47 BC, and about 27 BC became part of the province Syria-Cilicia Phoenice. At first the western district was left independent under native kings or priest-dynasts, and a small kingdom, under Tarcondimotus, was left in the east; but these were finally united to the province by Vespasian, AD 72. It had been deemed important enough to be governed by a proconsul.

ancientone
CivilWarRIC12.jpg
Civil Wars RIC 12172 viewsCivil Wars 68-69 CE. AR Denarius (17.50 mm, 3.39 g). Spanish mint, April-June 68 CE.
O: BONI EVENTVS, Female bust right, wearing fillet; hair rolled and looped above neck
R: VICTORIA P R, Victory standing left on globe, holding wreath in right hand and palm in left
- BMCRE I 292 Note + Taf 50.2; P.-H. Martin, the anonymous coins of the year 68 AD (1974) 82 # 99 PL 9; E. P. Nicolas, De Néron à Vespasien (1979) 1308 No. 31; 1435 f 1456 # 107 Taf 14.107 B; RIC I² Nr. 12 (Spain, 68 n. Chr.) R5 (Group I). Evidently the second known. The above references are all to one example found in Münzkabinett Berlin.

Likely struck by Galba in Spain between April 6 and early June, 68 AD, that is, between the dates of his acceptance of the offer from Vindex and of his receiving news of his recognition by the Senate.

The civil wars at the end of Nero’s reign began with the revolt of the governor of Gallia Lugdunensis, Gaius Julius Vindex, probably around the beginning of March of AD 68. Vindex had claimed that he had a force of 100,000 men, and a substantial coinage was certainly needed to pay them.

Vindex offered the leadership of the revolt to Servius Sulpicius Galba, then governor of Hispania Tarraconensis, who was hailed imperator by the Spanish legions at Carthago Nova in April of the same year. The title was cautiously refused, but Galba did declare himself the legatus of the senate and people of Rome. Just a month later, Galba’s confidence would be shaken by the crushing defeat of Vindex near Besançon by the general Lucius Verginius Rufus, governor of Germania Superior. By 9 June Nero was dead, having taken his own life. Galba began his march to Rome, and his brief reign was underway.

Without an emperor to strike in the name of (save for that in honor of the “model emperor” of Roman history, Augustus) the coinage was struck with messages suiting the political climate. The coinage under Vindex possesses a more aggressive air that underscores the militant nature of his revolt, while Galba’s tends to be more constitutional and optimistic in tone. Originally struck in large numbers, as indicated by the number of types employed, the coins of the civil wars are all rare today, having been recalled after the final victory of Vespasian in 69 AD.
5 commentsNemonater
Claudius_Æ_Sestertiu.jpg
Claudius (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius 6 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P - Laureate head right, NCAPR counterstamp behind bust
EX S C / P P / OB CIVES / SERVATOS - Legend within wreath
Mint: Rome (50-54AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 23.42g / 36.39mm / 180
Rarity: Scarce
References:
RIC² 112
Cohen 38
BMC 185
Sear 1850
Provenances:
Marc Breitsprecher
Old Roman Coins.Com
Acquisition/Sale: Ancient Imports Internet $0.00 8/17
The Gary R. Wilson Collection


The countermark NCAPR was applied to numerous orichalcum coins of the reigns of Tiberius and Claudius. NCAPR is most often explained as "Nero Caesar Augustus Populo Romano." Others believe NCAPR abbreviates "Nummus Caesare Augusto Probatus" or "Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit" (probavit means approved). Excavations of the Meta Sudans and the northeastern slope of the Palatine Hill in Rome indicate that this countermark was applied for Nero's congiarium (distribution to the people) in 57 A.D., which supports the Populo Romano interpretation. Varieties of this relatively common countermark are identified by some authors as applied in either Italy, Spain or Gaul. The countermark is not found on coins bearing the name or portrait of Caligula. Clearly any coins of Caligula that were still in circulation and collected for application of the countermark were picked out and melted down, in accordance with his damnatio, rather than being countermarked and returned to circulation. A NCAPR countermark has, however, been found on a Vespasian dupondius which, if genuine and official, seems to indicate the N may refer to Nerva, not Nero.



The wreath on the reverse is the corona civica, the oak wreath awarded to Roman citizens ex senatus consulto (by special decree of the Senate) for saving the life of another citizen by slaying an enemy in battle. It became a prerogative for Roman emperors to be awarded the Civic Crown, originating with Augustus, who was awarded it in 27 B.C. for saving the lives of citizens by ending the series of civil wars.

NCAPR counterstamp of Nero behind bust.

From The Museum of Countermarks on Roman Coins website:
There are several interpretations of what this, the most interesting of all Julio-Caludian ctmk., means. The two most likely are:
1. Nero Ceasar Augustus Populi Romani
2. Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit
In the first instance it is a congiarium or public dole given by Nero to the people of Rome. In the second, it is a revalidation of the earlier coins of ones predecessors still in circulation.
Possible is also a later use, eg. by Nerva, or that no emperors name was part of the countermark.

Previously believed to be applied during the reign of Nero, a specimen in the Pangerl collection appears on an as of Vespasian, necessitating a later date for the series. Three distinct production centers can be identified for this issue, in Spain, Gaul, and Italy. The Italian type is distinguished by the frequent joining of the letters NC at the base.

NCAPR (Nummus Caesare Augusto PRobatus?) in rectangular countermark-Translated-'Money Caesar Augustus Approved'
Gary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-oXfGCiAQjcBiF-Claudius_arch.jpg
Claudius (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius5 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P - Laureate head right with NCAPR countermark behind head.
NERO CLAVDIVS DRVSVS GERMAN IMP, S C - Arch of Nero Claudius Drusus: triumphal arch consisting of single arch & decorated piers set on raised base with four columns supporting ornate attic.
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (42AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 24.20g / 35mm / 180
Rarity: Scarce
References:
RIC 114
Cohen 48
BMC 187
Acquisition/Sale: shpadoinkle24 Ebay $0.00 8/17
Notes: Jan 9, 19 - NCAPR Countermark

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Nero Claudius Drusus was Tiberius' younger brother. He was a successful general but died at only 29 after a fall from his horse. He married Antonia, daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their sons were Germanicus and Claudius. Claudius issued his coins.

From CNG:
The Arch of Nero Claudius Drusus was erected by order of the Senate sometime after the death of Drusus in 9 BC. Located on the Via Appia, it commemorated his victories along the German frontier. Eventually, the presence of the arch may have lent its name to the surrounding region, known colloquially as the vicus Drusianus (Drusus' district). By the late fourth century AD, the arch may have survived as the arch then known as the arcus Recordationis (Arch of Remembrance).

Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D.
Claudius was one of the most capable, yet unlikely emperors. Shunned as an idiot by his family due to a limp and embarrassing stutter, Claudius spent the first decades of his life absorbed in scholarly studies until the death of his nephew Caligula. After Caligula's murder, the Praetorian Guard found him hiding behind a curtain in the Imperial Palace, expecting to be murdered. Instead, the guard proclaimed him emperor. His reign was marred by personal catastrophes, most notably promiscuity and betrayal by his first wife. He governed well and conquered the troublesome island of Britain. He was poisoned by his second wife, Agrippina Jr., mother of Nero.

The countermark NCAPR was applied to numerous orichalcum coins of the reigns of Tiberius and Claudius. NCAPR is most often explained as "Nero Caesar Augustus Populo Romano." Others believe NCAPR abbreviates "Nummus Caesare Augusto Probatus" or "Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit" (probavit means approved). Excavations of the Meta Sudans and the northeastern slope of the Palatine Hill in Rome indicate that this countermark was applied for Nero's congiarium (distribution to the people) in 57 A.D., which supports the Populo Romano interpretation. Varieties of this relatively common countermark are identified by some authors as applied in either Italy, Spain or Gaul. The countermark is not found on coins bearing the name or portrait of Caligula. Clearly any coins of Caligula that were still in circulation and collected for application of the countermark were picked out and melted down, in accordance with his damnatio, rather than being countermarked and returned to circulation. A NCAPR countermark has, however, been found on a Vespasian dupondius which, if genuine and official, seems to indicate the N may refer to Nerva, not Nero.

NCAPR counterstamp of Nero behind bust.

From The Museum of Countermarks on Roman Coins website:
There are several interpretations of what this, the most interesting of all Julio-Caludian ctmk., means. The two most likely are:
1. Nero Ceasar Augustus Populi Romani
2. Nero Caesar Augustus Probavit
In the first instance it is a congiarium or public dole given by Nero to the people of Rome. In the second, it is a revalidation of the earlier coins of ones predecessors still in circulation.
Possible is also a later use, eg. by Nerva, or that no emperors name was part of the countermark.

Previously believed to be applied during the reign of Nero, a specimen in the Pangerl collection appears on an as of Vespasian, necessitating a later date for the series. Three distinct production centers can be identified for this issue, in Spain, Gaul, and Italy. The Italian type is distinguished by the frequent joining of the letters NC at the base.

NCAPR (Nummus Caesare Augusto PRobatus?) in rectangular countermark-Translated-'Money Caesar Augustus Approved'

Just FYI-This coin has been 'Liberated' from the NGC slab and is now how it should be-free for a person to hold, as all ancients should be!
Gary W2
vespa_eagle.jpg
Commemorative As, eagle, RIC II 49738 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D. Commemorative Issued by Titus, Copper as, RIC II 497, Rome mint, 9.804g, 27.5mm, 180o, obverse IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS III, laureate head right; reverse S C, eagle standing facing on globe, head right, wings spread, S C at sides; ex. FORVM

2 commentsPodiceps
Domitian_unpublished_Cos_II.jpg
COS II denarius (RIC 680 for Vespasian) for Domitian39 viewsDenarius for Domitian. Rome mint. 73 AD. 2.89 grs.
Observe : Laureate head right. CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II. From low right.
Reverse : Domitian on horse left. Right hand raised and sceptre in left.

Weight is low but the coin is not plated.
Superb style.
3 commentslabienus
Divus_Vespasianvs_RIC_II_357_(Titvs).jpg
Denarius for Vespasianus (under Titus)148 viewsDenarius for DIVUS VESPASIANVS (struck under Titus). Circa 80-81 AD. Rome mint
20mm and 3.41 g.
Observe : DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right.
Reverse : S C inscribed on shield supported by two capricorns; globe below.
RIC II 357 (Titus).
Rarity : C2
6 commentslabienus
Picture_598.jpg
Denarius of Vespasian21 viewsJUDAEA1 commentshooverman
Vespasian.jpg
Denarius of Vespasian (Probable Fouree)47 viewsA (probable fouree) silver denarius of Vespasian, minted in Rome between 80-81 AD. This was minted after his death by his son, Titus. 19.36 g, 2.88 g

Obverse: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right

Reverse: S C inscribed on shield (remnants visible in hand) supported by two capricorns, orb below.

Attribution: RIC 357 (C2)
1 commentschuy1530
vespa_den~0.jpg
Denarius, Commemorative Issued by Titus, Two capricorns, RIC 63 Titus11 viewsVespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Commemorative Issued by Titus. Silver denarius, RIC II Titus 63, RSC II 497, BMCRE II 129, F, bent, Rome mint, 2.763g, 17.9mm, 180o, posthumous, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right; reverse S C, on shield supported by two Capricorns, globe below; deep divot on obverse gives the coin a cup shape. Ex FORVMPodiceps
vespa_den.jpg
Denarius, PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left7 viewsVespasian AR Denarius. Rev. PON MAX TR P COS VI, Pax seated left. 3 g RIC 90 RCV 2301 Podiceps
titus_ric115_elephant.jpg
Denarius; Elephant walking left17 viewsTitus denarius. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right / TRP IX IMP XV COS VIII PP, elephant walking left. RSC 303, BMC 43, RIC 115, Sear RCV I 2512. Ex Ferenc G. Seems to be a representative of the (now extinct) North African Elephant (Loxodonta africana pharaoensis)1 commentsPodiceps
vespasian_pax.jpg
Denarius; Pax seated left6 viewsVespasian Denarius. 70 A.D. 2,5 g, 16 mm. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / COS ITER T-R POT, Pax seated left, holding branch and caduceus. RIC 29, BMCRE 26; RSC 94h; Sear RCV I 2285.Podiceps
vespa_ceres.jpg
Denarius; CERES, RIC II 1329 viewsVespasian AD 69-79 AR Denarius, Rome mint: AD 78-79. Obv: CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG - Laureate head right Rev: CERES AVGVST - Ceres standing left, holding corn-ears and torch. RIC II 132, page 29, Cohen 54, SEAR RCV I 2283.Podiceps
vespasian_Ric847.jpg
Denarius; COS VII, eagle standing on an altar, head left. RIC 84724 viewsVespasian Denarius. 76 AD. IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right / COS VII, eagle standing on an altar, head left. RSC 121, RIC 847, (RIC [1962] 99a), BMC 180, Sear RCV I: 2287. Podiceps
piglets.jpg
Denarius; Sow & piglets7 viewsTitus, as Caesar, AR Denarius. 778 AD. T CAESAR VESPASIANVS, laureate head right / sow walking left with her piglets, IMP XIII in ex. RIC 220 (Vespasian), Sear RCV I 2443.Podiceps
vespa_vesta.jpg
Denarius; VESTA, RIC 36019 viewsVespasian Denarius, Rome AD 74. IMP CAES VESP AVG P M COS IIII, laureate head right / VES-TA to either side of Vesta standing left, holding simpulum & scepter. RIC 360, (RIC [1962] 50), RSC 574, BMC 71. Sear RCV I: 2316.Podiceps
divusvesp.jpg
Divus Vespasian46 viewsVESPASIAN, posthumous memorial AR silver denarius, Struck by TITUS, 79AD. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head of Divus Vespasian right. Reverse - S C inscribed on shield supported by two capricorns, orb below. RCV 2569, scarce. Well centered on a full sized flan. 19mm, 3.2g.1 commentsfordicus
Vespasian~1.jpg
Divus Vespasian57 viewsDIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS
laureate head right

E-X across field,
S C inscribed on shield set on a column, column surmounted by an urn, laurel branch on either side.

Rome,80-81 AD

2.87g

RIC II 62 (Titus); BMCRE 125 (Titus); BN 98; RSC 149; SEAR 6568

Ex-Calgary Coin

Sold Forum Auction March 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
DiviVespQuadriga.jpg
Divus Vespasian / Quadriga52 viewsDivus Vespasian. Died AD 79. Denarius struck under Titus, 80-81.
O: DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS. Laureate head of Divus Vespasian to right.
R: EX S C Empty quadriga advancing left, ornamented with a miniature quadriga flanked by Victories at the top and two standing figures on the side.
- BMC 119. BN 94. RIC 361 (all under Titus).
3 commentsNemonater
Vespasian_ric_60~0.jpg
Divus Vespasian(us)115 viewsRIC II 361 (Titus), RSC 146.
Divus Vespasian, struck under Titus, denarius.
Rome mint, 80-81 AD.
Obv. DIVVS AVGVSTVS VESPASIANVS, laureate head right.
Rev. EX S C in exergue, slow quadriga left, car ornamented with swag across front, two figures brandishing spears, Victories flanking quadriga above.

This coin, minted by Titus in honor of his deceased father, is a 10th anniversary commemorative of the triumph held in Rome after the reconquest of Judaea.

The quadriga on the reverse is a tensa, a chariot shaped like a temple in which the attributes of the divine Vespasian were borne to the Circus in the procession before games, an honor to the deceased Vespasian voted to him by the Senate, EX S C (source: information from Curtis L. Clay).

Good silver and nice details. Nothing better than a quadriga reverse!
3 commentsmars1112
D847.jpg
Domitia RIC 847111 viewsAR Cistophorus
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD (Domitian)
Obv: DOMITIA AVGVSTA; Bust of Domitia, draped r., hair massed in front and in long plait behind
Rev: VENVS AVG; Venus stg. r., leaning on column, with helmet and spear
RIC 847 (R). BMC 256. RSC 19. RPC 870 (8 spec.). BNC 226.
Ex CNG E424, 11 July 2018, lot 471.

A brief issue of cistophori were struck for Domitia as Augusta under Domitian in 82. Venus leaning on column was the sole reverse type chosen for her rare cistophori. The style and six o'clock die axis point to Rome as the home mint. K. Butcher and M. Ponting's metal analysis reveal they were struck from a different stock of metal than contemporary Rome mint denarii, possibly from recycled older denarii. At 80% silver fineness these early cistophori were likely struck before Domitian's major coinage reform of 82 when the denarius was raised to nearly 100% fineness.

Domitia Longina was the daughter of the famed Roman general Gnaeus Domitius Corbulo who was commanded to commit suicide by Nero for alleged treason. Domitian courted and married Domitia soon after Vespasian's accession, despite her already being the wife of Aelius Lamia. It was a good match - distancing the Flavians from the reign of Nero and uniting them to a beloved general's family. Soon after Domitian become emperor, Suetonius tells us he briefly divorced Domitia because of an adulterous affair she had with the actor Paris. Dio claims Domitian actually considered executing her but was persuaded from doing so by the praetorian prefect Ursus. He soon reunited with her after a brief separation alleging the people demanded it. Where this coin fits into that time frame is hard to tell. We don't know exactly when the divorce occurred or how long it lasted. However, it is likely this coin was struck after their reconciliation and can be seen as symbolically strengthening Domitia's position at court.

Struck in fine early style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
domitian2.jpg
Domitian50 viewsDomitian as Caesar, silver denarius, 79 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse- CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, Laureate head right.
Reverse- PRINCEPS-IVV_ENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, palladium in right hand, scepter in left.
RIC II, 244 (Vespasian), 17mm x 18mm, 2.78g.
1 commentsb70
00domitefe~0.jpg
DOMITIAN23 viewsAR denarius. Ephesus. 71 AD. 3,12 grs. Bust draped and cuirassed,wearing aegis,,head right. DOMITIANVS CAESAR AVG F / Female bust,draped and towered right. PACI ORB TERR AVG. Under bust E PHE (ligate).
RIC 350 (Vespasian),
2 commentsbenito
00domitcab~0.jpg
DOMITIAN18 viewsAR denarius. 77-78 AD. 3,43 grs. Laureate head right. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS / Helmeted horseman galloping right,his right hand extended and trailing behind. COS V.
RIC 957 (Vespasian). RSC 49.
benito
00domitefe.jpg
DOMITIAN78 viewsAR denarius. Ephesus. 71 AD. 3,12 grs. Bust draped and cuirassed,wearing aegis,,head right. DOMITIANVS CAESAR AVG F / Female bust,draped and towered right. PACI ORB TERR AVG. Under bust E PHE (ligate).
RIC 350 (Vespasian),
2 commentsbenito
domitcaballo~0.jpg
DOMITIAN21 viewsAR denarius. 76 AD. 3,41 grs. Laureate head right. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS / Pegasus walking right. COS IIII.
RIC 238 (Vespasian). RSC 47.
benito
domitcaballo.jpg
DOMITIAN23 viewsAR denarius. 76 AD. 3,41 grs. Laureate head right. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS / Pegasus walking right. COS IIII.
RIC 238 (Vespasian). RSC 47.
benito
4330386.jpg
Domitian23 viewsAR Denarius (18mm, 2.72 g, 7h). Ephesus mint. Struck AD 71. bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis / Victory advancing right, holding palm frond and wreath; EPE mintmark to lower right. RIC II 1447 (Vespasian); RPC 848; RSC 336. VF, minor roughness.

ex CNG Auc 433 lot 386
2 commentsarash p
70170q00.jpg
Domitian (as Caesar)23 viewsSilver Denarius
Roman Imperial - The Principate

Domitian
(As Caesar)

Rome mint, early 76 - early 77 A.D
Fine, toned.
17.9 mm / 3.282 g / 180°

Obverse: "CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS", laureate head right.
Reverse: "COS IIII", Pegasus standing right, only near wing showing, raising left foreleg.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins 2016 (70170)

RIC II, part 1, Vespasian 921 (C2); RSC II 47; BMCRE II Vespasian 193; BnF III Vespasian 169; SRCV I 2637

MyID: 029A

Image Credit: Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsTenthGen
Domitian_RIC_V232.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD71 viewsObv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II, laureate head r.

Rev: No legend, Domitian on horseback prancing left, raising right hand and holding a scepter in his left. (The scepter is described in the reference material as being surmounted by a human head, no such feature can be detected on his example).

Note: The reverse is believed to relate to Domitian's role in the Triumph celebrated for the victory in Judaea.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 73 AD

3 grams, 19 mm, 180°

RIC II Vespasian 232, RSC 664, S2644
4 commentsSPQR Coins
Domitian_RIC_V238.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD31 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: COS IIII, Pegasus stepping right.

Note: The reverse type was copied from an issue of Augustus.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 76 AD

3.4 grams, 18.8 mm, 180°

RIC II Vespasian 238, RSC 47, S2637, VM 9/1
SPQR Coins
Domitian_RIC_233.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD33 viewsObv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVT, Spes advancing left holding a flower and raising her robe.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 74 AD

3.2 grams, 19.25 x 17.4 mm, 180°

RIC II Vespasian 233, RSC 375, S2640, VM 54
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Domitian_RIC_V248.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD60 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: CERES AVGVST, Ceres standing left, holding corn-ears and a torch.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 76 - 78 AD

3.1 grams, 18.5 mm, 180°

RIC IIi Vespasian 976 (New Edition), RIC II Vespasian 248, RSC 30, S2636, VM 7
3 commentsSPQR Coins
Domitian_RIC_V241.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD29 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: COS V, She-wolf standing left, suckling the twins Romulus and Remus, boat in exergue.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 77 - 78 AD

3.3 grams, 17.5 mm, 135°

RIC II Vespasian 241, RSC 51, S2639, VM 10/2
1 commentsCaesar's Ghost
Domitian_RIC_V957.JPG
Domitian (as Caesar), 69 - 81 AD47 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head of Domitian facing right.

Rev: COS V, helmeted horseman galloping right, his right hand is extended and trailing behind him.

Note: The reverse type might have been inspired by the coinage of Galba.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 77 - 78 AD

3.38 grams, 18.6 mm, 135°

RIC IIi Vespasian 957, RSC 49, S2638, VM 10/1

Ex: FORVM
3 commentsMatt Inglima
Domitian_as_Aequitas.jpg
Domitian - AE as8 views(struck by Vespasian)
Rome
73 AD
laureate head left
CAESAR AVG F DOMITIAN COS II
Aequitas standing left, holding scales and scepter
AEQVITAS__AVGVST
S C
BMC 157, 681; RIC 666
7,19g
Johny SYSEL
Domitian_COS_V.jpg
Domitian - AR denarius5 viewsstruck by Vespasian
Rome
78 AD
laureate head right
CAESAR AVG F__DOMITIANVS
She-wolf standing left, suckling Romulus and Remus
COS V
ship in exergue
RIC II, part 1,Vespasian 961; RSC II 51; BMCRE II Vespasian 240
3,57g
Johny SYSEL
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Domitian - AS As, Rome Mint - VIRTUTI AUGUSTI - 10.92 Grams49 viewsAncient Rome.
Emperor Domitian(81 - 96 AD), AE As.
Latin titles;
obv: Laureate crowned bust of Emperor Domitian facing right.
rev:" VIRTUTI AUGUSTI " - Virtus standing right in military dress, holding vertical spear in one hand, parazonium in other arm. One knee slightly raised.
" SC " in fields, to either side of Virtus.

Weight 10.92 Grams
4 commentsrexesq
Domitian_RIC_921_(Vespasian).jpg
Domitian - [RIC II part 1 Vespasian 921 (C2), RSC II 47, BMCRE II 193, BnF III 169, SRCV I 2637]69 viewsSilver denarius, choice gF, 3.350g, 19.3mm, 180 degree, Rome mint, as caesar early 76 - early 77 A.D.

Obv. - CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right

Rev. - COS IIII, Pegasus standing right, archaic curved wing, only near wing showing, raising left foreleg

Nice portrait, toned, and perfect centering.
___________

Purchased from Forum Ancient Coins

Ex. FORVM Dealer Photo
2 commentsrenegade3220
Domitian.jpg
Domitian 81-96 A.D.14 viewsSYRIA, Antioch. Domitian, 81-96 AD. Æ19.5~20.4mm. 6.71g. Obv: DOMITIANVS CAESAR, laureate head left. Rev: Large SC in laurel wreath. RPC 2017. McAlee 403e. BMC 252.
Domitian: Caesar under Vespasian 69-79 AD; Caesar under Titus 79-81 AD; Augustus 81-96 AD.
ddwau
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Domitian AR Denarius. clasped hands before legionary eagle FOUREE33 viewsDomitian AR Denarius. FOUREE

Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI Laureate head right
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, clasped hands before
legionary eagle, set on prow.
RIC 1081 (RIC [1962] 246) (Vespasian), RSC 393, BMC 269.
I have not been able to locate the exact type of this coin. This is the nearest so far, but the obverse writing does not match, being -CAESVE- that I can make out.
The coin has been stablised since the photo was taken.
Weight - 3.0g
Diameter - 17.7mm approx.
1 commentslorry66
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Domitian As43 viewsDomitian AE As. Lyons mint, 77-78 AD. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS V, laureate head right with globe at point of bust / S-C, Spes advancing left holding flower & hem of skirt.

RIC 791a (Vespasian), Cohen 454cf, BMC 873
Tanit
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Domitian as Caesar25 viewsDomitian. As Caesar, AD 69-81. AR Denarius (18 mm, 2.8 gm.) Rome mint. Struck under Vespasian, AD 79.
Laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTTVTIS, clasped hands before legionary eagle.
RIC II 1081 (Vespasian).
1 commentsAjax
DomPeg_RIC_922.jpg
Domitian as Caesar / Pegasus83 viewsAR Denarius, Rome mint, 76-77 AD
Obv: CAES AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right
Rev: COS IIII, Pegasus pawing ground right
- RIC V922 (R2). BMC - . RSC -

A rare obverse legend variant with CAES rather than Caesar, struck for Domitian Caesar under Vespasian.
6 commentsNemonater
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Domitian as Caesar AR Denarius72 viewsObv: DOMITIANVS CAESAR AVG F - Laureate head of bearded Domitian right.
Rev: COS IIII - Pegasus standing right, the wings upright and one leg lifted.
Mint: Rome
Year: 76 AD
Ref: RIC 238 (Vespasian)
Notes: Scarce
oa
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Domitian as Caesar RIC 9689 viewsAR Denarius, 3.39g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Hands clasped over aquila on prow
RIC 96 (C). BMC 85. RSC 395. BNC 71.
Acquired from Imperial Coins, August 2011.

Struck in 80 AD under Titus, the reverse shows clasped hands over an aquila set on a prow, apparently representing "Concordia Militum" - "Harmony of the troops" (BMC II, xlii-xliii). An odd choice to be sure for anyone other than the emperor to issue. According to Suetonius - "After the death of his father, he (Domitian) hesitated for a long time whether he should offer the soldiery a double bounty and he never had any hesitation in stating that he had been left as a partner in the imperial position but that fraud had been applied to the will." (Suet., Dom., 2)

There is a COS VI of this reverse type assigned under Vespasian in both RIC and BMCRE but certainly post dates Vespasian's death.
1 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian as Caesar RIC 9779 viewsAR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Salus, stg. r., resting on column, feeding snake out of patera
RIC 97 (C). BMC 84. RSC 386. BNC -.
Ex Lanz, eBay, 28 March 2016.

The Salus feeding snake type was struck for Domitian Caesar under both Vespasian as COS VI and Titus as COS VII. AVG F in the obverse legend indicates this denarius was coined before Vespasian's deification, after which DIVI F was used. This Salus type was unique to Domitan Caesar and was discontinued in the following DIVI F issue when a whole new slate of reverse designs were employed.

Not as commonly found as the COS VI version.


6 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian as Caesar RIC 99101 viewsAR Denarius, 3.10g
Rome mint, 80 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Vesta, std. l., with palladium and sceptre
RIC 99 (R). BMC 83. RSC 380a. BNC 70.
Acquired from Artifact Man, February 2016.

The Vesta type was struck for Domitian Caesar with him as COS VI in 79 under Vespasian and COS VII in 80 under Titus. This denarius bears the COS VII dating and is much rarer than the common COS VI. Perhaps the window of time these rare COS VII Vesta denarii were struck was quite small because a whole new set of reverse designs were soon employed for him later in the year after Vespasian's deification (the DIVI F issue).

A fine denarius with dark toning.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V068044 viewsDomitian under Vespasian. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 73 A.D. (2.96 grams, 19.27 mm. 0 degree). Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II, laureate head right. Rev: Domitian riding horse left, right hand raised, sceptre in left with human head on it. RIC II V680. BMC 129.

This type probably refers to triumphal parade held for the victory Vespasian and Titus earned in Judaea. Suetonius and Josephus reveal that while Vespasian and Titus rode in separate chariots, Domitian, "magnificently adorned," rode alongside Titus' chariot on a splendid white horse.
3 commentsLucas H
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V078834 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Vespasian. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 74 A.D. Obv: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS III, Laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVT, Spes advancing left, holding flower in right hand and skirt in left. RIC II V788.RSC 375, BMC V156.
1 commentsLucas H
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V092193 viewsDomitian as Caesar 70-81 A.D.. AR Denarius, Rome Mint, 76 A.D.* (3.34g, 19.2m, 6h). Obv: CAESAR A[VG F] DOMITIANVS, laureate head r. Rev: COS IIII, Pegasus right. RIC II V921, BMC V193, RSC 47. Ex HBJ.
*Domitian did not become COS V until early 77 A.D., but most coins with COS IIII belong to 76 A.D.

A common coin of Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian, this reverse still calls to me. Used by the Flavians for the first time in 76 A.D., the Pegasus reverse copies an earlier type from Augustus. Using earlier types from popular emperors, as well as the republic, was a hallmark of Flavian coinage.
3 commentsLucas H
Domitian_RIC_II_V1081.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC II V108131 viewsDomitian as Caesar. 70-81 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 79 A.D. to 24 June. (3.02g, 18.9m, 6h ). Obv: CɅESɅR ɅVG F DOMITINVS COS VI, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, hands clasped over Aquila on prow. RIC II V1081, RSC 393, BMC V269.

The obverse legend should read DOMITIANVS, but the die engraver forgot the “A” in this example. Still, it’s in a great state of preservation for a common coin of Domitian as Caesar in the last months of Vespasian’s life.
1 commentsLucas H
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V108435 viewsDomitian as Caesar. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 79 A.D to 24 June. (3.07g, 19.8m, 6h). Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS IV, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPTS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, resting on column, feeding snake out of patera. RIC II V1084, BMC V265, RSC 384.

Salus, the Roman goddess of health, often appears on coins when the emperor labors under some type of aliment. This was minted in the months before Vespasian’s death on June 24, and Domitian had no known aliment at this time, so it could be for the benefit of his father.
1 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar,_RIC_II_244.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC II V108739 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Vespasian. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 79 A.D. 3.1g, 18mm. Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, holding palladium and sceptre. RIC II V1087. 1 commentsLucas H
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V108734 viewsDomitian as Caesar 69-81 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 79, to 24 June A.D. (3.39g, 17.7mm, 6h). Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right. Rev: Vesta std. l., with Palladium and scepter. RIC II V1087, BMC 262, RSC 378.

Vesta was the virgin goddess of home, hearth, and family. This was a part of the last issue of precious metal coins before Vespasian’s death, and this reverse is not shared with Vespasian or Titus.

This is another upgrade. When I first narrowed by primary collecting area to Flavian denarii, I tended to pick up common coins without regard for condition. In the back of my mind, I wondered if another would come along at all, much less in a price range I could afford. After watching the market for a longer period of time and understanding it better, I see my mistake, and now have the patience to wait for better examples of common coins. However, this leaves me correcting some of my early mistakes with upgrades.

This example is well centered and the obverse lettering is very sharp.
2 commentsLucas H
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Domitian as Caesar RIC II V1447 Overstrike65 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Vespasian. AR Denarius. Ephesus Mint, 71 A.D. (2.59g, 20.6m, 7h). Obv: DOMITIAN[VS CAES]AR AVG F, bare bust right, draped and cuirassed with aegis. Rev: PACI AVGUSTAE, Victory adv. R. with wreath and palm, lower r. [EPE]. RIC V1447. Overstruck on RIC II V1433.

Overstrike on identifiable under type of Vespasian RIC II 1433. Obv: IMP CAESAR VEPAS AVG COS III TR PPP, laureate head r. Rev: PACI AVGVSTAE, Victory adv. L. with wreath and palm, lower l. EPE. Unusual to have an overstrike of an emperor still in life, and of a coin as a part of the same series at the same mint.

3 commentsLucas H
T294.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-29472 viewsÆ Sestertius, 24.01g
Rome mint, 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI AVG VESP F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: S C in field; Minerva adv. r., with spear and shield
RIC 294 (C). BMC 231. BNC 238.
Acquired from Olding, MA Shops, May 2019 = Olding, List 96, March 2019, Sammlung Fritz Reusing, no. 177. From the collection of Fritz Reusing (1874-1956), inherited and continued by Reusing's nephew Paul Schürer (1890-1976).

An exquisite sestertius struck for Domitian as Caesar under Titus featuring his patron deity Minerva. DIVI AVG VESP F tells us the coin was struck after Vespasian's deification. The date of Vespasian's consecratio is dated by the epigraphic evidence sometime between September 8, 79 - May 29, 80, so this sestertius could not have been struck much earlier than June 80. The Minerva reverse was one of the more common types struck during this second bronze issue for Domitian Caesar under Titus.

Although fine portraits can occasionally be seen in silver, it is on the larger canvas of the bronze where the full flower of Roman imperial portraiture can be seen. This sestertius has one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've come across. A superb example of the imperial engraver's art.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
T517.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-517115 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.77g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD (Titus)
Obv: CAES DIVI F•DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: DIVO VESP across field; Altar shrine
RIC 517 (R). BMC 150. RSC 95. RPC 862 (6 spec.). BNC 112.
Acquired from NumisCorner, July 2017.

A fairly scarce Domitian Caesar cistophorus struck under Titus. The reverse honours the divine Vespasian and shows what catalogues have traditionally called a 'large altar' - in fact what the reverse depicts is a shrine in the shape of an altar. The doors, columns, and steps are strong evidence that what we are seeing is a building and not an altar. How the shrine related to the Temple of the Divine Vespasian is unknown.

Struck in good metal and fine Roman style.
9 commentsDavid Atherton
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Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T026641 viewsDomitian as Caesar. 69-81 A.D. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 80-81 A.D. (3.23g, 18.5mm, 6h). Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITANVS COS VII, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Altar, garlanded and lighted. RIC II T266, BMC T92, RSC 397a.

A unique pulvinaria reverse type for Domitian at the time used both as Caesar and emperor. The addition of “DIVI F” on Domitian’s coins in 80 A.D. help scholars determine that Vespasian’s deification had taken place by 80 A.D., although it arguably took place before in 79 A.D..

While worn, the legends on this example are complete.
1 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_under_TItus__RIC_II_T0267V.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T0267V39 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Titus. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 80-81 A.D. (3.28g, 18.0mm, 6h) Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head left. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, goat standing left within laurel wreath. RIC II T267 Variant (head left) (R2).

An interesting variant on the right facing common coin minted under Titus after the deification of Vespasian. I thought this might be a unique example, but Curtis Clay was aware of a previous example sold by Lucernae, on eBay, 25 Nov. 2013. With a weight of 2.46g.

This example is well centered and has full legends. Given the wear, it was well circulated, and others are bound to surface.
1 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesear,_RIC_II_T268.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T026836 viewsDomitian as Caesar. AR Denarius. Rome Mint. 80-81. (3.17g, 19.5mm, 6h). Obv: r to l out- CɅESɅR DIVI F DOMITIɅNVS COS VII, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Minerva advancing right with spear and shield. RIC II T268, RIC 268.

As Caesar, Domitian had many fewer coin types minted during Titus’ reign than he did during Vespasian’s longer reign. Even as Caesar, Domitian used Minerva on his coins which was to become much more common under Domitian as Augustus.
Lucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_RIC_II_T0271.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T027121 viewsDomitian as Caesar. AR Denarius. Rome Mint 80-81 A.D. (3.35g, 17.2m, 6h). Obv: CɅESɅR DIVI F DOMITIɅNVS COS VII, laureate head right. Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, draped seat with Corinthian helmet above. RIC II T271, Sear 2677, RSC 300a. Ex Warren Esty private collection.

This type, issued after the deification of Vespasian, is another of the pulvinaria types mirroring Titus’ issues of 80 A.D. The use of DIVI F corresponded with new precious metal types following the older types with AVG F and helps scholars date the deification of Vespasian.
Lucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_RIC_II_T272.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T027248 viewsDomitian as Caesar. 79-81 A.D. AR Quinarius. Rome Mint 80-81 A.D. (1.59g, 15.7m, 6h). Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head r. Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST (clockwise in), Victory adv. r. with wreath and palm. RIC II T272 (R).

A rare quinarius issued for Domitian as Caesar under Titus. It is through Domitian’s coinage with Divi F. that scholars determine Vespasian’s deification likely took place in 80 A.D. It appears the precious metal coinage of Titus was largely restricted to the first half of 80 A.D., perhaps because of the great fire in Rome.
3 commentsLucas H
Domitian_as_Caesar_RIC_II_T518.jpg
Domitian as Caesar under Titus RIC II T0518 cistophoric tetradrachm 60 viewsDomitian as Caesar under Titus. AR Cistophoric Tetradrachm. Rome Mint for Asia. 80-81 A.D. (10.64 g, 23,3m, 6h). Obv: CAES DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII, laureate head right. Rev: PRINC IVVENTVT, Domitian riding left, right hand raised, holding scepter. RIC II (Titus 518).

Subject to some dispute, cistophorii of the Flavians are thought to be minted in Rome for use in the East based on style. This coin mimics a denarius of Domitian as Caesar under Vespasian (RIC II V539), and likely refers to Domitian’s ride in the Judean triumph celebrated by Vespasian and Titius. Ex Incitatus, HBJ, and ACCG.
2 commentsLucas H
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Domitian Caesar / Titus Judaea Capta Sestertius Mule84 viewsDomitian Caesar / Titus Judaea Capta Æ Sestertius Mule, 25.38 g. Rome mint, struck 80/81

O: [CAES DIVI] AVG VESP F DOMITIAN[VS COS VII] - RIC II 288-306 (Titus)
R: IVD CAP across fields; SC in field below; mourning Jewess to left of palm on pile of arms; Jew on right with hands bound, arms on ground. - Titus RIC 153 (Perhaps a die match); Hendin 1593b; Upcoming addenda Titus 287A.

The only known sestertius mule under Titus.

From the patina it was likely found in eastern Europe, perhaps Bulgaria, a rich find spot for a lot of the judaea sestertii.

What evidence points to RIC II 288 / 306?

As noted by Curtis Clay, "Obverse legends beginning CAESAR are rare, and so far only known with portrait laur. left, according to RIC 275-7. Legends beginning CAES are very much more common.

With the N of DOMITIAN placed before Domitian's mouth, too much space seems to remain for just COS VII. We almost need that added VS to fill out the space.

Flavian mules in gold or silver occur with some regularity, though they are all rare individually.

It's not surprising, however, that very few sestertius mules occurred.

1. Vespasian struck c. 90% of the sestertii of his reign in the single year 71. Mules were impossible, because he hadn't yet begun striking sestertii for Titus and Domitian!

2. Later, when sestertii were being struck for Titus and Domitian too, the rev. types were not usually personalized, for example by carrying on the imperial titulature of each emperor, but were general and could be shared among the emperors, for example S C Spes advancing, or PAX AVGVSTI S C. Virtually all of the rev. types were appropriate for all three emperors, so there could be no mules!

Under Titus the possibilities for mules increased, since more types were introduced that were apparently meant for just one of the two imperial brothers, for example:

Titus: the Judaea Capta types, ANNONA AVG without S C, FELICIT PVBLIC, PIETAS AVGVST (Titus and Dom. shaking hands), PROVIDENT AVGVST (Vesp. hands globe to Titus), S C (Roma hands Palladium to Titus on horseback)

Domitian: S C (Minerva fighting right)."
3 commentsNemonater
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Domitian Denarius8 viewsDomitian. Caesar under Vespasian 69-79 AD; Caesar under Titus 79-81 AD; Augustus 81-96 AD.

18 mm., 2,66 g.

Struck 81AD, Rome

IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M: Head of Domitian, laureate, right

TR P COS VII DES VIII P P: Wreath above curule chair

References: RIC 48; Sear 2747

AAEX
RL
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Domitian denarius (issued as Caesar under Vespasian) with the Salus feeding snake reverse123 viewsDenarius from Domitianus (issued as Caesar under Vespasian in 79 AD).
Grs 3,49 and 18 mm.
Observe : CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right. Reverse : PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, leaning on column & feeding snake.
RIC 1084 (Vespasian).
Rarity : C2 (laureate left is R2).

A very beautiful denarius with sharp details on both obs. and rev.
6 commentslabienus
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Domitian Denarius ric 1081 (Vespasian)4 viewsCAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI
Laureate head right
PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS
Clasped hands before legionary eagle

Domitian Caesar 69-81
AR Denarius
Struck 79
3,13g/ 18mm
Ric 1081 (Vespasian)
Ex Tom Vossen
1 commentsParthicus Maximus
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Domitian Dupondius10 viewsDomitian. Caesar under Vespasian 69-79 AD; Caesar under Titus 79-81 AD; Augustus 81-96 AD.

28 mm., 10.77g.

Rome. 85-96AD

IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM [COS ... CENS POT P P]: Bust of Domitian, radiate, right, possibly with aegis

VIRTVTI AVGVSTI S C: Virtus standing right, resting foot on helmet, holding spear and parazonium

References: similar to RIC 374

AAFD
RL
DomDup.jpg
Domitian dupondius, 92-94 AD, Rome mint22 viewsDomitian. An emperor very much shaped by the circumstances of his upbringing, in a tumultuous and chaotic time, and neglected by (one of my more loved emperors) Vespasian in favor of Titus. I will give him serious commendation on the seriousness of his paranoia... "your lord and god Domitian" might have been paranoid, but he wasn't crazy in the vein of Commodus, Caracalla, or Caligula. For that, I can respect him.

Die axis 180 degrees.
EvaJupiterSkies
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Domitian Fouree Denarius, (imitating) RIC II 1084 (Vespasian)46 viewsUnofficial mint, Domitian Fouree Denarius, c. 79 A.D. AE plated w/AR, 2.86g 18mm, (imitating) RIC II 1084 (Vespasian)
O: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right
R: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Salus standing right, leaning on column & feeding snake
2 commentscasata137ec
Domitian_Horseback.jpg
Domitian on horseback119 viewsAD 69-81. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.48 g, 2h). Rome mint. Struck AD 73.
O: CAES AVG F DOMIT COS II; Laureate head right
R: Domitian on horseback left, raising hand and holding eagle-tipped scepter.
RIC II 680 (Vespasian); RSC 664.

The reverse depicts Domitian participating in the Judaea Capta triumph of 71 A.D. He is, as Josephus described him, riding alongside in magnificent apparel and mounted on a horse that was itself a site worth seeing.
4 commentsNemonater
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Domitian RIC 16100 viewsAR Denarius, 3.43g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: P P COS VII DES VIII; Seat, draped; above, semicircular frame decorated with three crescents
RIC 16 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC 8.
Acquired from Germania Inferior, June 2018.

Domitian seems to have been somewhat in a hurry to strike coins as Augustus after Titus' death in mid September 81 AD, presumably for a legionary donative. This denarius was struck before Domitian had been awarded the power of the tribunate (TR P) and pontifex maximus (PM). Here his only titles are Augustus (AVG), Imperator (IMP), Consul for the 7th time (COS VII), and pater patriae, father of the country (P P). Perhaps it may have taken a few days for the Senate to award the power of the tribunate to Domitian because they had assembled at the small town of Reate where Titus had died and needed to be in Rome in order to vote him the right. The religious ceremonies required for Domitian to assume the title pontifex maximus had not yet finished by this time either, here he is simply PONT, or in other words a member of the College of Pontiffs. Some have argued that PONT is the same as PM, I disagree. Titus as Caesar early on had also used the title PONT on his denarii and he was never pontifex maximus under Vespasian - only the emperor can be Pontifex Maximus or greatest priest. Although this Group 2 denarius is not part of Domitian's first RIC issue, it is very likely to have been struck within the first few days of him assuming the purple. RIC notes the chronology is not precise with these issues from 81 and they are grouped only for 'convenience'. Judging by the rarity of the Group 2 denarii they could not have been struck for any great length of time.

Dark cabinet toning with a stylish early portrait.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
D44.JPG
Domitian RIC 4488 viewsAR Denarius, 2.56g
Rome mint, 81 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DIVI VESP F DOMIT AVG PONT; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; Altar, garlanded and lighted
RIC 44 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.

An extremely rare and early denarius of Domitian. This coin was minted before Domitian became Pontifex Maximus, as shown by the obverse legend which only shows him as PONT. Presumably the official ceremonies for this elevation had not been completed when the coin was struck. Domitian, always a stickler for the correct procedures, probably insisted the correct form of his titles be struck. This coin also indicates how quickly new coins were struck for Domitian after he became emperor. Also, notice the nice mention of Vespasian in the obverse legend - DIVI VESP F, "Son of the Divine Vespasian".

The style is very typical of the early denarii of Domitian before his coinage reform the following year. Notice the veristic style with the hook nose. Later his portraits became more idealized.

Not listed in the BM nor Cohen. The new RIC cites examples at the Ashmolean and a private sale.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_COS_V_RIC_957.jpg
Domitian RIC 95754 viewsAR Denarius (19mm 2.76g)
ob. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS
laureate head of Domitian right
rev. COS V
soldier on horseback rearing right, extending arm
Rome mint under Vespasian AD 77-78
RIC 957
2 commentsHolgerG
133- Domitian RIC 725.JPG
Domitian RIC ??64 viewsAe As, Rome mint. 77-79 AD
Obv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS?
Rev: VICTORIA AVGVST, Victory right on Prow, holding wreath.
27mm, 10.9 gm
Possibly RIC 725 ( Vespasian) COS V , or RIC 730 (Vespasian) COS VI?
1 commentsjdholds
domitian_127.jpg
Domitian RIC II, 127512 viewsDomitian 81 - 96
AV - Aureus, 7.38g, 18mm
Rome AD 88 - 89
obv. DOMITIANVS AVGVSTVS
head laureate r.
rev. GERMANICVS COS XIIII
Germania naked to waist, wearing breeches, sitting r. on shield, in mourning
attitude; below a broken spear
shield with scroll ornaments and central dot
RIC II, 127; C.148
good F, clipped?

GERMANICUS, after the campaign against the Chatti and the extension of the DECUMATES AGRI of Vespasian to the river Main and the Taunus mountains AD 83
Hexagonal long shield, used by the Germanic tribes
1 commentsJochen
D183.jpg
Domitian RIC-183332 viewsAR Denarius, 2.90g
Rome mint, 84 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERMANIC; Bust of Domitian, laureate, draped, bearded, l.
Rev: P M TR POT III IMP V COS X P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 183 (R3). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, April 2014.

84 AD probably saw the peak of artistic quality with Domitian's precious metal coinage. Two years previous, the fineness of the denarius was increased and the style radically changed from the earlier issues. Upon Domitian's accession the veristic style of Vespasian and Titus still dominated, after the reform it became more idealised and much finer. By 84 the style had evolved to such a high degree that the mint was able to produce these finely engraved draped busts, albeit in small quantities. This extremely rare coin struck in 84 is an exquisite example of the new idealised style. This is the second known specimen of the type. Much experimentation was going on at the mint at this time with reverse types, busts, and style. I assume the amount of time an engraver spent on rendering these highly polished pieces was considerable, which could perhaps explain why they were not struck more commonly. RIC theorises the drapery represents a military cloak commemorating Domitian's recent German victory. Afterwards, the style remained idealised and fine but the finer portraits would sometimes appear with an aegis, the draped busts consigned to an experimental cul-de-sac. The idealised style would continue to evolve throughout the reign reaching baroque proportions by 88. It's a shame that this fine portrait bust was struck sparingly.

Ian Carradice speculated in his 1983 monograph Coinage and Finances in the Reign of Domitian that the same engraver who did this piece may have worked on an earlier left facing portrait from 81 (see my Domitian RIC 75). Although left facing portraits are extremely rare in Domitian's reign and it is not out of the realm of possibility that the same engraver was working at the mint three years later and produced another left facing bust, to my eyes the styles seem too different to warrant that conclusion.

The bust of Domitian here is superbly rendered, one of the finest portraits of Domitian I've ever seen on a denarius. Same obverse die as the unique specimen cited in RIC.

13 commentsDavid Atherton
D295a.jpg
Domitian RIC-29547 viewsÆ Dupondius, 13.50g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: S C in field; Trophy; to l., German captive std. l.; to r., Germania std. r.
RIC 295 (C). BMC 310. BNC 332.
Acquired from Forvm Ancient Coins, October 2019. Ex Edgar L. Owen.

A 'Germania Capta' dupondius struck during Domitian's first issue of 85, the first bronze issue that fully celebrated the German victory. The war with the German tribe the Chatti likely took place in either 82 or 83. Domitian acquired the title 'Germanicus' in 83, the year of his German triumph. Why it took so long for these achievements to be commemorated on the bronze coinage is a mystery. Perhaps the bronze mint was not in full operation until 85? The motif of the reverse design closely follows the 'Judaea Capta' types of Vespasian (who in turn copied it from well known republican types). The trunk of the trophy even resembles a palm. The 'Germania Capta' types would be struck for only a few short years between 85-88.

Beautiful dark olive green patina.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
D331sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-331168 viewsAR Denarius, 3.20g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POTES P P; Germania seated r. on shield; below, broken spear
RIC 331 (R2). BMC 82. RSC 181. BNC 84.
Ex Roma Auction V, 23 March 2013, lot 728.

In either 82 or 83 AD Domitian conducted a census of Gaul as a smoke screen in order to make preparations to invade the Germanic Chatti lands across the Rhine. Not much is known of what the actual war consisted of - perhaps some road building, punitive raids against Chatti strongholds, and some minor skirmishes. No large battles, a la Mons Graupius, have come down to us, prompting Tacitus' assertion, 'that in recent times, the Germans were more triumphed over than conquered'. Even the date of the conflict is in dispute - although Domitian did rack up four salutations between June 83 and September 84, several of which must be attributed to the Chattan Campaign.

Domitian celebrated a triumph over the Chatti in 83, after which he claimed the title 'Germanicus'. This rare denarius from 85 is a record of the war and triumph over the defeated German tribe. The coin is part of the last series of denarii minted with the recently increased silver fineness before the lesser Neronian standard was restored. During this period particular attention was paid by the die engravers to Domitian's portrait, evidenced here by the aegis and fine style. The Germania Capta reverse has become an iconic Flavian type, along with Vespasian and Titus' Judaea Capta types, despite the 'hollow' triumph it records.

A most wonderful coin in hand!
10 commentsDavid Atherton
D332.jpg
Domitian RIC-332173 viewsAR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT P P; Minerva adv r., with spear and shield (M1)
RIC 332 (R2). BMC 78. RSC 179a. BNC -.
Ex Jyrki Muona Collection.

This denarius was minted in 85 AD right after Domitian slightly lowered the fineness of his denarii to Neronian standards. He had previously in 82 raised the standard of the denarius to the levels set by Augustus but apparently financially could not maintain those standards. The coins were still minted at a higher standard than those under Vespasian or Titus and would remain so until the end of his reign.

This coin also illustrates the high artistic standards Domitian demanded of his die engravers. The addition of the aegis along with the fine style idealistic portrait shows the care the mint took in the minting of these coins.

The surface is slightly porous and the reverse faintly double struck but the overall eye appeal I believe overcomes all that.
7 commentsDavid Atherton
D397sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-39745 viewsÆ Sestertius, 26.19g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM XI CENS PER P P; Head of Domitian, laureate, r., with aegis
Rev: GERMANIA CAPTA; S C in exergue; Trophy; to r., German captive stg. r., hands bound, head l.; to l., Germania std. l.; around arms
RIC 397 (R2). BMC 361. BNC -.
Acquired from Incitatus Coins, August 2019.

In 85 Domitian struck a fairly impressive issue of sestertii, M. Grant hyperbolically called it the most 'ambitious' of any one reign or year. The series is the first major aes issue of Domitian's reign and is dominated by panoramic types commemorating his military victory over the Germanic tribe the Chatti. The details of the war are unclear, but the overall impression is that the conflict was a minor affair blown out of proportion by an emperor eager for military glory. Consequently, Domitian's Germanic triumph of 83 received a certain amount of ridicule from ancient writers who thought the whole thing was a sham (Dio goes so far as to say Domitian raided the palace's furniture stores for his fake spoils!), no doubt the numismatic propaganda for the victory was likely viewed in the same manner by contemporary senatorial elites. Germania Capta types were first struck in silver in 84 and in bronze in 85. This iconic Germania Capta sestertius strongly echoes Vespasian's Judaea Capta types - but instead of a palm tree we see a trophy and a bound captive replaces the triumphal emperor. H. Mattingly writes in BMCRE 'the type is closely modelled on the Judaea Capta of Vespasian, but the German element is indicated by the heavy angular cloak worn by the man and by the oblong shields.' Comparing the two triumphs, the Josephian scholar Steve Mason remarked - 'The same people who produced Flavian Triumph I: Judaea were on hand for Flavian Triumph II: Germania, and sequels are rarely as good as the originals.'

The Germania Capta sestertii were produced for only a few short years between 85-88. The present example from the third issue of 85 is a rare variant with an obverse legend struck just after Domitian had become censor for life (CENS PER).
3 commentsDavid Atherton
D686.jpg
Domitian RIC-686170 viewsAR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome mint, 89 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XXI COS XIIII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 686 (C2). BMC 159. RSC 258. BNC 154.
Acquired from Athena Numismatics, June 2014.

Late in 89 Domitian was voted a double triumph over the Chatti and the Dacians. This common denarius struck between mid September and 31 December records Domitian's 21st imperial acclamation, the culmination of the two campaigns. The portrait style is quite unusual featuring a bull necked, heavily jowled Domitian, perhaps features more fitting for Vespasian.

A large flan specimen with a distinctive colourful patina.
6 commentsDavid Atherton
D816_(5)sm.jpg
Domitian RIC-81672 viewsAR Denarius, 2.73g
Rome mint, 95-96 AD
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM; Head of Domitian, bare, bearded, r.
Rev: Temple, eight columns, seated figure in centre; IMP CAESAR on architrave
RIC 816 (R2). BMC 243. RSC 175. BNC -.
Ex Private Collection.

Domitian struck a rare undated issue of denarii depicting five different temples. Based on portrait style and the fact that Domitian's moneyers were experimenting with new reverse designs after 94, the issue has been dated to either 95 or 96. Four of the five temples have been identified - Serapis, Cybele, Minerva, and Capitoline Jupiter. The fifth type is an octastyle temple, as seen on the coin above, and its identification remains a mystery. Mattingly conjectured it could be the Temple of Divus Vespasian, P.V. Hill and D. Vagi thought it possibly the Temple of Jupiter Victor, R.H. Darwell-Smith speculated it is the Temple of Jupiter Custos, and M. Tameanko believed it to be the Temple of Divus Augustus. Tameanko makes the strongest case. Earlier renditions of the temple on the coinage under Caligula show it with a hexastyle facade. Domitian restored or rebuilt the temple after the fire of 80. His architect Rabirius may have completely overhauled the building in a more contemporary style producing an octastyle temple. Almost a hundred years later Antoninus Pius restored the temple again and struck a series of coins commemorating the event. His coins indeed depict an octastyle temple very much like the one seen on this denarius and may be proof that under Domitian the temple was rebuilt as an octastyle structure. However, until more evidence comes to light, the identification remains uncertain. Like Domitian's earlier Saecular Games series, the temple denarii were likely struck as a special issue, perhaps reflecting Domitian's new interest as builder. The remarkable bare headed portrait further enhances the issue as something special.

Needless to say it is a fantastically rare piece! Additionally, the eight column type may be the scarcest of the temple group, considering I have located only two other examples in trade over the last 15 years. The other two coins (OldRomanCoins 2002, HJB 145, lot 265) are obverse die matches with mine. Oddly, some specimens (BM 234 for example) lack IMP CAESAR on the architrave.

Worn, with some bumps and scrapes, but well-centred and in good style with plenty of eye appeal.
4 commentsDavid Atherton
D833.jpg
Domitian RIC-83354 viewsÆ Dupondius, 12.14g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 81 AD
Obv: IMP D CAES DIVI VESP F AVG P M TR P P P COS VII; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: ROMA; S C in exergue; Roma std. l. on cuirass, with wreath and parazonium
RIC 833 (R). BMC 513. RPC 528. BNC 549.
Ex eBay, July 2019.

An unidentified Eastern mint struck aes coinage for Titus between 80-81 and then for Domitian in 81-82. The style (heavily seriffed letters, large portraits, and massive reverse figures), unique obverse legends, and uncommon fabric (flat, almost convex flans) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region prompted a localised imperial issue. The striking of imperial bronze outside of Rome was an exceptional step at the time considering the last imperial branch mint at Lugdunum had shuttered late in Vespasian's reign. The issues consisted of sestertii, dupondii, asses, and semisses which copied types struck at Rome.

Production at this Eastern mint continued uninterrupted between Titus' and Domitian's reigns, hinted at by Domitian's seamless adoption of Titus' types and legend formula after his accession - exemplified by the minor substitution of a 'D' for a 'T' in the obverse legend of this dupondius. Roma is the only reverse type struck on the dupondius for both issues. The coinage struck under Domitian at this mint is quite rare, owing to the short time frame in which it was produced. After its closure in early 82, the striking of imperial coinage would be consolidated at Rome for the remainder of Domitian's reign.

Handsome dark patina and honest wear.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
D841.JPG
Domitian RIC-841152 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.81g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
RIC 841 (C). BMC 251. RSC 23. RPC 864 (8 spec.). BNC 221.
Acquired from Tom Cederlind, February 2013.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. It being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. Domitian completed the structure the following year and it was said no expense was spared. The building Domitian dedicated was a lavish structure, magnificent in appearance featuring Pentelic marble, gold plated doors, and a roof of gilded bronze.

This cistophorus minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor commemorates the new Temple of Jupiter Domitian bestowed on Rome. Curiously, although the building featured six columns, only four are seen here. Statues of the deities Juno, Jupiter (seated) and Minverva can be seen between the columns.

A most wonderful coin in hand.
8 commentsDavid Atherton
Domitian_Struck_by_Vespasian_Antioch.JPG
Domitian Struck by Vespasian Antioch24 viewsDomitian, AE Semis, Issued under Vespasian, Syria, Seleucis and Pieria-Antiochia ad Orontem 74 - 81 AD, Butcher 165 c.i.,
OBV: DOMITIAN-VS CAESAR, Laureate head left
REV: SC, Legend in laurel wreath of eight bunches of leaves terminating in pellet
Romanorvm
Domitian_RIC_238.JPG
Domitian(us) as Caesar99 viewsDomitian, denarius.
RIC II 921 (Vespasian), RSC 47.
Rome mint, 76 A.D.
Obv. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, right.
Rev. COS IIII, winged Pegasus, standing right with raising left foreleg.

The usual descriptions say that Pegasus is'stepping right', but he isn't moving at all – just raising one foreleg – although this does vary from coin to coin. Perhaps Pegasus is greeting Domitian, who was quite willing to link himself to Minerva, the goddess who produced the golden bridle that tamed Pegasus (source: What I like about ancient coins).

I couldn't resist this one! An attractive portrait of the young caesar and a charming reverse.
1 commentsMarsman
BrettDomitian1.jpg
Domitian, AD 81-96110 viewsAR denarius, 20 mm (3.34 gm).

CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate head right / COS IIII, Pegasus right. Rome mint, struck AD 76-77, as Caesar.

RIC II.1, 921 (Vespasian); BMCRE II, 193 (Vespasian); RSC II, 047.

3 commentssocalcoins
05.jpg
Domitian, AD 81-9623 viewsAR denarius.

CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS VI, laureate head right / PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS, Vesta seated left, with Palladium and sceptre. Rome mint, struck AD 79, as Caesar.

RIC II.1, 1087 (Vespasian); BMCRE II, 262 (Vespasian); RSC II, 378.
socalcoins
116.jpg
Domitian, AD 81-9622 viewsAE dupondius. 28.42 mm (9.57 gm).

CAESAR AVGVSTI F, laureate head left / DOMITIANVS COS II, winged caduceus between crossed cornucopiae. Rome mint, struck AD 74, as Caesar.

RIC II.1, 764 (Vespasian); BMCRE II, 883 (Vespasian); RPC II, 2001; McAlee, 414.
1 commentssocalcoins
Domitian_Dupondius.jpg
Domitian, AE Dupondius. 26 mm / 9,96 gr. 88-89 AD.5 viewsDomitian: Caesar under Vespasian 69-79 AD; Caesar under Titus 79-81 AD; Augustus 81-96 AD.

Domitian, AE Dupondius. 26 mm / 9,96 gr. 88-89 AD.
IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER PP, radiate head right with aegis / VIRTVTI AVGVSTI S-C, Virtus standing right, foot on helmet, holding spear and parazonium. RIC II 645; Paris 447; cf Sear 2798 (consular year). RIC 645
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
roman3.JPG
DOMITIAN, as Caesar. 76 AD. 60 viewsAR Denarius (3.54 gm).
Laureate head right / Pegasus standing right.
RIC II 238 (Vespasian); BMCRE 193 (Vespasian); RSC 47.
2 commentsCGPCGP
00domitcab.jpg
DOMITIAN.50 viewsAR denarius. 77-78 AD. 3,43 grs. Laureate head right. CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS / Helmeted horseman galloping right,his right hand extended and trailing behind. COS V.
RIC 957 (Vespasian). RSC 49.
1 commentsbenito
dom1-horz.jpg
Domitian. 81-96 AD.26 viewsCAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS, laureate bust right .
COS IIII, winged Pegasus standing right with raised left foreleg.

RIC 238 (Vespasian); Scarce.
1 commentsPedja R
IMG_3774.JPG
Dora Vespasian Struck During Jewish WAr 52 viewsVespasian, 69-79 AD, bronze of 22.6 mm. Struck at the mint of Dora, during the Jewish War, dated to 69/70 AD. Bust of Vespasian to right/Astarte standing lft. Rosenberger 23.
amibosam
Tiberius___Germanicus_Gemellus__AD_19_(37-8)_and_19_(23-4),_respectively__Æ_Sestertius_(34mm,_24_74_g,_6h)__Rome_mint__100.jpg
Drusus (Caesar) Coin: Brass Sestertius 10 views(no legend) - Crossed cornucopias, each surmounted by the bareheaded bust of a boy facing one another; winged caduceus between
DRVSVS CAESAR TI AVG F DIVI AVG N PONT TR POT II around large SC. - Legend surrounding large S C
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (22-23 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 24.74g / 34mm / 6h
Rarity: Scarce
References:
RIC I 42 (Tiberius)
BMC Tiberius 95
CBN Tiberius 73
Provenances:
Richard Baker Collection
CNG
Acquisition/Sale: CNG Internet 435 #315

The Gary R. Wilson Collection

This issue, commemorating the birth of twin sons to Drusus Caesar and his wife Livia Drusilla (Livilla), was part of the series issued under the Tiberius in AD 22-23 to promote the imperial virtue and dynastic solidity of the emperor's family. Although Germanicus Gemellus died very young, his brother Tiberius lived into his adulthood, with the expectation that he would be heir to his grandfather following the premature death of his father, Drusus. In the later years of the emperor’s life, though, Gaius (Caligula) was often seen in close company with the emperor, while Tiberius Gemellus’s status was shrouded in obscurity. Thus, after the death of the emperor, Caligula, assisted by the Praetorian Prefect, Macro, quickly moved to take the purple. Upon the reading of the deceased emperor’s will, however, it was discovered that Tiberius intended for both Tiberius Gemellus and his cousin Gaius to be jointly elevated, and, moreover, that Gemellus was to be the senior partner. Under unknown authority, Caligula quickly had the will vacated, and, shortly thereafter, his cousin murdered.

This sestertius was struck in 22/23, nearly three years after the death of Germanicus, Tiberius’ nephew and first heir. In the
interim Tiberius had named no heir, but with the nine coins in his dated aes of 22/23 he announces a ‘Tiberian dynasty’
that includes his son Drusus, his daughter-in-law (and niece) Livilla, and his twin grandsons Tiberius Gemellus and
Germanicus Gemellus, whose heads decorate the crossed cornucopias on this sestertius.
Since it is the only coin in the aes of 22/23 without an obverse inscription, we must presume its design was believed
sufficient to communicate the fact that the twin boys were portrayed. Though this type usually is thought to celebrate the
birth of the twins, that event had occurred two and a half years before this coin was struck. Rather, it is best seen in light of
early Julio-Claudian dynastic rhetoric in which male heirs were celebrated as twins (even if they were not literally twins, or
even biological brothers) and were routinely likened to the Dioscuri, the heavenly twins Castor and Pollux.
The crossed-cornucopias design is familiar on ancient coinage, and here the cornucopias, grape clusters, grape leaves and
pine cones seemingly allude to Bacchus or Liber in a reference to fecundity. In terms of dynastic appeal, the design boasts
of the prosperity and fruitfulness of the Tiberian line, with the caduceus symbolizing Mercury as the messenger of the gods
and the bringer of good fortune.
Despite the hopefulness represented by this series of coins, tragedy struck on two fronts. The ‘Tiberian dynasty’ collapsed
within months of its being announced when both Drusus and his son Germanicus Gemellus (the boy whose head is shown
on the right cornucopia) died in 23.
Poor fates awaited the remaining two members: Drusus’ wife Livilla became increasingly associated with Tiberius’ prefect
Sejanus, and she died shamefully in the aftermath of his downfall in 31, and the second grandson, Tiberius Gemellus,
survived long enough to be named co-heir of Tiberius with Caligula, but after Tiberius’ death he was pushed into a
subsidiary role and soon was executed by Caligula, who would not tolerate a second heir to the throne.

The Caduceus between two cornucopia indicates Concord, and is found on medals of Augustus, M. Antony, Vespasian, Titus, Domitian, Nerva, Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius, and Clodius Albinus in addition to this sestertius of Drusus.

Tiberius Julius Caesar Nero Gemellus, known Gemellus and his twin brother Tiberius Claudius Caesar Germanicus II Gemellus, were born on the 10th of October 19AD. They were the win sons of Drusus and Livilla, the grandson of the Emperor Tiberius, and the cousin of the Emperor Caligula. Gemellus is a nickname meaning “the twin”. Germanicus II Gemellus, died in early childhood in 23 AD whereas Nero Gemellus died 37 or 38AD perhaps on the orders of his cousin Caligula.

Gemellus’ father Drusus (also known as Castor) died mysteriously when Gemellus was only four. It is believed that Drusus died at the hands of the Praetorian Prefect, Lucius Aelius Sejanus. His mother Livilla was either put to death or committed suicide because she had been plotting with Sejanus to overthrow Tiberius, and also because she may have worked with Sejanus to poison her husband. Livilla had been Sejanus’ lover for a number of years before their deaths, and many including Tiberius believed that both Gemelli were really Sejanus’ sons.

We know very little about Gemellus’ life, since he was largely ignored by most of the Imperial family. When Gemellus was 12 years old, he was summoned to the island of Capri where Tiberius lived at that time, along with his cousin Caligula. Tiberius made both Caligula and Gemellus joint-heirs, but Caligula was the favorite.

After Tiberius died on March 16th, 37AD, Caligula became Emperor and adopted Gemellus as his son. Caligula soon thereafter ordered him killed in late 37 AD or early 38 AD . The allegation was plotting against Caligula while he was ill. Suetonius writes that Caligula ordered Gemellus killed.
Gary W2
Vespasian_Dupondius.png
Dupondius of Vespasian7 viewsBerlin, TiergartenAlex F
convex_quad_sm.jpg
Durotrigan Bi "Durotrigan E" or "Cranbourne Chase" type stater, region: South Britain (Dorset), c. 58 BC - 43 AD11 viewsFlan roughly circular, obverse convex, reverse concave.
18.5mm, 1.5+mm thick, 2.82g
Die axis: ~3h (Greek), assuming traditional diagonal wreath position with "eyes" right
Material: billon of unknown silver and other metal content.

Obverse: devolved head of a god (Celtic "Apollo") right , reverse: disjointed horse / chariot left with 12 pellets above and 1 below (possibly indicating 12+1 lunar months in a solar year)

The design is loosely based on golden staters of Philip II of Macedon with laureate head of Apollo on obverse and a charioteer driving a biga (Mediterranean two-horse chariot) on reverse.

References: Durotrigan E, Cranbourne Chase type, BMC 2525-2731, Mack 317-318, Sp 367, RDVA 1235-1237 etc.

Peculiarities in this case: small flan, so most of design does not fit onto it, probably indicating very late production, no usual correspondence between the "crook" crossing the "wreath" and the "left eye", pellets large and flat, obverse significantly off center, ornaments left to "cheek" clearly visible.

The Durotriges were one of the Celtic (possibly even pre-Celtic) tribes living in Britain prior to the Roman invasion. The tribe lived in modern Dorset, south Wiltshire, south Somerset and Devon east of the River Axe and the discovery of an Iron Age hoard in 2009 at Shalfleet, Isle of Wight gives evidence that they lived in the western half of the island. After the Roman conquest, their main civitates, or settlement-centred administrative units, were Durnovaria (modern Dorchester, "the probable original capital") and Lindinis (modern Ilchester, "whose former, unknown status was thereby enhanced"). Their territory was bordered to the west by the Dumnonii; and to the east by the Belgae.

Durotriges were more a tribal confederation than a tribe. They were one of the groups that issued coinage before the Roman conquest, part of the cultural "periphery" round the "core group" of Britons in the south. These coins were rather simple and had no inscriptions. The Durotriges presented a settled society, based in the farming of lands surrounded and controlled by strong hill forts that were still in use in 43 AD. Maiden Castle is a preserved example of one of these hill forts.

The area of the Durotriges is identified in part by coin finds: few Durotrigan coins are found in the "core" area, where they were apparently unacceptable and were reminted. To their north and east were the Belgae, beyond the Avon and its tributary Wylye: "the ancient division is today reflected in the county division between Wiltshire and Somerset." Their main outlet for the trade across the Channel, strong in the first half of the 1st century BC, when the potter's wheel was introduced, then drying up in the decades before the advent of the Romans, was at Hengistbury Head. Numismatic evidence shows progressive debasing of the coinage, suggesting economic retrenchment accompanying the increased cultural isolation. Analysis of the body of Durotrigan ceramics suggests that the production was increasingly centralised, at Poole Harbour. Burial of Durotriges was by inhumation, with a last ritual meal provided even under exiguous circumstances, as in the eight burials at Maiden Castle, carried out immediately after the Roman attack.

Not surprisingly, the Durotriges resisted Roman invasion in AD 43, and the historian Suetonius records some fights between the tribe and the second legion Augusta, then commanded by Vespasian. By 70 AD, the tribe was already Romanised and securely included in the Roman province of Britannia. In the tribe’s area, the Romans explored some quarries and supported a local pottery industry.

The Durotriges, and their relationship with the Roman Empire, form the basis for an ongoing archaeological research project (https://research.bournemouth.ac.uk/project/the-durotriges-project/) directed by Paul Cheetham, Ellen Hambleton and Miles Russell of Bournemouth University. The Durotriges Project has, since 2009, been reconsidering the Iron Age to Roman transition through a detailed programme of field survey, geophysical investigation and targeted excavation.
Yurii P
EB0397_scaled.JPG
EB0397 Vespasian / Eagle on Cippus7 viewsVespasian, AR Denarius, AD 76
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right.
Rev: COS [VII] across field, eagle standing front on base/cippus, wings open, head right.
References: RIC II 845.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.239 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0398_scaled.JPG
EB0398 Vespasian / Aequitas6 viewsVespasian, AE As, 77-78 AD.
Obv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG COS VIII PP, laureate head left, globe at point of bust.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVSTI, Aequitas standing left, holding scales and sceptre. S-C across fields.
References: RIC 1229; Lyons 88.
Diameter: 26mm, Weight: 8.713 grams.
Note: Sold.
EB
EB0599_scaled.JPG
EB0599 Vespasian / Nike12 viewsVespasian Æ35mm Drachm of Alexandria. Year 2 or 3 = 69/70 or 70/71 AD.
Obv: Laureate head right.
Rev: Winged bust of Nike right, (LB or LΓ before?).
References: Dattari 389-390.
Diameter: 35.5mm, Weight: 27.65 grams.
EB
EB0600_scaled.JPG
EB0600 Vespasian / Nike12 viewsVespasian Æ37mm Drachm of Alexandria. Year 3 = 70/71 AD.
Obv: Laureate head right.
Rev: Winged bust of Nike right, LΓ before.
References: Dattari 390.
Diameter: 37mm, Weight: 24.62 grams.
EB
EB0601_scaled.JPG
EB0601 Vespasian / Isis11 viewsVespasian, AE 25 of Alexandria. Year 4 = 71/72 AD.
Obv: Laureate head right.
Rev: Bust of Isis right, LΔ before.
References: Dattari 383.
Diameter: 25.5mm, Weight: 8.34 grams.
EB
EB0602_scaled.JPG
EB0602 Vespasian / Nike17 viewsVespasian AR Tetradrachm of Alexandria. Year 1 = 69 AD.
Obv: AVT TIT FLVIO VEΣΠAΣIANOV, Laureate head right, LA before.
Rev: Nike flying left holding wreath & palm.
References: Dattari 359.
Diameter: 24mm, Weight: 11.44 grams.
1 commentsEB
EB0683_scaled.JPG
EB0683 Vespasian / Nike15 viewsVespasian, 69-79, AR Hemidrachm of Caesarea, Cappadocia.
Obverse: AVTOKP KAICAΡ OVECΠACIANOC CEBA, laureate head right.
Reverse: Nike walking right holding wreath and palm.
Diameter: 15mm, Weight: 1.38g
References: Syd 94, Metcalf 17, RPC II 1659, SGI 735.
1 commentsEB
EB0705_scaled.JPG
EB0705 Vespasian / Temple of Aphrodite8 viewsVespasian 69-79, Koinon of Cyprus, AE 27, RY 8? (AD 75/6).
Obverse: OYЄCΠACIANOC CЄBACTOC, Laureate head right.
Reverse: ΚΟΙΝΟΝ ΚΥΠΡ - ΙΩΝ, Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, within which is conical xoanon between stars; candelabrum on each side of building; paved semicircular courtyard in foreground; [ΕΤΟΥC H?] date in legend.
References: Cf. RPC II 1821, cf. SNG Copenhagen 75.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 13.011g.
EB
020-Vespasian_AE-25,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS_SEBA-OYESPASIANOY,_LS-Y-6-73-74_Serapis-r__K-G-20_45,RPC-2441_Q-001_0h_23,8-25,3mm_8,15g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AE-25, G-300, D-401, LS, Serapis bust right,142 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AE-25, G-300, D-401, LS, Serapis bust right,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, Laureate head of Vespasianus right.
revers:- LS, Serapis bust right.
exe: -/-//LS, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,14g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Year (LS) 6 = 73-74 A.D., ref: Geissen-300, Dattari-401, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.45-p-70, RPC-2441, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
020-Vespasian_Billon-Tetradrachm,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS-SEBA-OYESPASIANOY_LB_POMH-Roma-left_K-G-20_15_Q-001_0h_25mm_12,69g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-278, D-365, PΩMH, Roma standing left,61 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-278, D-365, PΩMH, Roma standing left,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, laureate head of Vespasianus right, LB before.
revers:- PΩMH, Roma standing left, holding spear and shield.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,69g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Year (LB) 2 = 69-70 A.D., ref: Geissen-278, Dattari-365, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.15-p-68, RPC-2413, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
020-Vespasian_Billon-Tetradrachm,_Alexandria,_AYTOK-KAIS_SEBA-OYESPASIANOY,_L-Gamma_Isis-head-right_K-G-20_29_Q-001_axis-0h_23-25mm_12,14g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-287, D-379, LΓ, Isis bust right,82 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, 020 Vespasian (69-79 A.D.), AR-Tetradrachm, G-287, D-379, LΓ, Isis bust right,
avers:- AYTOK-KAIΣ-ΣEBA-OYEΣΠAΣIANOY, laureate head of Vespasianus right.
revers:- LΓ, Isis bust right.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,14g, axis: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: Year (LΓ) 3 = 70-71 A.D., ref: Geissen-287, Dattari-379, Kapmann-Ganschow-20.29-p-69, RPC-2430, Milne- ,
Q-001
quadrans
R610_Vespasian_fac.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 069/070, Vespasian, Alexandria5 viewsVespasian
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: AΥTOK KAIΣ ΣEBA OΥEΣΠAΣIANOΥ, laureate head right, date LB before
Rev.: AΛEΞANΔPEIA, Alexandria standing left, holding wreath and scepter.
Billon, 12.93g, 22mm
Ref.: Milne 397; Dattari 354; RPC 2414
shanxi
Vespasian_06.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 069/070, Vespasian, Eirene 31 viewsVespasian
Alexandria
Billon-Tetradrachm
Obv.: AΥTOK KAIΣ ΣEBA OΥEΣΠAΣIANOΥ, laureate head right, date LB before
Rev.: EIPHNH, Eirene standing left, branch in right, caduceus in left
Billon, 12.65g, 23-26mm
Ref.: RPC II 2411, BMC 232, Dattari 357
2 commentsshanxi
Vespasian_05.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, AD 070/071, Vespasian, Isis24 viewsVespasian
Alexandria
AE Diobol
Obv.: [AVT]OK KAIΣ ΣEBA OVEΣΠ[AΣIANOV], laureate head rigt
Rev.: LΓ, year=3, bust of Isis (looking like Vespasian) right, lotus flower atop head
AE, 9.80g, 25mm
Ref.: RG 287, D 379, RPC 2430
1 commentsshanxi