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Search results - "Ptolemy"
coin619.jpg
20 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #619
cars100
coin618.jpg
27 views Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF Coin #618
cars100
coin617.jpg
21 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, Æ29, Cyprus Mint.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ RTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Two eagles standing
left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before. S7900; SNG
Cop. 341. VF, brown patina. Coin #617

cars100
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61 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes. Æ Hemidrachm - Triobol. Alexandreia mint. First phase, struck circa 246-242/1. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right; cornucopia over shoulder; E between legs. Svoronos 974 var. (control mark).

AE40 about 46.5 g.

--------------------------------

Ar 0.249g, 6.7mm
Elea(Elia?), Aeolis, AR Hemiobol. Late 5th century BC. Head of Athena left, in crested helmet / E L A I, around olive wreath, all within incuse square. SNG Cop 164 ex Forvm
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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2 viewsPtolemy AE16 (3.71g.)
David C13
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1 viewsPtolemy AE22 8.53g. Governer? Likeness of Marc AntonyDavid C13
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2 Augustus and Ptolemy, King of Mauretania 26 viewsÆ Semis, Carthago Nova, Spain
C. Laetilius Apalus and Ptolemy, duoviri.

Bare head of Augustus right / Name and titles of the duoviri around diadem, REX PTOL inside

RPC 172; SNG Copenhagen 494

Ptolemy of Mauretania (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος, Latin: Ptolemaeus, 1 BC-40) was the son of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene and the grandson of Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. He was the last Roman client King of Mauretania, and the last of the Ptolemy line.
1 commentsSosius
Ptolemy_V_Epiphanes_AE_Tetrobol.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes11 viewsAlexandria mint.
Æ Tetrobol
27mm, 14.24 grams
205-180 BC., Struck circa 197-183/2 BC.
Wreathed and draped bust of Isis right
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1234; Weiser 130; SNG Copenhagen 247
jaseifert
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Ptolemy XII Auletes AR Tetradrachm, 72 BC69 viewsOBV: Diademed head right in aegis
REV: Eagle standing left on Thunderbolt; PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, [Pi A] in right field; Dated L.Theta (Year 9)

This coin was minted in the ninth year of Ptolemy XII Auletes. Svoronos originally ascribed this coin type to year 9 of Cleopatra VII (43 BC) but was reattributed by Regling to her father. This re-attribution is generally accepted. The coin is of relatively low-grade silver (ca 30%) and flat-struck on the obverse.
Svoronos 1856, Ref. Svoronos on-line
wt 13.8 gm
1 commentsdaverino
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09. Alexandria: Tetradrachm in the name of Alexander the Great.110 viewsTetradrachm, ca 310 - 305 BC, Alexandria (Egypt) mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander with Horn of Ammon, wearing elephant skin headdress.
Reverse: ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ / Athena carrying shield and hurling spear. Also small eagle sitting on thunderbolt at right. Two monograms: one at left, one at right.
15.10 gm., 26 mm.
S. #7749; BMC 6.6, 46.

You may have noticed that I refer to the obverse portraits on the Alexander the Great coins as "Head of Alexander as Herakles." Much has been written about these portraits as to whether or not they really portray Alexander's likeness. There can be no doubt, however, that the portrait on this coin was intended to be that of Alexander. Ptolemy issued this coin in the name of Alexander while he was Satrap of Egypt. The elephant skin headdress was probably inspired by the lion's skin headdress on Alexander's own coins. It likely refers to Alexander's conquests in India where he defeated an Indian army with 200 elephants. Beneath the elephant skin headdress, right above his ear, Alexander wears the Horn of Zeus Ammon. The priests of Zeus Ammon recognized Alexander as divine when he visited Egypt in 331 BC.
4 commentsCallimachus
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1. Seleukos I Nikator 15 viewsSELEUKID KINGS of SYRIA. Seleukos I Nikator. 312-281 BC. Æ Seleukeia II mint. Horned horse head right / Anchor; monogram to right. SC 145.

Seleukos fled from Antigonus the one-eyed in Babylonia on horseback. He credited this animal with saving his life. He then deified the animal on his coinage and in other cult shrines.

He eventually made it to Egypt where Ptolemy sheltered him for a while until he could regroup and begin to definitively establish what would become the Seleucid empire.
ecoli
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1.4 Egypt - Ptolemy II57 viewsPtolemy II - 248 BC
Egyptian bronze. 15 mm
obv. deified Alexander in Elephant headress
rev. eagle with spread wings, shield in front, H - lambda - year 38 PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS
Zam
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1.5 Egypt - Ptolemy II63 viewsPtolemy II - 248 BC
Egyptian Bronze, 15 mm
obv. deified Alexander in elephant headress
rev. eagle with spread wings, shild in front, H Lambda - year 38, PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS
Zam
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30. Ptolemy I.135 viewsTetradrachm, 305 - 283 BC, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΟΣ / Eagle standing on thunderbolt. Monogram and ΔΙ at left.
4.18 gm., 27 mm. S. #7761 var; BMC 6.18, 38.
3 commentsCallimachus
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31. Ptolemy III.28 viewsAE 38, Date and mint uncertain.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΟΣ / Eagle standing on thunderbolt. Cornucopiae at right, E between eagle's legs.
51.08 gm., 38 mm.
S. #7815; BMC 6.66, 38.
Callimachus
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4) Cleopatra Tetradrachm of Alexandria61 viewsThis coin was issued in the first year of Cleopatra's reign, which would place it around 50 B.C. while she was was still in a relationship with Julius Caesar. Twenty years later, she and Antony would commit suicide after their defeat at Actium, ending the reign of the Pharaohs of Egypt.

Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1817 (Ptolemaios XIII); SNG Cop 398; Cohen DCA 70; BMC Ptolemies p. 1817, 2 (Ptolemaios XIII); Noeske 363; Hosking 129; SNG Milan -, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, weight 9.476g, maximum diameter 25.6mm, die axis 0o, 51 - 50; obverse diademed bust right (feminized bust of Ptolemy I or Cleopatra?), wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, palm behind over right wing, LB (year 2) over crown of Isis left, PA right

Purchased from FORVM
RM0010
1 commentsSosius
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4) Cleopatra VII17 viewsCleopatra VII (maybe)
Bronze dichalkon, 1.491g, 11.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint

Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure / PTOLEMAIOU - BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons

Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); SNG Cop 649; Weiser -, Fine.

Caption per FORVM catalog:
Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.

Purchased from FORVM
RM0004
Sosius
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4) Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C.30 viewsCLEOPATRA VII
Bronze dichalkon, Paphos mint

Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis r., hair in melon-coiffure / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ−ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons

Kreuzer p. 44, 1st illustr; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649. VF
RM0022
Sosius
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4) Juba II and Cleopatra Selene28 viewsKINGS of MAURETANIA
Juba II, with Cleopatra Selene. 25 BC-24 AD.
AR Denarius (18mm, 2.95g)
Caesarea mint. Struck circa 20 BC-AD 24.

Diademed head right / Star in crescent. MAA 97; SNG Copenhagen 567. VF, weak strike.

For almost fifty years Juba II maintained order in North Africa as one of Rome's most loyal client kings. In AD 11, he had been given Cleopatra Selene, daughter of Cleopatra VII of Egypt, as a wife by a grateful Augustus, and their son, Ptolemy, succeeded him in AD 24.

Ex CNG
RM0005
2 commentsSosius
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501. Constantine I Alexandria Posthumous22 viewsAlexandria

The city passed formally under Roman jurisdiction in 80 BC, according to the will of Ptolemy Alexander but after it had been previously under Roman influence for more than a hundred years. Julius Caesar dallied with Cleopatra in Alexandria in 47 BC, saw Alexander's body (quipping 'I came to see a king, not a collection of corpses' when he was offered a view of the other royal burials) and was mobbed by the rabble. His example was followed by Marc Antony, for whose favor the city paid dearly to Octavian, who placed over it a prefect from the imperial household.

From the time of annexation onwards, Alexandria seems to have regained its old prosperity, commanding, as it did, an important granary of Rome. This fact, doubtless, was one of the chief reasons which induced Augustus to place it directly under imperial power. In AD 215 the emperor Caracalla visited the city and for some insulting satires that the inhabitants had directed at him, abruptly commanded his troops to put to death all youths capable of bearing arms. This brutal order seems to have been carried out even beyond the letter, for a general massacre ensued.

Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, now Alexandria acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government. There Arianism was formulated and where also Athanasius, the great opponent of both Arianism and pagan reaction, triumphed over both, establishing the Patriarch of Alexandria as a major influence in Christianity for the next two centuries.

As native influences began to reassert themselves in the Nile valley, Alexandria gradually became an alien city, more and more detached from Egypt and losing much of its commerce as the peace of the empire broke up during the 3rd century AD, followed by a fast decline in population and splendour.

In the late 4th century, persecution of pagans by Christians had reached new levels of intensity. Temples and statues were destroyed throughout the Roman empire: pagan rituals became forbidden under punishment of death, and libraries were closed. In 391, Emperor Theodosius I ordered the destruction of all pagan temples, and the Patriarch Theophilus, complied with his request. It is possible that the great Library of Alexandria and the Serapeum was destroyed about this time. The pagan mathematician and philosopher Hypathia was a prominent victim of the persecutions.

The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fell into ruin. On the mainland, life seemed to have centred in the vicinity of the Serapeum and Caesareum, both which became Christian churches. The Pharos and Heptastadium quarters, however, remained populous and left intact.

veiled head only
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Alexandria 32 C3

From uncleaned lot; one of the nicer finds.
ecoli
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501b. Crispus Ticinum VOTA10 viewsTicinum

Ticinum (the modern Pavia) was an ancient city of Gallia Transpadana, founded on the banks of the river of the same name (now the Ticino river) a little way above its confluence with the Padus (Po).

It is said by Pliny to have been founded by the Laevi and Marici, two Ligurian tribes, while Ptolemy attributes it to the Insubres.

Its importance in Roman times was due to the extension of the Via Aemilia from Ariminum (Rimini) to the Padus (187 BC), which it crossed at Placentia (Piacenza) and there forked, one branch going to Mediolanum (Milan) and the other to Ticinum, and thence to Laumellum where it divided once more, one branch going to Vercellae - and thence to Eporedia and Augusta Praetoria - and the other to Valentia - and thence to Augusta Taurinorum (Turin) or to Pollentia.

The branch to Eporedia must have been constructed before 100 BC. Ticinum is not infrequently mentioned by classical writers. It was a municipium, and from an inscription we know that a triumphal arch was erected in honor of Augustus and his family, but we learn little of it except that in the 4th century AD there was a manufacture of bows there.

It was pillaged by Attila in AD 452 and by Odoacer in 476, but rose to importance as a military centre in the Gothic period. At Dertona and here the grain stores of Liguria were placed, and Theodoric the Great constructed a palace, baths and amphitheatre and new town walls; while an inscription of Athalaric relating to repairs of seats in the amphitheatre is preserved (AD 528‑529). From this point, too, navigation on the Padus seems to have begun. Narses recovered it for the Eastern Empire, but after a long siege, the garrison had to surrender to the Lombards in 572.

001b. Crispus Ticinum

RIC VII Ticinum 153 R3

ecoli
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Abdera, Ptolemy III/ griffin; countermark48 viewsAbdera , 281 - 200 BC Æ22. 5.2g. Svoronos 929, Lindgren 740, SNG Cop 380, RPC II -, BMC Thrace -, AMNG II -, Abdera mint; obverse head of Ptolemy III right, circular countermark of a club; reverse ΑΒΔΗ−ΠΙΤΩΝ, griffin recumbent to left, star and pellet before. SNG Copenhagen speculates the kings depicted on this series are Ptolemy III, IV, or V.Podiceps
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AE 12; Zeus/ Hibiscus15 viewsRhodos, Caria, c. 225 B.C. Bronze AE 12, SNG Cop 797, nice F, Rhodos mint, 1.967g, 11.7mm, 0o, c. 225 BC; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse PO, rose, sun-disk behind; rare. Based on the unusual Zeus obverse, this small bronze could be connected to Ptolemy III of Egypt. A devastating earthquake struck Rhodes in 226 B.C. It knocked down the Colossus of Rhodes and destroyed the city. Polybius records that Ptolemy III promised the Rhodians '300 talents of silver, a million artabae of corn, ship-timber for 10 quinqueremes and 10 triremes, consisting of 40,000 cubits of squared pine planking, 1000 talents of bronze coinage, 180,000 pounds of tow (for ropes), 3000 pieces of sailcloth, 3000 talents (of copper?) for the repair of the Colossus, 100 master-builders with 350 workmen, and 14 talents yearly to pay their wages. Beside this, he gave 12,000 artabae of corn for their public games and sacrifices, and 20,000 artabae for victualling 10 triremes. The greater part of these goods were delivered at once, as well as one-third of the money named.' This issue shows perceived harmony with, or thanks to Ptolemaic Egypt. -- J. Ashton, Rhodian Bronze Coinage and the Earthquake of 229. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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AE provincial, Saitta, Lydia (Sidas Kaleh, Turkey), Senate/River-God (mid-2nd to early 3d century AD) 1 viewsIЄΡA - [CYNKΛHTOC], bare-headed youthful draped bust of Senate right / CAIT[THNΩN] + [ЄPMOC] in exergue, River-God Hermos reclining left, holding reed and cornucopiae, resting arm on urn (hydria) from which waters flow.

Ӕ (base metal yellow, orichalcum?), 22 mm, 5.68 g, die axis 6.5h (coin alignment)

It is difficult to read the name of the river. I think that ЄPMOC is more likely, but VΛΛΟС is also possible, representing the other important local river, Hyllos.

Possible catalog references are BMC Lydia 25 (or 26-27?), SNG Copenhagen 398, SNG München 439.
For the Hyllos reverse, Leypold 1153.

To emphasize the autonomy of certain Hellenistic polises, even under the Roman rule they sometimes used allegorical figures of Senate or Demos on obverses of their coins instead of imperial portraits. Saitta was issuing similar-looking coins with busts of emperors and their family as well, but in this issue the town Senate is honoured as the ruler. IЄΡA CYNKΛHTOC = Holy Senate. CAITTHNΩN = Saitta, ЄPMOC = Hermos, the name of the river and its god.

River-Gods or Potamoi (Ποταμοί) were the gods of the rivers and streams of the earth, all sons of the great earth-encirling river Okeanos (Oceanus) and his wife Tethys. Their sisters were the Okeanides (Oceanids), goddesses of small streams, clouds and rain, and their daughters were the Naiades, nymphs of springs and fountains. A River-God was depicted in one of three forms: as a man-headed bull; a bull-horned man with the tail of a serpentine-fish in place of legs; or as a reclining man with an arm resting upon a pitcher pouring water, which we see in this case. The addition of cornucopia symbolizes the blessings that a particular river bestows on those who live near it.

Saitta or Saittae (Σαίτται, Ptolemy 5.2.21: Σέτται, Σάετται) was a polis in eastern Lydia (aka Maeonia), in the rivers' triangle between the upper Hyllus (modern Demirci Çayı, c. 12 km to the west) and the Hermus or Hermos (modern Gediz Nehri, c. 20 km to the south). In Roman imperial times it belonged to the "conventus" of Sardis in the Roman province of Asia (conventus was a territorial unit of a Roman province, mostly for judicial purposes).

Now its ruins are known now as Sidas Kaleh or Sidaskale in Turkey, near the village of İçikler (İcikler Mahallesi, 45900 Demirci/Manisa). They were never excavated, so are little known or cared for. Ruins of a stadium and a theatre survive, together with remains of some temples and tombs.

Not much is known about it. It was a regional centre for the production of textiles. In 124 AD the town was probably visited by emperor Hadrianus. During the Roman period the cult of the moon god Mēn Axiottenus was very popular in the city. Because of its reference to "angels" (both literally as the Greek word and by their function as god's messengers) it was possibly close to the more general Asia Minor cult of Theos Hypsistos, Θεος ὕψιστος, "the highest god" (200 BC – 400 AD), which in turn was perhaps related to the gentile following of the Second Temple in Jerusalem.

Known Roman provincial coins issued by this city feature portraits of emperors from Hadrian to Gallienus, thus covering the period from 117 to 268 AD, with the peak around the Severan dynasty. The semi-autonomous issues are usually dated from mid-2nd to mid-3d century AD.

Later Saittae was the seat of a Byzantine bishopric. Bishop Limenius signed the Chalcedon Creed, while Bishop Amachius spoke at the Council of Chalcedon. Although an Islamic area now, Saittae remains a titular see of the Roman Catholic Church.
Yurii P
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Ake Ptolemais, Galilee, c. 2nd century B.C. AE 11, Dioskouroi heads/ cornucopia53 viewsAke Ptolemais, Galilee, c. 2nd century B.C. Bronze AE 11, L. Kadman, The Coins of Akko Ptolemais, CNP I / IV (1961), 94, 19; SGICV 6046, aF, Ptolemais (as Antiochia) mint, 1.589g, 11.1mm, 0o, obverse jugate heads of the Dioskouroi right; reverse “ANTIOCEWN TWN / EN PTOLEMAIDI” or similar, cornucopia. Ptolemais was a a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Ake-Ptolemais (Time of Antiochos IV) 175-164 B.C. 15 viewsAke-Ptolemais, Galilee. Originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter. Ae14.8~16.5mm. 2.79g. Time of Antiochos IV, 175-164 BC. Obv: Jugate, laureate busts of the Dioskuri right, star above each head. Rev: ANTIOXEΩN TΩN / EN ΠTOΛEMAIΔI, Cornucopiae, monogram outer left. Rouvier 962.ddwau
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Antigonus I Monophthalmus30 viewsAntigonus I Monophthalmus, Silver drachm, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, 17.9mm, 4.120g, Price 1979, Müller Alexander 555, SNG Cop,
OBV: Herakles' head right, clad in lion-skin head-dress;
REV: AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus enthroned left, eagle raised high in extended right,
long scepter vertical behind in left, A within wreath over B left, IAY monogram under throne;

EX: Forum Ancient Coins

RARE

Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C.,
he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus,
answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C.
Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. - Wikipedia
1 commentsRomanorvm
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Antiochos IV, Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C. AE 12; Dioskouroi heads/ cornucopia16 viewsAke Ptolemais, Galilee, c. 2nd century B.C. (Time of Antiochos IV, Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.) Bronze AE 12, SGCV 6046, F, Ptolemais mint, 2.472g, 13.5mm, 0o, obverse jugate heads of the Dioskouroi right; reverse “ΑΝΤΙΟΧΕΩΝ ΤΩΝ / ΕΝ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΔΙ” or similar, cornucopia. Ptolemais was a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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AP Monogram255 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.
10785. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 714, SNG Cop 506-507, aVF, 14.08g, 26.5mm, 0o, Phoenicia, Sidon mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis, small D behind ear; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, SI left, AP countermark right; slightly frosty; $125.00
whitetd49
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Arsinoë II Philadelphos - 1st daughter of Pharaoh Ptolemy I Soter310 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA, 253 - 252 BC, Struck under Ptolemy II.
AV Octodrachm (Mnaïeion) - 27mm, 27.69 g, 12h

O - Arsinoë II head right, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped scepter in background, Θ to left
R - APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet.

Svoronos 460; Troxell, Arsinoe, Transitional to Group 3, p. 43 and pl. 6, 2-3 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 134.

Arsinoe II married Lysimachus at the age of 15. After Lysimachus' death in battle in 281 BC, she fled to Cassandreia and married her paternal half-brother Ptolemy Keraunos. As he became more powerful, she conspired against him leading to the killing of her sons, Lysimachus and Philip. After their deaths, she fled to Alexandria, Egypt to seek protection from her brother, Ptolemy II Philadelphus; whom she later married. As a result, both were given the epithet "Philadelphoi" ("Sibling-loving (plural)") by the presumably scandalized Greeks.

Arsinoe II Philadelphos, died 270-268 BC.
4 commentsrobertpe
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Arsinoe II; Head of Arsinoe right/ Eagle; Svoronos 35118 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Arsinoe II, c. 273 - 268 B.C. Bronze AE 16, 1/16th drachm?, Svoronos 351; Weiser -; SNG Copenhagen 100, Fair, edge broken, uncertain mint, 2.772g, 15.9mm, 0o, c. 264 BC; obverse veiled and diademed head of Arsinoë II right; reverse PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings open, “DI” above monogram before; rare. Arsinoe II (316 B.C. - July 270 B.C.) was the daughter of king Ptolemy I Soter, the founder of the Hellenistic state of Egypt, and his second wife Berenice I., As the wife of King Lysimachus, she was queen of Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedonia. Later she was co-ruler of Egypt with her brother and husband Ptolemy II. Ex FORVMPodiceps
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Athena and Deified Alexander383 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T
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AUGUSTUS & PTOLEMY OF NUMIDIA AE semis174 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head of Augustus right

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, REX PTOL (Ptolemy, King) within diadem

Carthago Nova, Spain, under sole 'duovir quinqunennales' C Laetilius Apalus.

18.5mm, 5.3g.
RPC 172.

Ex-Incitatus

Ptolemy of Numidia was the son of King Juba II of Numidia and Cleopatra Selene II. He was also the grandson of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII on his mohter's side. He was named in honor of the memory of Cleopatra VII, the birthplace of his mother and the birthplace of her relatives. In choosing her son's name, Cleopatra Selene II created a distinct Greek-Egyptian tone and emphasized her role as the monarch who would continue the Ptolemaic dynasty. She by-passed the ancestral names of her husband. By naming her son Ptolemy instead of a Berber ancestral name, she offers an example rare in ancient history, especially in the case of a son who is the primary male heir, of reaching into the mother's family instead of the father's for a name. This emphasized the idea that his mother was the heiress of the Ptolemies and the leader of a Ptolemaic government in exile.

Through his parents he received Roman citizenship and was actually educated in Rome. Amazingly he grew up in the house of his maternal aunt, and Antony's daughter Antonia Minor, the youngest daughter of Mark Antony and the youngest niece of Augustus. Antonia was also a half-sister of Ptolemy's late mother, also a daughter of Mark Antony. Antonia Minor's mother was Octavia Minor, Mark Antony's fourth wife and the second sister of Octavian (later Augustus). Ptolemy lived in Rome until the age of 21, when he returned to the court of his aging father in Mauretania.

Ptolemy was a co-ruler with his father Juba II until Juba's death and was the last semi-autonomous ruler of Africa. On a visit to Rome in 40 AD he was seen by the Emperor Caligula in an amphitheather wearing a spectacular purpal cloak. A jealous Caligula had him murdered for his fashionable purple cloak.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
BCC_LT67_Zeus_Eagle_lead_coin.jpg
BCC LT6718 viewsCast Lead Token
Late 2nd Cent. BCE?
Obv: Head of Zeus Ammon to right.
Rev: Eagle standing left. In field: B?-A
Possibly related in design to a small
bronze coin of Ptolemy IX, reference:
Svoronos 1733, but considerably
larger in weight and diameter.
PB17mm 4.01gm. Axis:0
Reportedly found near Caesarea
Maritima, ca. 1971.
Rare
v-drome
BERENICE II.jpg
Berenice II -- Wife of Ptolemy III.360 viewsMarathos, Phoenicia. Struck under Ptolemy Philometer, 180-145 BC. Æ (21 mm, 8.65 g).
Obv: Veiled head of Berenice II, r.
Rev: Stylized Marathos standing, head l., holding apluster and resting on column. Phoenician Aramaic legend.
SGC 6037.
EmpressCollector
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-zg2aP0ewwCVrhb-Caligula_damnatio.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze AS4 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
Vesta SC - Vesta, veiled and draped, seated left, on throne with ornamented back and legs, holding patera in right hand and long transverse sceptre in left
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 10.40g / 28mm / 6h
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
BMCRE 46
BN 54
Cohen 27
Acquisition/Sale: indalocolecciones eBay

This coin seems to have suffered a 'Damnatio Memoriae'. It looks as if the portrait has had cut marks applied to the jaw and neck areas. Interestingly, the ancient writers said that on his assassination, the first strike to Caligula was to his jaw or neck/shoulder areas. Damnatio memoriae is a modern Latin phrase meaning "condemnation of memory", i.e., that a person is to be excluded from official accounts.


ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.

Gary W2
Gary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-2WcIZv40JXVImci-Caligula_69.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As4 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
VESTA SC - Vesta Seated Left, Holding Patera & Sceptre
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 11.61g / 29mm / 180
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
Acquisition/Sale: timeman21 Ebay

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.
Gary W2
CLEO I.jpg
Cleopatra I, wife of Ptolemy V (Epiphanes).298 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Æ (28.4 mm, 18.84 g), before 176 BCE.
Obv: Diademed head of Cleopatra I as Isis, r.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, wings open.
Svoronos 1235; Sear Greek 7880; BMC 6.94,72; SNG VIII 1175; Forrer 80.
EmpressCollector
Cleo_III.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Alexandria, 19.8 mm, obol20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426, F, Alexandria mint, 6.557 g, 19.8 mm, 315o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM

Podiceps
cleoIII.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Paphos, 30,7 mm, diobol13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, c. 116 - 104 B.C. Bronze diobol, Paphos II #315, Svoronos -, Poor/Fair, Paphos mint, 17.088g, 30.7mm, 0o; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU”?, two eagles standing left, star and “S” before; weak strike, rough; very rare. The flan is typical for the Paphos Mint. The two eagles indicates two rulers on the throne. The weight is double the more common c. 8.5 grams obol of this period. ex FORVM

Podiceps
ptolemy_X_01.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X AR Tetradrachm39 viewsObv: Diademed head right, wearing aegis.
Rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; LIΓ/I (date) before; ΠA behind.
Date: 105 - 104 BC
Mint: Alexandria mint.
Weight: 13.40g
Ref: Svoronos 1729, SNG Copenhagen 360
oa
2_kotkaa.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, AE 21.652 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426 var (Alexandria), gVF, Paphos mint, 8.369g, 21.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
cleo_III_ja_pojat.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons, Zeus Ammon, 30.1 mm20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. 32188. Bronze triobol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305 ff., SGCV II 7900 (all Ptolemy VI), VF, dark brown patina, 22.037g, 30.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, side by side, double cornucopia left. Among the most common of Ptolemaic coins, struck during the joint reign of Cleopatra III and her sons, Ptolemy IX then Ptolemy X. Svoronos 1424 has two very distinct varieties. The earlier 29 gram variety was found in quantity in the c. 160 B.C. CoinEx Hoard. In that hoard, there were none of this later, common, c. 23-24 gram variety. The two types are separated by about 50 years. ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo_paphos.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, dichalkon; Paphos, Cyprus13 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, gF, Paphos mint, 1.570g, 11.8mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; nice green patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, Paphos mint, 1.190 g, 10.9 mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons. Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVMPodiceps
25363_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_F.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, attractive patina, Paphos mint, 1.254g, 11.5mm, 270o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; crude, flan flaw. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
25389_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_aF.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus12 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, aF, Paphos mint, 1.498g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; green patina. FORVM. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus (2)10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, VF, obverse off center, 1.660g, 13.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII~0.JPG
Cleopatra VII41 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, 13mm, 1.7g, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus
OBV: diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure
REV: Double cornucopiae, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Kreuzer p. 44 first illustration, Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV), SNG Cop 649,

Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus,
assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.
1 commentsRomanorvm
cleo___poika.jpg
Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, Paphos19 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, 44 - 30 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1842 (Ptolemy XII), F, Paphos mint, 5.575g, 24.4mm, 0o, 44 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, headdress of Isis before; rough. The two eagles on the reverse symbolize harmony between the two rulers, in this case the mother and son, Cleopatra VII and Caesarion. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
w0378.jpg
Cornucopia201 viewsThrace, Thracian Chersones, ca. 350 BC. AE-20 mm, 6.43 grs. V: Prow to right. CM: Cornucopia (from the Egyptan Ptolemy) very interesting and rare! RV: ELAIOY / SIWN and Monogram in a laurel wreath. Collection: Mueller.Automan
w1859.jpg
Cornucopia240 viewsThrace, Thracian Chersones, ca. 350 BC. AE-20 mm, 6.37 grs. AV: Prow to right. CM: Cornucopia (from the Egyptan Ptolemy) very interesting and rare! RV: ELAIOY / SIWN and Monogram in a laurel wreath. Collection: Mueller.Automan
691CN465.jpg
Cr 352/1b AR Denarius L. Julius Bursio7 viewsRome, 85 BCE
o: Laureate, winged, and draped bust of Apollo Vejovis right; to left, trident above bow
r: Victory driving galloping quadriga right, holding reins and wreath; EX • A • P in ex.
Sydenham 729; Julia 6; Type as RBW 1348
(18.5mm, 4.04 g, 10h)
From the Andrew McCabe Collection.

I have noted some of my other coins whose types bear a variation on the indication of "from the Public Silver", usually interpreted to mean an issue that required a supplementary grant of authority from the Senate outside the normal annual authorization, as all of the coining metal was "public", including the precious metals from time to time appropriated from the temples of the state religion.

Since this coin is ex McCabe, I will quote his notes on the relative rarity of this type directly:
"The British Museum collection has 115 examples of RRC 352/1a or 352/1c with moneyers name L. IVLI BVRSIO, but just 4 examples with EX A. P. Crawford in RRC, p. 605, says that this issue was struck from money left to the Roman people by Ptolemy Alexander I of Egypt, which probably arrived at Rome in 86 BC. Given the rarity of the EX A. P. issue, perhaps the bequest was modest! "
As with the other 3 coins posted in this group, the coin is much better in hand, although the photos of the silver coins are clearer than the bronze.
PMah
CLEOPATRA_VII_ZEUS_REV.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII16 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
cleopatra_vii_ZEUS_REV_2.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII15 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
Diocletian_Tetra~0.jpg
Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 May 305 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt.34 viewsBillon tetradrachm, Geissen 3243; Dattari 5624; Milne 4915; Curtis 1956; SNG Cop 994; BMC Alexandria p. 326, 2530; Kampmann -, VF, crowded flan cuts off right side of obverse legend, Alexandria mint, 7.290 grams, 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, 29 Aug 288 - 28 Aug 289 A.D.; obverse and#913; and#922; and#915; and#927;and#933;and#913;and#923; and#8710;and#921;and#927;and#922;and#923;and#919;and#932;and#921;and#913;and#925;and#927;C Cand#917;and#914;, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse Alexandria standing left, turreted, head of Serapis in right, long scepter vertical in left, L - E (year 5) flanking across field, star right.

Ptolemy Soter integrated Egyptian religion with that of the Hellenic rulers by creating Serapis, a deity that would win the reverence of both groups. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy`s efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.


EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.
Sam
EB0156b_scaled.JPG
EB0156 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle6 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LI (year 10) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1671.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 13.083g.
EB
EB0157b_scaled.JPG
EB0157 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle3 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, with aegis at neck.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LC (year 6) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1667.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 14.108g.
EB
EB0158b_scaled.JPG
EB0158 Ptolemy XII / Eagle13 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy XII, AR Tetradrachm. Year 29 = 52/51 BC, Paphos Mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy XII right, aegis at neck.
Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm branch over shoulder, IKΘ over headdress of Isis in left field, ΠA in right field.
References: Svoronos 1839; SNG Cop 396; BMC 35-36.
Diameter: 25.5mm, Weight: 14.471g.
1 commentsEB
EB0231b_scaled.JPG
EB0231 Berenike II / Eagle6 viewsPtolemy III, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AE 22, 246-221 BC.
Obverse: [BEΡENIKHΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ or abbreviated], head of Berenice II right, hair in a bun.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed.
References: Svor. 1055.
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 8.772g.
EB
EB0233b_scaled.JPG
EB0233 Apollo / Eagle5 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of Magas in Kyrene, AE 17, 276-249 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head (Ptolemy as Apollo?) right.
Reverse: [ΠTOΛEM BAΣIΛ], eagle left, with wings open, MAΓ (?) monogram left.
References: Cf. Svoronos 328; BMC Ptolemies p. 39, 27-28.
Diameter: 17.5mm, Weight: 3.297g.
EB
EB0919_scaled.JPG
EB0919 Ptolemy II, Zeus / Eagle5 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, AE 23, Tyre mint 285-247 BC.
Obverse: Head of Zeus Ammon right.
Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; club in left field.
References: SNGCop 495.
Diameter: 23mm, Weight: 10.61g.
EB
EB0920_scaled.JPG
EB0920 Isis / Eagle4 viewsPtolemy V, AE 27, 204-181 BC.
Obverse: Wreathed head of Isis right.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open.
References: Svoronos 1234; SNG Copenhagen 247.
Diameter: 27mm, Weight: 16.8g.
EB
EB0921_scaled.JPG
EB0921 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes 246-221 BC, Æ Dichalkon, Tripod Series, Uncertain mint in Asia Minor.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; to left, tripod.
References: Svoronos 793 (Ptolemy II–Ake-Ptolemaïs); Weiser 80-1 (Ptolemy III).
Diameter: 16.5mm, Weight: 3.85g.
EB
EB0922_scaled.JPG
EB0922 Ptolemy VI, Zeus / Two Eagles3 viewsPtolemy VI 181-146 BC, AE 20 Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before.
References: Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 315.
Diameter: 20.5mm, Weight: 8.76g.
EB
EB0923_scaled.JPG
EB0923 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle19 viewsPtolemy III, Euergetes (246 - 221 BC), AE 36, Hemidrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, monogram between legs.
References: SNG Cop 173.
Diameter: 36mm, Weight: 30.96g.
1 commentsEB
EB0924_scaled.JPG
EB0924 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 31.
Obverse: Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, monogram between legs.
References:
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 19.61g.
The coin flip says Ptolemy IV, but I'm not sure.
EB
EB0928_scaled.JPG
EB0928 Ptolemy IV / Eagle5 viewsPtolemy, AE 14, 222-204 BC.
Obverse: Helmeted bust of a beardless male right.
Reverse: BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopiae in front.
References: (cornucopiae at shoulder) Svoronos 1155, SNGCop 235.
Diameter: 14mm, Weight: 2.16g.
EB
EB0929_scaled.JPG
EB0929 Ptolemy II, Zeus / Eagle1 viewsPtolemy II, AE 27, 285-247 BC.
Obverse: Laureate Zeus right.
Reverse: Open-wing eagle left, 'SIGMA' over Shield to left.
References:
Diameter: 27.5mm, Weight: 15.63g.
EB
EB0930_scaled.JPG
EB0930 Ptolemy II / Libya2 viewsPtolemy II, AE 22, 285-247 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Ptolomy I.
Reverse: Head of Libya, cornucopia in front.
References:
Diameter: 21.5mm, Weight: 7.72g.
EB
EB0931_scaled.JPG
EB0931 Alexander / Eagle1 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 25, Alexandria Mint.
Obverse: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress, horn of Ammon and aegis.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, E between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 977 (head left).
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 11.29g.
EB
EB0932_scaled.JPG
EB0932 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 37 Hemidrachm, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopiae at right shoulder, E between legs.
References: Cf. SG 7815.
Diameter: 37.5mm, Weight: 43.52g.
EB
EB0933_scaled.JPG
EB0933 Ptolemy III, Alexander / Eagle2 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 23, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Bust of Alexander in elephants skin.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
References:
Diameter: 22mm, Weight: 9.32g.
EB
EB0934_scaled.JPG
EB0934 Ptolemy II, Zeus / Eagle4 viewsPtolemy II 285-247 BC, AE 38, Alexandria mint.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopiae at right shoulder, E between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 974.
Diameter: 38mm, Weight: 45.42g.
Note: The coin flip says Ptolemy II, but this looks very similar to EB0932, where the flip says Ptolemy III.
EB
EB0935_scaled.JPG
EB0935 Zeus / Eagle2 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, AE 19, 285-247 BC.
Obverse: Laureate head of Zeus right.
Reverse: ΠTO[ΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ], eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
References: -.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 6.62g.
EB
EB0936_scaled.JPG
EB0936 Ptolemy VI and VIII, Zeus / Eagle4 viewsPtolemy VI and VIII, AE 29.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon.
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, wings closed; double-cornucopiae in left field.
References: Cf. Svoronos 1424.
Diameter: 29mm, Weight: 23.77g.
EB
EB0938_scaled.JPG
EB0938 Cleopatra I / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy V 204-180 BC, AE 26.
Obverse: Head of Cleopatra I as Isis right.
Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; monogram (Omega/Sigma ?) at left.
References: Svoronos 1233 sim.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 15.86g.
Ex: Malter Auction II, lot 184.
EB
EB0939_scaled.JPG
EB0939 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle2 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 36.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, star between legs.
References: Cf. Svoronos 1149.
Diameter: 36mm, Weight: 45.13g.
EB
EB0940_scaled.JPG
EB0940 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle16 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 42.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia before, DELTA IOTA between legs.
References: Svoronos 1129.
Diameter: 42mm, Weight: 68.34g.
1 commentsEB
EB0941_scaled.JPG
EB0941 Ptolemy IV, Zeus / Eagle16 viewsPtolemy IV 221-205 BC, AE 42 (drachm).
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, cornucopia before, DELTA IOTA between legs.
References: Sear (SG) 7841, Svoronos 1125, SNG Cop 199, BMC 108.
Diameter: 42mm, Weight: 67.21g.
Ex: Superior Stamp & Coin
1 commentsEB
EB0942_scaled.JPG
EB0942 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle1 viewsPtolemy III 246-221 BC, AE 35.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, CHI-RHO monogram between legs.
References: Svoronos 965.
Diameter: 35mm, Weight: 34.44g.
EB
EB0943_scaled.JPG
EB0943 Ptolemy III, Zeus / Eagle23 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes 246-221 BC, AE 42.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, CHI-RHO monogram between legs.
References: Svoronos 964.
Diameter: 42.5mm, Weight: 70.26g.
Ex: Numismatic Art and Ancient Coins
2 commentsEB
EB0944_scaled.JPG
EB0944 Zeus / Two Eagles2 viewsPtolemy X with Cleopatra III, AE 30.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before.
References:
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 25.71g.
EB
Ptolemy_III_Euergetes.png
Egypt , Ptolemaic Kingdom: Ptolemy III / AE Obol.15 viewsAE Obol. Alexandria Mint , between 246-222 BC. 11 Gr.

Obverse: Deified head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, cornucopia over shoulder; E between legs.
References: Svoronos 976; SNG Copenhagen 232. Super Rare.
Sam
ptolmey_I.jpg
EGYPT - Ptolemy I22 viewsEGYPT - Ptolemy I 305-285 B.C., bronze of 28.3 mm, 6.56 grams. Obverse: Bust of Zeus to right. Reverse: Eagle, wings spread, stands left on thunderbolt control marks not clear. Reference: cf. Copenhagen 80.
dpaul7
PTOLEMY_I_SV220.jpg
EGYPT - Ptolemy I14 viewsEGYPT - Ptolemy I ( 305-285 BC) AE Denomination C (20 mm). Obv.: Alexander head in elephant skin. Rev.: Eagle faces left, head let, wings open; PI/EPSILON momogram in field left; ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Reference: Svoronos 220. dpaul7
PTOLEMY_II_No3.jpg
EGYPT - Ptolemy II Philadelphos72 viewsEGYPT - Ptolemy II Philadelphos (285-246 B.C.) Year Δ (267 BC) Bronze Denomination E. Obv.: Horned head of deified Alexander in elephant headdress right; dotted border. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ on left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ on right. Eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt, head left. Dotted border. Central depression on reverse. Delta between legs. References: SV-439; SNG Cop. 158. dpaul7
18-ptol_III.jpg
EGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES15 viewsEGYPT -- PTOLEMY III EUERGETES -- (246-221 BC) AE20. Paphos Mint, Cyprus, Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ , facing cult statue of Aphrodite. Reference: Svoronos 1007.
dpaul7
coin288.JPG
Egypt, Alexandria127 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), c. 170 - 164 B.C.

Two eagles in the reverse may symbolize joint rule
ecoli
coin37.JPG
Egypt, Alexandria28 viewsPtolemy VIII
145-116BC
AE24, 15.06G
SNG COP-334
Head of Alexander in elephant scalp
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt

ex Don Doswell collection
ex HJB
ecoli
c30.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria42 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. Æ Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 260 BC. Deified head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.ecoli
Ptolemy_II_Philadelphos281-246BC,_Egypt,Alexandria,_E,_Sov-451,_265BC,Q-001,_h,_20m,_6,58g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy II. Philadelphos, (281-246 B.C.), Svoronos 451, E, 3rd. Series, AE-20, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, #179 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy II. Philadelphos, (281-246 B.C.), Svoronos 451, E, 3rd. Series, AE-20, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, #1
avers: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, E monogram between legs.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 20,0mm, weight: 6,58g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 265 B.C., ref: Svoronos 451, E, 3rd. Series,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-Alexandria,_AE-43-Drachm_Svoronos-964-Chi-Pho_series__BC__Q-001_0h_42-43mm_59,7g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 964 Chi-Rho Series, AE-Drachm, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, 135 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 964 Chi-Rho Series, AE-Drachm, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
avers:- Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings closed, cornucopia tied with fillet before, Chi-Rho monogram between legs.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 42,0-43,0mm, weight: 59,7g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 247-47,221-20 B.C., ref: Svoronos 964 Chi-Rho Series,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-Alexandria,_AE-30-Diobol_Svoronos-966-Chi-Pho_series__BC__Q-001_0h_30mm_21,4g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 966 Chi-Rho Series, AE-Diobol, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,112 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 966 Chi-Rho Series, AE-Diobol, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
avers:- Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings closed, cornucopia tied with fillet before, Chi-Rho monogram between legs.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 30,0mm, weight: 21,4g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 247-47,221-20 B.C., ref: Svoronos 966 Chi-Rho Series,
Q-001
quadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-Alexandria,_AE-37-Tetrobol_Svoronos-974-Eseries-var__BC__Q-001_0h_37mm_45,4g-s.jpg
Egypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 974 Epsilon Series var., AE-Tetrobol, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, 123 viewsEgypt, Alexandria, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 974 Epsilon Series var., AE-Tetrobol, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
avers:- Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings closed, head right, cornucopiae over the shoulder, E between legs.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 37,0mm, weight: 45,4g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Alexandria, date: 247-47,221-20 B.C., ref: Svoronos 974 Epsilon Series var.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-Berytos,_AE-16-,_Svoronos-839-Trident_series__BC__Q-001_0h_15-17mm_2,79g-s.jpg
Egypt, Berytos, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 839 Trident Series, AE-16, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, 121 viewsEgypt, Berytos, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 B.C.), Svoronos 839 Trident Series, AE-16, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
avers:- Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, trident before.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 15,0-17,0mm, weight: 2,79g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Berytos, date: 247-47,221-20 B.C., ref: Svoronos 839 Trident Series,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Cleopatra_VII,__51-30_BC,_AE13.jpg
Egypt, Cleopatra VII 51-30 BC, AE13, 31 viewsDraped and diademmed bust of Cleópatra right.
Filleted cornucopiae "PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS"
1.43gr. SNG Cop 649
Older refences attribute this issue to Ptolemy VI. More recent evidence points to Cleopatra VII
_3809
Antonivs Protti
2_eagles_k.jpg
EGYPT, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII8 viewsAE30, 24g, 12h; Alexandria mint, 170 - 164 B.C.,
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right,
Rev.: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ; Two eagles standing left, side-by-side on thunderbolt, double cornucopia left.
Reference: Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 306 ff.
Ex-FORUM / 17-69-110
John Anthony
unkeagleOR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, SV416 variant38 viewsAlexandria mint, Ptolemy II Philadelphos c 260 B.C. AE, 23mm 8.41g, SV416 variant
O: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant skin headdress
R: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, uncertain control mark
casata137ec
Ptolemy_II_AE.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE26, 285-246 B.C.10 viewsPtolemy II, AE26, 285-246 B.C. Alexandria. Zeus/Eagle standing on thunderbolt. SNG Cop IZ.14. VFmjabrial
Ptolemy_II_Philodelphos.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos Silver Tetradrachm, 285-246 B.C.9 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos Silver Tetradrachm, 285-246 B.C. of Tyre. Head of Ptolemy/Eagle on thunderbolt. 13.57 grams. SNG.Cop.483. AVFmjabrial
berptolOR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III (Berenike), Svoronos 105637 viewsSvoronos 1056, Ptolemy III. Depicting Berenike (wife of Ptolemy III) and an open-wing eagle on the reverse. It should have an inscription on the obverse, a little unusual for Ptolemaic coins, possibly too worn or corroded to see clearly on this one. These are thought to be issues of a short-lived mint in Northern Syria, possibly during the 3rd Syrian war of ca. 246-241BC early in the reign of Ptolemy III (partly a mission to rescue his doomed sister who married into the Seleukid royal family). There is a 'family' of about 10 bronze types which depict Berenike, different sizes variations. This type would have some letters to the left of the eagle, off the flan on this specimen. (Info from PtolemAE)casata137ec
greekL_copy.jpg
EGYPT, Ptolemy III Euergetes19 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, Egypt, AE 17, 3.00g, ca. 246-221 B.C. Obv: Zeus facing right within dotted border. Rev: Eagle standing left, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; around border. Dark green patina, aXF.Molinari
Ptolemy_III.jpg
Egypt, PTOLEMY III EUERGETES I21 viewsPTOLEMY III EUERGETES I
AE38.2mm, 51 grams
Alexandria Mint, 246-221 BC

O: Bust of Zeus Ammon to right.

R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head reverted, cornucopiae on back, monogram E between legs.

Reference: Ref: Svoronos 974, SNG Copenhagen 224-226.

Ex Amphora Coins
1 commentsSosius
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-AE-21_Sovronos-1698_xx_BC__Q-001_axis-0h_21mm_8,53g-s.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), AE-21, Sv-1698 ???, 101 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), AE-21, Sv-1698 ???,
avers:- Laureate head of Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Two eagle standing left on thunderbolt; club (???) in left field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 21mm, weight:8,53 g, axes:0 h,
mint: Egypt, date: , ref: Sovronos-1698,
Q-001
quadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-AE-xx_Sovronos-xx_xx_BC__Q-001_axis-0h_xmm_x,xg-s.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), Alexandria Cornucopia Series with CHI/RHO 83 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), Alexandria Cornucopia Series with CHI/RHO
avers:- Laureate head of Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; Cornucopiae in left field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: mm, weight: g, axes: h,
mint: Egypt, date: , ref: ,
Q-001
quadrans
Ptolemy-III_Euregetes_Greek-AE-20_Tyre_Club_Series_Sv-709_SNG-Cop-496_247-47,221-20_BC__Q-001_axis-0h_19,5mm_6,21g-s.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), Tyre Club Series, AE-20, 86 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, (247-47,221-20 BC.), Tyre Club Series, AE-20,
avers:- Laureate head of Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; club in left field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19,5mm, weight: 6,21g, axes: 0h,
mint: Egypt, Tyre Club Series, date: 247-47,221-20 BC.,?? ref: SNG Cop-496, Sv-709 (as Ptolemy II??),
Q-001
quadrans
Ptolemy_III_Euergetes,_Kyrene_mint,_Svoronos_871_(Ptolemy_II),_SNG_Cop__442-4_(Ptolemy_IV),_246-222_BC_,_Q-001,_h,_23mm,_9,08g-s_.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, Kyrene mint, (247-46,222-20 BC.), AE-21, Sv-871, Head of Libya right, 99 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy III. Euregetes, Kyrene mint, (247-46,222-20 BC.), AE-21, Sv-871, Head of Libya right,
avers: Diademed head of Ptolemy I. right, wearing aegis.
reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY, Head of Libya right, wearing tainia, cornucopia below the chin.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 23,0mm, weight:9,08g, axes: h,
mint: Egypt, Kyrene mint, date:247-222 B.C., ref: Svoronos 871 (Ptolemy II); SNG Copenhagen 442-4 (Ptolemy IV). ,
Q-001
quadrans
coin607.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20. 65 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE210 Ptolemy VI VIII Joint Reign after 169BC AE 29.7-30.0mm : 23.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Two Eagles f/L on thunderbolt, double cornucopia in left field, no monograms, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1383, SNGCop 308-310 Weiser 141-142 Coin #607
1 commentscars100
coin606.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20. 41 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy IX, Svoronos 1698 Ptolemy IX AE20.
Paphos, Cyprus, Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
/ BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, two eagles standing
left, on thunderbolt, cornucopia before.
SNG Cop 674var. Coin #606
cars100
unkptol1OR.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy V Philometer, SNGCOP 270-271 49 viewsAlexandria mint, Ptolemy V Philometer Obol, 205-180 B.C. AE, 23mm 8.45g, Svoronos 1376 (as Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC) - SNGCOP 270-271 (NOTE (per ptolemae’s site)- Attributed as Ptolemy V by C. Lorber based on modern hoard data
O: Bearded Herakles in lion skin headdress, facing right
R: BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY, Eagle standing f/L on thunderbolt, kerykeion over right shoulder, KAPPA control symbol between legs

1 commentscasata137ec
Ptolemy-V-VI-Alexandria-Lorber-Faucher-Series-6E_Sv1424b_180-145_BC_Q-001_11h_28-30mm_20,95g-s.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy V.-VI., (180-145 BC.), Lorber-Faucher-Series-6E, AE-28, Sv-1424b71 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy V.-VI., (180-145 BC.), Lorber-Faucher-Series-6E, AE-28, Sv-1424b
avers:- Laureate head of Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
revers:- ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Two eagle standing left on thunderbolt; Cornucopiae in left field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 28-30mm, weight: 20,95g, axes: 11h,
mint: Egypt, Lorber-Faucher-Series-6E, date:180-145 BC.,?? , ref: Sv-1424b (as Ptolemy V-VI),
Q-001
quadrans
Ptolemy_VI_Svoronos_1383.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy VI11 viewsPTOLEMAIC EGYPT
PTOLEMY VI PHILOMETOR
AE30, Cyprus Mint (21.5g)
181-174 BC

O: Zeus Ammon, right

R: 2 eagles with closed wings, double cornucopia in l. field

Svoronos 1383
Sosius
Comb22092017082621.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy VIII, 145-116 BC. Alexandria Mint.28 viewsObv. Head of bearded Hercules right, wearing lion scalp.
Rev. PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, Eagle standing left.
24mm, 11.2 grams.
References: SV. 1494.
1 commentsCanaan
Ptolemy_X_Soter_AE.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy X, Soter II, AE28, 116-80 BC25 viewsPtolemy X, Soter II
AE28 (23.0gm), 116-80 BC

Head of Zeus right wearing the horn of Ammon / BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOY, Two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, Cornucopia in field left

Svoronos 1697
Sosius
PtolemeusXII_4drachmLIH.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy XII - AR tetradrachm103 viewsPtolemy XII (80-58 BC). AR Tetradrachm, year (L) IH = 18 (=64/3 BC); 14.11 g; obv. Diademed head of Ptolemy right; rev. Eagle on thunderbolt left.
BMC-6.119,36/7; SNG Cop-389; S-7944/6.
Bartosz Awianowicz
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Silver Tetradrachm, 83-50 B.C.11 viewsEgypt, Ptolemy XII, Silver Tetradrachm, 83-50 B.C. Ptolemy/Eagle. 12.8 grams. MNZ.15. VF+mjabrial
Egypt_Ptolemy_X_GCV_7939~0.JPG
Egypt: Ptolemy X (Joint reign) Tetradrachm29 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Ptolemy I facing right, wearing aegis.

Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, wings closed, LIΓ (year 13) / I (year 10) in left field; ΠA in right field.

Silver Tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 105 - 104 BC (Joint reign with Cleopatra III)

13.5 grams, 24.8 mm, 0°

GCV 7939 (var.)

Ex: FORVM
SPQR Matt
Egypt_Ptolemy_XII_GCV_7944~0.JPG
Egypt: Ptolemy XII, Neos Dionysos (first reign), 80 - 58 BC32 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Ptolemy I, wearing aegis, facing right.

Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, wings closed, LГ (year 3) to left, ΠA on right.

Silver Tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 79 - 78 BC

13.9 grams, 25.4 mm, 0°

GCV 7944 (var.), Svoronos 1849, SNG Copenhagen 378

Ex: FORVM
SPQR Matt
PtolemySm.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy II9 viewsA Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy II, minted in Alexandria in 282 BC. 20mm, 7.8g.

Obverse: Alexander wearing elephant trunk headdress.

Reverse: an eagle with spread wings facing left, with the inscription BASILEWS [PTOLEMAIOY] = "[Coin] of King [Ptolemy]", and a hard to see oval shield and small monogram at the left. There's also a delta between the eagle's legs,

Attribution: Svoronos 565
chuy1530
PtolemyBig.jpg
Egyptian Bronze Ptolemy III14 viewsA massive Ptolemaic Egyptian bronze coin of Ptolemy III, minted in Alexandria between 246-221 BC. 38mm, 44.4g.

Obverse: horned head of Zeus-Ammon.

Reverse: an eagle standing on a thunderbolt with an E between its legs, with the inscription PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS = "King Ptolemy".

Attribution: Svoronos 974
chuy1530
LarryW8026.jpg
GG, Ptolemaic, Arsinoe II, died c. 268 BC84 viewsGold oktadrachm, 28mm, 27.7g, VF
Postumous strike by Ptolemy Philadelphos at Alexandria, c. 268 - 250 BC
Veiled head of Arsinoe right, wears stephane and cow's horn, holds sceptre; K behind, circle of dots around / APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornuacopiae with fillets; circle of dots around
Svoronos 475
1 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW8025.jpg
GG, Ptolemy Philadelphos, 282-246 BC121 viewsGold tetradrachm, 13.8g, VF
Struck at Alexandria c. 270-261 BC
AΔEΛΦΩN, diademed and draped busts of Ptolemy Philadelphos and Arsinoe II; shield behind / ΘEΩN, diademed and draped busts of Ptolemy Soter and Berenike I
Svoronos 604
4 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
LarryW2400.jpg
GG, Ptolemy Soter, 305-283 BC308 viewsGold pentadrachm, 22.82mm, 17.82g, EF
Postumous strike under Ptolemy Philadelphos at Tyre c. 271-267 BC
Diademed head of Ptolemy Soter right, wearing aegis / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing half left atop a thunderbolt, wings closed, H above club in left field. RCOA
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins
Svoronos 636 (citing 8 specimens); BMC p. 9,74 (same obv die)
5 commentsLawrence Woolslayer
Ptolemy_II_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Greek Ptolemaic kingdom. Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285-246 BC. AR tetradrachm (26mm, 12.70 g). Tyre mint.114 viewsDiademed bust of Ptolemy I r. wearing aegis
Legend PTOLEMAIOU SOTHPOS around eagle standing l. thunderbolt; mint mark above club to l. and monogram to l. Date to r. Struck in regnal year 30 (256/5 BC).
Svoronos 658. _17100
Antonivs Protti
GAE898a_O.jpg
Greek, Alexander Ptolemaic Bronze256 viewsBronze Hemiobol of Ptolemy I ca. 290BC
Portrait of Alexander the Great with Ammon horn
Svoronos 172. 17.4mm 4.58gm 11.5h (345deg)
Stylistic elegance on early Ptolemaic bronze.
PtolemAE
24847q00.jpg
GREEK, Arsinoe II, Wife of Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Gold oktodrachm29 viewsSH24847. Gold oktodrachm, Svoronos 475; BMC Ptolemies p. 43, 10 and pl. VIII, 4; SGCV II 7768, gVF, weight 27.702 g, maximum diameter 28.4 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, c. 253 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed and veiled head or Arsinoe II right, K behind; reverse APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛA∆EΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet1 commentsJoe Sermarini
FotorCreated~97.jpg
Greek, Cleopatra I, Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy 6th circa 180-176 BC Ae 2896 viewsHead of Cleopatra 1st as Isis. Rev eagle standing on thunderbolt left.
EX NFA
Grant H
Ptolemy_XIII_-_XV_and_Cleopatra_VII,_c__51_-_39_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. 82 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. Bronze diobol, 10.340g, 29.5mm. VF. Attributution by Matt Kreuzer, author of "The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus." The two eagles symbolize two rulers on the throne of Cyprus, in this case Cleopatra VII and one of her two successive brother-husbands, Ptolemy XIII or XIV, less likely her son Ptolemy XV. The round, thin flan and weight standard is correct for the very late Ptolemaic Kingdom. The palm branch appears on obols (c. 6 grams) across the eagles, RPC 3903. Obv: diademed head of Zeus right, of Cypriot style, star before? Ref: unstruck Greek legend, presumably PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, palm branch before. Unpublished in major references: SNG Cop -, BMC -, Svor -, Paphos II -, RPC -, Noeske -. Exstremely rareBard Gram O
Rare_Ptolemy_VIII_145_-_116_BC.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Minted c. 135 B.C. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C.23 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Minted c. 135 B.C. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze obol, 7.973 g, 23.2 mm, F. Obv: diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right. Rev: eagle standing right, helmet before, PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS. This coin type is undated but was almost certainly issued at the same time as dated issues with this same helmet symbol, c. 135 B.C. Ref: Cox pp. 15, 106 #119, plate IV. RareBard Gram O
5__Bronze_Ptolémée_IV.jpg
Greek, Egypt, Ptolemaic, Ptolemy IV70 views- Grand bronze, Ptolémée IV, Alexandrie, 244-203 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Tête laurée de Zeus à droite.
Revers : Aigle debout à droite sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
Roger D2
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
GREEK, EGYPT, PTOLEMAIC, Ptolemy XII, 80-58 BC.48 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy XII, 80-58 BC.
AR Tetradrachm (14.28 gm; 24 mm).
Alexandria mint, year 8[74/3 BC].
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy right
Rev: Eagle on thunderbolt left. LH (Date) on left field; PA monogram on right.
Ref: BMC 6.118,13; S. 7945.
Nicely struck on a good metal. Choice Good VF. Very Pleasing Example.
1 commentsJorge C
Kyrenaikadidrachm.jpg
GREEK, Kyrenaika, AR Didrachm700 viewsExcellent Kyrenaikan Didrachm from Magistrate/Ptolemy I period.6 commentsalexB
68257q00.jpg
GREEK, Macedonian Kingdom, Ptolemy I, Satrap of Egypt, 323 - 305 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great, Gold stater16 viewsSH68257. Gold stater, Svoronos 11, Price 3975, Müller Alexander 6, SNG Cop 643, EF, weight 8.554 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, reign of Philip III, c. 323 - 316 B.C.; obverse head of Athena right wearing earring, necklace, and crested Corinthian helmet decorated with a coiled snake, hair in ringlets; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Nike standing left, wreath in right hand, stylus in left, thunderbolt left, small ∆I at feet on left; ex Gorny & Mosch auction 215, lot 775Joe Sermarini
Kyrene,_North_Africa,_Ptolemy_Apion,_c__101_-_96_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, North Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC.20 viewsNorth Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. Bronze quarter-obol, Fair, 1.214g, 12.2mm. Obv: diademed head of Ptolemy I as Zeus right, wearing aegis, hole from minting process. Rev: head of Libya or Isis right, PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS. Ref: Buttrey: The Extramural Sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at Cyrene, Libya, Final Reports, Volume VI, 542 - 603. Rare

Ptolemy Apion was a son of Ptolemy VIII, perhaps by an Egyptian concubine. This makes him a half-brother of Ptolemy IX and X. Ptolemy Apion died in 96 B.C., without an heir, leaving his kingdom to the Roman Republic. According to Butrey, Apion's coinage was nothing but very small change, with a peak about 1.3 grams. Buttrey notes, "the Greek coinage of Cyrenaica, of glorious tradition, ended in the lamentable small bronzes of Apion."
Bard Gram O
Kyrene_North_Africa_Ptolemy_Apion_101-96_BC_Rare.jpg
GREEK, North Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. 16 viewsNorth Africa, Kyrene mint. c. 101 - 96 BC. Bronze quarter-obol, F/VF, 1.141g, 13.6mm. Dark patina, untrimmed flan edges. Obv: diademed head of Ptolemy I as Zeus right, wearing aegis, hole from minting process. Rev: head of Libya or Isis right, [PTOLEMAIOU] BASILEWS. Ref: Buttrey: The Extramural Sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at Cyrene, Libya, Final Reports, Volume VI, 542 - 603. Rare Bard Gram O
newer_ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, AR Tetradrachm, c.300-285 B.C.53 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter AR Tetradrachm. Alexandreia, circa 300-285 BC.
Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck, small Δ behind ear / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram.
Svoronos 265; SNG Copenhagen 73;
14.31g, 26mm, 1h.
1 commentschance v
PT1or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2264 viewsObv: Head of Herakles wearing lionskin facing right.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS Eagle standing left, wings spread.
gparch
PtolemyIAE26or.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AE2671 views305-285 BC
AE 25.6x26.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, laureate
Rev. PTOLEMAIOY BASILIEOS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, A over X in left field.
Svoronos Pl. 10b no. 16; Sear 7763
gparch
ptolemy_drachm.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AR Drachm, c.311-305 B.C.81 viewsPtolemy I Soter, 323-305 as satrap. Alexandria Drachm circa 311-305, AR 16mm., 3.68g.
Obv: Head r., wearinh elephan-skin.
Rev: Athena standing r., holding shield and spear.; in r. field, eagle on thunderbolt.
Zervos Issue 68. Svoronos 34.
2 commentschance v
ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy I, AR Tetradrachm, 305-282 B.C.58 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. 305-282 BC. AR Tetradrachm (27mm, 14.21 g, 12h). Alexandria mint. Struck circa 300-285 BC.
Diademed head right, wearing aegis; small Δ behind ear / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, P above monogram.
Svoronos 256; Noeske 29.
chance v
PtolemyIIFORVM.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE1960 viewsObv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, diademed.
Rev. PTOLOMEOY BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread, oval symbol between legs.
Alexandria mint
285-246 BC
Svoronos 468
gparch
AE28PtolemyII.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, AE2870 viewsAE 27.6x28.4mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, laureate.
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, sigma and shield at left.
2 commentsgparch
GAE583.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy II, Alexander in Elephantskin255 viewsAE25 12.83gm 12h
Ptolemy II ca 270-260BC
Sidon Provincial Mint - Obol
Svoronos 763
Unusually nice condition and portrait style for the Alexander-in-Elephantskin type. Wear ordinarily obscures the Ammon horn which here is visible through the skin headdress. Unusual type that appears to conform to post-260BC weight categories but lacks central depressions, a bit of a conundrum in this type.
5 commentsPtolemAE
GAE660.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy III Large Bronze543 viewsPtolemy III - ca 240BC - Alexandria - Drachm
Bronze - 43.1-43.9mm - 73.2gm - 11h
CHI/RHO monogram in eagle's legs
Svoronos 964, SNG Cop. 172
Not especially rare type, but always rare this nice. A real monster, too.
10 commentsPtolemAE
6198661089_bc575456b8_b~0.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy III, Medium Bronze170 viewsPtolemy III Eugertes
Alexandria Mint, 246-241BC
AE hemidrachm, 40.38mm 42.75g
Svoronos 1166
crawforde
PtolemyIVOBREVb.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopator99 viewsAE 38
222-204 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Eagle standing L. on thunderbolt,
looking back over shoulder,
cornucopia on shoulder,
E monogram between legs.
1 commentsgparch
Sv1381_GAE916_AE22_7x114g_12h.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Kleopatra I196 viewsRare middle-size bronze of the series that has unusual name of Queen Kleopatra I (BASILISES KLEOPATRAS) on the *obverse* in addition to the usual BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY on the reverse. Svoronos 1381. Full sharp inscriptions, centered. Nice.
Portrait of 'Alexandria' on obverse, open-wing eagle on reverse with PI/A monogram to left.

22mm - 7.114 gram - 12h

Kleopatra I was the daughter of Antiochos III, married off to Ptolemy V at the end of the 5th Syrian war ca 195BC, tying up the turnover and permanent loss of all of Phoenician Ptolemaic territory (Tyre, Sidon, Ake-Ptolemais, etc.) to the Seleukid kingdom. Mother of Ptolemy VI who assumed the throne at age 5 upon the death of Ptolemy V, Kleopatra I was his regent until her death in 176 BC. An unusual series of three sizes of bronze coins (Svoronos 1380, 81, 82) bear her name on the obverse where most Ptolemaic bronzes have no inscription at all. When Antiochos IV attacked Egypt ca. 170 BC and captured Ptolemy VI, ruling for a time with him, it was all in the family. Antiochos IV was the young Egyptian king's uncle, through the earlier marriage of Kleopatra I into the Lagid court of Alexandria. Interesting and historic coin type, unusual layout of inscriptions for a Ptolemaic bronze.
5 commentsPtolemAE
AE20Twoeagles.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and VIII, AE20102 viewsAE 20
Joint reign, after 169 BC (169-145 BC)
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Two eagles Standing L.,
on thunderbolts, wings closed,
cornucopia in L. field
2 commentsgparch
gae681_pair.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI Medium Bronze - Isis Head Type357 viewsPtolemy VI - Alexandria - Diobol - 180/145BC
AE 25.0-25.7mm : 15.962gm : 11h
OBV - Goddess Isis with hanging curls, headdress with with corn wreath, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing facing left on thunderbolt with PI-ALPHA monogram at left
REF - Svoronos 1384
NOTE - Early sole reign of Ptolemy VI.
7 commentsPtolemAE
Picture_33.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor719 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.

Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265

8 commentsmihali84
06869p00.jpe
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI, 204-181 B.C831 viewsMasterpiece portrait. SNG Cop lists a simliar coin in the same year, with an owl in the left field, for the mint of Citium, Cyprus (SNG Cop 588). At Salamis, the owl was also used in the left field on a coin of the Selukid king, Antiocus IV, 170-168 B.C. Our coin is unpublished in references held by FORVM.7 commentssalem
bpGS1T1Ptolemy.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II111 viewsTetradrachm, 14 gm, 26.5 mm, 285-246 BC, Svoronos 373
Obv: Anepigraphic with diademed head of Ptolemy I, right. Countermarks.
Rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ to left. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right. In left lower field, the monogram ΑΧΡ over ΔΙ. Countermarks.
Comment: Multiple countermarks are common on coins of Ptolemy II. Many thanks to the members of Forum for attribution.
Massanutten
Ptolemy2tridentor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II AE 2738 viewsca. 285-265 BC
AE 26.2x27.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon, right
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, shield at left.
Inscription not readable. Trident countermark.
Sear 7779

A. Davesne (1987) states that the trident countermark was applied in Cyprus to revalidate bronzes demonetized by the reform of ca. 265 BC.
gparch
PtolomeoIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos AE 2436 viewsAE 22.3x24.1mm
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev. PTOLOMEUS BASILEUS
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club at left.
285-246 BC
gparch
AE20PtolemyIIIor.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III30 viewsAE 20
247-222 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. Eagle standing L.
wings spread, on thunderbolt,
PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
edge chipped.
gparch
Ptolemy3bOBREV.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes33 viewsObv. Head of Zeus-Ammon, right
Rev. Eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
wings closed, cornucopia at left.
gparch
Ptolemy3aOBREV.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes42 views247-222 BC
AE 35
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS.
eagle on thunderbolt L.,
chi-rho monogram between legs,
cornucopia in L. field
1 commentsgparch
Ptolemy III AE33 temp~0.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III, AE3356 viewsobv: head of Zeus right
rev: Eagle standing on thunderbolt
Jericho
ptolemy III AE19.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy III, Evergetes AE1936 viewsobv: Bust of Ptolemy III right
rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field
Struck 246-221 B.C.
Jericho
PtolemyIVOBREVa.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy IV, AE3831 views222-204 BC
OB. Zeus-Ammon R.
REV. PTOLOMAEUS BASILICUS,
Eagle standing L. on thunderbolt,
looking back over shoulder,
cornucopia on shoulder,
E monogram between legs
gparch
Ptolemy IV AE40 black.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy IV, AE4095 viewsobv: head of Zeus right
rev: eagle standing on thunderbolt
Jericho
AE29PtolemyVI+VIII.JPG
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VI and VIII AE2946 viewsgparch
inhandpt1.png
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), c. 170 - 164 B.C.78 viewsBronze triobol, Svoronos 1424 (type I, heavier var)
SNG Cop 306 ff., Noeske 212 ff., Hosking 75, Weiser 142 (Ptolemy V, 180 - 176 B.C.), SGCV II 7900, gF
Alexandria mint, weight 31.520g, maximum diameter 32.1mm, die axis 0o, c. 170 - 164 B.C.
Obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon
Reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, double cornucopia left;
big, heavy 32 mm bronze (Ex FORVM)
superflex
PTOLEMAIC_KINGDOM,_Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II26 viewsTetradrakme 14,07g 24,9mm. Kition mint. This coin you can ex. date . The letter LN = year 50 is 120/121 BC .
Svoronos 1611 Noeske 226var. (date)
Karsten K
24848q00.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Gold tetradrachm12 viewsSH24848. Gold tetradrachm, Svoronos 604; BMC Ptolemies p. 40, 4 - 5; SNG Cop 133; SGCV II 7790, superb aEF, weight 13.813 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 265 - 260 B.C.; obverse A∆EΛΦΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy II Philadelphos, diademed and draped, and Arsinoe II, diademed and veiled, shield behind; reverse ΘEΩN, jugate busts of Ptolemy I Soter, diademed and wearing aegis, and Berenike I, diademed and veiledJoe Sermarini
FotorCreated~96.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Ptolemy 12th Neos Dionysos {Auletes} restored 55-51 BC77 viewsAlexandreia mint dated RY 28 {54-3} Diademed head of Ptolemy right wearing aegis. Rev eagle standing left on thunderbolt LKH date and headdress of Isis in left field.
Nicknamed Auletes the flute player .
Grant H
ptolemy2~0.jpg
Greek, Ptolemy II Philadelphus AR Tetradrachm119 viewsObverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I Soter
Reverse: Eagle with folded wings standing on thunderbolts. PTOLEMAIOY SOTHROS; Regnal Year 31 (255/54 BC) of Ptolemy II (285-246 BC) Monograms and control marks of the Gaza mint in the fields

Many of the portraits of Ptolemy Soter (the Savior) are little more than caricatures on the tetradrachms that are commonly for sale. Perhaps after engraving the same features for centuries the man behind the image became lost. I think this coin portrait has great quality and I imagine it looks a lot like the original Ptolemy I although cut about thirty years after his death. Ptolemy I may have been regarded as the George Washington of his day and the the notion of "father of his country" is exemplified in this portrait.
It is ironic that his patron, Alexander, overthrew the Persian God-Kings and was a major factor in preserving the role of the individual in Western values. Ptolemy's dynasty generally followed the Egyptian model with family members succeeding family members for over two centuries rather than the highly competitive and dynamic model that shaped Western politics and history.

Gaza mint; Svoronos 828; wt 13.7 gm
daverino
Ptolemy_tyre_tet~0.jpg
Greek, Ptolemy II Tetradrachm 193 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Svoronos 626 var (no monogram) or Svoronos 644 var (D behind ear), VF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, weight 14.076g, maximum diameter 27.4mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, Tyre monogram and club left; rare;

Ex Forvm

Svoronos' description for tetradrachm 626 is the "same as the gold pentadrachm." In the notes for the pentadrachm he notes the type sometimes has a Tyre monogram, but the notes for the tetradrachm 626 discuss only countermarks and not a monogram. The monogram is absent on the plate coin.

Svoronos 644 is be marked with a tiny D behind Ptolemy's ear. On this coin the mark appears to be absent.

Philoromaos
Picture_14.jpg
Greek, Ptolemy VI Philometor296 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265
4 commentsmihali84
06869p00~0.jpe
Greek, Ptolemy VI, 204-181 B.C716 views6869. Silver tetradrachm, BMC-, SNG Cop -, gVF, 13.87g, 26.2mm, 40o, Salamis, Cyprus mint, 177-176 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, owl in left field, LE (regnal year 5) over SA (Salamis mint, Cyprus) in right field; superb portrait, fantastic style, extremely rare, possibly unique;3 commentssalem
25884q00.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C.223 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.
5 commentsJoe Sermarini
GAE404_O.jpg
Greek, Zeus, Syracusan Imitation Ptolemaic Diobol of Hieron II ca. 265BC210 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos - Syracuse Issue of Hieron II - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 26.9-28.4mm : 14.736gm : 2h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field, N control letter behind eagle tail at right. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 619
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
1 commentsPtolemAE
Ptolemy_II,_Joppa.jpg
Greek: Ptolemy II, tet147 viewsPtolemy II, Philadelphos. 285-246 B.C. AR Tetradrachm. Joppa mint, 249/8 B.C. (14.21 g, 26.8 mm, 10h). Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I, right wearing aegis. Rev: IOΠ (Joppa), ΓΑ (Gaza), left filed, ΛΙ (date), Θ, right field, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. Svoronos 814. Ex Amphora, catalog 98, 122.

Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, is the Egyptian ruler that translated the Torah into Greek, known to history as the Septuagint. A less common coin from the Joppa mint with a curious monogram typically associated with the Gaza mint below.
1 commentsLucas H
PtolemyI.jpg
Hellenistic Egypt: Ptolemy I Soter (305 - 283 BC)114 viewsAR Tetradrachm, Alexandreia mint, c. 300-285 BC, 26mm, 14.18g, Svoronos 257, SNG Cop -
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, Aegis around neck, Δ behind ear
Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ, Eagle standing atop thunderbolt left, in left field P, A and monogram
Ex- Coin Galleries (2006, lot 142), Ex- HJB (Buy/Bid Sale 161, lot 192)
4 commentsRemus22
Unidentified.jpg
I sense an African theme...21 viewsTop left: Can I sing some U2? "I stillllll haven't found... what I'm looking forrrrrr..."

Top and bottom right: Ptolemaic, not sure exactly which Ptolemy. Gorgeous though.

Bottom left: Carthaginian.
Bronze, 17 mm at widest, 4 grams (by my terrible kitchen scale)
Head of Tanit left, obverse
Prancing (or rearing?) horse right, reverse
60-75 degree die axis (ish)
EvaJupiterSkies
2009-03-22_03-29_Sizilien_389_Solunto.jpg
Italy, Sicily, View of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra)58 viewsView of Solanto from the ruins of Soluntum (aka Solus, Solous, and Kefra), Sicily

Solus (or Soluntum, near modern Solanto) was an ancient city on the north coast of Sicily, one of the three chief Phoenician settlements on the island, about 16 kilometers (10 miles) east of Panormus (modern Palermo). It lay 183 meters (600 ft) above sea level, on the southeast side of Monte Catalfano 373 meters (1,225 ft), in a naturally strong situation, and commanding a fine view. The date of its founding is unknown. Solus was one of the few colonies that the Phoenicians retained when they withdrew to the northwest corner of the island before the advance of the Greek colonies in Sicily. Together with Panormus and Motya, it allied with the Carthaginians. In 396 B.C. Dionysius took the city but it probably soon broke away again to Carthage and was usually part of their dominions on the island. In 307 B.C. it was given to the soldiers and mercenaries of Agathocles, who had made peace with the Carthage when abandoned by their leader in Africa. During the First Punic War it was still subject to Carthage, and it was not until after the fall of Panormus that Soluntum also opened its gates to the Romans. It continued to under Roman dominion as a municipal town, but apparently one of no great importance, as its name is only slightly and occasionally mentioned by Cicero. But it is still noticed both by Pliny and Ptolemy, as well as at a later period by the Itineraries. Its destruction probably dates from the time of the Saracens.

Excavations have brought to light considerable remains of the ancient town, belonging entirely to the Roman period, and a good deal still remains unexplored. The traces of two ancient roads, paved with large blocks of stone, which led up to the city, may still be followed, and the whole summit of Monte Catalfano is covered with fragments of ancient walls and foundations of buildings. Among these may be traced the remains of two temples, of which some capitals and portions of friezes, have been discovered. An archaic oriental Artemis sitting between a lion and a panther, found here, is in the museum at Palermo, with other antiquities from this site. An inscription, erected by the citizens in honor of Fulvia Plautilla, the wife of Caracalla, was found there in 1857. With the exception of the winding road by which the town was approached on the south, the streets, despite the unevenness of the ground, which in places is so steep that steps have to be introduced, are laid out regularly, running from east to west and from north to south, and intersecting at right angles. They are as a rule paved with slabs of stone. The houses were constructed of rough walling, which was afterwards plastered over; the natural rock is often used for the lower part of the walls. One of the largest of them, with a peristyle, was in 1911, though wrongly, called the gymnasium. Near the top of the town are some cisterns cut in the rock, and at the summit is a larger house than usual, with mosaic pavements and paintings on its walls. Several sepulchres also have been found.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soluntum

Photo by Allie Caulfield from Germany.
Joe Sermarini
JubaII.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene89 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed and draped bust right, club over shoulder

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Headdress of Isis, with stalks of grain, crescent above

Caesarea mint, 25 B.C. - 24 A.D

12.62g

Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos 209, Mazard 351 (RRR), SNG Cop 605, De Luynes 4013

Very Rare! Excellent for the type!

From a very old collection


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
JubaCleo.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene daughter of Antony62 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-D. Loates Fine Arts; Ex-William McDonald Collection; Ex-Geoffrey Bell 2012 Fall Auction lot 273

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death
Jay GT4
Juba_II.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene215 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed head right

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Star and crescent.

Caesarea; 25 B.C.-23 A.D
17 mm, 2.62 gm

MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300.
VF, toned
Scarce

Ex-ANE

Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.
6 commentsJay GT4
Jubaselene.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene84 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-William McDonald Collection

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death.
2 commentsJay GT4
323_-_315_BC_ALEXANDER_III_AE_Quarter-Obol.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AE Quarter-Obol (2 Chalkoi). Struck 323 – 315 BC under Nikokreon at Salamis, Cyprus.5 viewsObverse: No legend. Macedonian shield with Gorgoneion (Medusa) head as the boss in the centre. The shield boss is sometimes called the episema, the Greek name for a symbol of a particular city or clan which was placed in the centre of a soldier's shield.
Reverse: Macedonian helmet surmounted with a horse hair crest; B - A (for BAΣIΛEOΣ AΛEΞANĐPOY = King Alexander) above; mint marks below the helmet, to left, a kerykeion (caduceus) and to the right, the monogram NK (for Nikokreon).
Diameter: 14mm | Weight: 4.6gms | Die Axis: 1
Price: 3162 | Liampi, Chronologie 170-92

This coin is a Type 7 (Macedonian shield type) bronze Quarter-Obol (two chalkoi). Price dated the Macedonian Shield coins as beginning during the latter part of Alexander's life, c.325 BC, and ending c.310 BC. Liampi later argued, based on new hoard evidence, that they were minted as early as 334 BC. This particular coin is dated from c.323 to 315 BC.

Salamis was founded around 1100 BC by the inhabitants of Enkomi, a Late Bronze Age city on Cyprus, though in Homeric tradition, the city was established by Teucer, one of the Greek princes who fought in the Trojan War. After Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire, of which Salamis was a part, Greek culture and art flourished in the city and, as well as being the seat of the governor of Cyprus, it was the island's most important port.
Nikokreon had succeeded Pnytagoras on the throne of Salamis and is reported to have paid homage to Alexander after the conqueror’s return from Egypt to Tyre in 331 BC. After Alexander's death, his empire was split between his generals, Cyprus falling to Ptolomy I of Egypt. In 315 BC during the war between Antigonos and Ptolemy, Nikokreon supported the latter and was rewarded by being made governor of all Cyprus. However, in 311 BC Ptolemy forced Nikokreon to commit suicide because he no longer trusted him. Ptolemy's brother, King Menelaus, was made governor in Nikokreon's stead.
In 306 BC, Salamis was the scene of a naval battle between the fleets of Ptolemy and Demetrius I of Macedon. Demetrius won the battle and captured the island.
*Alex
ALEXANDER_III_AR_Drachm.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AR Drachm. Struck 323 – 317 BC at Lampsakos, Mysia.21 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Zeus Aëtophoros seated facing left, right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, sceptre in left; buckle in left field; Λ above Ω below throne.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 4.16gms | Die Axis: 7 | Cut mark above eyebrow on obverse.
Price: 1376

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but this coin was struck shortly after his death, in around 323 to 317 BC under Leonnatos, Philip III Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos.

Leonnatos was a Macedonian officer under Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi, rival generals, family and friends of Alexander the Great who fought for the control of Alexander's empire after his death in 323 BC.
Leonnatos was the same age as Alexander and was very close to him. After Alexander died, Leonnatos was made satrap of Phrygia and Alexander's sister, Cleopatra, offered him her hand in marriage. When the Athenians heard that Alexander had died, they revolted against Macedonia. Leonnatos led an army of 20,000 infantry and 1,500 cavalry to relieve the new regent, Antipater, probably with the ambition of usurping Antipater's power since a victory over the Athenians would have enhanced Leonnatos' own claim to the throne. However, in 322 BC, Leonnatus was killed in battle against the Athenians and his marriage to Cleopatra never took place.
Philip III Arrhidaeus was the king of Macedonia after the death of Alexander the Great, from 323 BC until his own death in 317 BC. He was a son of King Philip II of Macedonia and a half-brother of Alexander. Named Arrhidaeus at birth, he assumed the name Philip when he ascended the throne.
As Arrhidaeus grew older it became apparent that he had mild learning difficulties. Alexander was very fond of him, and took him on his campaigns, both to protect his life and to ensure he would not be used as a pawn in a challenge for the throne. After Alexander's death in Babylon, Arrhidaeus was proclaimed king by the Macedonian army in Asia, but he was a mere figurehead, and a pawn of the powerful generals, one after the other.
Antigonos I Monophthalmus (Antigonos the One-eyed) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. As part of the division of the provinces after Alexander's death, Antigonos received Pamphylia and Lycia from Perdiccas, regent of the empire, but he incurred the enmity of Perdiccas by refusing to assist Eumenes to obtain possession of Paphlagonia and Cappadocia, the provinces which had been allotted to him. Leonnatos had left with his army for Greece, leaving Antigonos to deal with Cappadocia, a task he apparently couldn't complete alone and Perdiccas seems to have viewed this as a direct affront to his authority. Perdiccas then went with the royal army to conquer the area himself and from there he turned west towards Phrygia in order to confront Antigonos. Antigonos, however, escaped to Greece where, in 321 BC, he obtained the favour of Antipater, regent of Macedonia.
When Perdiccas died later that same year, a new attempt at division of the empire took place and Antigonos found himself entrusted with the command of the war against Eumenes, who had joined Perdiccas against the coalition of the other generals which included Antipater, Antigonos, Ptolemy and Craterus. Eumenes was defeated and forced to retire to the fortress of Nora in Cappadocia, and a new army that was marching to his relief was routed by Antigonos.
In 319 BC Antipater died, and Polyperchon was given the regentship, but Antigonos and the other dynasts refused to recognize him since it undermined their own ambitions. Antigonos' old adversary, Eumenes, who had been given authority over anyone within the empire by Polyperchon, raised an army and built a fleet in Cilicia and Phoenicia, and soon after formed a coalition with the satraps of the eastern provinces. Antigonos fought against him in two great battles and, though both were inconclusive, in the aftermath of the second battle Antigonos managed to capture the family and possessions of the Silvershields, an elite regiment within Eumenes' army. The Silvershields negotiated the release of their families by handing over Eumenes to Antigonos in return. Antigonos had Eumenes executed resulting in him now being in possession of the empire's Asian territories, stretching from the eastern satrapies to Syria and Asia Minor in the west.
2 comments*Alex
496_Greek.jpg
Kingdom of Thrace, Lysimachos, 305 - 281 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great30 viewsReference. this is the only example of this type known to Forum; possibly unique
Unpublished variety; Meydancikkale - (cf. 2691, different controls, same engraver), Müller -, SNG Cop -, Thompson -, Black Sea Hoard -, Armenak -

Note. Thrace, Ainos (Enez, Turkey) mint, likely posthumous, c. 282 - 272 B.C

Obv.
diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon
.

Rev. BASILEWS LUSIMACOU
Athena enthroned left, holding Nike and resting left elbow on shield decorated with lion’s head, spear resting to her right; ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ to right, ΛΥΣΙΜΑΞΟΥ crowned by Nike to left, monogram in inner left field, monogram in exergue

16.503 gr
28.6 mm
180o

Note.
Barry Murphy identified the mint for this coin as Ainos, noting, "Not the same dies or the same monograms, but clearly the same engraver as Meydicikkale 2691."

A subject ally of Athens, Aenus provided peltasts at the Battle of Sphacteria in 425 B.C. and sent forces to the Sicilian Expedition in 415. It was in the possession of Ptolemy Philopator in 222 B.C., of Philip V of Macedon in 200, of Lysimachos in 283, and later of Antiochus the Great, who lost it to the Romans in 185 B.C., whereupon the Romans declared Aenus a free city. It was still a free city in the time of Pliny the Elder.
2 commentsokidoki
56899q00_(2).jpg
Kingdom of Thrace. Lysimachos AR Tetradrachm178 viewsCirca 297-281 B.C. AR Tetradrachm, Thompson 59, Müller 88 (Sestus mint), 17.146g, maximum diameter 31.2mm, die axis 0o, Mysia, Lampsacus mint. Obverse diademed head of Alexander the Great wearing the horn of Ammon. Reverse Athena seated left on prow, Nike crowning name in extended right, transverse spear resting against right side, resting left arm on shield behind, KA monogram inner left, herm outer left. gVF. Nice style, beautiful portrait of Alexander.

Ex Otakirak Collection. Ex Stack's, Bowers and Ponterio NYINC Auction 2012, lot 194. Ex FORVM.

Lysimachos, a Macedonian of great physical strength and fortitude, rose to prominence as a σωματοφύλαξ, or “bodyguard” for Alexander the Great. When Alexander’s territories were parceled out during the settlement at Babylon in 323 BC, Lysimachos was given control of Thrace, the Chersonese, and the intervening Black Sea coast. Unfortunately, much of this territory was no longer under Macedonian control, but was claimed by various Thracian tribes. Although Lysimachos was involved to some extent in the early wars of the Diadochs, most of his early years as satrap were preoccupied with subduing the Thracian tribes, an endeavor that was largely unsuccessful. By the time he assumed the royal title in 306/5 BC, his kingdom consisted of little more than the southern portions of Thrace. While this territory included a few already active mints, such as Ainos and Byzantion, Lysimachos was forced to depend on his ally Kassander, the king of Macedon, for coinage, as the sources of bullion were under the control of his enemies. This situation changed in 302 BC, when Lysimachos raised an army at the urging of Kassander and invaded Asia Minor, territory which Antigonos I Monophthalmos controlled, and whose son, Demetrios I Poliorketes, was threatening Kassander’s southern flank in Thessaly. Lysimachos quickly captured much of the Hellespont, and he penetrated as far as Lydia. This territory was rich with both silver bullion and mint cities, including Alexandria Troas, Ephesos, Lampsakos, Magnesia, and Sardis. Lysimachos used these mints to begin striking coinage on his behalf, while at the same time, he apparently sent bullion back to Thrace, where Lysimacheia and Sestos also began to produce coinage for him. These mints initially struck coins of Alexander type for Lysimachos, but later changed to the new Lysimachos type in 297 BC. After Lysimachos and Seleukos I defeated the Antigonids at Ipsos in 301 BC, most of western Asia Minor passed to Lysimachos. He now held some of the most prosperous cities in the Aegean, and soon most of the well-established mints were striking coinage in his name. Many of these same mints were required to pay large sums of tribute in order to fund further campaigns of expansion. One such object of expansion was Macedon, the ultimate goal of all the Diodochs. Since the death of Kassander in 298 BC, it had fallen into chaos and was eventually captured by Demetrios, who was, in turn, driven out by the joint invasion of Lysimachos and Pyrrhos in 288 BC. Initially, Macedon was split between the two, with Lysimachos taking the eastern half and its mint of Amphipolis. By 285 BC, when Lysimachos also obtained the western half from Pyrrhos, Pella also began producing coinage for Lysimachos. His successes, however, were short-lived. Beginning in 284 BC with the murder of his step-sons, Lysimachos became involved in a treacherous game of political and dynastic intrigue. As a result, revolt broke out among the Asian cities under his control, and Seleukos I launched an invasion against him. At the battle of Korupedion in 281 BC, Lysimachos was killed, and his kingdom was subsumed into the Seleukid empire. Ptolemy Keraunos, however, siezed Lysimachos’ European territories after he murdered Seleukos I later that year. Edward T. Newell’s study of Lysimachos’ lifetime issues arranged them according to the territorial expansion of his kingdom. Unfortunately, Newell died before completing his study, and consequently many issues are missing from Margaret Thompson’s survey of his unfinished work. The many ‘unpublished’ coins that have appeared over the past two decades reveal how little is known about Lysimachos’ coinage. Although most catalogs list these unpublished coins as posthumous issues, this is unlikely, as most of his mint cities were taken over by other kingdoms following Lysimachos’ death. The cities that continued to issue his coins as a regular type, such as Byzantion, were mostly ones that regularly conducted trade with cities to the north of Thrace, whose economies were likely dominated by Lysimachos type coinage during his lifetime. A few cities, such as Tenedos, struck brief, sporadic issues of Lysimachos type coins long after his death, but these issues were likely struck for some specific purpose that required this type, and are not part of any regular series. At the beginning of his reign, Lysimachos continued to use Alexander’s coinage types, later modifying them by replacing Alexander’s name with his own. In 297 BC, Lysimachos introduced a new type: the obverse was a portrait of Alexander; the reverse was Athena, Lysimachos’ patron goddess. G.K Jenkins noted the power of the Alexander portrait in his commentary on the Gulbenkian Collection: “The idealized portrait of Alexander introduced on the coinage of Lysimachos in 297 BC is characterized by the horn of Ammon which appears above the ear. The allusion is to Alexander’s famous visit to the oracle of Ammon at the Siwa Oasis in 331, when the god is supposed to have greeted Alexander as ‘My son’.... The best of the Alexander heads on Lysimachos’ coinage...have a power and brilliance of effect that is irresistible. It [is speculated] that these Alexander heads may have derived from an original gem carved by Pyrgoteles, an engraver prominent among the artists of Alexander’s court....” Regardless of the inspiration for the new design, part of the remarkable attraction of this coinage is its artistic variety: each engraver created his own fresh and distinctive portrayal of the world’s greatest conqueror. (Commentary courtesy of CNG).
6 commentsJason T
Byblos_Alexander_Tetradrachm__(Berytos_of_Price).jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III the Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm – Byblos mint c. 321/0 BC35 viewsHead of young Herakles r. in lion skin headdress, paws tied at neck.
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ Zeus Aëtophoros seated l., retrograde B to l., H beneath throne.

Price -.
Previously unrecorded type that based on style and mint controls is attributed Byblos (Berytos of Price) and dated to c. 321/0 BC in a mintage associated with the withdrawal of the Macedonian Royal army from Egypt to Triparadeisos.

(26 mm, 16.72 g, 9h).

Solidus Numismatik 29 (12 May 2018), Lot 46.

This type is unrecorded in Price. The style together with the retrograde B mint control associate it with the small series of Alexander issues attributed to Berytos by Price, now reattributed to Byblos. It appears that this coinage was struck to help meet the arrears in army pay that resulted from the abortive campaign led by Perdikkas against Ptolemy in Egypt. Perdikkas was assassinated and as the Macedonian Royal army withdrew to Triparadeisos the matter of arrears in pay became a festering issue with the infantry. In an effort to placate the troops it appears that a mint at Byblos was established to coin available silver for at least a token payment to the army.
2 commentsn.igma
Macedonian_Kingdom,_Salamis_,_Alexander_III,_AR_Tetradrachm_.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Alexander III The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm – Cyprus, Salamis under Nikokreon32 viewsHead of young Herakles right in lion skin headdress, paws tied at neck.
ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡOΥ Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, bow to left.

Price 3139a (same dies); Newell Salamis 7. The first tetradrachm emission of Salamis ca. 325/4 BC, struck under Nikokreon.

(24 mm, 16.97 g, 12h).

CNG 259 (6 July 2011) Lot 66

After the Battle of Issos, the island of Cyprus surrendered to Alexander III the Great, denying the Persian navy a base in proximity to the westernmost coast of the Mediterranean. Struck from the first set of tetradrachm dies used at the mint, this coin dates to the start of Alexander emissions from Salamis around 325/4 BC. Nikokreon (ca. 331-311/10 BC), under whose authority this coin was issued, succeeded his father Pnytagoras on the throne of Salamis. He had actively supported Alexander in the siege of Tyre and is reported to have paid homage to Alexander after the conqueror’s return from Egypt to Tyre in 331. In return he was left in power to govern Salamis. Following Alexander’s death he allied himself with Ptolemy who in 312 BC placed him in control of the entire island of Cyprus. He died in 311/10 BC after which Cyprus became the focus of the power struggle between the military forces of Ptolemy and Antigonos Monopthalmos.
2 commentsn.igma
Corinth,_Alexander_Tetradrachm,_Price_691.jpg
Kings of Macedon, Demetrios I Poliorketes, 306-283 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Corinth ca. 290-287 BC 28 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion skin headdress.
BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, Nikai on throne back, cornucopia in left field, NO beneath throne.

Price 691; Müller 877; Commerce ("Seleucus I") Hoard 2005 (CH 10.265) 339-374 (same obv. die as 376 a Price 691 variant). Struck ca. 290-287 BC in Corinth by Demetrios I Poliorketes.
Struck from worn and rusty dies.

(28 mm, 17.16 g, 4h).
ex- Commerce ("Seleucus I") Hoard 2005 (CH 10.265)

The Commerce ("Seleucus I") Hoard 2005 (CH 10.265) is believed to have been a part of Seleukos’ treasury at the time he was assassinated by Ptolemy Keraunos. The coins in the hoard consist of tetradrachms and drachms, of early the Hellenistic period accompanied by one Boeotian and five Athenian civic issues. The Hellenistic royal coinage derived from the mints of Alexander the Great, Antigonos Monopthalmos, Demetrios Poliorketes, Lysimachos and Seleukos. The hoard was found in an undisclosed location in Asia Minor. Its composition is inferred from 1,721 coins in commerce in 2005-06, although the total hoard is believed to have consisted of more than 3,000 coins. The hoard appears to have been closed around 281 BC at the time of the murder of Seleukos.
n.igma
00165q00.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Alexander III ‘The Great’, (Circa 332-323 BC)11 viewsAR Tetradrachm

26 mm, 17.21 g

Salamis, struck under Nikokreon.

Obverse: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Reverse: AΛEΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left on low throne, holding long scepter in his left hand and eagle standing right with closed wings in his right; to left, bow.

Price 3139.

Nikokreon succeeded Pnytagoras on the throne of Salamis (Cyprus) and is reported to have paid homage to Alexander after the conqueror’s return from Egypt to Tyre in 331. In the war between Antigonos and Ptolemy (315), Nikokreon supported the latter and was rewarded by being placed in control of all Cyprus. He was the last of the Teucridai to rule in Salamis (upon his death in 310 BC, the city came under the rule of Ptolemy’s brother, Menelaos).

The Teucridai were kings of Salamis who claimed descent from Teucer, the mythical founder of the city. The bow in left field on the reverse undoubtedly references Teucer's fame as a great archer, who loosed his shafts from behind the giant shield of his half-brother Ajax the Great during the Trojan War.
2 commentsNathan P
Sardes.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Philip III Arrhidaios, (Circa 322-318 BC)21 viewsAR Drachm

17 mm, 4.20 g

Sardes mint under Philip III Arrhidaios (323-317 BC) in the types of Alexander III

Obverse: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Reverse: ΦIΛIΠΠΟΥ (FILIPPOU) Zeus seated left on throne, holding eagle in his right hand and scepter in his left; to left, bee; below throne, A.

Price P104

This coin is a die match for Nomos Web Auction 6, Lot 330, 11/20/2016 (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3481680)

Subsequent to his death in 323 BC, Alexander the Great's sister, Cleopatra, traveled to Sardes (Autumn 322 BC) to lure a husband from among her brother's former generals (who had already begun warring over Alexander's empire). Over the course of the next two years she was visited twice by Alexander's former secretary and now dashing outlaw general, Eumenes of Cardia. The first time Eumenes brought an offer of marriage from the general Perdiccas, who Cleopatra turned away (rightfully, it turned out, as he was killed by his own troops after failing in battle vs. Ptolemy in Egypt). The second time (320 BC) Eumenes offered to ally with Cleopatra to combine his military might and her royal legitimacy.(This was not an offer of marriage, as Eumenes was not Macedonian.) To impress the princess, Eumenes paraded his cavalry back and forth before Sardes. But Cleopatra, though she granted Eumenes an audience, was not willing to become his partisan. Throughout the wars that followed Cleopatra never married or even left Sardes, where she remained as a veritable damsel in the tower keep until her death by assassination in 308 BC.
Nathan P
Lysimachos.jpg
Kings of Thrace. Lysimachos. (Circa 305-281 B.C.)18 viewsAE 18, 4.87 g

Obverse: Helmeted Head of Athena right

Reverse: BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY (Of King Lysimachos), lion leaping right, EAM monogram and caduceus in left field, spear head below.

SNG Copenhagen 1153-4; Müller 76

Lysimachos (360 BC – 281 BC) was a Macedonian officer and diadochus "successor" of Alexander the Great, who became a king in 306 BC, ruling Thrace, Asia Minor and Macedon. In 302 BC, when the second alliance between Cassander, Ptolemy and Seleucus was made, Lysimachus, reinforced by troops from Cassander, entered Asia Minor, where he met with little resistance. On the approach of Antigonus he retired into winter quarters near Heraclea, marrying its widowed queen Amastris, a Persian princess. Seleucus joined him in 301 BC, and at the Battle of Ipsus Antigonus was defeated and slain. Antigonus' dominions were divided among the victors. Lysimachus' share was Lydia, Ionia, Phrygia and the north coast of Asia Minor. He was later killed at the battle of Corupedium when fighting another of Alexander's successors, Seleucus, who ruled much of what was formerly Persia.
Nathan P
kyrene_magas.jpg
Kyrene; Magas; horned head of Apollo Karneios left/ ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of the Magas in Kyrene, c. 276-249 B.C. Bronze AE 12, BMC -, VF, Kyrene mint, weight 2.220g, maximum diameter 12.3mm, die axis 180o, 276 - 250 B.C.; obverse horned head of Apollo Karneios left; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜ ΒΑΣΙΛ, eagle standing right, K-Y at sides; rough reddish patina; rare. Magas was half-brother to Ptolemy II and son of Berenike, the Macedonian second wife of Ptolemy I. He tried repeatedly to gain independence from Ptolemaic control. In 276 B.C he crowned himself King, married the daughter of Antiochos I and staged a double invasion of Egypt. But the Seleukid army was defeated by Ptolemy II and Magas also faced an internal revolt of Lybian nomads. Still, Kyrene remained independent as long as Magas lived; Ex ForumPodiceps
VA13374LG.jpg
L. Censorinus. 82 BC. 23 viewsIn the contest between Apollo and Marsyas, the terms stated that the winner could treat the defeated party any way he wanted. Since the contest was judged by the Muses, Marsyas naturally lost and was flayed alive in a cave near Celaenae for his hubris to challenge a god. Apollo then nailed Marsyas' skin to a pine tree, near Lake Aulocrene (the Turkish Karakuyu Gölü), which Strabo noted was full of the reeds from which the pipes were fashioned. Diodorus Siculus felt that Apollo must have repented this "excessive" deed, and said that he had laid aside his lyre for a while, but Karl Kerenyi observes of the flaying of Marsyas' "shaggy hide: a penalty which will not seem especially cruel if one assumes that Marsyas' animal guise was merely a masquerade." Classical Greeks were unaware of such shamanistic overtones, and the Flaying of Marsyas became a theme for painting and sculpture. His brothers, nymphs, gods and goddesses mourned his death, and their tears, according to Ovid's Metamorphoses, were the source of the river Marsyas in Phrygia, which joins the Meander near Celaenae, where Herodotus reported that the flayed skin of Marsyas was still to be seen, and Ptolemy Hephaestion recorded a "festival of Apollo, where the skins of all those victims one has flayed are offered to the god." Plato was of the opinion that it had been made into a wineskin.

There are alternative sources of this story which state that it wasn't actually Marsyas who challenged Apollo but Apollo who challenged Marsyas because of his jealousy of the satyr's ability to play the flute. Therefore, hubris would not necessarily be a theme in this tale; rather the capricious weakness of the gods and their equally weak nature in comparison to humans.

There are several versions of the contest; according to Hyginus, Marsyas was departing as victor after the first round, when Apollo, turning his lyre upside down, played the same tune. This was something that Marsyas could not do with his flute. According to another version Marsyas was defeated when Apollo added his voice to the sound of the lyre. Marsyas protested, arguing that the skill with the instrument was to be compared, not the voice. However, Apollo replied that when Marsyas blew into the pipes, he was doing almost the same thing himself. The Muses supported Apollo's claim, leading to his victory.

Ovid touches upon the theme of Marsyas twice, very briefly telling the tale in Metamorphoses vi.383–400, where he concentrates on the tears shed into the river Marsyas, and making an allusion in Fasti, vi.649–710, where Ovid's primary focus is on the aulos and the roles of flute-players rather than Marsyas, whose name is not actually mentioned.

AR Denarius (17mm - 3.97 g)

Laureate head of Apollo right / Satyr Marsyas standing left, holding wine skin over shoulder; column surmounted by statue to right.
1 commentsecoli
Lysimachus_Tetradrachm2.jpg
Lysimachus Tetradrachm - Rare LAX Monogram -- 297-240 BC12 views15.98 g, 29.30 mm, 0°
Uncertain Mint
Silver Tetradrachm; Very Rough,
Müller Lysimachus 559; Otherwise Unpublished; Very Rare

Obverse: Diademed Head of Deified Alexander the Great Wearing Horn of Ammon Right.
Reverse: BΑΣΙΛΕΛΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY (Of King Lysimachus), Athena Nikephoros Enthroned Resting on Shield, Transverse Spear Resting Against Her. LAX monogram

Lysimachus was a distinguished bodyguard of Alexander the Great during the conquest of Persia. Following Alexander's death, he became strategos (military governor) of Thrace. He took the title of King in 305 BC and expanded his rule over Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281 BC, Lysimachus attacked Seleukos I of Syria and died in the battle of Korupedion. His kingdom disappeared with his death, Ptolemy Keraunos, son of Ptolemy I Soter, becoming King of Macedon and Thrace.
_____________________________________
A great win from one of FORVM's eBay auctions.
Hydro
Lysimachus_Tetradrachm.jpg
Lysimachus Tetradrachm -- Magnesia -- 297-282 BC12 views16.34 g, 30.29 mm, 0°
Minted in Magnesia
Silver Tetradrachm; Rough
Price 6813-6816; Thompson 116

Obverse: Diademed Head of Deified Alexander the Great Wearing Horn of Ammon Right.
Reverse: BΑΣΙΛΕΛΣ ΛYΣIMAXOY (Of King Lysimachus), Athena Nikephoros Enthroned Resting on Shield, Transverse Spear Resting Against Her.

Lysimachus was a distinguished bodyguard of Alexander the Great during the conquest of Persia. Following Alexander's death, he became strategos (military governor) of Thrace. He took the title of King in 305 BC and expanded his rule over Asia Minor and Macedonia. In 281 BC, Lysimachus attacked Seleukos I of Syria and died in the battle of Korupedion. His kingdom disappeared with his death, Ptolemy Keraunos, son of Ptolemy I Soter, becoming King of Macedon and Thrace.
Hydro
Alexander_III_Drachm.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great.69 viewsUnder Study by President Joseph Sermarini - ( very rare ).


Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
2 commentsSam
Antigonos_I_Monophthalmos.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonos I Monophthalmos, 320 - 306 B.C., In the Name and Types of Alexander the Great.45 viewsSilver drachm, Hersh 29, Hersh Near East 2.1d, Price -, Müller Alexander -, SNG Cop -, SNG Munchen -, SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC Choice XF, Strike 4/5, Surface 3/5 (2490379-006), 4.000g, 18.2mm, 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum mint, struck under Menander, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, clad in Nemean Lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, feet on footstool, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, head of ram left on left, AΛEΞAN∆POY, ( " Of Alexander " in Ancient Greek ) downward on right; very rare.

Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (382 B.C. - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.

FORVM Ancient Coins./ The Sam Mansourati Collection.

*A special Thank to president Joe Sermarini for his work for complete information on this very rare Drachm.
2 commentsSam
PhilipIIMacedonLifetimeTet.jpg
Macedonian Kingdom, Philip II, 359 - 336 B.C., Lifetime Issue126 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Le Rider 233 (D130/R188); SNG ANS 385 ff., VF, Pella, 14.163g, 25.4mm, 225o, 342 - 336 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse "FILIPPOU", naked youth on horse pacing right on horseback holding palm, thunderbolt below; ex CNG 214, 82; very high relief sculptural portrait, nice style, lifetime issue. Ex FORVM.

Philip II expanded the size and influence of the Macedonian Kingdom, but is perhaps best known as the father of Alexander the Great. He personally selected the design of his coins.

Philip II of Macedon (382 BC–336 BC; in Greek Φίλιππος = φίλος (friend) + ίππος (horse), transliterated Philippos) was the King of Macedon from 359 BC until his assassination. He was the father of Alexander the Great, Phillip III Arrhidaeus, and possibly Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

Born in Pella, Philip was the youngest son of King Amyntas III and Eurydice. In his youth, (ca. 368 BC–365 BC) Philip was a hostage in Thebes, which was the leading city of Greece during the Theban hegemony. While a captive there, Philip received a military and diplomatic education from Epaminondas, was involved in a pederastic relationship with Pelopidas and lived with Pammenes, who was an enthusiastic advocate of the Sacred Band of Thebes. In 364 BC, Philip returned to Macedonia. The deaths of Philip's elder brothers, King Alexander II and Perdiccas III, allowed him to take the throne in 359 BC. Originally appointed regent for his infant nephew Amyntas IV, who was the son of Perdiccas III, Philip managed to take the kingdom for himself that same year.

Philip's military skills and expansionist vision of Macedonian greatness brought him early success. The hill tribes were broken by a single battle in 358 BC, and Philip established his authority inland as far as Lake Ohrid. He used the Social War as an opportunity for expansion. In 357 BC, he took the Athenian colony of Amphipolis, which commanded the gold mines of Mount Pangaion. That same year Philip married the Epirote princess Olympias, who was the daughter of the king of the Molossians. In 356 BC, Philip conquered the town of Crenides and changed its name to Philippi. Philip also attacked Abdera and Maronea, on the Thracian sea-board. Also in 356 Alexander was born and his race horse won in the Olympics in He took Methone in 354 BC, a town which had belonged to Athens. During the siege of Methone, Philip lost an eye.

Not until his armies were opposed by Athens at Thermopylae in 352 BC did Philip face any serious resistance. Philip did not attempt to advance into central Greece because the Athenians had occupied Thermopylae. Also in 352 BC, the Macedonian army won a complete victory over the Phocians at the Battle of Crocus Field. This battle made Philip tagus of Thessaly, and he claimed as his own Magnesia, with the important harbour of Pagasae.
Hostilities with Athens did not yet take place, but Athens was threatened by the Macedonian party which Philip's gold created in Euboea. From 352 to 346 BC, Philip did not again come south. He was active in completing the subjugation of the Balkan hill-country to the west and north, and in reducing the Greek cities of the coast as far as the Hebrus (Maritza). For the chief of these coastal cities, Olynthus, Philip continued to profess friendship until its neighboring cities were in his hands.

In 349 BC, Philip started the siege of Olynthus. Olynthus at first allied itself with Philip, but later shifted its allegiance to Athens. The Athenians did nothing to help Olynthus. Philip finally took Olynthus in 348 BC and razed the city to the ground. In 346 BC, he intervened effectively in the war between Thebes and the Phocians, but his wars with Athens continued intermittently.

Macedonia and the regions adjoining it having now been securely consolidated, Philip celebrated his Olympic games at Dium. In 347 BC, Philip advanced to the conquest of the eastern districts about the Hebrus, and compelled the submission of the Thracian prince Cersobleptes. Meanwhile, Athens had made overtures for peace, and when Philip, in 346 BC, again moved south, peace was sworn in Thessaly. With key Greek city-states in submission, Philip turned to Sparta; he sent them a message, "You are advised to submit without further delay, for if I bring my army into your land, I will destroy your farms, slay your people, and raze your city." Their reply was "If." Philip and Alexander would both leave them alone. Later, the Macedonian arms were carried across Epirus to the Adriatic Sea. In 342 BC, Philip led a great military expedition north against the Scythians, conquering the Thracian fortified settlement Eumolpia to give it his name, Philippoupolis (modern Plovdiv).

In 340 BC, Philip started the siege of Perinthus. Philip began another siege in 339 BC of the city of Byzantium. After unsuccessful sieges of both cities, Philip's influence all over Greece was compromised. However, Philip successfully reasserted his authority in the Aegean by defeating an alliance of Thebans and Athenians at the Battle of Chaeronea in 338 BC. He erected a memorial of a marble lion to the Sacred Band of Thebes for their bravery that still stands today. Philip created and led the League of Corinth in 337 BC. Members of the League agreed never to wage war against each other, unless it was to suppress revolution. Philip was elected as leader (hegemon) of the army of invasion against the Persian Empire. In 336 BC, when the invasion of Persia was in its very early stage, Philip was assassinated, and was succeeded on the throne of Macedon by his son Alexander the Great.

Philip’s Assassination

The murder happened in October of 336 BC, at Aegae, the ancient capital of the kingdom of Macedon. The court had gathered there for the celebration of the marriage between Alexander of Epirus and Philip's daughter. While the king was entering unprotected into the town's theatre (highlighting his approachability to the Greek diplomats present), he was killed by Pausanias of Orestis, one of Philip's seven bodyguards. The assassin immediately tried to escape and reach his associates who were waiting for him with horses at the entrance of Aegae. He was pursued by three of Philip's bodyguards and died by their hands.
The reasons for Pausanias' assassination of Phillip are difficult to fully expound, since there was controversy already among ancient historians. The only contemporary account in our possession is that of Aristotle, who states rather tersely that Philip was killed because Pausanias had been offended by the followers of Attalus, the king's father-in-law.

Whatever else that may be written about Philip II it must be recognized that he was responsible for making Macedon the ascendant Greek power. He reorganized the Macedonian army. It was this army that Alexander the Great inherited. Phillip II trained some of Alexander’s best generals: Antigonus Cyclops, Antipater, Nearchus, Parmenion, and Perdiccas.

According to the Greek historian Theopompus of Chios, Europe had never seen a man like king Philip of Macedonia, and he called his history of the mid-fourth century BCE the Philippic History. Theopompus had a point. Not even his better known son Alexander has done so much to change the course of Greek history. Philip reorganized his kingdom, gave it access to the sea, expanded its power so that it could defeat the Achaemenid Empire, and subdued the Greek city-states, which never regained their independence again. To achieve this, he modernized the Macedonian economy, improved the army, and concluded several marital alliances. The result was a superpower with one weakness: it was as strong as its king. When Philip's son Alexander died, the institutions were too weak, and Macedonia never recovered.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_II_of_Macedon
http://www.livius.org/phi-php/philip/philip_ii.htm
Ed. by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsCleisthenes
656_Marathos_Cleopatra_I.jpg
Marathos - AE2 views187-186 BC
veiled bust of Cleopatra I (wife of Ptolemy V) right
prow left
MRTS (aramaic script)
III¯NNN (73)
BMC Phoenicia p. 122, 15 -18 and SNG Cop 158
3,71 g
Johny SYSEL
Pergammon.jpg
Mysia. Kings of Pergamon. Eumenes I AR Tetradrachm.87 viewsStruck circa 263-255/50 BC (30mm, 17.02g, 2h). Westermark Group III, obv. die V.XXIV; SNG France 1606-9; SNG von Aulock 1355 (same obverse die); SNG Copenhagen 334. Obverse: Head of Philetairos right, wearing laurel wreath bound with a broad ribbon with wide hemmed borders. Reverse: ΦIΛETAIPOY in right field, Athena enthroned left, right hand resting on shield set at her feet, left elbow resting on small sphinx seated right; transverse spear in background, ivy leaf above knee, monogram on throne, bow to right. EF, toned. High relief portrait.

Ex CNG: Classical Numismatic Review XXXIX.1 Spring 2014 lot 929022.

The coinage of Pergamon under Eumenes I crystalized the design of the kingdom’s tetradrachmai for almost 100 years. It features on the obverse a realistic portrait of the eunuch Philetairos, who was initially a treasurer for the diadoch Lysimachos. He entrusted to the eunuch 6000 talents of silver (and gold) for safekeeping in Sardis. However, Philetairos switched allegiance to Seleukos shortly before the Battle of Korupedion in 281 BC, when Seleukos defeated Lysimachos. Seleukos, in turn, was assassinated roughly a year later. The newly created kingdom enjoyed autonomy from the Seleukids and the fortress city of Pergamon was built with Philetairos as its “king”, although he was never publicly crowned as such. Philetairos coined at least three different types of tetradrachmai, which were influenced by his allegiance to different rulers. First, he minted Lysimachos-type coins for his master Lysimachos. After the latter’s defeat and death he next minted coins of the Alexander-type either with the legend Alexandrou or Seleukou. Lastly, in a show of self-assurance and independence, he minted coins with the obverse portrait of Seleukos and the reverse directly copied from the earlier Lysimachos-type coin with Athena seated. However, the similarity ends there: instead of putting a dominating diadoch’s name, he boldly put his name on the coins. After his death, the administration passed on to his adopted nephew Eumenes I. The new ruler was able to liberate his realm from the dominion of the Seleukids when he revolted, at the instigation of Ptolemy II of Egypt, and rather unexpectedly, defeated Antiochos I in Sardis in 261 BC. He greatly expanded his territory and founded several cities. His coinage initiated a type which showed a highly realistic and unflattering portrait of his predecessor Philetairos and showed him as diademed, heavy-set and ostensibly obese whose face dominates the whole space of the obverse of the coin. At this point, there is no need of legitimizing current rulers by reference to Alexander. They could either put their own portraits or the likeness of the founder of a dynasty which they belong. This would eventually become the norm for most coins of third century BC Hellenistic kingdoms. The design on Eumenes’ coins would remain unchanged for the next century and would be adopted by succeeding rulers Attalos I ((241-197 BC) and Eumenes II (197-160 BC). It was estimated that it required 200 obverse dies to mint the coins during those span of time of its existence. As for any long-lived (and much copied) designs of any ancient coin (i.e. coins of Phillip II, Alexander III and Lysimachos), the various Philetairou-type coins could be assigned to a particular ruler according to symbols and monograms and level of artistry.
6 commentsJason T
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Nabataean Kingdom, Anonymous11 viewsProto-Nabataean Overstrike
AE22, 6.24g; Unknown mint, struck over coin of Ptolemy III.
Obv.: Head of Athena right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet.
Rev.: Nike standing left, holding wreath.
Reference: cf. Schmitt-Korte 6
Notes: These are typically overstruck on smaller coins, weighing approximately 3g. Overstrikes on larger host coins are rare. Whether they circulated at a higher denomination is unknown.
John Anthony
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NILUS148 viewsPtolemaic Bronze ca. 180BC - Ptolemy V - VI
Svoronos 1378 (K control letter in eagle's legs)
Rare type with expressive portrait of Nilus rather than typical Ptolemaic Zeus.
AE20 5.98gm 11h
Part of scarce series of coins with 'K' control letter, 5 sizes each with different designs.
Few specimens known in books, museum collections.
Some thought that the K might represent Kleopatra I, mother of Ptolemy VI. Exact date unknown but likely ca. 190-170BC. Apparently the only Ptolemaic bronze type with a representation of the 'River God', Nilus.
PtolemAE
Side.jpg
Pamphylia, Side (Circa 145-125BC)29 viewsAR Tetradrachm

29 mm, 15.94 g

Kleuch-, magistrate.

Obverse: Helmeted head of Athena right.

Reverse: ΚΛΕ - ΥΧ, Nike advancing left, holding wreath; pomegranate to left.

SNG BN 697.

In 333 BC, Alexander the Great occupied Side and introduced the population to Hellenistic culture, which became the dominant tradition until the 1st century BC. Ptolemy later overtook the city when he declared himself king of Egypt in 305 BC. Side stayed under Ptolemaic control until it was captured by the Seleucid Empire in the 2nd century BC. In 190 B.C., however, a fleet from Rhodes, supported by Rome and Pergamum, defeated the Seleucid fleet, which was under the command of the fugitive Carthaginian general, Hannibal (who was unskilled in naval warfare, but to his credit still almost won the battle). The Seleucid defeat solidified by the Treaty of Apamea (188 BC), left Side in an uncertain state of autonomy during which it minted its own money. This lasted until 36 BC when the city came under the rule of the Roman client King of Galatia, Amyntas.
2 commentsNathan P
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Paphos. Arsinoe III9 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Arsinoe III, wife of Ptolemy IV Philopator. 222-205/4 B.C. AE dichalkon (12.2 mm, 1.78 g, 1 h). Paphos. Diademed and draped bust right / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, double cornucopia tied with fillet. Svronos 1161; Wieser 96; SNG Cop 650. ecoli
Pergamonacrop.jpg
Pergamon54 viewsThe oldest section of Pergamon, the acropolis or upper city, sits on an impressive steep ridge between two tributaries of the Caicus river. The ridge is naturally fortified on all but the S side which slopes down to the Caicus valley floor. The Caicus valley provides access from Pergamon to the Aegean coast and the port town of Elaea in the W and the Persian Royal Road to the E.

The upper city, which was fortified in the 4th or 3rd century B.C. contains the 3rd century Sanctuary of Athena, the oldest cult center of the city as well as palace quarters, barracks, and arsenals. In the 2nd century B.C. the 10,000 seat theater, the library adjacent to the Sanctuary of Athena, and the Great Altar of Zeus and Athena were added. In the 2nd century A.D. the monumental Trajaneum was erected on what must have been an earlier unknown cult center. From the upper agora a paved main street leads S and downslope to the middle city.

The city of Pergamon began to extend down the S slope in the 3rd century B.C. and during the 2nd century a massive building program completely transformed the entire lower slope. The major construction in the area was the gigantic gymnasium complex which extended down three large terraces linked by vaulted stairways and passages. The complex encorporated three open training courts, a covered track or xystus, a small theater or odeum, several shrines, and two large baths. Other major sections of the middle city included the Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore and, below the gymnasium along the main street leading to the Eumenes' Gate, the lower agora. North and E of the gymnasium massive terraces support the streets and houses of the residential quarter. In the first half of the 2nd century B.C. Eumenes II strengthened the entire fortification system of Pergamon and enclosed all of the middle city, which extended almost to the base of the south slope, within the new walls.

During the Roman Imperial period the city continued to expand southward and spread over the plain and the area occuppied by modern Bergama. The large Sanctuary of the Egyptian Gods (the "Kizil Avlu"), numerous bridges, and remains of the Roman stadium, theater, and amphitheater remain visible today.

Pergamon emerged as a power during the struggle for territorial control following the death of Alexander the Great in 323 B.C. By the middle of the 3rd century Pergamon had been established as an independent state under the leadership of the Attalid dynasty. The power of the Attalids and the city grew as a result of successful battles against the Gauls of central Anatolia and careful political alliances with Rome.

The peak period of Pergamene power and achievement was reached during the reign of Eumenes II (197-159 B.C.). The kingdom had grown to include most of western Anatolia and was rich in agriculture and industry. Noted industrial exports included textiles, fine pottery, and "Pergamene paper" or parchment. The last industry developed when Ptolemy, reportedly jealous of the growing fame of the library in Pergamon, prohibited the export of papyrus from Egypt. Eumenes II enlarged the city of Pergamon to include all of the southern slope and enclosed the city with a new and stronger fortification wall. In addition to the major new constructions in the lower city Eumenes also commissioned the Great Altar of Zeus and Athena, the theater, and the new library in the upper city.

In the 2nd century B.C. Pergamon rivalled Athens and Alexandria as centers of Hellenic culture. The city possessed one of the greatest libraries of antiquity, monumental gymnasia, and numerous religious sanctuaries, including the Asklepion outside the city walls. Pergamon was a haven for noted philosophers and artists and was the center of a major movement in Hellenistic sculpture. The Attalids supported the arts and learning in Pergamon and elsewhere and made major donations, such as the Stoa of Attalos II in Athens.

The last Attalid ruler, Attalos III, bequeathed the kingdom of Pergamon to Rome in 133 B.C. During Roman rule the prosperity of Pergamon continued and the city had a period of commercial expansion. The city itself expanded to the plain S and W of the acropolis across the flat land now occuppied by modern Bergama.

See: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/siteindex?lookup=Pergamon

Cleisthenes
Ptolomy_VI.jpg
Phoenicia - Marathos - Ptolemy VI Philometor ca. 186–145 BC) 9 viewsPhoenicia - Marathos - Ae17.1 ~ 17.7mm. (2nd century BC, 7.67gm.) Obv: Laureate and draped bust of Ptolemy VI as Hermes to right, caduceus at shoulder. Rev: Marathos standing left holding aplustre. Phoenician date and legend before and behind. (BMC 23 / S. 6038) ddwau
B7675386-5FAE-4F9B-B975-5A820E4AEFC7.jpeg
PHOENICIA, Marathos.8 viewsPHOENICIA, Marathos. 199/8-169/8 BC. Æ. Dated Year 91 (169/8 BC). Laureate and draped bust of Ptolemy VI as Hermes right, kerykeion over shoulder / Marathos standing left, leaning on column and holding aphlaston; date to left. Duyrat, Ateliers 263; SNG Copenhagen 161 var. (date); BMC 23.ecoli
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Pisidia, Parlais. Julia Domna. Cult Image of Men49 viewsParlais, Pisidia. Julia Domna. 20mm and 4.0gm. Reverse IVL AVG COL PARLAIS. Men stg. facing, holding sceptre and pine-cone, foot set on bucranium.

As a Roman colony it was called Julia Augusta Parlais, and money was coined under this title. Ptolemy calls it Paralais and places it in Lycaonia (Eckhel, "Historica veterum nummorum", III, 33.). Kiepert identified it with Barla, in the Ottoman vilayet of Koniah, but W. M. Ramsay believes that it is contained in the ruins known as Uzumla Monastir.
ancientone
PolemoII.jpg
Polemo II-Mark Antony's great grandson465 views Silver drachm

BACΙΛΕΩC ΠΟΛΕΜΩΝΟC
diademed head of Polemo right

ETOYC - K (year 20)
laureate head of Nero right;

57 - 58 A.D.
3.645g

18.1mm, die axis 180o

RPC I 3832, SNG Cop 242, BMC Pontus 7 - 8, SNG von Aulock 6691

Ex-Forum

Marcus Antonius Polemon Pythodoros, also known as Polemon II of Pontos and Polemon of Cilicia is the only known direct descendant of Mark Antony who bares his name. Through his maternal grandmother he was a direct descendant of Mark Antony and his second wife Antonia Hybrida Minor. Antony and Antonia Hybrida were first paternal cousins. He was Antony’s second born great grandson. Through Antony, he was a distant cousin to Roman Client King Ptolemy of Mauretania and Drusilla of Mauretania. He was also a distant cousin to Roman Emperors Caligula, Claudius and Nero and Roman Empresses Valeria Messalina, Agrippina the Younger and Claudia Octavia.

Polemon II’s father Polemon Pythodoros King of Pontos died in 8 BC. His mother then married King Archelaus of Cappadocia, and the family moved to the court of his stepfather. In 17 AD Archelaus died and Polemon II and his mother moved back to Pontus. From 17 until 38, Polemon II assisted his mother in the administration of Pontos. When his mother died in 38, Polemon II succeeded her as the sole ruler of Pontus, Colchis and Cilicia.

Around 50 AD, Polemon II met the Judean princess Julia Berenice in Tiberias during a visit to King Agrippa I. Berenice was widowed in 48 AD when her second husband and paternal uncle Herod of Chalcis, died. She had two sons by him, Berenicianus and Hyrcanus. Berenice set the condition that Polemon II had to convert to Judaism before marriage, which included undergoing the rite of circumcision. Polemon II complied, and the marriage went ahead but it did not last long. Berenice left Pontus with her sons and returned to the court of her brother. Polemon II abandoned Judaism and, according to the legend of Bartholomew the Apostle, accepted Christianity, only to become a pagan again.

In 62, Nero compelled Polemon II to abdicate the Pontian throne. Pontos and Colchis became a Roman province. From then until his death, Polemon II only ruled Cilicia. He never remarried and had no children that are known.

Polemon's sister Antonia Tryphaena's Royal lineage goes all the way down to Nana Queen of Iberia, who died in 363 AD. Truly Antony may have lost the battle of Actium but won the war of genetics!
8 commentsJay GT4
Ptolemy_eagle_rev.jpg
Ptolemaic Eagle210 viewsPen & ink sketch of my Ptolemy VI Tetradrachm Eagle reverse and legend. 2"x 2"5 commentsmihali84
g~3.jpg
Ptolemaic Egypt - Ptolemy I Soter (305-282 BC)32 viewsAR tetradrachm (14.21 gm). Alexandria. Diademed head right, wearing aegis / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; monogram to left. Svoronos 248. SNG Copenhagen 68. A couple of banker's marks, as is typical on this type.RobertBohn
ptolemy_vi_AND_viii.JPG
PTOLEMAIC EGYPT - Ptolemy VI Philometer & Ptolemy VIII71 viewsPTOLEMAIC EGYPT - Ptolemy VI Philometer & Ptolemy VIII - 170-164 B.C.E. AE 31. Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field. 31.4 mm 29.115 g., Alexandria mint. Reference: Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 340 ff., Noeske 212 ff., Hosking 75, Weiser 142 (Ptolemy V), SGCV II 7900. Ex-FORVM. Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother.dpaul7
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27.3g.jpg
Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I33 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC
30 mm, 27.27 g
Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field
Sear 7900var
ex Bart Lewis
areich
Ptolemy_VI_180-145_BC.jpg
PTOLEMAIC EMPIRE.EGYPT.ALEXANDRIA.Ptolemy VI Philometor 180-145 BC, 1st period of reign 180-170 BC.AR.Tetradrachm.106 viewsPTOLEMAIC EMPIRE.EGYPT.ALEXANDRIA.Ptolemy VI Philometor. 180-145 BC, 1st period of reign 180-170 BC.AR.Tetradrachm.
( 13.10g, 26mm, 12h )
Diademed bust of Ptolemy I Soter ( founder of the dynasty )
Reverse. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed.
Ref:Sv.1489, SNG Cop 262-268.
Obverse porus purface from water corrossion.
Antonivs Protti
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_Cleopatra_51-30_BC_AR_Tetradrachm_Yr__17_(36_to_35_BC_).jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). ISIS HEADDRESS SYMBOL102 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). Diademed head of Ptolemy I
PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing, headdress of Isis before and palm branch at shoulder.
Size: 23 mm 13.24 grams SOLD
Antonivs Protti
Ptolemy II.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt60 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C.

Sidon is mentioned by the prophets Isaiah (e.g. Isaiah 23:2,4,12), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:22, 27:3, 47:4), Ezekiel (Ezekiel 27:8, 28:21, 32:30) and Joel (Joel 3:4). Jesus visited Sidon on (Matthew 15:21, Mark 3:8, Mark 7:24, Luke 6:17). Paul sailed for Rome from Sidon (Acts 27:3,4).

Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 713, SNG Cop 506, aVF, Sidon mint, 14.39g, 27.0mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.



1 commentsDumanyu2
740-3.png
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII with Ptolemy XV, AR tetradrachm, Year 11 (42/1 BC)36 views44-30 BC
12.6 Grams
Obv.: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm over shoulder; date LIA (Yr 11) to left, ΠA to right.
Purchased on eBay
Grade: XF; Strike 5/5; Surface 3/5
Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned jointly with his mother Cleopatra VII of Egypt, from September 2, 47 BC. Between the death of Cleopatra, on August 12, 30 BC, and his own death on August 23, 30 BC, he was nominally the sole pharaoh. He was killed on the orders of Octavian, who would soon become the Roman emperor Augustus. He was the eldest son of Cleopatra VII, and possibly the only son of Julius Caesar, for whom he was named.
2 commentsRichard M10
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Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter, 367-283 BCE9 viewsBronze Obol, Svoronos 377, SNG Cop -, Cyprus, Kition mint,
8.8g, 21.4mm, 0°, obverse head of Alexander right,
wearing elephant skin headdress;
reverse ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ,
eagle standing left, thunderbolt in talons, EY, KI and X monogram left;
NORMAN K
Ptolemy_II_Ae.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos53 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C, AE Hemiobol , choice quality

17mm , 3.78 gm
2 commentsPhiloromaos
Ptolemy_Bronze.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246-222 B.C. Diobol47 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-222 B.C. Diobol. OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right. REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, E between legs, wings open, head facing left, cornucopiae in left field.  PTOLEMAIOY to the left. BASILEOS to the right, 26mm 14.39gm

1 commentsPhiloromaos
37103.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Alexandria. Ptolemy I Soter (Circa 305-282 BC)27 viewsAR Tetradrachm

26.5 mm, 13.25 g

Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right

Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed; P / AΠP monogram.

Svoronos 255
2 commentsNathan P
Ptolemaic_1b_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm53 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1b_img~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm36 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
maridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1a_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 236106 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.
4 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1a_img~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 23651 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

A toned but wonderfully detailed reverse.

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.

Updated image of an old coin from my collection.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1a_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I Soter, 294 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 23668 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I Soter, founder of the Pteolmaic Kingdom
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:– ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram left
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 294
Reference:– Svoronos 236, SNG Cop 75
14.379g, 29.9mm, 0o

Ex-Forum

The following notes were provided by Forum in their catalog description.
"Struck on a briefly used standard of 21-attic obols. Broad flan. Overstruck over an Alexander tetradrachm, which had a banker's mark. Undertype visible at 4:00 on obverse. Minor chip. Rare overstrike!"

Many thanks to mihali84 for spotting the signature on the coin. The coin has the signature of the Delta artist behind the ear (between the ear and the first curl near the neck). I was not aware of this wonderful detail and it wasn't mentioned by Forum in their description either. This artist was a master craftsman and was responsible for some coins of high artistry at Alexandria during the reign of Ptolemy I (possibly into the early reign of Ptolemy II) and produced from quite early in the reign, including one of the iconic elephant's skin headdress tetradrachm.

Updated image using new photography setup.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemy_tyre_tet.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Tyre, Phoenicia169 viewsSilver tetradrachm, Svoronos 626 var (no monogram) or Svoronos 644 var (D behind ear), VF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, weight 14.076g, maximum diameter 27.4mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, Tyre monogram and club left; rare;

Ex Forvm

Svoronos' description for tetradrachm 626 is the "same as the gold pentadrachm." In the notes for the pentadrachm he notes the type sometimes has a Tyre monogram, but the notes for the tetradrachm 626 discuss only countermarks and not a monogram. The monogram is absent on the plate coin.

Svoronos 644 is be marked with a tiny D behind Ptolemy's ear. On this coin the mark appears to be absent.
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1e_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Soter (285 - 246 B.C.), Tetradrachm, Svoronos 77436 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY [SOTERWS], eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed, PT and ME monograms left, date AL and Q right
Minted in Galilee, Ake Ptolemais, Year 31. B.C. 255
Reference:– BMC.112 var. Svoronos 774 pl. XXV/10 (4 ex.) SNG Cop.470. Delepierre- Gülnar 2/4074 pl. 129(6 ex.)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
ptolemy-3-eagle-4-30-2019=1.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes 246-222 B.C. AE20, Tyre mint3 viewsAncient Greek, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes 246-222 B.C. AE20, Tyre mint, Struck ca. 242/1-222 B.C.

Obverse: Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia.

Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; club to left.

Reference: Svoronos 709; SNG Copenhagen 496

Ex: Musa Ali - VCoins - Holyland Ancient Coin Corporation
Gil-galad
Ptolemy_III_hemidrachm.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 220 B.C.103 viewsBronze hemidrachm, (Svoronos 965, Weiser 71; Hosking 31; Weber 8260), VF, pitting, 26.014g, 34.6mm, 0o, Alexandria mint, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse BAΕIΛΩΕ ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's legs; Olive base color with light desert patina, with a few green, yellow and red spots.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins

Photo by Forvm Ancient Coins
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolemaic_1c_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246-221 B.C., AE4234 viewsAE42
Obv:– Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed, GreeK_Sigma between legs
Minted in Alexandria under Ptolemy III Euergetes or Ptolemy IV
Reference:- Svoronos 992

70.23g, 41.93mm, 0 degrees.

At this size it is potentially a drachm.
maridvnvm
Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_II .jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. 39 viewsObverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right, circle of dots around.
Reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, tripod in left field.
VF , Bronze , Ptolemais Ake mint.
Svoronos 793 (Ptolemy II).


From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
PtolemyIV42mm.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE4227 views221-205 B.C.
AE42, 67.86gm
Obv: Head of Zeus Ammon right with ram's horn, wearing taenia diadem
Rev: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ BΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; Σ between legs; Cornucopiae left decorated with royal diadem
Ref: Svoronos 992
TIF
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1f_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV Philopator (221 - 204 B.C.), AE Hemidrachm , Svoronos 112767 viewsBronze hemidrachm
Obv:- Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia;
Rev:- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ∆Ι between eagle's legs
Minted in Alexandria
References:- Svoronos 1127; SNG Cop 202; Noeske 145; BMC Ptolemies p. 57, 109 - 110; Weiser 50 (Ptolemy II, 253 - 249 B.C.)

33.40 g. 33.72 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
o_027.JPG
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. 67 viewsBronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF,
Alexandria mint,
7.899g, 20.5mm, 0o,
170 - 163 B.C.;
obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right;
reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left
ex forvm



"The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII."

new pic
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Ptol_VI_pan.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, 170 - 164 B.C.115 viewsBronze AE 31, SGCV II 7900, (Svoronos 1424), (SNG Cop 306 ff.), (Noeske 212 ff.), (Hosking 75), (Weiser 142) ~Ptolemy V, 180 - 176 B.C.), 29.102g, 33.4mm, Alexandria mint, Obv. diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; Rev. PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field, Olive patina with earthen deposits, surface a little rough.

Background info courtsey Forvm Ancient coins

Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother.

Ex Forvm Ancient Coins
Steve E
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1d_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180-145 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 1489150 viewsObv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 180-145
Reference:– Svoronos 1489, SNG Cop 262

Ex Forum

14.031g, 27.3m, 0o

Additional comments from Forum - "Ptolemy VI became king in 180 B.C. at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra I, until her death in 176 BC. From 170 to 164 B.C., Egypt was ruled by Ptolemy, his sister-queen and his younger brother Ptolemy VIII Physcon. In 170 BC, the Seleukid King Antiochus IV invaded and was even crowned king in 168, but abandoned his claim on the orders from Rome. In 164 Ptolemy VI was driven out by his brother. He went to Rome and received support from Cato. He was restored the following year. In 152 BC, he briefly ruled jointly with his son, Ptolemy Eupator, but his son probably died that same year. In 145 B.C. he died of battle wounds received against Alexander Balas of Syria. Ptolemy VI ruled uneasily, cruelly suppressing frequent rebellions."
9 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemy_X_pan.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.140 viewsAR Tetradrachm, (Sovornos 1868~Cleopatra VII), (SNG Cop 391), Weight 14.1g, Max. diameter 24.15mm, Paphos mint (Alexandria mint in some refs.) year 21 (60/61 B.C.), Obv. Diademed head of Ptolemy Soter right, wearing aegis, Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt (off flan); L KA (date) before; ΠA behind, Background toning with some pitting on obv.


There is some disagreement between references as to which ruler it is assigned to. And the mint.

Background info courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

In 80 B.C., Ptolemy XI was removed from the throne by the Egyptian people after he killed his coregent and step-mother Berenice III. Since he had no male heir, the oldest (illegitimate) son of Ptolemy IX was made King Ptolemy XII. Ptolemy XI had left the throne to Rome in his will, but Rome did not challenge Ptolemy XII's succession because the Senate did not want an Egyptian expansion.

Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

Ex. Aegean Numismatics
Ex. CNG auction 91 lot 75

Pictured on Wildwinds
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_II.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom- Ptolemy II, Philadelphos48 viewsAR Tetradrachm
285-246 B.C.
27mm, 14.12g
GCV-7771var

Obverse:
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis. Δ behind ear.

Reverse:
ΠTOΛEMAIOY
BAΣIΛEΩΣ
EY
KΛE (mongrammed)
Eagle standing left on a thunderbolt.
1 commentsrubadub
ptol_eagle.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I or II35 viewsca. 295 - 260 BC
AE 19 mm 8.02 g
OBV: DEIFIED ALEXANDER WEARING ELEPHANT SKIN HEADDRESS R
REV: EAGLE STANDING L, HEAD L, WINGS OPEN, MONOGRAM IN L FIELD
EGYPT
(both Ptolemy I and Ptolemy II had issues of this type during the period 295 - 260 BC)
laney
ptol_HP_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I or II8 views280 - 265 BC (pre-reform)
AE 12.5 mm max.; 1.41 g
O: Head of Alexander right
R: Eagle with wings open, HP monogram to left
Alexandria and other mints; Sv239
laney
ptol_soter_a.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I SOTER17 views367 - 283 BC
struck 310 - 306 BC
AE 20 mm 6.99 g
O: HEAD OF APHRODITE WEARING ORNAMENTED STEPHANOS, R
R: EAGLE WITH CLOSED WINGS STANDING L ON THUNDERBOLT
[PTO]LEMAI[OU] TO R
PAPHOS, CYPRUS
laney
ptol_i_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY I SOTER15 viewsAE 15.5 mm, 3.75 g
367 - 283 BC
minted ca. 305 BC
O: Head of Alexander wearing elephant skin headdress and horn of Ammon, right
R: Eagle, wings open, standing left on thunderbolt; monogram/crested helmet in left field
laney
ptol_11_eleph_b_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS31 views285-246 BC
struck ca. 260 BC (Post-Reform)
AE 23 mm, 9.76 g
O: Head of Alexander the Great wearing elephant-skin headdress, right
R: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ Eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head right, wings open; D monogram between legs
Alexandria mint; Svoronos 439; Weiser 34; SNG Copenhagen 158
laney
kyrene_b.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II OR III (KYRENE)22 viewsca. 283 - 240 BC
Late Ptolemy II or early Ptolemy III
AE 20.5 mm 7.5 g
O: HEAD OF PTOLEMY I, R
R: HEAD OF LIBYA, R, CORNUCOPIAE AT CHIN
KYRENE MINT
Svoronos 871
laney
ptol_ii_res_b.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS15 views285 - 246 BC
AE 28 mm; 17.08 g
O: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right;
R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, monogram over shield left.
Alexandria mint
laney
ptol_ii.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY II PHILADELPHOS14 viewsca 260 BC
(Post-Reform, Series 3)
AE 19 mm; 5.83 g
O: Head of Zeus right
R: BASILEWS - PTOLEMAIOY Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, L monogram between legs
Alexandria mint
laney
ptol_iii_club.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III EUERGETES20 views246 - 222 BC
AE 18.5 mm; 4.83 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, within border of dots;
R:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, within border of dots
Tyre mint
laney
ptolemy_tyre.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III EUERGETES13 views246 - 222 BC
AE 23.5 mm; 11.87 g
O: diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right;
R: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, no control letters
Phoenicia, Tyre mint; Svoronos 708, SNG Cop 495, Weiser 55 - 56 (all attributed to Ptolemy II),
laney
ptol_iii_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY III, EURGETES I25 views247 - 222 BC
AE 25 mm 12.10 g
O: Head of Zeus Ammon right
R: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS Eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's leg
Alexandria mint
laney
PTOLEMY_IVresized.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY IV PHILOPATER49 viewsAE 44 mm 68.94 g
221 - 204 BC
OBV: DIADEMED HEAD OF ZEUS, R
REV: EAGLE STANDING L

ALEXANDRIA SEAR 7841v
2 commentslaney
ISIS_EAGLE_PTOL_RES_2.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY VI PHILOMETOR17 views180-145 BC.
Æ 26.5 mm, 13.21 g
O: Wreathed and draped bust of Isis right /
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, with wings spread; monogram to left
Alexandria mint
laney
ptolemy_viii_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM--PTOLEMY VIII EUERGETES II (PHYSCON)21 views145 - 116 BC
AE 1/4 Obol 9 mm; 2.95 g
O: Diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon right;
R: Eagle standing half left with wings open

Kyrene mint;cf. Svoronos 1655, SNG Cop 658
laney
50116LG.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy III Euergetes.40 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy III Euergetes. 246-222 B.C. Æ drachm (43 mm, 60.36 g, 11 h). Alexandria. Head of Zeus Ammon right wearing taenia and Osiris cap / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, cornucopia; between legs, XP monogram. Svoronos 964; SNG Copenhagen 171-2. VF, multihued rough brown, black and green patina. ecoli
307_Greek.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy III Euergetes. Bronze drachm 245-222 BC15 viewsAlexandria, circa 245-222 BC.

Reference.
Köln 71; SNG Copenhagen 171-172; Svoronos 964.

Obv. no legend.
Horned head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing taenia with basileion

Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ- ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (PTOLEMAIOU-BASILEWS)
Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, filleted corncuopia in
left field, XP monogram between legs

66.85 gr
43 mm
12h.
1 commentsokidoki
029_50.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt29 views Ptolemy V Epiphanes or Ptolemy VI Philometer
205-180 B.C. or 181/0-145 B.C.
Æ Obol
10.31 gm, 23.5 mm
Obv.: Head of bearded Herakles right, wearing lion skin, dotted boarder
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around Eagle with closed wings
standing left on thunderbolt, monogram to left
Cyprus mint
Svoronos 1385; SNG Cop 288-290; Weiser 148;
BMC 6, p.68,7
Jaimelai
278654_50.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt46 viewsPtolemy III Euregetes
247/6-221/20 B.C.
Æ Obol
10.29 gm, 24.5 mm
Obv.: Head of Alexander right, wearing elephant skin, dotted boarder
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ around Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt, head right,
filleted cornucopia to right, Ε between legs, dotted boarder
Alexandria mint
Svoronos 976; SNG Cop 232; BMC 6, p.66, 41-2; Sear 7819
1 commentsJaimelai
88000548.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT, ALEXANDRIA, 253 - 252 BC155 viewsAV Octodrachm (Mnaïeion) - 27mm, 27.69 g, 12h

Arsinoe II Philadelphos, died 270-268 BC. Struck under Ptolemy II,

O - Arsinoë II head right, veiled and wearing stephane; lotus-tipped scepter in background, Θ to left
R - APΣINOHΣ ΦIΛAΔEΛΦOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet.

Svoronos 460; Troxell, Arsinoe, Transitional to Group 3, p. 43 and pl. 6, 2-3 (same obv. die); SNG Copenhagen 134; Boston MFA -; Triton XII, lot 386 (same obv. die); CNG 76, lot 875 (same obv. die); CNG 87, lot 698 (same obv. die).
3 commentsrobertpe
Egypt,_Mamphis_Mint,_Alexander_tetradrachm.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy I Soter as Satrap, 323-305 BC - Memphis Mint60 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress; test cut applied to top of the head.
AΛΕΞANΔPOY Zeus seated left, holding eagle and scepter; rose before, ΔI beneath throne, O between throne and scepter.

Price 3971; Muller 124; SNG Copenhagen 853; Dewing 1180.
Memphis mint ca. 323-316 BC.

(27 mm, 16.92 g, 12h).
ex- Barry P. Murphy.

Amongst the first Egyptian issues of Alexandrine tetradrachms, minted shortly after Ptolemy took control of Egypt as Satrap.
3 commentsn.igma
greek72.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes Æ Oktobol (47mm, 83.04 g)42 viewsAlexandreia mint. Phase 1. (246-222 BC).
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; E between legs.
Svoronos 446; Weiser 19-21 (Ptolemy II); SNG Copenhagen 142; Noeske 64 (Ptolemy II).
Minos
FotorCreated~58.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt,Ptolemy 1st Soter as satrap 323-305 BC AR Tetradrachm 28mm 15.90g 6h29 viewsPtolemaic standard,in the name of Alexander 3rd of Macedon,Alexandreia mint,struck circa 311/0-305 BC.Diademed head of the deified Alexander right wearing elephant skin headdress.Rev Athena Alkidemos advancing right,Corinthian helmet,monogram and eagle standing on thunderbolt.Grant H
FotorCreated~111.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt,Ptolemy 3rd AE Drachm 41 circa 246-222 BC 41 mm 66.97g 12h 24 viewsDiademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.Rev eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt,filleted cornucopia to left XP monogram between legs.
Alexandreia mint series 5, struck 230-222 BC'
Thick red and brown patina
Grant H
Ptolemy_I_Soter,_as_satrap.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter, as satrap, 323-305 BC. Tetradrachm70 viewsTetradrachm (Silver, 26mm, 16.30 g 12), Alexandria, circa 313-312.

Head of the deified Alexander III to right, wearing mitra of Dionysos and elephant skin headdress, with aegis around his neck, and with horn of Ammon on his forehead.
Rev. ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟΥ Athena Alkidemos advancing right, hurling spear with her right hand and with shield over her extended left arm; to right, eagle with closed wings standing on thunderbolt to right with ΔΙ below. SNG Copenhagen 14. Svoronos 33. Zervos Issue XIII. Minor corrosion, otherwise, good very fine.

Extremely rare with tiny K on obverse, Zervos notes only 9 examples from 2 obverse dies.

While the small Δ is commonly found on Ptolemy’s obverse dies, the appearance of the K is extremely rare. It is tempting to assume these are die engraver signatures, but Zervos notes that this is far from proven. Given the diversity of styles found with the Δ mark, it does appear unlikely.
2 commentsLeo
Svoronos_34.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Drachm20 views15mm, 3.72 g, 12h
Uncertain standard. In the name of Alexander III of Macedon. Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 311/0-305 BC. Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant skin / Athena Alkidemos advancing right; to right, ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt. Svoronos 34; Zervos Issue 68; SNG Copenhagen –; Noeske –; BMC 15. VF, toned, a hint of porosity. Very rare denomination.
1 commentsLeo
Price_3971c.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Tetradrachm14 views28mm, 16.92 g, 11h

In the name and types of Alexander III of Macedon. Memphis or Alexandreia mint. Struck circa 323/2-317/1 BC. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin / Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; rose in left field, ΔI below throne, O to left of scepter. Svoronos –; Zervos Issue 2C; Price 3971c; SNG Copenhagen 7. Good VF, toned, some roughness at edge.

From the collection of José Miguel Márquez del Prado.
Leo
2c.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy I Soter. As satrap, 323-305 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Akko mint. Dated RY 33 of 'Ozmilk, king of Tyre (317/6 BC)57 viewsObv. Head of Herakles right, wearing lion skin.
Rev. Zeus Aëtophoros seated left; in left field, Phoenician 'K (for 'Ozmilk) and ||| –= (date). 
References: Price 3279 (Ake); Newell, Dated 37.
24mm, 15.61 grams.
3 commentsCanaan
ptolemy~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt. Ptolemy III Euergetes. 246-222 BC.16 viewsÆ Triobol, 34mm, 34.07g, 12h; Alexandreia mint. Series 5. Struck 230-222 BC.
Obv.: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia to left, XP monogram between legs.
Reference: Svoronos 965; Weiser 72; SNG Copenhagen 173-5; Noeske 120-2.
Notes: ex-CNG, ex-Andy Singer (Baltimore Expo), 3/28/15, 150.
John Anthony
334_Greek_SNG_Cop311-4_.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy IX to Ptolemy XII. 116-51 BC. Æ Alexandreia(?) mint. Series 9.12 viewsReference.
Svoronos 1426 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and VIII); Weiser 143 (Ptolemy V); SNG Copenhagen 311-4 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII); Noeske 216-20 (Joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII); cf. Lorber & Faucher Series 6E.

Obv.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.

Rev.
Two eagles with their wings closed standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to left.

8.90 gr
20 mm
12h
1 commentsokidoki
Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes_II_(Physcon).jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon). 145-116 BC. 13 views26mm, 13.92 g, 12h
Paphos mint.
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis around neck
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; LΛ (date) to left, ΠA to right
Svoronos -; Paphos Hoard 6; SNG Copenhagen
JBGood
chalkous_k.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Time of Ptolemy VIII-X. 145-88 BC. 10 viewsÆ Chalkous, 14mm, 1.7g, 12h; Uncertain mint in Cyprus (or Alexandria?).
Obv.: Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia.
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Reference: Svoronos 1715 (Ptolemy X); Noeske 389; SNG Copenhagen 669 / 17-102-127
John Anthony
Svoronos-965.jpg
Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt: Ptolemy III Euergetes (246-222 BCE) Æ Triobol, Alexandreia (Svoronos 965; SNG Copenhagen 173-5)27 viewsObv: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; filleted cornucopia to left, XP monogram between legs
Quant.Geek
Ptolemaios_IV_b.jpg
Ptolemaios IV. The Philopator AE 3816 views221-205 B.C.
38 mm, 48 grams
Tibsi
BOTH_PTOLEMY.jpg
Ptolemy 11 Philadelphus Tetradrachm 283-246 BC2 viewsObverse-Head of Ptolemy 1 Soter wearing Aegis
27.49 mm 14.24 gm
Struck in Alexandria after 275 BC
Rev- Eagle with closed wings clutching thunderbolt.
Left field, Σ , Galatian shield
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ
Y between eagles legs
cicerokid
jAP2Bp6Eb4WAac5Zz3Hb8Gy7Ft95RQ.jpg
Ptolemy AE16 obol Zeus Ammon / Eagles left on thunderbolt14 viewsPtolemy AE16 obol Zeus Ammon / Eagles left on thunderbolt
Very nice quality with clear lettering on reverse! _1680
Antonivs Protti
WP_20160409_14_29_32_Pro.jpg
Ptolemy coin - obverse - unidentified further?5 viewsSIMON C2
WP_20160409_14_29_46_Pro.jpg
Ptolemy coin - two eagle reverse - unidentified further?4 viewsSIMON C2
ptolemy_drachm.jpg
Ptolemy drachm Athena style 25 viewsChance Vandal
PTLOM.jpg
Ptolemy I70 viewsSilver tetradrachm, BMC 57, VF, 14.0g, 25.4mm, 40o, Miletus, Ionia? mint, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, minute D behind the ear; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, P over MI monogram in left field; high relief, toned, reverse off center
1 commentssalem
Ptolemy I.jpg
Ptolemy I109 viewsPtolemy I AE29. Laureate head of Zeus right / Eagle standing left, on a thunderbolt, wings back, monograms before.

Sear 7763; Svoronos 293.
3 commentsTanit
b_014.JPG
Ptolemy I140 viewsPtolemy I 305-285 BC
Tetradrachm

Obverse:Head of Ptolemy right
Reverse:PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; P above F in left field.

25.40mm 13.59gm

Svoronos 263
maik
Ptolemy_portrait_1.jpg
Ptolemy I118 viewsPortrait of Ptolemy I inspired by my Ptolemy VI philometer Tetradrachm. Pen and ink. 2"x2"1 commentsmihali84
Ptolemy_I_Paphos_Cop_643.JPG
Ptolemy I38 viewsPtolemy I
Date: 323-283 BC
Type: AE 16mm 4.57g
Mint: Paphos (Cyprus) (310-305 BC)
Obverse: Aprodite
Reverse: Eagle
Reference: COP 643
3 commentsJohn K
860_522469487789967_610866663_n.jpg
Ptolemy I28 viewsRandygeki(h2)
Ptolemy_I.jpg
Ptolemy I - AR tetradrachm4 viewsAlexandria
300-285 BC
diademed head with Aegis right
Δ (behind ear)
eagle standing left on thunderbolt
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
P / (ΠAP)
Svoronos 255; SNG Cop 70 - 71; Noeske 41 - 42 (284/3 B.C.); SNG Milan 8; Hazzard C1021; BMC Ptolemies p. 20, 59; Hosking -; Malter -,
ex Dionysos
Johny SYSEL
ptolemy_I.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter65 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy I, 323-283 BC. Bronze.
Obverse- Deified Head of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant skin headdress.
Reverse- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle with open wings standing on thunderbolt to left.; between legs E.
Svoronos 439, SNG Cop 158, 24mm, 11.94gm.
2 commentsb70
Ptolemy_I_Soter.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter430 viewsSilver Tetradrachm of Ptolemy I
Egypt / Cyprus
Alexandria Mint
Circa 305-283 BC
13.75g, 26mm, 0o
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis. Artists signature D behind ear.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt. P (R) above, unknown monogram below.
Svoronos 250-256
2 commentskypros84
Ptol_I.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter96 viewsPtolemy I Soter
Silver Tetradrachm
Alexandria Mint
mihali84
Ptol Alex AE.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter - AE 2220 viewsHead of Alexander the Great right, wearing elephant-skin
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ , eagle standing left on thinderbolt, wings open
Ginolerhino
Ptolemy_I_Soter_AR_Tetradrachm,_Alexandria.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter AR Tetradrachm, portrait by the Delta-Master117 viewsPtolemy I Soter (305-282 BC). Tetradrachm (14.53 g), c. 294-285 BC, Alexandria.
Obv. Diademed head right, wearing aegis around neck; small Δ behind ear.
Rev. BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΠTOΛEMAIOY, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; to left, A above Δ.
Cf. Svoronos 190.

Splendid portrait. Areas of corrosion.
On this coin we encounter the first true portrait of one of Alexander's successors. The tiny letter Δ found in his hair behind the ear is the initial of the engraver, the so called Delta-Master.
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
Ptolemy_I_-_Alexandria_Tetradrachm_-_Satrap.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter as Satrap Tetradrachm -- 311-305 BC17 views13.92 g, 28 mm, 0°
Alexandria Mint
Silver Tetradrachm; Very Rough, Edge Chip, Scratches
Minted during reign of Ptolemy I as Satrap
Svoronos 146; SNG Copenhagen 18

Obverse: Head of Alexander III Right with Horn of Ammon, Clad in Elephant's Skin and Aegis.
Reverse: AΛEΣAN∆POY (Of Alexander), Athena Alkidemos (Defender of the People) Advancing Right, Brandishing Spear and Shield; Eagle on Thunderbolt.

Ptolemy I Soter (Savior) (c. 367-283 BC) was a close boyhood friend and later trusted bodyguard and general of Alexander the Great. On Alexander's death, Ptolemy received Egypt as his inheritance. He ruled for 18 years as 'Satrap' of Egypt, but in 305 BC took the title of Pharaoh. He ruled for a further 20 years before dying peacefully in bed, the only of the Diadochi to do so (305-283 BC). He succeeded in creating a stable and prosperous kingdom which his dynasty ruled for 293 years. Most knowledge of Alexander the Great comes from works based on his lost account.
______________________________
The design of these tetradrachms are quite possibly my favorite, but based on their common price I despaired over my chances of ever owning one. Luckily, I was able to find one in rough, but still beautiful, condition for much less than the common price tag.
Hydro
Ptolemy_I.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm -- 305-285 BC9 views13.70 g, 26 mm, 180°
Alexandria Mint
Silver Tetradrachm; Edge Chip
Minted during reign of Ptolemy I as Pharaoh
SNG Copenhagen 49

Obverse: Diademed Head of Ptolemy I Soter Right, Wearing Aegis.
Reverse: ΠTOλEMAlOY (Of Ptolemy), Eagle Standing on Thunderbolt, Facing Left.

Ptolemy I Soter (Savior) (c. 367-283 BC) was a close boyhood friend and later trusted bodyguard and general of Alexander the Great. On Alexander's death, Ptolemy received Egypt as his inheritance. He ruled for 18 years as 'Satrap' of Egypt, but in 305 BC took the title of Pharaoh. He ruled for a further 20 years before dying peacefully in bed, the only of the Diadochi to do so (305-283 BC). He succeeded in creating a stable and prosperous kingdom which his dynasty ruled for 293 years. Most knowledge of Alexander the Great comes from works based on his lost account.
_____________________________
Purchased from FORVM member, Kallisto. Thank you very much, love the coin.
Hydro
PtolemyI26mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap18 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.68 g, 26mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III. Overstruck on earlier Alexander tetradrachm, 306-305 BC.
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, aegis around neck with tiny Δ in scales.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet right above ΔI and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, undertype beading visible on obverse just above elephant's ear; on the reverse, portrait of Alexander above eagles head into Athena's shield.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some of these issues, such as this one, show the clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonater
Ptolemy_30mms.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter Tetradrachm as Satrap17 viewsPtolemy I Soter. Silver Tetradrachm (15.65 g, 30mm), as Satrap, 323-305 BC. Alexandria, in the name of Alexander III
O: Diademed head of the deified Alexander right, wearing elephant's skin headdress.
R: AΛEΞANΔPOY in left field, Athena Alkidemos advancing right, wielding javelin and holding forth shield;in right field, monogram, Corinthian helmet above and eagle standing right on thunderbolt.
Overstruck, traces of undertype visible.

The earlier 17g tetradrachms were withdrawn from circulation in 306/305 BC and reissued after weight adjustment. They were trimmed to remove 1.5g of silver, heated and restruck. This must have been faster than melting them down into bullion and restriking. Some issues show clear evidence of the edges being trimmed, although many, such as this one, do not.

Ptolemy was feeling the financial burden of repelling Antigonus’ invasion and supporting Rhodes through a thirteen-month siege. The government needed extra currency and Egypt produced little or no silver. The recall of the heavy issues meant 8 tetradrachms were restruck into 9 “Crisis Issues” but with no change in the appearance of the dies.
3 commentsNemonater
ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter, Alexandria78 viewsPtolemy I Soter, Bronze Hemiobol, Alexandria mint 19.6mm, 305-282 BC
Obverse: Deified head of Alexander the Great right with horn of Ammon, hair long, thunderbolt countermark on cheek.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt with wings open, head left; Aphlaston left
Dk0311USMC
1__Ptolemy_I.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter, Hellenistic ruler of Egypt 305- 282 BC34 viewsDenom: Bronze Diobol
Mint: Alexandria; Date: 295-282 BC (no lathing dimple)
Obv: Boarder of dots,Zeus laureate head facing right.
Rev: Boarder of dots, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ right.
Eagle facing left,open wings,standing on a thunderbolt.
Left field monogram: ALPHA over EPSILON
No leg control symbol
Size: 26.5mm; 18gms
Ref: Svor 272; BMC 43; SNG Cop ?
brian l
Ptolemy_I_Soter.jpg
Ptolemy I Soter, Sear 7766, 305 - 283 BC, Alexandria or Cyrene2 viewsDeified head of Alexander III 'The Great' with horns of Ammon.
Eagle with open wings standing on thunderbolt.

PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS
of King Ptolemy I
Jonathan N
image.jpg
Ptolemy I Sotor50 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt
Ptolemy I Sotor (323-283 BCE)
AR Tetradrachm (28mm, 15.05g)
Alexandria mint, as Satrap, c 310-305 BCE

O: Head of Alexander the Great right wearing elephant skin headdress
R: AΛEΞANΔΡOΥ, Athena advancing right brandishing spear and shield; to right; eagle on thunderbolt, helmet, and monogram.

SNG Cop-29; Svoronos-162
1 commentsSalaethus
Ptolemy_I.JPG
Ptolemy I.171 viewsPtolemy I; 323-310 BC, Alexandria, c. 312-285 BC, AR Tetradrachm, 14.18g. Diademed bust of Ptolemy I r., aegis around neck, within beaded border. Rx: ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, P and monogram in l. field, Sv. 252, SNG Cop. 69

Ex Harlan J. Berk BBS 46, 6.12.1986, lot 332
3 commentsAuer
l_100.JPG
Ptolemy II 37 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246
AE 34
Obverse:Head of Ammon Zeus
Reverse:Eagle with closed wings standing on thunderbolt.Club left.ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ

34.32mm 37.01g

SVORONOS 706
maik
b_012.JPG
Ptolemy II38 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 BC
Tetradrachm

Obverse:Head of Ptolemy right
Reverse:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;monograms at left field

27.41mm 13.38gm

Svoronos 365
maik
v_032.JPG
Ptolemy II 23 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 b.c
AE 16
Obverse:Head of Alexander the great wearing elephant skin and aegis
Reverse:Eagle standing on thunderbolt,shield and monogram at left field

16.63mm 6.96gm
Svoronos 601
maik
ptol.jpg
Ptolemy II42 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 b.c
Tetradrachm Tyre mint 256 b.c
Obverse:Head of Ptolemy I right
Reverse:PTOLEMAIOU SOTIROS;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;Tyre monogram and club at left;L =date and AB at right field

26.15mm 14.06gm

SVORONOS 660

1 commentsmaik
a_103.JPG
Ptolemy II 33 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 B.C
Tyros 284-280 B.C

Obverse:Diademed and horned head of deified Alexander the great
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;Club over monogram at left field

14.94mm 4,39gm

Svoronos 628
maik
a_104.jpg
Ptolemy II36 viewsPtolemy II
Ptolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 B.C

Obverse:Head of Alexaner the great right wearing elephant skin
Reverse:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; EY over monogram at left field

20.75mm 8.31gm

Svoronos 363
maik
a_121.JPG
Ptolemy II39 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 BC
267 BC

Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ;Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;Λ between eagles legs

30.72mm 24.38gm

Svoronos 481
maik
a_106.JPG
Ptolemy II27 viewsPtolemy II Phoiladelphos 285-246 BC
275 BC

Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:Eagle standing left on thunderbolt;Shield and monograms at left field

27.55mm 15.97gm

Svoronos 581
maik
100_4839.JPG
Ptolemy II28 views285-265 BC
Ptolemy II AE 27 mm. Head of Zeus, laureate, right / Eagle l., wings open; to l., shield; inscription. Trident countermark (Cyprusca. 265 BC.)
Randygeki(h2)
90053-Ptolemy2.jpg
Ptolemy II 23 viewsPtolemy II Tetradrachm
25 mm 14.40 gm
Diademed head of Ptolemy right.
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, monogram and club in the field
2 commentsKoffy
IMG_3978.jpg
Ptolemy II52 viewsPtolemy II, 285/4-246 BC PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
AR Tetradrachm 14.09 g.
NGC Grade
Ch XF Strike: 4/5 Surface: 2/5

obv. Diademed bust right of Ptolemy Soter wearing aegis around neck
rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, in left field TYP monogram above club

Ref:Sv.644, SNG Cop 482-483, BMC.-, Meydancikkale 4206-4353, Noeske 84.
5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Ptolemy_II~1.jpg
Ptolemy II - AE drachm22 viewsAlexandria
266-256 BC
diademed head of Zeus-Ammon
2 eagles standing on lightning left
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
Λ
Svornos 479
67,19g
ex Lanz
2 commentsJohny SYSEL
Ptolemy_II_Alexander.jpg
Ptolemy II - AE Obol4 viewsAlexandria
264-256 BC
head of Alexander III right wearing elephant scalp headdress and aegis
eagle standing on lightning left, spread wings
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
E
Svornos 450
Johny SYSEL
1412_Ptolemy_II_obol.jpg
Ptolemy II - AE Obol0 viewsAlexandria
264-256 BC
head of Alexander III right wearing elephant scalp headdress and aegis
eagle standing on lightning left, spread wings
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
A
Svornos 424
10,1g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
PtolemaiosII_obol.jpg
Ptolemy II - obol Weiser 1750 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos (285-246 BC). AE obol. Alexandria mint, ca 269-268 BC; 19.09g; obv. Laureate head of Zeus-Ammon right; rev. Eagle standing left on winged thunderbolt; monogram & shield to left, tiny monogram between legs. SNG Cop. 119, Svoronos 553, Weiser 17.

Ex A. Reich's collection
2 commentsBartosz Awianowicz
ptolemy_01.jpg
Ptolemy II AR Tetradrachm39 viewsObv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right; dotted border.
Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣILEΩΣ - Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; SI before.
Year: 285-246 BC
Mint: Sidon
Cat #:Svoronos 713
oa
J04-Ptolemy II.jpg
Ptolemy II “Philadelphos” (Egypt), 285-246 BCE35 viewsBronze of Ptolemy II “Philadelphos”, 29 mm, 23 grams Grade: F. Period: 275 – 250 BCE

Obverse: Head of Zeus-Ammon facing right.
Reverse: [ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ] ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ Eagle standing on thunderbolt left.

Reference: Sear 7786

Added to collection: August 13, 2005
Daniel Friedman
PtolemaiosII_ArsinoeII_AE10.jpg
Ptolemy II or Ptolemy Keraunos for Arsinoe II - AE10 R!120 viewsPtolemy II (285-246 BC) or Ptolemy Keraunos (281-279 BC). Æ 10mm, 1.63g; obv. Diademed and draped bust of Arsinöe II right; rev. Eagle standing left. Very rare! SNG Cop. -, Weiser -.

Ex F. R. Künker Auktion 143
1 commentsBartosz Awianowicz
Ptolemaic.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos38 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 BC Egypt, AE271 commentsareich
Ptolemy_AE.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos166 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos Hemidrachm
Struck c. 249-246 B.C.
43.3g 39mm
[click to enlarge]
4 commentsmihali84
Ptolemy_II.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos208 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos Silver Tetradrachm
Tyre mint, 257 B.C.
14.11g, 27mm
Svoronos 656, SNG Cop 482
4 commentsmihali84
ptolemyii.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos19 viewsBronze Obol, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Alexandria mint, 24mm
Obverse: Alexander head right wearing elephant skin headdress
Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ Eagle standing left on thunderbolt wings open
Dk0311USMC
GAE246_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Obverse120 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE246
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - Alexandria Mint - 285/246BC
AE 40.9-42.2mm : 72.8gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Twin eagles standing on thunderbolts facing left, RHO monogram between legs. BASILEOS on right, PTOLEMAIOY on left. Denomination B. Svoronos identifies the 'two eagles' type as struck after the death of Arsinoe.
REF - Svoronos 497 Noeske 66 (with RHO monogram, like this coin)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE087_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Obverse88 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE087
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 44.1-45.0mm : 100.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE246_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse124 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE246
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - Alexandria Mint - 285/246BC
AE 40.9-42.2mm : 72.8gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Twin eagles standing on thunderbolts facing left, RHO monogram between legs. BASILEOS on right, PTOLEMAIOY on left. Denomination B. Svoronos identifies the 'two eagles' type as struck after the death of Arsinoe.
REF - Svoronos 497 Noeske 66 (with RHO monogram, like this coin)
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE099_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse100 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
PtolemAE
GAE087_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 283/246BC - Drachm - Reverse39 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE087
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 44.1-45.0mm : 100.9gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
PtolemAE
GAE072_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC - Diobol - Obverse96 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE072
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC
AE 30.2-31.0mm : 22.900gm
OBV - Zeus with taenia, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, no cornucopia, wing at left slightly opened, DELTA monogram between legs. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.
REF - Svoronos 438 (denom. D - Plate 17 #11) SNGCop 156
PtolemAE
GAE072_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC - Diobol - Reverse36 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE072
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - 285/246BC
AE 30.2-31.0mm : 22.900gm
OBV - Zeus with taenia, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, no cornucopia, wing at left slightly opened, DELTA monogram between legs. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.
REF - Svoronos 438 (denom. D - Plate 17 #11) SNGCop 156
PtolemAE
GAE233_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC - Obverse93 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE233
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 25.8-26.6mm : 17.462gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
1 commentsPtolemAE
GAE233_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC - Reverse60 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE233
Ptolemy II Philadelphos - Alexandria - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 25.8-26.6mm : 17.462gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
PtolemAE
Ptolemy_II_Philadelphos_285_-_246_BC_King_of_Egypt.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos 285 - 246 BC King of Egypt 124 viewsAE 22 12.7 gram coin
Obverse: Bust of Hercules Right
Reverse: Eagle Left _2500 sold
2 commentsAntonivs Protti
2300158.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos 285-246 B.C AR Tetradrachm, Sidon Mint80 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. AR Tetradrachm (25mm, 14.02 g, 1h). Sidon mint. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; c/m: pellet with radiating lines / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; ΣI before. Svoronos 713; SNG Copenhagen 506. VF, toned.
Ex CNG Sale 230 Lot: 158
1 commentsPhiloromaos
GAE244_O.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Obverse130 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE244
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 45.1-46.5mm : 100.4gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE099_O~0.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Obverse231 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE244_R.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria - Reverse145 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE244
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC
AE 45.1-46.5mm : 100.4gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, no monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A
REF - Svoronos 412 (Plate 17 #1)
4 commentsPtolemAE
ptolemy_II_s838~0.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 16.1mm, Zeus, Gaza, Svoronos 83823 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Svoronos 838, aVF, off-center, Gaza mint, 5.234g, 16.1mm, 45o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, double cornucopia across shoulder, club left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy_II_s418.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 16.4mm, Zeus, Alexandria, Svoronos 41814 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze quarter obol, Svoronos 418, VF, Alexandria mint, 3.428g, 16.4mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, no symbols or control letters. This is the smallest denomination of the post reform (c. 260 B.C.) coinage series, with central depression. Ex FORVMPodiceps
svoronos_838.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 17.0mm, Zeus, Gaza, Svoronos 83819 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 16, Svoronos 838, VF, Gaza mint, 6.745g, 17.0mm, 30o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, double cornucopia across shoulder, club left. The club mintmark usually indicates Tyre. The absence of central depressions may indicate this type was struck c. 280 - 265 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
6198660561_f6809d0b22_b.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 19mm34 viewsTyre mint
19mm 4.59g
2 commentscrawforde
Ptolemy_II_s623.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 26.4mm, Syracuse, Svoronos 6239 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 623, SNG Cop 118, VF/F, Syracuse mint, 16.137g, 26.4mm, 225o, c. 265 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, shield left, “F” behind tail. Ex FORVMPodiceps
PtolemyII_s610_II.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 27.3mm, Syracuse, Svoronos 610, Type II24 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 610, Type II (solid reverse border), SNG Cop 114, Weiser 18, Fair/VF, Syracuse mint, 17.017g, 27.3mm, 0o, c. 275 - 260 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, shield left, no symbol between legs. Ex FORVM Podiceps
ptole-x.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 30.3 mm; Ake11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Ake mint. Bronze AE 30, Svoronos 790, 18.990g, 30.3mm, 0o, Ptolemais Ake mint, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right, circle of dots around; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, double cornucopia across shoulder, Ake monogram in field, ex FORVM

Podiceps
pII.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Alexander/ eagle, AE2418 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285-246 B.C.
24 mm, 11.4 g, Obverse: Head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, clad in elephant's skin headdress. Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS; eagle standing left on thunderbolt; Theta between legs. ex areich
1 commentsPodiceps
s418.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Bronze AE 18, Svoronos 4186 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 18, Svoronos 418, VF, Alexandria mint, 2.784g, 17.0mm, 0o, c. 260 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy_II_s838.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Bronze AE 18.5, Svoronos 838, Tyre9 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 838, F, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 5.179g, 18.5mm, 0o, 285 - 260 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club left; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
S465.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Bronze diobol, Svoronos 46515 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 465, aVF, Alexandria mint, 22.118g, 29.0mm, 0o, c. 260 - 246 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, “Θ” between legs; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
1__Ptolemy_II_.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Hellenistic ruler of Egypt 284-246 BC37 viewsDenom: Bronze Diobol
Mint:Alexandria; Date: 275-260 BC (no lathing dimples)
Obv: Boarder of dots, Zeus laureate head facing right.
Rev: Boarder of dots, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ right.
Eagle facing left,open wings,standing on a thunderbolt.
Left field monogram: Serifed SIGMA above a Galatian shield
Leg control symbol: IOTA
Size: 28.5mm;16.72gms
Ref: Svor 576; BMC 15; SNG Cop 123
2 commentsbrian l
42838_Ptolemy_II_s709.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Tyre, hemiobol; Svoronos 70944 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 709, SNG Cop 496, BMC 70-1, SNG Milan 138-140; Hunter 49; Köln 57, F, rough, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 4.569g, 20.0mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club left; beautiful desert patina. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
S610,_type_I.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos. Bronze diobol, Syracuse. Svoronos 610, Type I13 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 610, Type I (dotted reverse border), SNG Cop 114, Weiser 18, VF, Syracuse mint, 16.708g, 26.3mm, 0o, c. 275 or 260 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, shield left, no symbol between legs; partly uncleaned, green patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
S610,_type_II.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos. Bronze diobol, Syracuse. Svoronos 610, Type II10 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 610, Type II (circular reverse border), SNG Cop 114, Weiser 18, VF, Syracuse mint, 16.614g, 25.8mm, 0o, c. 275 - 260 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, shield left, no symbol between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
nios_ptolemy_II.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos/ Ptolemy Nios15 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C. Bronze quarter-obol, Svoronos 839 (attributed to Ptolemy III, Berytos); BMC p. 54, 80 ff., aVF, Lycian? mint, 2.145g, 15.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, trident left; green patina. The trident symbol is found on this Ptolemaic bronze and its half-denomination (Svoronos 840) in Asia Minor. The weight standard places the issue after the bronze reform of Ptolemy II, c. 268 B.C. Issued by or for Ptolemy Nios, who was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268-259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency following a 259 B.C. rebellion, but remained as ruler of Telemessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C. ex FORVMPodiceps
svoronos840.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos/ Ptolemy Nios; AE12, Svoronos 8409 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy Nios under Ptolemy II, 268 - 259 B.C. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 840 (attributed to Ptolemy III, Berytos), F, Lycian? mint, 1.607g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, trident left; very rare. The trident symbol is found on this Ptolemaic bronze and its double-denomination (Svoronos 839) in Asia Minor. The weight standard places the issue after the bronze reform of Ptolemy II, c. 268 B.C. Issued by or for Ptolemy Nios, who was the son of Lysimachos and Arsinoe II, as well as the step-son and co-ruler of Ptolemy II from 268-259 B.C. He was removed from his co-regency following a 259 B.C. rebellion, but remained as ruler of Telemessos in Lycia until after 240 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolem-x.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphos; 30.6 mm; Sidon11 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze AE 30, Svoronos 760, F, 21.330g, 30.6mm, 0o, Sidon mint, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, double cornucopia across shoulder; rare, ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemaios_II_diobol.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphus - AE diobol4 viewsPossible Mint in Greece
c. 275 - 267/266 BC
laureate head of Zeus-Ammon right
eagle with spread wings standing on lightning, Galatian shield left
ΠΤΟΛEMAIOY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
(ΣΩ) // (XAP)
Λ between eagle's legs
Svornos 581
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Ptolemaios_II_hemiobol.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphus - AE hemiobol32 viewsAlexandria
266-256 BC
head of Zeus-Ammon right with tainia
eagle with spread wings standing on lightning
ΠΤΟΛEMAIOY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Θ between eagle's legs
Svoronos, 469
5,14g 19mm
Johny SYSEL
ptolemy2.jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphus AR Tetradrachm92 viewsObverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I Soter
Reverse: Eagle with folded wings standing on thunderbolts. PTOLEMAIOY SOTHROS; Regnal Year 31 (255/54 BC) of Ptolemy II (285-246 BC) Monograms and control marks of the Gaza mint in the fields

Many of the portraits of Ptolemy Soter (the Savior) are little more than caricatures on the tetradrachms that are commonly for sale. Perhaps after engraving the same features for centuries the man behind the image became lost. I think this coin portrait has great quality and I imagine it looks a lot like the original Ptolemy I although cut about thirty years after his death. Ptolemy I may have been regarded as the George Washington of his day and the the notion of "father of his country" is exemplified in this portrait.
It is ironic that his patron, Alexander, overthrew the Persian God-Kings and was a major factor in preserving the role of the individual in Western values. Ptolemy's dynasty generally followed the Egyptian model with family members succeeding family members for over two centuries rather than the highly competitive and dynamic model that shaped Western politics and history.

Gaza mint; Svoronos 828; wt 13.7 gm
1 commentsdaverino
Ptolemy_I_Sorter_I[1].jpg
Ptolemy II Philadelphus, 285-246 BCE14 viewsDiademed head of Ptolemy I Sorter wearing elephant skin .
Obverse - eagle standing left wings open, symbols before
19.9 mm., 7.4 g.
NORMAN K
PtolemyII.jpg
Ptolemy II Tetradrachm104 viewsDiademed bust of Ptolemy I Soster right, Aegis around neck

ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Eagle on thunderbolt left. In left field city monogram over club (Tyre), right year date KΔ as monogram= year 24

Tyre mint
262-261 BC

14.21g

SNG COP 486

ex-ANE

Sold to Calgary Coin Jan 2016
1 commentsJay GT4
ptolemy_ii_k.jpg
Ptolemy II, 283-246 BC5 viewsÆ Obol, 20mm, 6.7g, 12h; Alexandria mint, c. 260 BC
Obv.: Bust of Alexander III in elephant-skin headdress.
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Reference: Svoronos 416 / 16-409-55
John Anthony
4237_4238.jpg
Ptolemy II, AE17, ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ6 viewsAE17
Ptolemaic Kingdom
Egypt
Ptolemy II
17.0mm 4.22gr
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle standing left, wings open.
zurqieh_dubai 291121770624
10/30/14 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
ptolemy_II_s635.jpg
Ptolemy II, Alexander, AE 15.3, Svoronos 6355 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 635, early type, with no central depression, Fair, Alexandria mint, 3.815g, 15.3mm, 0o, c. 283 - 260 B.C.; obverse head of deified Alexander the Great with horn of Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, H over club left, no symbol between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_II_s467.jpg
Ptolemy II, Alexander, AE 23, Svoronos 46712 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 467, Weiser 33, SNG Cop -, Fair, rough, Alexandria mint, 7.520g, 23.0mm, 0o, post-reform, c. 260 B.C., with central depression; obverse head of Alexander the Great, in elephant scalp headdress, right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, no cornucopia, “Q” between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
greek10.jpg
Ptolemy II, AR Tetradrachm25 viewsSV 749? /249-248 BC /Sidon mint
obv: dia. st r. wearing aegis
rev: eagle l.on thunderbolt, date in field
1 commentshill132
IMG_1211.JPG
Ptolemy II, Diobol, C. 290-265BC. AE 28mm, 18.8grm15 viewsPtolemy II, Diobol, C. 290-265BC.
Obv. Laureate Zeus R.
Rev. PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt,Galatian shield shield & M (Sigma) monogram in left field.
Lee S
LarryW2312.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 282-246 BC53 viewsAR tetradrachm, 26mm, 13.59g, aEF
Struck at Tyre 256 BC
Diademed head Ptolemy I right wearing aegis / ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. TYP monogram left field, Θ between legs, Λ over AB monogram right field.
Sear 7773; Svoronos 658
Lawrence Woolslayer
s842.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 842 8 viewsPtolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 842 (Ptolemy III, only one example known to Svoronos), F, Paphos mint, 7.034g, 21.1mm, 0o, c. 282 - 262 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, lotus before; scarce. ex FORVMPodiceps
svoronos_450.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Bronze obol, Alexander; Svoronos 45014 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C., Portrait of Alexander the Great. Bronze obol, Svoronos 450, SNG Cop -, Weiser 31, aF, Alexandria mint, 10.508g, 22.2mm, 0o, post reform, c. 260 B.C. (with central depression); obverse head of Alexander the Great, in elephant scalp headdress, right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with wings open, standing left on thunderbolt, head left, E between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptole_II_svor_627.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Svoronos 627, AE 1524 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 627 (1 example known to Svoronos), Fine, dark patina, Tyre mint, 4.310g, 15.6mm, 0o, 285 - 284 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander the Great right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left, thunderbolt in talons, club and A left; rare. ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy2.jpg
Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, Svoronos 976, AE 2421 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 976, VF, brown patina, 8.172g, 24.1mm, 0o, obverse head of Alexander the Great as Herakles right, wearing lion scalp headdress; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, heard turned right, cornucopia across shoulder, E between legs. ex FORVM Podiceps
sidon.jpg
Ptolemy II, Sidon14 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II, Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Svoronos 762, SNG Cop 191, Weiser 45, aVF/F, Sidon mint, 5.562g, 18.3mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia across shoulder; scarce. ex FORVM Podiceps
ptolemy_II_s581.jpg
Ptolemy II, Zeus, AE 25.7, Svoronos 58123 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, 285 - 246 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 581, SNG Cop 124, Weiser 12, VF, 14.640g, 25.7mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left, with spread wings, “ΣΩ” monogram above shield over “ΧΑΡ” left, “Λ” between legs; nice style. The pre-reform coinage of Ptolemy II with Galatian shield was probably minted between 275 B.C. and 262 B.C. No central depressions appear on these coins. This type with a XAP monogram under the shield has been found in Greece and may have been used to pay troops during the Chremonidean war, during which Ptolemy II supported Athens. ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy II AE27.JPG
Ptolemy II. AE27. Alexandria.39 viewsAE27. Alexandria mint.
Obv. Laureate head of Zeus right.
Rev. Eagle
Svoronos 586; Weiser 11; SNG Copenhagen 123

EF
1 commentsLordBest
b_005.JPG
Ptolemy III 143 viewsPtolemy the III 246-221 b.c
Dekadrachm 245 b.c
Obverse:Veiled head of Arsinoe II wearing stephane,sceptre behind head visible above;behind BB
Reverse:ΑΡΣΙΝΟΗΣ ΦΙΛΑΔΕΛΦΟΥ; Double cornucopiae,bound with fillet

34.35mm 33.74gm

SVORONOS 938

BB on obverse = date = 245 BC

Ex H.J.B
6 commentsmaik
a_108.jpg
Ptolemy III32 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes 246-221 B.C
Tyros
Obverse:Diademed bust of Berenike II right
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ; filleted cornucopiae

12.59mm 1.64gm
Svoronos 1050
maik
a_114.jpg
Ptolemy III26 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-221 BC
Cyprus
Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ;Cultus-statue of Aphrodite standing facing

20.34mm 6.63gm

Svoronos 1007; Tziampazis p43- 32
maik
6198661089_bc575456b8_b.jpg
Ptolemy III30 viewsPtolemy III Eugertes

Alexandria Mint, 246-241BC
AE hemidrachm, 40.38mm 42.75g
Svornos 1166
1 commentscrawforde
014.JPG
Ptolemy III60 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes. Æ Hemidrachm - Triobol. Alexandreia mint. First phase, struck circa 246-242/1. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right; cornucopia over shoulder; E between legs. Svoronos 974 var. (control mark).

AE40 about 46.5 g.

Thanks Bill and PtolemyAE for the attribution
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
004.JPG
Ptolemy III49 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes. Æ Hemidrachm - Triobol. Alexandreia mint. First phase, struck circa 246-242/1. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right; cornucopia over shoulder; E between legs. Svoronos 974 var. (control mark).

AE40 about 46.5 g.

Thanks Bill and PtolemyAE for the attribution
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_1240.JPG
Ptolemy III , Hemidrachm. Alexandria Cornucopia Series. 246–222 BC. AE34mm. 33.7grm.13 viewsPtolemy III , Alexandria Cornucopia Series. 246–222 BC.

Obv. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.

Rev. PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, monogram between legs.

Ref. Svoronos 965
Lee S
coin602~0.jpg
Ptolemy III - 246-221BC - Svoronos 96521 viewsPtolemy III - 246-221BC - Svoronos 965 SNGCop 173-5 Weiser 72
'hemidrachm' denomination of Alexandria with 'chi-rho' leg monogram
Well known fairly common (Svoronos recorded over 40 specimens) type. Coin #602
cars100
Ptolemy_III_1_4obol.jpg
Ptolemy III - AE 1/4 obol5 viewsLycia or Caria (according some sources Telmessos could be the mint)
circa 240 BC
diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
eagle standing on thunderbolt, tripod left
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
Svoronos 793 (Ptolemy II–Ake-Ptolemaïs); Weiser 80-1 (Ptolemy III)
ex Gitbud and Naumann
Johny SYSEL
Ptolemy_III.jpg
Ptolemy III - AE 5/2 obol10 viewsAlexandria
246-235 BC
laureate head of Zeus-Ammon right
eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia on shoulder
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
Λ
Svoronos 1167, SEAR 8025
31,01g
ex Gitbud & Naumann
Johny SYSEL
ptolemy_III.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes193 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes AE drachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae tied with fillet before, Cho-Ro monogram between legs.
Svoronos 964. 43mm, 72.7 grams.
2 commentsb70
Euergetes.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes37 viewsObverse : Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis
Reverse : Draped bust of Libya right; cornucopia below chin.

Svoronos 871 (Ptolemy II); SNG Copenhagen 442–4 (Ptolemy IV-VIII); Asolati 68A (Ptolemy III).
Dated 246-222 BC. Æ (21mm, 8.61 g, 11h).
Kyrene mint.
Bolayi
IMG_2765.JPG
Ptolemy III Euergetes17 viewsAE 17-181 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Ptolemy_III_Bronze_Coin.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes ("Benefactor"), King of Egypt 246-221 BC.65 viewsBronze 40 mm 65.4 gram
Obverse: Bust of Zeus Right
Reverse: Eagle Left _12500 sold
Antonivs Protti
GAE289_O~0.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - 246/221BC - Rare Denomination - Obverse162 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE289
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Diobol - 246/221BC
AE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE289_R.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - 246/221BC - Rare Denomination - Reverse58 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE289
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Diobol or Hemicrachm - 246/221BC
AE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
PtolemAE
Ptol GrandB.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - AE 3824 viewsHead of Zeus Ammon right
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ , eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head turned right, between his legs : E

Sear 7815
Ginolerhino
GAE070_O.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC - Obverse124 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE070
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC
AE 37.4-37.8mm : 50.3gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt to left, head reverted to right of coin, head facing a filetted cornucopia ascending from right (on coin) shoulder, EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - SGCV 7815 BC222-04 Svoronos 974 (Plate 29 #12) Noeske 155-158
NOTE - Attributed by Lorber as Ptolemy III hemidrachm of heavy weight standard
PtolemAE
GAE070_R.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC - Reverse117 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE070
Ptolemy III Euergeties - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 246/221BC
AE 37.4-37.8mm : 50.3gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt to left, head reverted to right of coin, head facing a filetted cornucopia ascending from right (on coin) shoulder, EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - SGCV 7815 BC222-04 Svoronos 974 (Plate 29 #12) Noeske 155-158
NOTE - Attributed by Lorber as Ptolemy III hemidrachm of heavy weight standard
PtolemAE
Ptolémée Soter 4dr.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes - tetradrachm minted in 240-239 BC19 viewsDiademed bust right of Ptolemy I wearing aegis
ΠTOΛEMAIOY ΣΩTHPOΣ , eagle standing left on thunderbolt, in field to the left : OB (year 72 = 240-239 BC).
Ginolerhino
Ptolemy_III_Euergetes_Tyre_Sv_709.JPG
Ptolemy III Euergetes Tyre Sv 70955 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, Tyre, 246 - 221 BC, 19.51mm, 5.9g, Svoronos 709, SNG Cop 496
OBV: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
REV: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club to left
Romanorvm
ptolemy_VI~0.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 23 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-220 B.C. 4.98g, 18mm. Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / ΠΤΟΛEMIOY BAΣΙΛΕΩΣ - Eagle standing left, cornucopia over right shoulder, chi-rho between eagle's legs; Podiceps
svoronos_971.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 12.3mm, Alexandria, Svoronos 97118 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-220 B.C. Bronze AE 12, Svoronos 971, F, Alexandria mint, 1.065g, 12.3mm, 0o, obverse head of (Alexander as) Herakles right, wearing lion-skin head-dress; reverse “BASILWS PTOLEMAIOU”, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's legs; rare. Smallest denomination of the chi-rho monogram series of Ptolemy III. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_III_s969.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 16.8mm, Alexandria, Svoronos 96920 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-220 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos 969, rough VF, Alexandria mint, 4.391g, 16.8mm, 0o, obverse head of (Alexander as) Herakles right, wearing lion-skin head-dress; reverse “BASILWS PTOLEMAIOU”, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, chi-rho between eagle's legs; very scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_III_s708.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 23.9mm, Zeus, Tyre, Svoronos 70812 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-220 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 708, SNG Cop 495, Weiser 55 - 56 (all Ptolemy II), gF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 11.517g, 23.9mm, 0o, c. 230 - 222 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club left, no control letters. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_k.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246-222 BC2 viewsÆ Hemidrachm (Triobol), 39mm, 44.8g, 12h; Alexandria mint.
Obv.: Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia.
Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right; filleted cornucopia to right, monogram between legs.
Reference: Svoronos 974; SNG Copenhagen 227-9.
John Anthony
ptolemy_III.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Asia Minor mint; tripod in left field19 viewsPtolemy III, Euergetes. 246-221 B.C. AE 16 (3.26g, 16mm). Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right, dotted border / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΙΟΨ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - Eagle with closed wings standing left on thunderbolt; tripod in left field; dotted border. Uncertain mint in Asia Minor. Svoronos 793.Podiceps
1__Ptolemy_III.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Hellenistic ruler of Egypt, 246-222 BC88 viewsDenom: Bronze Hemiobol
Mint: Tyre; Date: 246-222 BC (lathing dimple)
Obv: Boarder of dots,Zeus Ammon head facing right.
Rev: Boarder of dots, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ right.
Eagle facing left,closed wings,standing on a thunderbolt.
Left field monogram: Club
No leg control symbol
Size: 19mm; 7.2gms
Ref: Svor 709(as Ptolemy II); BMC 73; SNG Cop 497
NOTE - Svoronos attributed these to Ptolemy II but more recent information has come to light indicating these are Ptolemy III issues.- PtolemyBronze.com
brian l
ptolemy_III_s975.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Zeus, AE 26, Svoronos 97517 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C. Bronze AE 26, Svoronos 975, SNG Cop 230, nice F, Alexandria mint, 14.133g, 26.4mm, 0o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle, wings open, standing half left atop fulmen, head right; cornucopia left, E between legs. ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy_III,_Sv_974.JPG
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Zeus, AE 38, Svoronos 97427 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes, 246-221 BC, AE Hemidrachm of heavy weight standard, Alexandria mint. Size/Weight: 39mm, 45.3g. Obverse: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Reverse: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS; eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head reverted, cornucopiae on back decorated fruit and bound with fillet , E between legs. Attribution: Svoronos 974, SNG Cop 227-229. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
ptolemy_III_s1166.jpg
Ptolemy III Euergetes, Zeus, AE 40.2, Svoronos 116624 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy III Euergetes, 246 - 222 B.C. Bronze hemidrachm, Svoronos 1166, SNG Cop 220 - 221, Weiser 87 - 88, F, Alexandria mint, 39.0534g, 40.2mm, 0o, c. 246 - 230 B.C.; obverse head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing half left on fulmen, wings closed, head right, filleted cornucopia ascending behind from shoulder, “L” between legs. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Big Ptolemy.JPG
Ptolemy III Euregetes, AE4327 viewsAE43, Ptolemy III Euregetes, 247/6-221/20 B.C.
Obverse: Head of Zeus Ammon right
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, Eagle standing on thunderbolt, Cornucopia left Chi Rho between legs
43mm, 64.5gm
Svonoros 964.
Jerome Holderman
ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy III Eurgetes, 246-221 BC48 viewsAE16: 2.77g, 12h; Tyre mint, Club series
Obv.: Diademed bust of Zeus Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, club in front.
Reference: Svoronos 711
1 commentsJohn Anthony
coin605.jpg
Ptolemy III tetradrachm, Tyre mint26 viewsPtolemy III tetradrachm, Tyre mint, Diademed head
of Ptolemy I right, a minute I engraved behind his ear
/ PTOLEMAIOU SOTHPOS, eagle standing left
on thunderbolt; TUP monogram & club to left, K
monogram to right. Coin #605
cars100
Pt_III_trita_k.jpg
Ptolemy III, 246-222 BC6 viewsÆ tritatemorion, 16mm, 4.8g, 12h; Alexandria series 5, mid to late reign.
Obv.: Head of Zeus Ammon right.
Rev.: Eagle standing left, wings closed; cornucopia on left shoulder.
Reference: Svoronos 969
John Anthony
0162_0163~0.jpg
Ptolemy III, Euergetes, AE23, ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ3 viewsAE23
Ptolemy III, Euergetes
King: 246 - 221BC
Issued: 244 - 243BC
23.0mm 5.49gr
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus, right.
R: ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wings closed.
Exergue: Club, left field.
Tyre Mint
BMC 64F
zurqieh_dubai 391390717887
2/24/16 1/22/17
Nicholas Z
Ptolomy_IV~2.jpg
Ptolemy III, Eurgetes 246 - 221 B.C.9 viewsPtolemy III, Euergetes ("Benefactor") 246 - 221 B.C. Ae 38.1~38.8mm. 48.76g. Alexandria mint tetrobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia at shoulder right, E (closed loop) monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 974 E(var.). ddwau
PtolemyIIIcyrene2.jpg
Ptolemy III. Cyrenaica, Cyrene. Isis39 views PTOLEMY III EUERGETES, 246-221 B.C.

Cyrenaica, Cyrene. AE 1.79 g. Diademed head of Ptolemy I Soter, r. Rev. ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ Diademed, female head of Isis r., cornuacopia in field l. Svoronos, Pt. 873. SNG Cop. 439. Rare
ancientone
Ptolemy_III.JPG
Ptolemy III. Euergetes134 viewsPtolemy III Euergetes (246 – 221 BC), Drachm, AE 42, 74,94 gm, Zeus Ammon, facing right / Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs, Svoronos 9642 commentsAuer
PTOLEMY_III_-_GREEK.JPG
Ptolemy IV83 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom - Ptolemy IV, Philopator I - Alexandria Mint - Hemidrachm

O: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia

R: ΠTOΛΣMAIOY BAΣIΛΣΩΣ, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, ΔI between eagle's legs

Ref: Svronos 1127, SNG Cop 201

36.3g, 33.7mm, 0 degree die axis, 222-204BC
7 commentsBiancasDad
ptolemyIV.jpg
Ptolemy IV AE3543 views`Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy IV,221-205 BC, AE 35 (32.21g). Obv: Head of Zeus-Ammon right. Rev: Eagle stg. left clutching thunderbolt.1 commentsancientone
830_Ptolemy_IV.JPG
Ptolemy IV - AE hemidrachm4 viewsAlexandria
221-204 BC
diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to the left
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
ΔI
Svoronos 1127; SNG Cop 202; Noeske 145; BMC Ptolemies p. 57, 109 - 110; Weiser 50 (Ptolemy II, 253 - 249 B.C.)
Johny SYSEL
PtolemaiosIV_pentobol_Weiser91.jpg
Ptolemy IV - pentobol Weiser 9162 viewsPtolemy IV, Philopater (221 - 205 BC); 45.15g; obv. Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; rev. PTOLEMIAOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, looking back at cornucopia under right wing. SNG Cop. 224; Svoronos 974; Weiser 91

Ex F. R. Künker Auction 143
Bartosz Awianowicz
Ptolemy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV AE36 SNG Cop 221, Eagle17 viewsOBV: Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
REV: PTOLEMIAOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, looking back at cornucopiae under right wing
46.4g, 36mm

Minted at Egypt, 221-205 AD
Legatus
Ptolemy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV drachm147 viewsBronze drachm

Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia

ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ (PTOLEMAIOU BASILWS)
Eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, filleted cornucopia left, LI between eagle's legs

Alexandria (or Sidon) mint
220-203 BC

Svoronos 1126, VF, brown patina,
68.751g, 40.9mm, 0o,


Ex-Forum

SOLD!
5 commentsJay GT4
GAE095_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Obverse101 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE095
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 41.2-41.6mm : 73.1gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), LAMDA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE026_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Obverse133 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE026
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 42.3mm : 73.52gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), DELTA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE095_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Reverse85 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE095
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 41.2-41.6mm : 73.1gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), LAMDA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE026_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC - Reverse39 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE026
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Drachm - 221/205 BC
AE 42.3mm : 73.52gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left (of coin), filetted cornucopia in front of eagle (left side of coin), DELTA IOTA monogram between legs
REF - SNGCOP 199-200 Svoronos 1125 (Plate 36 #17) Ex. R.C. Lockett Collection
PtolemAE
GAE025_O.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC - Obverse135 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE025
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC
AE 32mm : 35.7gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle on thunderbolt cornucopia L BASILEOS PTOLEMOY SIGMA IOTA or SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 993 (Plate 35 #9 - Ptolemy III) SNGCOP 212
NOTE - Recent reattribution by Lorber as later issue hemidrachm of Ptolemy IV
3 commentsPtolemAE
GAE025_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC - Reverse31 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE025
Ptolemy IV Philopater - Alexandria - Hemidrachm - 221/205BC
AE 32mm : 35.7gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle on thunderbolt cornucopia L BASILEOS PTOLEMOY SIGMA IOTA or SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 993 (Plate 35 #9 - Ptolemy III) SNGCOP 212
NOTE - Recent reattribution by Lorber as later issue hemidrachm of Ptolemy IV
PtolemAE
sistertiii_163.JPG
Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC. 222 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC.
O: Head Zeus with Horn of Ammon r, centering dimple evident.
R: Eagle with closed wings stg. l., Filleted Cornucopia in l. field, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around, LI symbol between legs.
Svoronos 1126, SNG Cop 200v(DI between legs).
32500
6 commentsAntonio Protti
Egypt_Bronze_Zeus_Eagle.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC76 viewsPtolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy IV Philopater AE41 64.05g 221-204 BC. Struck 212 BC.
O: Head Zeus with Horn of Ammon r, centering dimple evident.
R: Eagle with closed wings stg. l., Filleted Cornucopia in l. field, BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU around, LI symbol between legs.
Svoronos 1126, SNG Cop 200v(DI between legs).
32500 sold

Ptolemy IV Philopater reigned 221–205 BCE, son of Ptolemy III and Berenice II of Egypt was the fourth Pharaoh of Ptolemaic Egypt. Under the reign of Ptolemy IV, the decline of the Ptolemaic kingdom began.
His reign was inaugurated by the murder of his mother, and he was always under the dominion of favourites, male and female, who indulged his vices and conducted the government as they pleased. Self-interest led his ministers to make serious preparations to meet the attacks of Antiochus III the Great on Coele-Syria including Judea, and the great Egyptian victory of Raphia (217), where Ptolemy himself was present, secured the northern borders of the kingdom for the remainder of his reign.

The arming of Egyptians in this campaign had a disturbing effect upon the native population of Egypt, leading to the secession of Upper Egypt under pharaohs Harmachis (also known as Hugronaphor) and Ankmachis (also known as Chaonnophris), thus creating a kingdom that occupied much of the country and lasted nearly twenty years.

Philopator was devoted to orgiastic forms of religion and literary dilettantism. He built a temple to Homer and composed a tragedy, to which his favourite Agathocles added a commentary. He married (about 220 BC) his sister Arsinoë III, but continued to be ruled by his mistress Agathoclea, sister of Agathocles. In late c. 210 BC, Agathoclea may have given birth to a son from her affair with Ptolemy IV, who may had died shortly after his birth.

Ptolemy is said to have built a giant ship known as the tessarakonteres ("forty"), a huge type of galley. The forty of its name may refer to its number of banks of oars. The only recorded instance of this type of vessel, in fact, is this showpiece galley built for Ptolemy IV, described by Callixenus of Rhodes, writing in the 3rd century BCE, and by Athenaeus in the 2nd century AD. Plutarch also mentions that Ptolemy Philopater owned this immense vessel in his Life of Demetrios. The current theory is that Ptolemy's ship was an oversize catamaran galley, measuring 128 m 420 ft.

Ptolemy IV is a major protagonist of the apocryphal 3 Maccabees, which describes purported events following the Battle of Raphia, in both Jerusalem and Alexandria.
3 commentsAntonivs Protti
Ptolomy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.10 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 36.0~37.1mm. 48.41g. Alexandria mint tetrobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, cornucopia countermark left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 1149ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~0.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.22 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 41.8~43.5mm. 67.71g. Alexandria mint drachm. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, filleted cornucopia left, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 992.ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~1.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.11 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 35.1~36.2mm. 33.86g. Alexandria mint diobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia countermark left, ΛI monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 1127 ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~3.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.9 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 29.3~31.1mm. 22.63g. Alexandria mint hemiobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia at shoulder right, ΣE monogram between eagle's legs. Svoronos 994, Svoronos 1151.ddwau
Ptolomy_IV~4.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 B.C.13 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C. Ae 30.0~30.8mm. 24.32g. Alexandria mint hemiobol. Obv: Horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, monogram between eagle's legs.ddwau
ptiva~0.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator 221 - 204 BCE11 viewsObverse: Laureate head of Zeus right
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open, head left, cornucopia left, EP monogram between legs. 15.1 g, 28.2 mm, ALEXANDRIA MINT, WEISER 93,NOESKA 165; SVORONOS 975 (e, PTOLEMY III) SNG COP 230 (E); BMC PTOLEMIES P. 47, 15-16 (E, PTOLEMY III)

Most references list this type with an E control symbol. Weiser and Noeska identify the E as an EP monogram, the p formed by a small arc in the inside upper corner of the E. The “P” is rarely visible but is clear on this example. Forum - GP42312
NORMAN K
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Ptolemy IV Philopator Tetrobol36 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator.
Tetrobol
circa 221-205BC
38 mm; 44.3 gms.
Obverse:Head of Zeus Amon right with diadem and floral ornament; dotted border.
Reverse: Eagle left,looking right, on thunderbolt: on left shoulder cornucopiae bound with fillet; SIGMA control letter between the eagle's legs, ; dotted border; TOEMAIOY BAIE.
Svoronos 1149 , a cornucopiae in square countermark.
Minted in Kyrenaika.
Tanit
Ptolemy~0.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 204 B.C.119 viewsAlexandria mint, 40g, 38.3mm
Hemidrachm

Obverse: Head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia
Reverse: "PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS" eagle standing half left on fulmen, wings closed, head right, filleted cornucopia ascending behind from shoulder, EP monogram between legs.
3 commentsDk0311USMC
tyre_Ptolemy_IV.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, Bronze hemiobol, 17,5mm. Tyre. Unpublished10 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 221 - 205 B.C. Bronze hemiobol, Unpublished: Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, Weiser -, et al.; similar to other Tyre issues except for Sigma control letter, Fair, Tyre mint, 4.759g, 17.5mm, 0o, obverse filleted and horned head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, “Σ”between legs, club left; only a few other examples known; extremely rare. Ex FORVMPodiceps
38373_ptolemy_IV_s1154.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, obol; Alexandria; Isis; Svoronos 115411 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 220 - 203 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1154; SNG Copenhagen 240 - 242; Noeske 54; BMC Alexandria p. 79, 9-12 (Ptolemy VI); SGCV 7848; Weiser -, F, rough, Alexandria mint, 6.950g, 20.2mm, 315o, obverse head of Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, head right, wings closed, cornucopia across shoulder. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
42050_Ptolemy_IV_Svoronos_1149,_aVF,_.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator, Tetrobol, Svoronos 1149, countermark19 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator, 220 - 203 B.C. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1149, aVF, rough areas, Alexandria mint, 38.589g, 38.9mm, 0o, obverse horned head of Zeus Ammon right, wearing taenia; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ”, eagle with wings closed standing left on thunderbolt, head turned back right, “ΣΕ” monogram between eagle's legs, rectangular cornucopia countermark; flaked red patina (stabilized), leaving rough areas where patina is absent. Svoronos 1149 is the same as Svoronos 1148 but with the addition of the countermark. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Ptolemy IV Philopator,Hellenistic ruler of Egypt 222-204 BC38 viewsDenom: Bronze Hemidrachm
Mint: Alexandria; Date: 222-204 BC (lathing dimple)
Obv: Boarder of dots,Zeus Ammon head facing right.
Rev: Boarder of dots, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ right.
Eagle facing left,closed wings,standing on a thunderbolt.
Left field monogram: Cornucopia bound with fillet.
Leg control symbol: LAMBDA IOTA
Size: 33mm; 34.4gms
Ref: Svor 1128; BMC ?? : SNG Cop. 203
brian l
Ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopator. 221-205 BC. AE 38mm43 viewsPtolemy IV Philopator. 221-205 BC. AE 38mm . Diademed head of Zeus Ammon right / BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, looking right; cornucpiae at shoulder, E below. SNG Cop 224. 1 commentsPhiloromaos
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Ptolemy IV Philopatros - Alexandria - 221/205BC - Tetrobol - Obverse87 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE255
Ptolemy IV Philopater - 221/205BC - Alexandria - Tetrobol
AE 36.3-37.0mm : 39.6gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head turned right over open wing, SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs, square/rectangular countermark of cornucopia at position where typically the device (engraved into die) is found on Ptolemy III issues. Possibly transitional issue or early issue of Ptolemy IV. Lorber (AJN, Second Series #12, pp.67-92, 2000) notes that the countermark may represent re-establishment of monetized value of this type by Ptolemy IV during a time of monetary reform and demonetization of earlier types.
REF - Svoronos 1149 (not illustrated this size, rev. similar to #1150 - Plate 37 #11) SNGCOP 211
PtolemAE
GAE255_R.jpg
Ptolemy IV Philopatros - Alexandria - 221/205BC - Tetrobol - Reverse88 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE255
Ptolemy IV Philopater - 221/205BC - Alexandria - Tetrobol
AE 36.3-37.0mm : 39.6gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head turned right over open wing, SIGMA EPSILON monogram between legs, square/rectangular countermark of cornucopia at position where typically the device (engraved into die) is found on Ptolemy III issues. Possibly transitional issue or early issue of Ptolemy IV. Lorber (AJN, Second Series #12, pp.67-92, 2000) notes that the countermark may represent re-establishment of monetized value of this type by Ptolemy IV during a time of monetary reform and demonetization of earlier types.
REF - Svoronos 1149 (not illustrated this size, rev. similar to #1150 - Plate 37 #11) SNGCOP 211
PtolemAE
ptolomy.jpg
Ptolemy IV Tetrobol ca. 240BC. AE 38mm. 46.9grm14 viewsPtolemy IV Tetrobol ca. 240BC.
Obv. Head of Zeus-Ammon right
Rev. PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae behind, monogram between legs.
Ref. Svoronos 974
Lee S
ptole_f.jpg
Ptolemy IV, Philopator, 34 mm23 viewsPtolemy IV, Philopator, 221 - 205 B.C. Bronze hemidrachm, Svoronos 1127, SNG Cop 201, VF, 35.136 g, 34.0mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse "PTOLEMAOIOU BASILEWS", eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, cornucopia left, "DI" between legs, dot border; ex areich ex FORVMPodiceps
ptole.jpg
Ptolemy IV, Philopator; Svoronos 1130, 35.0mm21 viewsPtolemy IV, Philopator, 221 - 205 B.C. 35.0mm. Bronze hemidrachm, Tyre Mint, 220-205. Svoronos 1130, Obverse diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse "PTOLEMAOIOU BASILEWS", eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, club in left field, "DI" between legs. ex moremoth.Podiceps
PtolemyIV_1148.jpg
Ptolemy IV, Svoronos 1148, AE 3821 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy IV. 221-205 BC. Æ 38mm (47.42 g). Alexandria mint. Head of Zeus-Ammon right, wearing tainia / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt with open wings, head turned right; SE monogram between legs. Svoronos 1148; Weiser 97 var. (monogram); SNG Copenhagen 207 var. (monogram). ex VAuctionsPodiceps
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PTOLEMY IV. 221-204 BC. AE368 viewsObv: Head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Rev: PTOLEMIAOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae to left.
ancientone
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Ptolemy IX 20 viewsPtolemy IX Soter 116-80 BC
Cyprus

Obverse:Head of ptolemy right
Reverse:Eagle standing left at thunderbolt

14.58mm 1.45gm

Svoronos 1715
maik
ptolemy_IX.jpg
Ptolemy IX, Soter, Tetradrachm, Paphos18 viewsPtolemy IX, Soter, 116-106 B.C. Tetradrachm 107/106 B.C., Paphos, 13,44 g Sear GCV II: 7922,Podiceps
macedonia,Paroreia.jpg
Ptolemy Keraunos, King or Macedon, 281-279 B.C.E.29 viewsBronze AE 20, 18 x 21 mm diam. & 7.3 grams, (BMC Macedonia p. 15, 61, SNG Cop 255, Paroreia mint.)
See PtolemyBronze.com for additional info. for case for I.D. as Ptolemy Issue.
Obverse - laureate head of Zeus Dodonaios right.
Reverse - eagle standing right on thunderbolt, uncertain monogram or symbol upper right, TTAP monogram right.
NORMAN K
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Ptolemy Keraunos, King or Macedon, 281-279 B.C.E.14 viewsBronze AE 20, 18 x 21 mm diam. & 7.3 grams,
(BMC Macedonia p. 15, 61, SNG Cop 255, Paroreia mint.)
See PtolemyBronze.com for additional info. for case for I.D.
as Ptolemy Issue.
Obverse - laureate head of Zeus Dodonaios right.
Reverse - eagle standing right on thunderbolt, uncertain
monogram or symbol upper right, TTAP monogram right.
sold 3-2018
NORMAN K
PTOLEMY_III__DEALERS_REDUCED_BOTH.jpg
Ptolemy lll AE Reduced Drachm9 viewsOBS: Head of Zeus Ammon
REV: Eagle facing left on thunderbolt.
Cornocopia with fillets in Left Field
ΧΡ Chrestogram between legs
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ
Sv 964
40mm 73.9gm
cicerokid
Ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy of Mauretania139 views1/2 Unit
Ptolemy of Mauretania - A. D. 23-40
22 mm - 6.5 gms
Obv:REX PTOLEMAEVS Diademed head right
Rev: Lion stg. right ; above, a star.

L. Müller 198
J. Mazard 498
SNG 665

Tanit
newer_ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy tetradrachm (1)36 views1 commentsChance Vandal
ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy tetradrachm (2)17 viewsChance Vandal
coin182.JPG
Ptolemy V23 viewsWeiser 136 (Ptolemy V)ecoli
Ptolemy_V.jpg
Ptolemy V 204-180 B.C.0 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes(?). 204-180 B.C. Æ Hemiobol (17mm, 4.14g & 16mm. 2.75g.). Kyrene mint. Obv:Diademed head of Ptolemy V right, aegis around neck Rev:Draped bust of Libya right,
wearing tainia; double cornucopia below chin.
ddwau
GAE309_O.jpg
Ptolemy V - Alexandria - Obverse99 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE309
Ptolemy V Philometer 205/181BC
AE 19.1-19.5mm : 5.978gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing f/L on thunderbolt with head reverted, KAPPA monogram between legs, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1378 (Plate 47 #7) Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC - SNGCOP 273
PtolemAE
GAE309_R.jpg
Ptolemy V - Alexandria - Reverse93 viewsPtolemy Coin GAE309
Ptolemy V Philometer 205/181BC
AE 19.1-19.5mm : 5.978gm
OBV - Laureate Zeus, facing right
REV - Eagle with open wing standing f/L on thunderbolt with head reverted, KAPPA monogram between legs, BASILEOS PTOLEMAIOY
REF - Svoronos 1378 (Plate 47 #7) Ptolemy VI - Commemoration of Kleopatra I Series - Struck 181/174BC - SNGCOP 273
PtolemAE
Ptolémée V Epiphane Sear 7880.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes - Ae 2730 viewsHead of Isis (Cleopatra I) right
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ , eagle standing left on thunderbolt
Ginolerhino
tetradrachm.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes Tetradrachm10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy V Epiphanes. 205-180 B.C. AR tetradrachm (26.4 mm, 13.83 g, 12 h). Alexandria, ca. 204 B.C. Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis / ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; wings closed. Svoronos 1231; Noeske 176-7; SNG Cop 244Holding_History
41117_Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_V_Epiphanes,_205_-_180_B_C_S1238.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE17, Isis, Svoronos 123811 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 - 180 B.C. Bronze AE 17, Svoronos 1238, SNG Cop 256, F, Alexandria mint, 3.856g, 17.0mm, 0o, 180 B.C.; obverse head of Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE26, 205-180 BC.JPG
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE26, 205-180 BC25 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes
AE 26mm, 205-180 BC
bust of Cleopatra I r.
eagle std. r.
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Svoronos 1234
Ardatirion
s1423.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1423 var (horn)9 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1423 var (horn), SNG Cop -, F, Alexandria mint, 43.565g, 34.9mm, 0o, obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon, unusual variation with large horn protruding high at the top of the head; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΙΑΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, wings closed, no symbols or control letters; thick and heavy flan; scarce. In a 1994 Article, Stephen Huston and C. Lorber noted the existance of this large horned variety in the CoinEx Hoard, dating the coin and the entire hoard to the time of Ptolemies IV and V. This particular variety is attributed to Ptolemy V. Matt Kreuzer and Richard Pincock attribute this type to the joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. They believe Huston and Lorber dated Coinex too early, two eagles always symbolizes joint rule, and the weight of this issue fits a standard used only after 168 B.C. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_V_libya.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Cyrene, Bust of Libya; Svoronos 87114 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom. Ptolemy V Epiphanes. 205-180 B.C. 21mm. Cyrene. Diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis / Diademed bust of Libya right; before, cornucopia. SNG Copenhagen 442-445; Svoronos 871; Buttrey, Demeter Sanctuary 268-74. Podiceps
1_Ptolemy_V.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Hellenistic ruler of Egypt 205-180 BC105 viewsDenom: Bronze Obol
Mint:Kyrene; Date: 205-193 BC ( lathing dimples)
Obv: Boarder of dots, Diademed bust of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: Diademed bust of Libya right,Cornucopia below chin.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ left, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ right.
Size: 21mm;6.55gms
Ref: Svor 871;SNG Copenhagen 442-5.
At this time,it is difficult to attribute this type to a particular Ptolemy,until more data is discovered but Ptolemy V is a good,educated guess...Paraphrased from PtolemAE.

3 commentsbrian l
41108_Ptolemy_V_obol,_Svoronos_1494.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Obol, Svoronos 14947 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205 - 180 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1494 (Ptolemy VIII), SNG Cop 339 ff. (Ptolemy VIII), Weiser 126, BMC Alexandria p. 69, 9 - 10 (Paphos?), Noeske -, Hosking -, aF, encrustation, corrosion, Alexandria mint, 9.216g, 24.0mm, 0o, 200 - 197 B.C.; obverse bearded head of Herakles right wearing lion-scalp headdress; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, head left; scarce. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemy_V_s1253.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, Tyre; 13.6mm; Zeus. Svoronos 125310 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 204 - 180 B.C. Bronze AE 14, Svoronos 1253, gF, Phoenicia, Tyre mint, 2.334g, 13.6mm, 180o, obverse head of Zeus Ammon right, border of dots; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle with closed wings standing left atop fulmen, cornucopia with fillet on left shoulder, AP monogram between legs, large club in left field, border of dots around; scarce. Ex FORVMPodiceps
41476_Ptolemy_V_S1234.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes; Alexandria; Isis; Svoronos 123435 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy V Epiphanes, 205/4 - 180 B.C. GB41476. Bronze AE 20, Svoronos 1234, SNG Cop 247, Alexandria mint, 15.302g, 27.2mm, 0o, obverse wreathed head of Isis right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings spread. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Isis_k.jpg
Ptolemy V-VI, 204-145 BC5 viewsÆ Hemidrachm, 27mm, 18.4g, 6h; Alexandria mint.
Obv.: Diademed head of Isis right.
Rev.: ΠTOΛEMAIOΥ BAΣIΛEΩΣ; Eagle on thunderbolt.
Reference: Svoronos 1234 and SNG Cop 247 (as Ptolemy IV)
16-375-115
John Anthony
Comb29072018114216.jpg
Ptolemy V. 204 - 180 BC11 viewsObv: Head of Cleopatra I as Isis.
Rev: Eagle standing on thunderbolt with one open wing.
Svoronos 1237.
SNG Copenhagen 253.
15mm and 2.97 grams
Canaan
S3.jpg
Ptolemy VI33 viewsEgyptian silver tetradrachm of Ptolemy VI (180-145 BC) from year 20 (LK, = 160 BC)Tanit
p121.jpg
PTOLEMY VI 118 viewsPtolemy VI Philometor
180-145 b.c
AE 44
Obverse:Head of Ammon Zeus to right
Reverse:Eagle with closed wings standing to left,lotus flower ,PTOLEMAIOY
One of the largest Ptolemaic bronze

Cyprus mint
44.67mm 90.56g

SVORONOS 1403,TZIAMPAZIS 46/50
maik
pjimage_(4)_(1).jpg
Ptolemy VI & Ptolemy VIII7 viewsAlexandriaJustin L
Ptolemy_VI_VIII_30d.jpg
Ptolemy VI + Ptolemy VIII - AE 30 drachm?3 viewsAlexandria
170-163 BC
head of Zeus right with Amon's horns
two eagles standing on lightning, cornucopiae before them
ΠΤΟΛEMAIOY ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Svoronos 1426; SNG Cop 315; Sear 7901
8,37g
Johny SYSEL
ptvi.jpg
PTOLEMY VI AE 22 MM , 180-176 BCE12 viewsPTOLEMY VI AE 22 Diobol. Struck 180-176 B.C.E.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOY BAEILEWE, two eagles standing left on a thunderbolt ; cornucopia before.
SVORONOS 1426, Sng Cop 315. 21.8 mm., 7.9 g.
NORMAN K
Ptolemy_VI.jpg
PTOLEMY VI AE20, SNG Cop 315, Two Eagles16 viewsOBVERSE: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right
REVERSE: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before
Struck at CYPRUS 180-176 BC
6.11g, 20mm
Legatus
Ptolemaic_Isis_Eagle_AE27_15_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Cleopatra I as Isis, AE 2814 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 28. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Zeus, AE 3011 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC. 30 mm, 27.27 g. Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field. Sear 7900var. ex Bart Lewis & areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
isis_cleo.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27. Cleopatra I as Isis13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27, 17,37g. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var.Podiceps
Ptolemy_VI_and_Ptolemy_VII_Bronze_Coin.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VII after 169 BC 45 viewsAE 28 mm 20.5 gram
Obverse: Bust Zeus Right
Reverse: Two eagles Left _6250 SOLD
Antonivs Protti
-Ptolemy_VI_VIII.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII - AE 80 drachm8 viewsAlexandria
180-173? BC
diademed head of Zeus-Ammon
2 eagles standing on lightning left
ΠTOΛEMAIOY_ΒAΣIΛEΩΣ
cornucopia left
Sv1424a
29,71g
Johny SYSEL
coin603.jpg
Ptolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 164-145 BC. 12 viewsPtolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 164-145 BC.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right , two eagles
standing left on thunderbolt. Coin #603

cars100
coin600.jpg
Ptolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 164-145 BC. 9 viewsPtolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 164-145 BC.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right , two eagles
standing left on thunderbolt. Coin #600
cars100
coin604.jpg
Ptolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC. 11 viewsPtolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / PTOLE
MAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on
thunderbolt; cornucopiae before. Svoronos 1426,
SNG Cop 315. Coin #604

cars100
coin601.jpg
Ptolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC. 9 viewsPtolemy VI Æ 22mm Diobol. Struck 180-176 BC.
Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right / PTOLEMAI
OU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on
thunderbolt; cornucopiae before. Svoronos 1426,
SNG Cop 315. Coin #601
cars100
Ptolomaic_Didrachm.jpg
Ptolemy VI Didrachm 151-150 B.C. Arados Mint, Phoenicia39 viewsSilver didrachm, Svoronos 1216 (Ptolemy VI); SNG Cop 556, VF, Phoenicia, Arados mint, weight 6.882g, maximum diameter 22.3mm, die axis 0o, 151 - 150 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis; reverse BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle with wings closed standing half left atop fulmen, date R-Q across field ( year 109 Arados Era);
Ex Forvm
1 commentsPhiloromaos
Ptolemy_Paphos_New.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometer387 viewsPtolemy VI Silver Tetradrachm
Paphos mint, Cyprus
Year KG (23)= 158 B.C.
26mm 13.6g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; date in left field, PA in right.
Svoronos 1435, SNG Cop. 619, BMC 37
6 commentsmihali84
1__PTOLEMY_VI.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometer, Hellenistic ruler of Egypt 180-145 BC39 viewsDenom: Bronze Diobol
Mint:Alexandria; Date: ca.175BC (lathing dimples)
Obv: Boarder of dots,Isis with hanging curls, wreathed with corn wreath, facing right.
Rev: Boarder of dots, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ right.
Eagle facing left,open wings,standing on a thunderbolt.
Left field monogram: PI-ALPHA
No leg control symbol
Size: 27mm;15.11gms
Ref: Svor.1384, SNG Cop. 279-87, Weiser 147.
2 commentsbrian l
Ptolemy_VI_Philometer~0.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometer/ VIII Euergetes591 viewsPtolemy VI Philometer Silver Tetradrachm
Struck under the joint reign of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII, 170-164 B.C.
Alexandria mint
26mm 13.7g 0degrees
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1489, SNG Cop. 262-268.
High relief dies.
8 commentskypros84
greek_2.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor36 viewsPtolemy VI Philometor (181-145 BC), Bronze 30mm, Cyprus, series B, head of Zeus Ammon right, with diadem and floral ornament, rev PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae on left field, monogram between the legs of the eagles, (Svornos p.226, 1383, pl.43, 10).Tanit
Ptolemy_VI_Tetrad.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor493 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265
--OLDER PHOTO--
16 commentsmihali84
Ptolemy_tetradrachm_new.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor 251 viewsSilver Tetradrachm
Alexandria mint
Struck c. 170-164 B.C.
27mm 14.2g
Obv: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt.
Svoronos 1489; SNG Copenhagen 265
--NEW PHOTO--
7 commentsmihali84
Ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor15 views186 - 145 BC

Obverse: Head of Ptolemy right.

Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunder bolt.
Pericles J2
ptvi.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor AE 30 170-163 BC84 viewsOBV; Diademed head of Zeus Ammon
REV: PTOLEMAIOY BASILIWS; Two Eagles standing left on thunderbolt with cornucopia in left field

The salt mined near the Oracle of Ammon in Egypt was known for its peculiar taste, hence we get the word "ammonia". The significance of the double eagle reverse as compared to the more typical single eagle on these bronzes is a matter of debate. Some think it refers to Ptolemy VI's joint reign with Ptolemy VIII, although his silver coins bear only one eagle. Others think it signified a denomination. Five different bronze 'double eagles' in the weight range about 5 -35 grams are attributed to Ptolemy VI although he also minted coins with a single eagle reverse.

Svoronos 1424, Sear 7900, SNG Cop. 309 (Ref. W'winds)

Diam ~30 mm, wt 27.1 gm
daverino
Ptolemy_VI.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor (180-145 B.C.)33 viewsPtolemy VI Philometor (180-145 BC). Ae 18 to 21mm. 7 to 11g. Obv: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right. Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia before.1 commentsddwau
41113_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor_and_Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes,_170_-_163_B_C__S_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, diobol, Svoronos 142610 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, F, Alexandria mint, 7.926g, 21.4mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41083_Ptolemy_VI___VIII_diobol,_Svoronos_1426.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, Diobol, Svoronos 14268 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, 170 - 163 B.C. Bronze diobol, Svoronos 1426, SNG Cop 311 - 318, Weiser 143, VF, Alexandria mint, 7.371g, 20.6mm, 0o, 170 - 163 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left, side-by-side, on thunderbolt, single cornucopia left; nice centering. The two eagles may symbolize the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and Ptolemy VIII. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
42053_Ptolemy_VI___VIII_S1424.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, obol, Svoronos 142416 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor and Ptolemy VIII, 170 - 164 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305, SGCV II 7900, F, 22.556g, 29.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolts, double cornucopia in the left field. Two eagles on the reverse may be symbolic of the joint rule of Ptolemy VI and his younger brother. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
41065_Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C_,_Cleopatra_I_Thea_as_Regent_S1384.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Tetrobol, Svoronos 138412 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1384, SNG Cop 286, Fair, Alexandria mint, 13.790g, 28.1mm, 0o, 180 - 177 B.C.; obverse head of (Cleopatra I as) Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing half left, wings open, head left, monogram left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemyVI.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Herakles/ Eagle, 25 mm, "K"18 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1376, SNG Cop 270, VF, obverse weak in places, 11.427g, 25.0mm, 315o, c. 180 - 168 B.C.; obverse Bearded head of Herakles right wearing lion's scalp; circle of dots around; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing half left, head turned back right, long transverse caduceus behind, K below; rare. The bearded Herakles obverse occurs on three different series of Ptolemaic bronzes identified by Svoronos. Our coin type has an average obol weight of 10.93 g. The style and weight connect it to the reign of Ptolemy VI. Similar issues with a transverse scepter have “EUL” between the legs of the eagle, for Eulaios an advisor to young Ptolemy VI. The K may refer to Cleopatra I, senior co-ruler between 180 and 178/7 BC, while Ptolemy VI was a young child. Alternatively, K may stand for either Komanos or Kineas, who took the advisor-roles of Eulaios and Lenaios. Diobols (Svoronos 1375) exhibit a different eagle but the same K between the legs. The relative scarcity of the K-issues suggests that they may be for Komanos or Kineas. ex FORVM

Podiceps
24845_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C__obol_svoronos_1397.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, obol, Cyprus, Svoronos 139715 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Bronze obol, Svoronos 1397; BMC Ptolemies p. 80, 18 - 19, VF, Cyprus mint, weight 13.015g, maximum diameter 24.6mm, die axis 0o, 174 - 171 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, lotus symbol before, ΕΥΛ between legs; ΕΥΛ probably refers to Eulaios, regent with Lenaios during part of the minority of Ptolemy VI. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
DSC06573.JPG
Ptolemy VI VIII Joint Reign after 169BC39 viewsObv. - Zeus Ammon, facing right
Rev. - Two Eagles facing left on thunderbolt, PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS , single cornucopia in left field.

20mm
8.1g

Svoronos 1426 (Plate 48 #14) SNGCop 316

ex. M&M Numismatics
CGPCGP
PTO.jpg
Ptolemy VI, 204-181 B.C212 viewsSilver tetradrachm, BMC-, SNG Cop -, gVF, 13.87g, 26.2mm, 40o, Salamis, Cyprus mint, 177-176 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, owl in left field, LE (regnal year 5) over SA (Salamis mint, Cyprus) in right field; superb portrait, fantastic style, extremely rare, possibly unique6 commentssalem
ptolemy_VI.jpg
Ptolemy VI, AE 24, Alexandria, Herakles9 viewsPtolemy VI, 204 - 181 B.C. AE 24, Alexandria, 8.92g. SNG Cop-289. Obv: Head of Herakles r. Rev: Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, monogram in l. field. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
4235_4236.jpg
Ptolemy VI, AE21, ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ7 viewsAE Diobol
Ptolemaic Kingdom
Egypt
Ptolemy VI
King: 180 - 164BC
Issued: 180 - 176BC
21.0 x 20.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Diademed bust of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΡΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae before.
Good Fine
SNG Cop 315; Svoronos 1426; Sear SG 7901.
CIVITAS Galleries CICF 2015
4/12/15 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
4233_4234.jpg
Ptolemy VI, Diobol, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ7 viewsAE Diobol
Greek Provincial
Ptolemaic Egypt
Ptolemy VI
Issued: 180 - 145BC
21.0mm
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus-Ammon, right.
R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑIΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ; Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae before.
SNG Cop 311cf
ECIN Associates
11/18/14 4/30/17
Nicholas Z
ptolemyIV.jpg
Ptolemy VI, Silver didrachm21 viewsPtolemy VI, 204 - 181 B.C. Silver didrachm, SNG Cop 638, Svoronos 1789 (Ptolemy V), rough F, Cyprus mint, 5.583g, 21.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Ptolemy as Dionysos right, thyrsus across shoulder; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open; rare. ex FORVM 1 commentsPodiceps
a_123.JPG
Ptolemy VIII66 viewsPtomemy VIII Euergetes 145-144 BC
Cyprus 145-144 BC

Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ;Eagle standing left at thunderbolt;lotus at left field

24.02mm 9.18gm

Svoronos 1621
1 commentsmaik
Ptolemy_VIII_Salamis.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes294 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes
Silver Tetradrachm
Struck during the sole reign of Ptolemy VIII
Salamis Mint, Cyprus
Year LA (31)= 150 B.C.
24mm, 14.1g
Obv: Diademed bust right, wearing aegis.
Rev: BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; date in left field, SA in right.
Svoronos 1463, SNG Cop. 569.
Dark toning with areas of blue iridescence
3 commentsmihali84
Ptolemy.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria mint24 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes AR Tetradrachm. Alexandria mint

Metal: AR likely low-percentage (debased) silver alloy
Diam: 25 mm.
Weight: 10.5 gr.
OBV: Laureate Head of Ptolemy I Facing right
Most Ptolemaic tetradrachms are said to depict Ptolemy I, though the style changes over time. some folks say that particular Ptolemaic rulers had their own features put onto these tetradrachm portraits but I don't know how anyone could really support that contention. One of the mysterious, but interesting, aspects of most Ptolemaic coinage is that is largely is 'fixed' over long periods of time with little that allows us to tell which coins came from which rulers by looking at the coins. This coin is later with a date that helps narrow it down, but many don't. The analysis of hoards and such is the best data we have for many types to help us try and determine which ruler(s) may have made them. The main design features are fairly 'constant' for many of the types for hundreds of years
OBV-LEGEND: Not Visible
Marks-OBV: None
REV: Standing eagle facing Left, with closed wings
REV-LEGEND : Not Visible
Marks-REV: On Left of eagle ‘s back what appears to be mint marks ( PA or πA ) and date marks on the Right in front of eagle chest (4i ?? )
It does appear to be a late era Ptolemaic Tetradrachm; the overall look is consistent with that identification
Source : Alexandria, Egypt Catacombs when was young
Age: Somewhere around that time, late 2nd C. to 1st C. BC. Mostly around 64 B.C
Mint: Alexandria ( Egypt)

Ref : Svoronos 1520 is REally Similar
http://www.wildwinds.com/coins/greece/egypt/ptolemy_VIII/t.html
Michel C2
Ptolemy_VIII_Euergetes.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II26 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes II (145-116 BC), the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, AR tetradrachm (25 mm, 14.01 g) minted in Kition, Cyprus, 138-137 BC. Obverse: diademed head right. Reverse: eagle standing left on thunderbolt, regnal year 33 over crested helmet in left field, KI in right field. References: Svoronos 1587; SNG Cop. 599.Jan
42373_Ptolemy_VIII_AE_27,_Svoronos_1493.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, AE 27, Svoronos 14938 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon), Second Reign, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze AE 27, Svoronos 1493, SNG Cop 335, Weiser 174 (Ptolemy X, c. 101 B.C.), Noeske 253, Hosking -, Fair, Alexandria mint, 16.813g, 26.1mm, 0o, obverse head of Alexander right wearing elephant-skin head-dress; reverse “ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ”, eagle with spread wings standing left on thunderbolt. Ptolemy VIII's nickname was Physcon, which means potbelly. Weiser assigns the type to Ptolemy X Alexander, presumably because Alexander would favor his namesake as a type, but notes the attribution is hypothetical. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
silphium.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C. Zeus/ two eagles & silphium plant25 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C., Bronze AE 17, SNG Copenhagen 455; Svoronos 1158 (Ptolemy IV), 6.87g, Kyrene mint, head of Zeus Ammon right with ram's horn, wearing taenia and uraeus; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΩΣ, two eagles with closed wings standing left on two thunderbolts, silphium plant in left field; The date and reign of issue for this type are uncertain. Svoronos attributed it to Ptolemy IV but noted it may `belong to a later reign.` Recent attributions span from Ptolemy VIII to Ptolemy X. Kreuzer suggests it is similar to Svoronos 1426, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
S1655.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes, Bronze 1/4 obol, Svoronos 165556 viewsPtolemy VIII Euergetes, 145 - 116 B.C. Bronze 1/4 obol, Svoronos 1655, SNG Cop 658, F/VF, Kyrene mint, 2.040g, 13.5mm, 180o, obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “[ΕΤΟΥ] ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ [ΠΤΟΛ]”, eagle standing half left with wings open, grasping fulmen in talons, “ΘΕ” left. Ex FORVMPodiceps
Ptolemy_IX_Soter_II_AR_Tetradrachm.JPG
Ptolemy X Soter II, 116-80 BC. AR Tetradrachm Paphos, Cyprus Mint, yarr 14 = 103 BC. PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. 41 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM. Ptolemy X Soter II, 116-80 BC. AR Tetradrachm. Paphos, yr. 14 (103 BC). Diademed head of Ptolemy X right wearing aegis /PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, LID on left, PA on right. _16501
Svor.1674. SNGCop.363. 13.0 gram sold
Antonivs Protti
a_125.JPG
Ptolemy XII58 viewsPtolemy XIII Auletes 81-50 BC

Obverse:Head of Zeus right
Reverse:ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ;Two eagles with closed wings standing left at thunderbolt;Isis headdress at top of monogram at left field

22.71mm 6.94gm

Svoronos 1842
maik
Ptolemy_XII_brockage.jpg
Ptolemy XII 348 viewsSilver tetradrachm, VF, partial brockage
Alexandria mint
13.384g, 25.1mm, 0o, 62 - 61 B.C.
Obverse: diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, date LK left ( year 20, L appears as I) and PA right.

Svoronos 1867 (Cleopatra VII); BMC 113, 39-40 (Ptolemaeus XI), SNG Cop-.

Ex FORVM: "Rare partial brockage. A partial brockage occurs when: 1) one coin jams in the die, 2) a second coin is struck using the first coin as a die, 3) the first coin is removed, and 4) the second coin is re-struck with the die. This is an unusual circumstance of events. Clashed dies are more common. In clashed dies, the dies are struck against each other, creating a weak design of one or each die on the other. This coin is a partial brockage, not the product of clashed dies. The depth of the intaglio image, position in relation to the cameo image, and weakness of the higher points of the cameo image support the attribution to "partial brockage.""
mihali84
nT4A8WFyreZ2p3wFEb9qo3H57Bszc6.jpg
Ptolemy XII AE23, 2 eagles, headdress of Isis. Cyprus13 viewsPtolemy XII AE23, 2 eagles, headdress of Isis. Cyprus
S#7950. _1200
Antonivs Protti
cleoptol.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes [53 BC] AR Tetradrachm24 views Svoronos 1837, SNG Cop 395. Paphos Mint, 11.9 grams

Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I with feminine features.
Reverse:Eagle standing left with thunderbolt in claws and Isis crown to left, palm branch over its right shoulder. In the left field 'LKH' (=year 28); in right field 'PA' (=Paphos)/ BASILEWE PTOLEMAIOY (of King Ptolemy)


In 54 BC, Ptolemy XII returned to Egypt from a 3-year exile and issued new Tetradrachms for the last 27-30th years of his rule. They show the crown of Isis in the eagle's claw that recognized Cleopatra as his heir and likely co-regent. The Isis crown remained the symbol of Cleo VII on her coins following Ptolemy's death in 51 BC. This pattern remained unchanged for all of Cleopatra's tetradrachms though the quality of coins became very bad owing to the huge bribes that had to be paid for Roman "protection". For a great discussion of these attributions and coin history see the link: http://www.ptolemaic.net/cleopatra/4coin-isis.htm#p5bydelay.

This coin was issued by Ptolemy XII in his 28th regnal year (53 BC) when his daughter, Cleopatra was about 15.

1 commentsdaverino
PtolCleo.jpg
Ptolemy XII or Cleopatra VII Tetradrachm102 viewsPtolemy XII (80-58 BC) or Cleopatra VII
AR Tetradrachm
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right

ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Eagle on thunderbolt left.
year (L) IH = 18 (=64-63 BC or 34-33 BC), PA to right

Listed as Alexandria mint, though the "PA" to the right suggests it was minted in Paphos, Cyprus.

SNG Cop-389

13.49g

Ex-ANE

IH is year 18 and in this context it is ambiguous - either 64BC (modern scholars like Morkholm, Noeske, etc.) or 34BC (Svoronos).

Hence this issue is either Ptolemy XII (modern interpretation) or Cleopatra VII ruling with Ptolemy XIV, Ptolemy XV or Ptolemy XVI (Svoronos interpretation).
1 commentsJay GT4
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII Silver Tetradrachm47 viewsPtolemy XII, Silver tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 14.577g, 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 58 - 57 BC, Noeske 356, Svoronos -, SNG Cop -,
OBV: diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
REV: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, LKD left (year 24), PA right; struck with a worn obverse die; scarce;

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.
Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player.
Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance.
His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsRomanorvm
ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII, tetradrachm71 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Neos Dionysos, 80 - 51 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1839; BMC 117, 35; SNG Cop 396, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, 13.683 g, 25.9 mm, 0o, 52 - 51 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I or XII? right, wearing aegis; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, date “IKQ” (year 29) and crown of Isis left, “PA ” right. Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Disposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt. Minted under Roman supervision. About 33% silver. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
8365_8366.jpg
Ptolemy, AE12, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΥΣ0 viewsAE12
Ptolemy (?)
King:
Issued:
12.0mm 1.40gr 0h
O: NO LEGEND; Head of Zeus, right.
R: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΥΣ; Eagle, standing left, wings spread.
Richard Sheryka, Christmas
12/25/18 2/12/19
Nicholas Z
Ptolemy-O.jpg
Ptolemy-O17 viewsJerome Holderman
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Ptolemy? 12.62mm, 2.16g24 viewscrawforde
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Ptolemy? 17.94mm. 2.84g29 viewscrawforde
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Ptolomy II Alexandria18 viewsPtolemy II, ca. 275-260BC, diobol, Alexandria AE-24-25, 12.72 grams Laureate Zeus and open-wing eagle with SIGMA over Galatian Shield to left of the eagle. Romanorvm
Ptolemy_II_Philadelphos~0.JPG
Ptolomy II Philadelphios24 viewsPtolemy II, ca. 2285-246 BC, diobol, Philadelphos, AE 29, 16.46 grams - type with Laureate Zeus and open-wing eagle with SIGMA over Galatian Shield to left of the eagle. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left.Romanorvm
ptolomy-svoronos_1149.jpg
Ptolomy IV - Svoronos 114920 viewsPtolemy IV
36mm, 44,78 g.
Head of Zeus Ammon right
BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, looking back, wings open; S(E??) between legs.
(Rectangle with cornucopia on the left.)
xokleng
Ptolomy_IV_Philopator~0.JPG
Ptolomy IV Philopator20 viewsPtolemy III, 36.7mm , 41.77g
Most books show this as Ptolemy IV, but things have changed based on some published modern hoard analysis research.
Svoronos 974. Today we would consider this most likely a hemidrachm - basically 1/2 the weight and size of the monster types of 80-100g,
AE 40-50.
Romanorvm
ptolomeu_XII.jpg
Ptolomy XII - Svoronos 18409 viewsPtolemy XII, Neos Dionysos,
AR Tetradrachm. (24 mm, 14.0 g.)
Alexandria mint, dated Year 30 = 52/51 BC.
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, in aegis /
BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU, eagle standing left on thunderbolt,
palm over right shoulder; date LL above headdress of Isis to left, PA to right.
xokleng
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Revolt of the Provinces, Time of Ptolemy X Soter II47 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Revolt of the Provinces, Time of Ptolemy X Soter II, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze AE 34, Svoronos 1917, obverse encrustation, 17.991g, 34.5mm, 0o, c. 86 - 84 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse barbarous imitation of “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, very crude. A large and very crude imitation of common Zeus obverse, two-eagles reverse type. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
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Rhodes, Caria. (Circa 305-275 BC)31 viewsAR Didrachm

18 mm, 6.41 g

Obverse: Helios head in three-quarter view on the right.

Reverse: POΔΙΟΝ (RODION) above and Ε-Υ to left and right of rose with bud to right; in left field, bunch of grapes.

SNG Keckman 452; R. Ashton in: Money and Its Uses in the Ancient Greek World (Oxford 2001), p. 104, 158; H. Troxell, The Norman Davis Collection, ANS 1969, #228.

This coin was minted either during or in the years following one of the most notable sieges of antiquity, when, in the midst of the Successor Wars, Demetrius Poliorcetes, son of Antigonus I, besieged Rhodes in an attempt to make it abandon its neutrality and close relationship with Ptolemy I.

The citizens of Rhodes were successful in resisting Demetrius; after one year he abandoned the siege and signed a peace agreement (304 BC) which Demetrius presented as a victory because Rhodes agreed to remain neutral in his war with Ptolemy (Egypt).

Several years later the Helepolis (Demetrius' famed siege tower), which had been abandoned, had its metal plating melted down and - along with the money from selling the remains of the siege engines and equipment left behind by Demetrius - was used to erect a statue of their sun god, Helios, now known as the Colossus of Rhodes, to commemorate their heroic resistance.
1 commentsNathan P
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ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Titus Tetradrachm341 viewsSilver tetradrachm

AYTOK TITOY KAIΣO YEΣΠAΣIANOY ΣEB
laureate head of Titus right

ΣAPAΠIΣ
bust of Serapis right, wearing taenia, modius on head ornamented with branches of laurel, date LB (year 2) right

Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 79 - 28 Aug 80 A.D
12.254g, 25.4mm

Milne 456 - 457; Geissen 319; Dattari 426; cf. BMC Alexandria p. 34, 281 (year 3); Emmett 235

Ex-Forum

This is the Wildwinds example

Ptolemy Soter, wanting to integrate Egyptian religion with that of their Hellenic rulers, promoted worship of Serapis as a deity that would win the reverence of both groups alike. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.

4 commentsJay GT4
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Roman Republic, M. Aemilius Lepidus, 61 B.C.53 viewsSilver denarius, RSC Aemilia 24, Sydenham 832, Crawford 419/2, RBW Collection -, F, rough, burnished, both sides off center, Rome mint, weight 3.435g, maximum diameter 18.0mm, die axis 180o, 61 B.C.; obverse head of Alexandria right, wearing turreted crown, ALEXANDREA below; reverse M. Lepidus, togate, standing facing, head left, crowning the young figure of Ptolemy V, standing facing, holding scepter, S·C above, TVTOR·REG downward on left, PONF·MAX· upward on right, M LEPIDVS in exergue; this is the first example of this rare type ever handled by Forum; rare;

This coin records an alleged guardianship of the moneyer's ancestor, Marcus Lepidus, over the young king of Egypt, Ptolemy V. Neither Polybius nor Livy make any mention of it. The story is likely an exaggeration, invented by the later Lepidi. In 201 B.C., Lepidus was sent to deliver the ultimatum to Philip ordering him to cease attacking his Greek neighbors, and return the Ptolemy's possessions. He was also a member of the embassy sent to Ptolemy V (and Antiochos III) to gain support should Rome and Macedonia declare war. But Lepidus was a junior member of the embassy, which included two ex-consuls, thus it is unlikely he would have been a guardian of the Ptolemaic king.

EX; FORVM Ancient Coins.

*With my sincere thank and appreciation , Photo and Description courtesy of FORVM Ancient Coins Staff.

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
1 commentsSam
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ROMAN REPUBLIC, Overstruck "Anonymous" Corn Ear AE Quadrans - Crawford 42/2var19 viewsRome, The Republic.
Corn Ear Series (No Corn Ear), 214-212 BCE.
AE Quadrans (16.76g; 29mm).

Obv: Head of Hercules right in boarskin; three pellets (mark of value = 3 unciae) behind.

Rev: Bull leaping over snake; three pellets (mark of value) above; ROMA below.

Reference: Crawford 42/2var (no corn ear): See Russo, Essays Hersh (1998) p. 141.

Provenance: ex Agora Auction 70 (21 Nov 2017) Lot 194; ex RBW Collection duplicate (not in prior sales); ex P. Vecchi Auction 6 (14 Sep 1981) Lot 245.

In "Roman Republican Coinage", Michael Crawford recognized many silver “symbol” Republican series for which there were parallel “anonymous” types omitting the symbols. This coin is an anonymous version (missing symbol) of the Corn Ear Quadrans of the Crawford 42 series, produced in Sicily. It is identical in style to the Sicilian Corn Ear coins and only misses the symbol. Roberto Russo wrote about these anonymous coins in his article “Unpublished Roman Republican Bronze Coins” (Essays Hersh, 1998), where he notes that the parallel issue of anonymous silver coins to series with symbols applies equally to the bronze coins. Andrew McCabe takes this approach much further in his article “The Anonymous Struck Bronze Coinage of the Roman Republic” (Essays Russo, 2013) in which he links many of the anonymous Republican bronzes to symbol series based on precise style considerations. The takeaway from all this is that for many of the Roman Republican symbol series of the late Second Punic War and early 2nd Century BCE, there are parallel anonymous series identifiable by style. The rationale for these parallel issues is unclear, though possibly related to (a) governmental approvals for the issue or (b) mint control of the precious metal source from which the issue was struck or (c) workshop identification.

This particular example is overstruck, showing particular evidence of the under-type on the reverse. Based on that evidence and weight of the coin, I’ve concluded the under-type a Hieron II AE Obol imitative of Ptolemy II. The edge of the reverse shows the hairline of Zeus as depicted on this Hieron II issue.
1 commentsCarausius
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Roman Republic, T.Carisius 46 BC, AR Denarius47 views3.9 g, 21 mm


This denarius was minted in Rome by Titus Carisius in 46 BC.

The obverse portrays head of Aphrodisian Sibyl Herophile right.Sibyl, a goddess of prophecy, her hair decorated with jewels and tied with bands.

The reverse depicts the Sphinx, a monster with a human head and body of a lion, which originates in Egypt. Above the head is the legend 'T.CARISIVS' referring to the moneyer. The legend below, 'III.VIR', indicates his official position.

In the 1st century BC, Rome gradually gained control of Egypt, supporting members of the Ptolemy dynasty. In the winter of 48-47 BC Caesar was in Egypt, supporting the claims, and becoming the lover, of Cleopatra. She later lived in Rome as his mistress.

Caesar seized Rome at an early stage in the Civil War with Pompey, and with it the means to mint in Rome. The designs of coins from this time generally relate to Caesar, not, as was more common before, exploits and symbols of the individual moneyers.

XLi
pixodaros.jpg
SATRAPS OF CARIA, Pixodaros.35 viewsCirca 341/0-336/5 BC. AR Didrachm (20mm, 6.94g, 12h). Pixodarus 11-47 (unlisted dies); Konuk, Identities 30; SNG Copenhagen 596-7. Obverse: Head of Apollo/Helios facing slightly right, wearing laurel wreath, drapery around neck. Reverse: Zeus Labraundos standing right. ΠIΞOΔAPO[Y] to right field. Good VF, toned, minor die rust.

Ex-CNG.

The Pixodaros Affair
Pixodaros was a satrap of Caria in south-western Asia Minor, the youngest brother of Maussolos, and a member of the Hecatomnid Dynasty who remained loyal to the Persian King. When Persia was in turmoil after the eunuch Bagoas murdered Artaxerxes III, in the midst of the confusion, Pixodaros decided in 337 B.C. to offer his eldest daughter’s hand in marriage to Phillip II’s son Arridaios as a diplomatic move. The pact was accepted. According to Plutarch, Phillip II’s wife Olympias and a number of Alexander’s friends conspired to convince Alexander that Philip intended to marry Arridaios to Pixodaros’ daughter as a prelude to giving him the Macedonian throne. Alexander felt that his father had left him out and decided to act on his own. He sent his friend, the famous tragic actor Thessalos, to Caria to tell Pixodaros that not only was Arridaios an illegitimate son of the Macedonian king but feeble-minded as well. To make sure that the marriage did not go ahead, Alexander offered to marry Pixodaros’ daughter himself. Pixodaros, of course, could not have asked for a better deal. When Philip found it out he was enraged and went to Alexander’s quarters and scolded his son for wanting to marry the daughter of a man “who was no more than the slave of a barbarian king”. The whole affair concluded with Philip canceling the Macedonian-Carian alliance and ordering Thessalos to be brought back to Macedon in chains, and exiled four of Alexander’s friends Erygius, Harpalos, Nearchos, and Ptolemy. Pixodaros died some time before the landing of Alexander in Asia Minor in 334 BC. He was succeeded by his son-in-law Orontobates, a Persian, who married the princess who was once supposed to have married Arridaios.

2 commentsJason T
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Seleucid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C., Ake, Galilee44 viewsBronze serrated AE 14, SNG Spaer 1130, S 6994, F, obverse 1/2 off center, Ake mint, 2.650g, 14.6mm, 0o, obverse radiate head right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU, veiled and draped goddess (Hera ?) standing facing, holding long sceptre or torch;
Accho or Ake was a a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter. Today it is Acre, Israel. It was at Ptolemais that the Jews met Petronius, sent to set up statues of the emperor in the Temple, and persuaded him to turn back. St Paul spent a day in Ptolemais (Acts 21:7).
cwonsidler
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Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus AR Drachm Circa 144 - 142 or 141 B.C. (Ex FORVM)81 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex.

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.

Purchased from FORVM (March 04, 2012).
2 commentsJason T
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Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312-281 BC, AR Tetradrachm - Sardis 282-281 BC 15 viewsHead of Herakles right wearing lion-skin headdress.
ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣEΛEYKOY Zeus Nikephoros seated left, EP monogram to left, AΣ beneath throne.

SC 3.3a; HGC 9, 16a; Miller & Hoover AJN 22 (2010), 41 (this coin illustrated on plate 14) dies A1/P7; Nelson "Seleucus I" Hoard (CH 10.265) 726-732 (this coin); WSM 1352 α, A1/ P7.

Seleukos’ military mint at Sardis 282-281 BC.

(25 mm, 17.12 g, 12h).

ex- Commerce "Seleucus I" Hoard (CH 10.265).

This coin was struck in 282 BC following the fall of the city of Sardis to Seleukos, during the preliminaries of the campaign that delivered the decisive victory over Lysimachos at Korupedion, in the late summer of 281 BC. Six months later Seleukos was assassinated aged seventy-seven years.

Struck from the first obverse and seventh reverse die in the series, this coin is interpreted by Miller and Hoover (The Sardes Mint under Seleucus I Nicator) to have originated from a military mint operation associated with Seleukos army. The obverse bears a striking resemblance to the last die used at Seleukeia in Pieria, to the extent that both dies were almost certainly engraved by the same hand. This led Miller and Hoover to propose that …Stylistic affinities between the first die of Sardes and the last of Seleucia in Pieria raise the possibility that the equipment and personnel of the latter may have been moved to Sardes to serve as a supplemental military mint.

The Commerce ("Seleucus I") Hoard 2005 (CH 10.265), from which the coin originates, is believed to have been a part of Seleukos’ treasury at the time he was assassinated by Ptolemy Keraunos. The hoard was found in an undisclosed location in Asia Minor. Its composition is inferred from 1,721 coins in commerce in 2005-06, although the total hoard is believed to have consisted of more than 3,000 coins. The hoard closed around 281 BC at the time of the murder of Seleukos.

References:
Miller, R. P. and O. D. Hoover. 2010. The Sardes Mint under Seleucus I Nicator. American Journal of Numismatics Second Series, 22, 25-34.
Nelson, B. R. 2010 Commerce (“Seleucus I” Hoard) 2005 (CH 10.265). In CH 10, 73-104.
CH 10 = Hoover, O., A. Meadows and U. Wartenberg, eds. 2010. Coin hoards, Volume X: Greek Hoards. New York: Royal Numismatic Society/American Numismatic Society.
n.igma
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Sicily, Syracuse. Pyrrhus (Circa 278-275 BC)18 viewsAE 23mm, 11.43 g

Obverse: Head of Heracles l., wearing lion's headdress; in r. field, cornucopiae.

Rev. Athena Promachos standing r., holding spear and shield; in l. field, thunderbolt.

SNG Copenhagen 811. Calciati 177.

Pyrrhus was king of the Greek tribe of Molossians (west coast of Greece) and later became king of Epirus. One of the greatest military commanders of the ancient world, Pyrrhus took a large army to southern Italy at the behest of the Greek colony of Tarentum in their war against Rome. With his superior cavalry, deadly phalanx, and 20 elephants, Pyrrhus defeated the Romans in a succession of battles but at great cost. After a victory at Apulia (279 BC) where Pyrrhus lost 3,500 men including many officers, he famously commented that, "If we are victorious in one more battle with the Romans, we shall be utterly ruined." It is from this semi-legendary event that the term Pyrrhic victory originates.

In 278 BC, the Greek cities in Sicily asked Pyrrhus to help drive out Carthage, which along with Rome was one of the two great powers of the Western Mediterranean. While successful, his request for manpower and money from the Sicilians for a fleet to blockade Carthage’s final stronghold was met with resistance, forcing Pyrrhus to proclaim a military dictatorship of Sicily and install military garrisons in Sicilian cities. These actions were deeply unpopular and with Sicily growing increasingly hostile to Pyrrhus, he abandoned Sicily and returned to Italy to fight another inconclusive battle against the Romans. Pyrrhus soon ended his campaign in Italy and returned to Epirus.

In 274 BC he captured the Macedonian throne in a battle against Antigonus Gonatus II. But two years later while storming the city of Argos, Pyrrhus was killed in a confused battle at night in the narrow city streets. While fighting an Argive soldier, the soldier's mother, who was watching from a rooftop, threw a tile which knocked Pyrrhus from his horse and broke part of his spine, paralyzing him. His death was assured after a soldier beheaded his motionless body.

Athena Promachos ("Athena who fights in the front line") was a colossal bronze statue of Athena. Erected around 456 BC in Athens, the Athena Promachos likely memorialized the Persian Wars. The very first specific archaistic Athena Promachos coin image was depicted on coins that were issued by Alexander the Great in 326 BC. Ten years later, the Athena Promachos appeared on coins issued by Ptolemy in Alexandria. Pyrrhus' alliance with Ptolemy (I and II) and admiration of Alexander the Great (they were second cousins) undoubtedly inspired the design of this coin with Heracles on obverse (like Alexander's coins) and Athena Promachos on the reverse.
2 commentsNathan P
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Sidon41 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGS of EGYPT. Ptolemy II Philadelphos. 285-246 BC. Æ Obol (23mm, 11.34 g). Sidon mint. Struck 256-249 BC. Laureate head of Zeus right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; double cornucopia before. Svoronos 761; Weiser 44; SNG Copenhagen -. VF, attractive black patina.

ecoli
coin184.JPG
Sidon, Ptolemy II15 viewsPtolemy II
285-246 BC
Sidon
AE 37, 43.24 g
sv-759, SNG Cop
Obv: Head of Zeus Ammon
Rx: Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, double conucopia before

Ex Don Doswell Collection
Ex HJB
ecoli
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Syracusan Imitation Ptolemaic Diobol of Hieron II ca. 265BC164 viewsPtolemy II Philadelphos - Syracuse Issue of Hieron II - Diobol - 285/246BC
AE 26.9-28.4mm : 14.736gm : 2h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field, N control letter behind eagle tail at right. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 619
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
1 commentsPtolemAE
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Syria, Koile10 viewsKoile Syria, Chalkis under mount Libanos
PTOLEMY
Ituarean Dynasty, issued under son of Mennaios (84-40 BC)

O: Bust of Artemis, r., bow and quiver over shoulder (note bowstring across ear)

R: Anepigraphic. Double cornucopia. Monograms in various positions.

Herman 8, HGC 9, 1444 (R1). gF

Thanks to FORVM member rover1.3 for his help IDing this coin!
Sosius
Titustet.jpg
Titus Tetradrachm202 viewsSilver tetradrachm

AYTOK TITOY KAIΣO YEΣΠAΣIANOY ΣEB
laureate head of Titus right

ΣAPAΠIΣ
bust of Serapis right, wearing taenia, modius on head ornamented with branches of laurel, date LB (year 2) right

Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 79 - 28 Aug 80 A.D
12.254g, 25.4mm

Milne 456 - 457; Geissen 319; Dattari 426; cf. BMC Alexandria p. 34, 281 (year 3); Emmett 235

Ex-Forum

2011 Forum Best of Type winner

This is the Wildwinds example

Ptolemy Soter, wanting to integrate Egyptian religion with that of their Hellenic rulers, by promoted worship of Serapis as a deity that would win the reverence of both groups alike. This was despite the curses of the Egyptian priests against the gods of previous foreign rulers (i.e Set who was lauded by the Hyksos). Alexander the Great had attempted to use Amun for this purpose, but Amum was more prominent in Upper Egypt, and not as popular in Lower Egypt, where the Greeks had stronger influence. The Greeks had little respect for animal-headed figures, and so an anthropomorphic statue was chosen as the idol, and proclaimed as the equivalent of the highly popular Apis. It was named Aser-hapi (i.e. Osiris-Apis), which became Serapis, and was said to be Osiris in full, rather than just his Ka (life force). Ptolemy's efforts were successful - in time Serapis was held by the Egyptians in the highest reverence above all other deities, and he was adored in Athens and other Greek cities.
7 commentsJay GT4