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Search results - "Nicomedia"
justinian_M7.JPG
138 viewsFollis, 527-537, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 29mm, 16.1g, green patina.vercingetorix
Constantine_Commemorative_1.JPG
36 viewsConstantine the Great, Commemorative, AD 330-335, Nicomedia Mint
Jon the Lecturer
Votive_Nicomedia_mintmark_web.jpg
23 viewsClose up of mintmark from different angles/lighting for coin suspected to be from NicomediaMatthew W2
Sear-653.jpg
15 viewsPhocas. 602-610. Æ Follis – 40 Nummi (32mm, 12.92 g, 6h). Thessalonica mint. Dated RY 5 (606/7). Crowned facing bust, wearing consular robes, holding mappa and cross / Large XXXX; ANNO above, Ч to right; TЄS. DOC 47; MIBE 91; SB 653. Good VF, dark brown-black patina, hint of earthen deposits, cleaning marks. Overstruck on a Nicomedia follis of Maurice Tiberius (SB 512). Quant.Geek
Maximinus_II_a_jpg.png
15 viewsMaximinus II Æ Follis. Nicomedia, struck circa AD 311.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right
/ HERCVLI VICTORI, Hercules standing right, leaning on club; * and B in left field; SMN in exergue.
RIC VI 68.

21mm, 3.92.
1 commentspaul1888
Randy.JPG
Falling horseman55 viewsAll 15 official mints.
Alexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
Barbaous Mint

Updated coins with a new background (thanks Jay!)
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
constantius84.jpg
Constantius II RIC VIII 84 Nicomedia23 viewsSilvered AE 22
Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG: pearl diademed, draped bust right.
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier spearing a fallen horseman who is bearded, wears cap, reaching backwards.
Dot SMNA gamma ex. Gamma in left field.
RIC VIII 84 Nicomedia. 21.81 mm., 4.8 g.
sold 4-2018
NORMAN K
Galerius_RIC_VI_Nicomedia_54a_66a.jpg
4 Galerius34 viewsGALERIUS
AE Folles, Nicomedia Mint, 307-308 / 310-311

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG, bust l. / GENIO AV-GVSTI CM[H], Genius standing left holding patera and, cornucopiae, SMN delta in ex

RIC VI Nicomedia 54a/66a (identical)

Sosius
RIC_VI_Nicomedia_55.jpg
6 Maximinus II23 viewsMAXIMINUS II
AE Follis, Nicomedia, 307-308 AD

GAL VAL MAXIMINVS NOB CAES, bust l. / GENIO CA-ESARIS CM[H], Genius with patera and cornucopia, SMN gamma in ex.

RIC VI Nicomedia 55
Sosius
Licinius_Unid_2.jpg
8 Licinius42 viewsLICINIUS I
AE Follis, Nicomedia, 313-317 AD

IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG, Laureate bust r. / IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and sceptre, eagle with wreath to left, A in r. field, SMN in ex.

RIC VII Nicomedia 13, VF/EF, silvered. R1.
Sosius
constantiusII49.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RIC VIII 4915 viewsConstantius II, AE 4. 347-348 CE.
Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed bust right.
Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX within wreath.
Mintmark SMND, Nicomedia13.2 mm, 1.4 g.
NORMAN K
lic171.jpg
Licinius I AE Follis, RIC 13 Nicomedia, 313-317 CE18 views
Obverse: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and eagle-tipped sceptre; eagle with wreath at foot left.
Officina letter B in right field.
Mintmark SMNT. Nicomedia 23.2 mm., 2.8 g.
NORMAN K
bith_2_blk.jpg
(0222) SEVERUS ALEXANDER33 views222 - 235 AD
AE 21.5 mm, 3.84 g
O: M AVP CEV ALEXANDROC AV, laureate head right
R: NIKOMHDEWN DIC NEW/K, aquila between two miliary standards. SNGCop 577v (bust radiate). SNGCop 57
Nicomedia, Bithynia
laney
maximus_caesar_b.jpg
(0235) MAXIMUS CAESAR20 views235 - 238 AD
AE27 mm max., 7.33 g
O: G IOV OVHP MAZIMOC KAICA, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: NIKOMEDEWN DIC NEWKORWN, Serapis standing left with raised hand and leaning on sceptre
Bithynia, Nicomedia; Recuiel General 347 v.
laney
LICINIUS_I_IOVI_CAP_EAG_VIC_.jpg
(0308) LICINIUS I30 views308 - 324 AD
AE 20.5 mm 2.85 g
O: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG, rad dr cuir bust right
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe, seated captive at feet on right, eagle with wreath at left, X/IIGdamma in right field,
SMNA in exe
Nicomedia
RIC VII 44
laney
MAXIMINUS.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA27 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 309 - 313 AD
AE 21.5 mm 4.04 g
O: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
LAUR HEAD R
R: GENIO AVGVSTI
GENIUS STANDING L POURING FROM PATERS, HOLDING CORNUCOPIAE, EAGLE AT FEET, GAMMA IN R FIELD
SMNA IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
laney
max_ii_gen_1_res.jpg
(0309) MAXIMINUS II DAIA13 viewsCaesar 305-308; Filius Augustorum 308-309; Augustus 309-313 AD.
struck 305-308 AD
AE 23.5 mm 4.86 g
O: GAL VAL MIXIMINVS NOB CAES , Laureate bust right REVERSE: GENIO CAESARIS , Genius standing left holding patera and cornucopiae; SMNA in exe.
Nicomedia mint
laney
crispus_0702.jpg
(0317) CRISPUS33 views317 - 326 AD
AE 18 mm 3.84 g
O: DN FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES, laureate, cuirassed bust right
R: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe & leaning on scepter; pellet over Gamma in right field, palm branch in left field
SMN in exe. Nicomedia
RIC VII 32 (R2)
laney
LICINIUS_II_JUPITER.jpg
(0317) LICINIUS II43 views317 - 320 AD
AE 18 mm 2.60 g
O: D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
R: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe & scepter, branch left, dot over B right
SMN in ex.
Nicomedia RIC 34 (R2)
1 commentslaney
licin_ii_prov_res.jpg
(0317) LICINIUS II34 views317 - 324 AD (Caesar)
AE 19.1 mm 2.78 g
O D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, scepter in left, Victory on globe presenting wreath in right, palm frond left, pellet over Δ right, SMN in ex;
Nicomedia mint; RIC VII 34; scarce
(ex-Forum)
laney
csts2fel.jpg
(0337) CONSTANTIUS II14 views337 - 361 AD
AE 17.5 mm; 1.92 g
O: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed cuirassed bust right
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen Phyrgian horseman who is reaching back' SMNG in exe.
Nicomedia mint
laney
c_gallus_horse_smna.jpg
(0351) CONSTANTIUS GALLUS18 views351 - 354 AD
AE17 X 19 mm; 4.00 g
Obv: DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CEAS Bareheaded, draped and cuirassed bust of emperor, right.
Rev: FEL TEMP RE PARATIO Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm , spearing falling horseman; SMNA in exe.
Nicomedia mint
laney
gratian_vot_res.jpg
(0367) GRATIAN14 views367 - 383 AD
struck 378 - 383 AD (2nd Officina)
AE nummus 13.5 mm; 0.96 g
O: DN GRATIANVS PF AVG diademed draped bust right
R: VOT XX MVLT XXX in three lines within wreath; SMNB in exe.
Nicomedia mint; RIC 39a; scarce
laney
gratian_virt_res.jpg
(0367) GRATIAN--VIRTVS26 views367 - 383 AD
AE 18.5 mm 2.89 g
O: D N GRATIANVS P F AVG, DIADEMED DRAPED BUST RIGHT
R: VIRTVS ROMANORVM, ROMA SEATED FACING, HEAD LEFT, HOLDING GLOBE & SCEPTER
SMNA IN EXE.
NICOMEDIA
RIC IX 33 (RARE)
laney
val_salus_res.jpg
(0375) VALENTINIAN II23 views375 - 392 AD
AE 11.5 mm; 1.24 g
O: [D N VALEN]TINIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right;
R: SALVS REI-P[VBLICAE], Victory walking left, trophy over shoulder and, dragging captive behind her; Chi-Rho in left field
SM--? in exe; Cyzicus or Nicomedia mint
laney
valentinian_ii_b.jpg
(0375) VALENTINIAN II--GLORIA (GALLEY)76 views370 - 392 AD
AE 23 mm 5.37 g
O: DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG
DIAD DR CUIR BUST R IN CRESTED HELMET, HOLDING SPEAR & SHIELD
R: GLORIA ROMANORVM
EMPEROR STANDING L ON PRO OF GALLEY BEING STEERED BY VICTORY, DOT IN L FIELD
SMNB IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
RIC IX Nicomedia 25b-5

3 commentslaney
arcadius.jpg
(0383) ARCADIUS44 views383 - 408 AD
Struck 383 - 388 AD
AE 23 mm 4.71 g
O: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG
DIAD DR CUIR BUST R HOLDING SPEAR, CROWNED BY HAND OF GOD ABOVE
R: GLORIA ROMANORVM
ARCADIUS STANDING FACING, HEAD L, HOLDING CHI-RHO STANDARD & SHIELED, CAPTIVE TO LEFT
SMNB IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
laney
honorius.jpg
(0393) HONORIUS36 views393 - 423 AD
AE 22 mm 4.74 g
O: DN HONORIVS PF AVG
DIAD DR CUIR BUST R
R: HONORIUS STANDING HLDING LABARUM AND GLOBE
NICOMEDIA
laney
BYZ.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I48 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis
O: Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
R: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, XX/VI to right, NI below
Nicomedia
laney
justinian_i_(3).jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I26 views527 - 565 AD
AE DECANUMMIUM 16.5 mm 4.02 g
O: DIAD DR CUIR BUST R
R: LARGE I, CROSS ON EACH SIDE, NIK IN EXE
NICOMEDIA
SEAR 204
(EB)
laney
justinian_i_half_follis_b.jpg
(0527) JUSTINIAN I19 views527-565 AD
Æ Half Follis
O: Helmeted and cuirassed facing bust, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
R: Large K, ANNO to left, cross above, XX/VI to right, NI below
Nicomedia
laney
justinian_half_follis_8.jpg
(0527)JUSTINIAN I25 views527 - 565 AD
AE Half Follis 23.5 mm 7.16 g
O: Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: Long cross dividing N/I to left OF LARGE K, B TO RIGHT
SEAR SB 202, Nicomedia
laney
Constantine_I.jpg
*SOLD*31 viewsConstantine the Great AE3

Attribution: RIC VII 153, Nicomedia
Date: AD 328-329
Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG; head r. w/ pearl diadem
Reverse: RPVIDEN-TIAE AVGG; camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above
Size: 18.54 mm
Weight: 3.1 grams
Noah
Constantius_II.jpg
*SOLD*80 viewsConstantius II AE2

Attribution: RIC VIII 67, Nicomedia
Date: AD 348-351
Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped,
cuirassed bust l., holding globe
Reverse: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor standing l., holding labarum in r. hand,
resting l. hand on shield; two bound captives kneeling before him, SMNA in exergue
Size: 21 mm
Weight: 4.04 grams
6 commentsNoah
coins157.JPG
001. VRBS Roma Nicomedia11 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 195 R1
ecoli
coins150.JPG
001. VRBS ROMA Nicomedia R411 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 205 R4

VRBS ROMA Mule
ecoli
w9~0.JPG
002. Constantine II GLORIA EXERCITVS Nicomedia26 viewsRIC VIII Nicomedia 5
ecoli
coins90.JPG
002. CONSTANTINOPOLIS Nicomedia 9 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 196 R4
ecoli
coin51~0.JPG
002. CONSTANTINOPOLIS Nicomedia 15 viewsCONSTAN-TINOPOLI

RIC VII Nicomedia 196
ecoli
ss9~0.JPG
004. Constantius II Nicomedia FEL TEMP16 viewsNicomedia 104 C3
ecoli
coin248~0.JPG
004. CONSTANTIUS II Nicomedia Fel Temp9 viewsNicomedia 104 C3
ecoli
a80.JPG
004. Constantius II Nicomedia Vota27 viewsConstantius II
FL IVL CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
VOT XX MVLT XXX
dot SMN theta dot
RIC VIII Nicomedia 55

ecoli
Constantius_cent.jpg
008 - Constantius II (augustus 347-355 AD), AE2 - RIC 7133 viewsObv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl-diadem, draped and ciurassed bust left, globe in hand.
Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, emperor in military dress, standing left, holding standard with chi-rho on banner, left hand on chield. Two kneeling captives at feet, leaning to left. Star in field.

Minted in Nicomedia (SMNgamma), officina 3.
pierre_p77
Theodosius_ae2.jpg
012 - Theodosius I (379-395 AD), AE 2 - RIC 46a43 viewsObv: DN THEODO-SIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing, facing, head right, holding standard and globe.
Minted in Nicomedia (SMNA in exe), first officina, 15 may 392 - 17 jan. 395 AD.
pierre_p77
049_Septimius-Severus_AE-26-Bithynia,_Nicomedia,_AVK-L-CE_T-CEVHPOC-laur_head-right_NIKOMH-_E_N-_IC-NE_KO-P_N-_ctastyle-temple-with-Counterm_BMC-41_Q-001_26-27mm_11,37gx-s.jpg
049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, BMC-41, AE-26, Temple,61 views049p Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, BMC-41, AE-26, Temple,
avers:- AVK-L-CEΠT-CEVHPOC, Radiate head right.
revers:- NIKOMH-ΔEΩN-ΔIC-NEΩKO-PΩN, Ο Ctastyle temple with Countermark.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26-27mm, weight:11,37g, axis:1h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: ?? , ref: BMC-41,
Q-001
quadrans
06-Constantine-Nic-57.jpg
06. Constantine: Nicomedia.57 viewsAE 4, 347 - 348, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG / Veiled bust of Constantine.
Reverse: VN MR / Constantine standing, veiled.
Mint mark: SMNI .
.96 gm., 14 mm.
RIC #57; LRBC #1155; Sear #17469.

VN MR stands for Venerabilis Memoria (Revered Memory).
RIC dates this coin 347 - 348, which was the 10'th anniversary of Constantine's death. LRBC, however, dates it to 341 - 346.

Callimachus
063.jpg
060 LICINIUS I5 viewsEMPEROR: Licinius I
DENOMINATION: AE follis
OBVERSE: AD 317-320. IMP LICI-NIVS AVG, laureate bust left in consular robe, holding globe, sceptre and mappa
REVERSE: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and eagle-tipped sceptre. Palm branch angled, Z in right field
EXERGUE: SMN
DATE: 317-320 AD
MINT: Nicomedia
WEIGHT: 3.17 g
RIC: RIC VII Nicomedia 24
Barnaba6
062_Severus-Alexander_AE-22_M-AYP-_________C-K______-__N_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
062p Severus Alexander (222-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-22, NI-KO/MH−ΔЄ/Ω−N/ΔIC NЄΩ/K, Octastyle temple,63 views062p Severus Alexander (222-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-22, NI-KO/MH−ΔЄ/Ω−N/ΔIC NЄΩ/K, Octastyle temple,
avers:- M-AYP-ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟC-K, Laureate head right.
revers:- ΝΙ−ΚΟ / ΜΗ−ΔЄ / Ω−Ν / ΔΙC ΝЄΩ / Κ, octastyle temple set on two-tiered base, pellet in pediment.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22mm, weight: 9,07g, axis: 5h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: 222-235 A.D., ref: ,
Q-001
quadrans
064_Julia_Mamaea_(_-235_A_D_),_AE-19,_Nikomedeia_in_Bithynia,_NIKOMH___N-_IC-N__K,_Astakos_,_Not_listed__Q-001_7h_19mm_3,47g-s.jpg
064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,62 views064p Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), Bithynia, Nicomedia, AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
avers:- IOVΛIA-MAMAIA-AVG,
revers:- NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,47g, axis: 7h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: ??? A.D., ref: Not listed ???,
Q-001
quadrans
LarryW1906.jpg
0658 Focas, 602-61042 viewsBronze follis, 32.24mm, 11.51g, gVF
Struck 603-604 at Nicomedia
d m [FOCA - PE]R AVG, bust facing wearing consular robes and crown with cross on circlet, mappa in right, eagle tipped scepter in left / XXXX, ANNO above, II right, NIKO A in exg
Certificate of Authenticity by David R. Sear, ACCS
Ex: Forvm Ancient Coins; Harlan Berk
Unpublished with this date: year 2. cf. Sear 658 (years 3 and 4)
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1909.jpg
0659 Focas, 602-61029 viewsÆ follis, 31.6mm, 11.1g, aF
Struck 606-607 at Nicomedia
DM FOCA PER AVG, bust of facing, wearing crown with pendilia and consular robes, and holding mappa and cross / [X]XXX with ANNO above, regnal year II at right, NIKO A in exg. Overstrike, apparently on follis of Maurice Tiberius
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 659; MIB 69b
Lawrence Woolslayer
LarryW1910.jpg
0661 Focas, 602-61034 viewsÆ half follis, 23.4mm, 5.18g, Fair
Struck 602-603 at Nicomedia
Phocas and Leontia standing facing, with Phocas holding globus cruciger and Leontia, nimbate, holding cruciform sceptre, a cross between their heads / XX, cross above and NIKO B in exg. Scarce early issue, dark brown patina. Polished.
Ex: Glenn W. Woods
Sear 661; MIB 71
Lawrence Woolslayer
07e-Constantine-Sis-200b.jpg
07e. Constantine as Filius Augustorum: Siscia follis.29 viewsFollis, 309 - 310, Siscia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS FIL AVGG / Laureate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI / Genius standing, chlamys over left shoulder, pouring liquid from patera, and holding cornucopiae. Crescent in left field; A in right field.
Mint mark: SIS
6.14 gm., 24 mm.
RIC #200b; PBCC #786; Sear #15581.

The obverse legend shows Constantine as "Filius Augustorum" -- an empty title granted him after the conference at Carnuntum in November 308. Coins with this title were issued for a short time at 5 mints under the control of Galerius (Siscia, Thessalonica, Nicomedia, Antioch, Alexandria). This title was not recognized in the area under the control of Constantine himself, nor in Italy which was under the control of Maxentius.
Callimachus
IMG_2655.JPG
09 Constantius Gallus43 viewsConstantius Gallus
DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
soldier standing left, spearing a fallen horseman,
hair straight up, no beard, reaching (hair type not in RIC)
SMN[?]

Nicomedia 97 var
C
ex DS
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ciisn.jpg
09 Constantius II66 viewsConstantius II, 22 May 337 - 3 November 361 A.D.
Bronze AE 2, D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse FEL TEMPRE-PARATIO, Star in left, soldier spearing Horseman, no beard, Phrygian helmet, clutching, SMNA in ex Nicomedia 63, R
Better Photo
Randygeki(h2)
IMG_3947.jpg
09 Constantius II51 viewsConstantius II
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing falling horseman, no beard Phrygian helmet, reaching
SMNS in ex, gamma left
Nicomedia 84
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
IMG_4128.jpg
09 Constantius II54 viewsConstantius II
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
Soldier spearing falling horseman, Phrygian helmet, reaching
dot SMN gamma in ex, gamma left
Nicomedia 84
5 commentsRandygeki(h2)
454_P_Hadrian.jpg
0968 Hadrian, Cistophorus BITHYNIA Koinon of Bithynia mint, Octastyle temple49 viewsReference.
RPC III, 968; RIC II 461b; Metcalf, Cistophori, type B1; RSC 240b; Pinder 100

Issue Reverse legend includes COM BIT

Obv. IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG P P
Laureate head right

Rev. COM - BIT (in field), ROM S P AVG (in entablature)
Octastyle temple on podium of three steps

10.52 gr
27 mm
6 h

Note.

The temple depicted is that of Roma and Augustus erected by the koinon of Bithynia at Nicomedia, of which no archaeological remains have been discovered.

Cistophori were produced in the name of the Commune Bithyniae only once, under Hadrian. The inscription on the frieze, reconstructed as ROM(ae) S(enatui) P(opulo) AVG(usto) and translated as "To Rome, the Senate, the People, and Augustus" tentatively identifies the building as a temple of Rome and Augustus at Nicomedia. No archaeological remains of this structure have as yet been found, and reconstructions of it are based entirely on the second century numismatic evidence. Both Tacitus and Dio Cassius report that in 19 BC Augustus did authorize the construction of a temple to Rome and himself at Pergamum, an event commemorated on his cistophori there. No such evidence for a temple at Nicomedia occurs earlier than this cistophorus.
1 commentsokidoki
rjb_con_1108_11_05.jpg
1108 Nicomedia39 viewsLRBC I 1108
RIC VII 153
1 commentsmauseus
111-Constantine-19.JPG
111-Constantine The Great-19-S48 viewsAE Follis, 313-317 AD , Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing holding Victory on globe and sceptre. Eagle at feet with wreath in beak, S right.
SMN in exergue.
19mm, 3.3gm.
RIC12
jdholds
114- Constantine-22.JPG
114- Constantine The Great -22-S46 viewsAE Follis, 313-317 AD , Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing holding Victory on globe and sceptre. Eagle at feet with wreath in beak, Z right.
SMN in exergue.
21mm, 3.1gm.
RIC12
jdholds
12-Constans-Nic-059.jpg
12. Constans / Wreath.31 viewsAE 4, 347 - 348, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: DN CONSTANS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Constans.
Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX in wreath.
Mint mark: SMNΔ.
1.08 gm., 14 mm.
RIC #59; LRBC #1157; Sear #18643.
Callimachus
DiocleAnt.jpg
1301a, Diocletian, 284-305 A.D. (Antioch)86 viewsDIOCLETIAN (284 – 305 AD) AE Antoninianus, 293-95 AD, RIC V 322, Cohen 34. 20.70 mm/3.1 gm, aVF, Antioch. Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Radiate bust right, draped & cuirassed; Reverse: CONCORDIA MILITVM, Jupiter presents Victory on a globe to Diocletian, I/XXI. Early Diocletian with dusty earthen green patina.


De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

1 commentsCleisthenes
DicletianConcordCyz.jpg
1301b, Diocletian, 20 November 284 - 1 March 305 A.D.56 viewsDiocletian. RIC V Part II Cyzicus 256 var. Not listed with pellet in exegrue
Item ref: RI141f. VF. Minted in Cyzicus (B in centre field, XXI dot in exegrue)Obverse:- IMP CC VAL DIOCLETIANVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Reverse:- CONCORDIA MILITVM, Diocletian standing right, holding parazonium, receiving Victory from Jupiter standing left with scepter.
A post reform radiate of Diocletian. Ex Maridvnvm.

De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Diocletian ( 284-305 A.D.)

Ralph W. Mathisen
University of South Carolina


Summary and Introduction
The Emperor Gaius Aurelius Valerius Diocletianus (A.D. 284-305) put an end to the disastrous phase of Roman history known as the "Military Anarchy" or the "Imperial Crisis" (235-284). He established an obvious military despotism and was responsible for laying the groundwork for the second phase of the Roman Empire, which is known variously as the "Dominate," the "Tetrarchy," the "Later Roman Empire," or the "Byzantine Empire." His reforms ensured the continuity of the Roman Empire in the east for more than a thousand years.

Diocletian's Early Life and Reign
Diocletian was born ca. 236/237 on the Dalmatian coast, perhaps at Salona. He was of very humble birth, and was originally named Diocles. He would have received little education beyond an elementary literacy and he was apparently deeply imbued with religious piety He had a wife Prisca and a daughter Valeria, both of whom reputedly were Christians. During Diocletian's early life, the Roman empire was in the midst of turmoil. In the early years of the third century, emperors increasingly insecure on their thrones had granted inflationary pay raises to the soldiers. The only meaningful income the soldiers now received was in the form of gold donatives granted by newly acclaimed emperors. Beginning in 235, armies throughout the empire began to set up their generals as rival emperors. The resultant civil wars opened up the empire to invasion in both the north, by the Franks, Alamanni, and Goths, and the east, by the Sassanid Persians. Another reason for the unrest in the army was the great gap between the social background of the common soldiers and the officer corps.

Diocletian sought his fortune in the army. He showed himself to be a shrewd, able, and ambitious individual. He is first attested as "Duke of Moesia" (an area on the banks of the lower Danube River), with responsibility for border defense. He was a prudent and methodical officer, a seeker of victory rather than glory. In 282, the legions of the upper Danube proclaimed the praetorian prefect Carus as emperor. Diocletian found favor under the new emperor, and was promoted to Count of the Domestics, the commander of the cavalry arm of the imperial bodyguard. In 283 he was granted the honor of a consulate.

In 284, in the midst of a campaign against the Persians, Carus was killed, struck by a bolt of lightning which one writer noted might have been forged in a legionary armory. This left the empire in the hands of his two young sons, Numerian in the east and Carinus in the west. Soon thereafter, Numerian died under mysterious circumstances near Nicomedia, and Diocletian was acclaimed emperor in his place. At this time he changed his name from Diocles to Diocletian. In 285 Carinus was killed in a battle near Belgrade, and Diocletian gained control of the entire empire.

Diocletian's Administrative and Military Reforms
As emperor, Diocletian was faced with many problems. His most immediate concerns were to bring the mutinous and increasingly barbarized Roman armies back under control and to make the frontiers once again secure from invasion. His long-term goals were to restore effective government and economic prosperity to the empire. Diocletian concluded that stern measures were necessary if these problems were to be solved. He felt that it was the responsibility of the imperial government to take whatever steps were necessary, no matter how harsh or innovative, to bring the empire back under control.

Diocletian was able to bring the army back under control by making several changes. He subdivided the roughly fifty existing provinces into approximately one hundred. The provinces also were apportioned among twelve "dioceses," each under a "vicar," and later also among four "prefectures," each under a "praetorian prefect." As a result, the imperial bureaucracy became increasingly bloated. He institutionalized the policy of separating civil and military careers. He divided the army itself into so-called "border troops," actually an ineffective citizen militia, and "palace troops," the real field army, which often was led by the emperor in person.

Following the precedent of Aurelian (A.D.270-275), Diocletian transformed the emperorship into an out-and-out oriental monarchy. Access to him became restricted; he now was addressed not as First Citizen (Princeps) or the soldierly general (Imperator), but as Lord and Master (Dominus Noster) . Those in audience were required to prostrate themselves on the ground before him.

Diocletian also concluded that the empire was too large and complex to be ruled by only a single emperor. Therefore, in order to provide an imperial presence throughout the empire, he introduced the "Tetrarchy," or "Rule by Four." In 285, he named his lieutenant Maximianus "Caesar," and assigned him the western half of the empire. This practice began the process which would culminate with the de facto split of the empire in 395. Both Diocletian and Maximianus adopted divine attributes. Diocletian was identified with Jupiter and Maximianus with Hercules. In 286, Diocletian promoted Maximianus to the rank of Augustus, "Senior Emperor," and in 293 he appointed two new Caesars, Constantius (the father of Constantine I ), who was given Gaul and Britain in the west, and Galerius, who was assigned the Balkans in the east.

By instituting his Tetrarchy, Diocletian also hoped to solve another problem. In the Augustan Principate, there had been no constitutional method for choosing new emperors. According to Diocletian's plan, the successor of each Augustus would be the respective Caesar, who then would name a new Caesar. Initially, the Tetrarchy operated smoothly and effectively.

Once the army was under control, Diocletian could turn his attention to other problems. The borders were restored and strengthened. In the early years of his reign, Diocletian and his subordinates were able to defeat foreign enemies such as Alamanni, Sarmatians, Saracens, Franks, and Persians, and to put down rebellions in Britain and Egypt. The easter frontier was actually expanded.

.
Diocletian's Economic Reforms
Another problem was the economy, which was in an especially sorry state. The coinage had become so debased as to be virtually worthless. Diocletian's attempt to reissue good gold and silver coins failed because there simply was not enough gold and silver available to restore confidence in the currency. A "Maximum Price Edict" issued in 301, intended to curb inflation, served only to drive goods onto the black market. Diocletian finally accepted the ruin of the money economy and revised the tax system so that it was based on payments in kind . The soldiers too came to be paid in kind.

In order to assure the long term survival of the empire, Diocletian identified certain occupations which he felt would have to be performed. These were known as the "compulsory services." They included such occupations as soldiers, bakers, members of town councils, and tenant farmers. These functions became hereditary, and those engaging in them were inhibited from changing their careers. The repetitious nature of these laws, however, suggests that they were not widely obeyed. Diocletian also expanded the policy of third-century emperors of restricting the entry of senators into high-ranking governmental posts, especially military ones.

Diocletian attempted to use the state religion as a unifying element. Encouraged by the Caesar Galerius, Diocletian in 303 issued a series of four increasingly harsh decrees designed to compel Christians to take part in the imperial cult, the traditional means by which allegiance was pledged to the empire. This began the so-called "Great Persecution."

Diocletian's Resignation and Death
On 1 May 305, wearied by his twenty years in office, and determined to implement his method for the imperial succession, Diocletian abdicated. He compelled his co-regent Maximianus to do the same. Constantius and Galerius then became the new Augusti, and two new Caesars were selected, Maximinus (305-313) in the east and Severus (305- 307) in the west. Diocletian then retired to his palace at Split on the Croatian coast. In 308 he declined an offer to resume the purple, and the aged ex-emperor died at Split on 3 December 316.

Copyright (C) 1996, Ralph W. Mathisen, University of South Carolina
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
Constantius1_silvered_follis.jpg
1304a, Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.47 viewsSilvered follis, RIC 20a, S 3671, VM 25, gVF, Heraclea mint, 10.144g, 27.7mm, 180o, 297 - 298 A.D. Obverse: FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; Reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, cornucopia in left, pouring liquor from patera, HTD in exergue; some silvering, nice portrait, well centered.



De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families

Constantius I Chlorus (305-306 A.D.)

Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Salve Regina University

Constantius' Early Life and Marriage

Born March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

Constantius' Reign as Caesar

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius.. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

Constantius as Augustus and His Untimely Death

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son (Constantine I, known to history as “The Great”) at his side.

Copyright (C) 1996, Michael DiMaio, Jr.
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Licinius-II__AE-Follis-Sivered_DN-VAL-LICIN-LICINIVS-NOB-C-(6d,B4)_PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAESS_palm-dot-A_SMN_RIC-VII-34-p-605_Nicomedia_317-320-AD_R2_Q-001_0h_18-19mm_3,03g-s.jpg
133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 034, palm/•/A//SMN, AE-3 Follis, PROVIDENTIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, R2!!87 views133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 034, palm/•/A//SMN, AE-3 Follis, PROVIDENTIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, R2!!
avers:- D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, (6d, B4), Laureate, draped bust right.
revers:- PROVIDEN TIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter; palm in left down and • over A in right in field.
exergo: palm/•/A//SMN, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 3,03g, axis: 0h,
mint: Nicomedia, 1st. off., date: 317-320 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-34, p-605, R2!!,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Licinius-II__AE-Follis-Sivered_DN-VAL-LICIN-LICINIVS-NOB-C-6d-B4_PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAESS-palm-dot-B_SMN_RIC-34-p605-R1_Nicomedia_317-320-AD__Q-001_axis-6h_18-20mm_2,56ga-s.jpg
133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 034, palm/•/B//SMN, AE-3 Follis, PROVIDENTIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, R1!65 views133 Licinius II. (317-324 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 034, palm/•/B//SMN, AE-3 Follis, PROVIDENTIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, R1!
avers:- D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, 6d, B4, Laureate, draped bust right.
revers:- PROVIDENTIAE CAES S, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and scepter; palm in left down and • over B in right in field.
exergo: palm/•/B//SMN, diameter: 19mm, weight: 2,56g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, 2nd. off., date: 317-320 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-34, p605, R1!,
Q-001
quadrans
136_Constantinus_I_,_Nicomedia,_RIC_VI_71c,_AE-Follis,_IMP_C_FL_VAL_CONSTANTINVS_P_F_AVG,_GENIO_AVGVSTI,_-B_SMN,_312_AD,_S_Q-001,_0h,_21,5-22,7mm,_6,06g-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VI 071c, AE-Follis, -/B//SMN, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, Scarce!116 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VI 071c, AE-Follis, -/B//SMN, GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, Scarce!
avers: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, holding patera over altar and cornucopiae, B right.
exergue: -/B//SMN, diameter: 21,5-22,7mm, weight: 6,06g, axis: 0h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 312 A.D., ref: RIC VI 71c, Scarce!
Q-001
quadrans
136_Constantinus_I__Nicomedia_RIC_VII_188D,_AE-Follis,_CONSTANTI_NVS_MAX_AVG,_GLOR_IA_EXERC_ITVS,_SMND,_330-35_AD,_Q-001,_11h,_17,5m,_2,48gx-s.jpg
136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 188Δ, AE-Follis, -/-//SMNΔ, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, #160 views136 Constantinus I. (306-309 A.D. Caesar, 309-910 A.D. Filius Augustorum, 307-337 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 188Δ, AE-Follis, -/-//SMNΔ, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, #1
avers: CONSTANTI NVS MAX AVG, Laurel and rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: GLOR IA EXERC ITVS, Two soldiers helmeted, standing facing one another, reversed spear in outer hands, inner hands on shields resting on the ground, between the two standards.
exergue: -/-//SMNΔ, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 2,48g, axis: 11h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 330-335 A.D., ref: RIC VII 188Δ,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Urbs-Roma_AE-18_VRBS-ROMA_SMN-Gamma_three-dotsRIC-VII-195-p634_Q-005_axis-11h_17-18mm_2,57g-s.jpg
137 Commemorative, (330-335 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 195, AE-3, -/-//SMNΓ, She-wolf left, R1, #1,119 views137 Commemorative, (330-335 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 195, AE-3, -/-//SMNΓ, She-wolf left, R1, #1,
avers: VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left.
reverse: She-wolf and twins, 2 stars above with three dots vertically placed between them.
exergue: -/-//SMNΓ, diameter: 17,0-18,0 mm, weight: 2,57 g, axis: 11 h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 330-335 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-195, p634, R1!,
Q-001
quadrans
City_Commemorative,_Nicomedia,_RIC_VII_195,_AE-3,_VRBS_ROMA,_SMNS,_Sear_16521,_330-335_AD,_Q-001,_11h,_16-16,5mm,_2,39g-s.jpg
137 Commemorative, (330-335 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 195, AE-3, -/-//SMNS, She-wolf left, #1,144 views137 Commemorative, (330-335 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 195, AE-3, -/-//SMNS, She-wolf left, #1,
avers: VRBS ROMA, Helmeted bust of Roma left.
reverse: She-wolf and twins, 2 stars above with three dots vertically placed between them.
exergue: -/-//SMNS, diameter: 16,0-16,5 mm, weight: 2,39 g, axis: 11 h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 330-335 A.D., ref: RIC VII 195, Sear 16521,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
rjb_pius2_06_09.jpg
13821 views23 views
Antoninus Pius 138-61 AD
AE 18 mm
Nicomedia in Bithynia
Rev Demeter standing left
BMC 13
1 commentsmauseus
Helena_FL-HELENA-AVGVSTA_SECVRITAS-REIPVBLICA_SMNDelta_RIC-VII-95-p-615-12-E10_R4_Nicomedia_324-25-AD_Q-001_5h_19mm_3,22ga-s.jpg
139 Helena (? -329 A.D.), AE-3 Follis, Heraclea, RIC VII 079, -/-//SMHΔ, SECVRITAS REIPVBLICA, Securitas standing left, R3!!!,62 views139 Helena (? -329 A.D.), AE-3 Follis, Heraclea, RIC VII 079, -/-//SMHΔ, SECVRITAS REIPVBLICA, Securitas standing left, R3!!!,
avers:- FL HELENA AVGVSTA, 12,E10, Diademed, draped bust right.
revers:- SECVRITAS REIPVBLICA, Securitas standing left, lowering branch with left hand, raising robe with the right hand.
exergo: -/-//SMHΔ, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,22g, axis: 5h,
mint: Heraclea, date: 324-25 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-79, p-551,
Q-001
quadrans
St.Helena.jpg
1401a, St. Helena, Augusta 8 November 324 - 328 to 330 A.D., mother of Constantine the Great95 viewsBronze AE 3, RIC 148, VF, Alexandria mint, 3.243g, 19.4mm, 165o, 327 - 328 A.D. Obverse: FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and mantled bust right wearing double necklace; Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas holding branch downward in right and lifting fold of robe in left, wreath left, I right, SMAL in exergue; rare.

The mother of Constantine the Great, born about the middle of the third century, possibly in Drepanum (later known as Helenopolis) on the Nicomedian Gulf; died about 330. She was of humble parentage; St. Ambrose, in his "Oratio de obitu Theodosii", referred to her as a stabularia, or inn-keeper. Nevertheless, she became the lawful wife of Constantius Chlorus. Her first and only son, Constantine, was born in Naissus in Upper Moesia, in the year 274. The statement made by English chroniclers of the Middle Ages, according to which Helena was supposed to have been the daughter of a British prince, is entirely without historical foundation. It may arise from the misinterpretation of a term used in the fourth chapter of the panegyric on Constantine's marriage with Fausta, that Constantine, oriendo (i. e., "by his beginnings," "from the outset") had honoured Britain, which was taken as an allusion to his birth, whereas the reference was really to the beginning of his reign.

On the death of Constantius Chlorus, in 308, Constantine, who succeeded him, summoned his mother to the imperial court, conferred on her the title of Augusta, ordered that all honour should be paid her as the mother of the sovereign, and had coins struck bearing her effigy. Her son's influence caused her to embrace Christianity after his victory over Maxentius. This is directly attested by Eusebius (Vita Constantini, III, xlvii): "She (his mother) became under his (Constantine's) influence such a devout servant of God, that one might believe her to have been from her very childhood a disciple of the Redeemer of mankind". It is also clear from the declaration of the contemporary historian of the Church that Helena, from the time of her conversion had an earnestly Christian life and by her influence and liberality favoured the wider spread of Christianity. Tradition links her name with the building of Christian churches in the cities of the West, where the imperial court resided, notably at Rome and Trier, and there is no reason for rejecting this tradition, for we know positively through Eusebius that Helena erected churches on the hallowed spots of Palestine. Despite her advanced age she undertook a journey to Palestine when Constantine, through his victory over Licinius, had become sole master of the Roman Empire, subsequently, therefore, to the year 324. It was in Palestine, as we learn from Eusebius (loc. cit., xlii), that she had resolved to bring to God, the King of kings, the homage and tribute of her devotion. She lavished on that land her bounties and good deeds, she "explored it with remarkable discernment", and "visited it with the care and solicitude of the emperor himself". Then, when she "had shown due veneration to the footsteps of the Saviour", she had two churches erected for the worship of God: one was raised in Bethlehem near the Grotto of the Nativity, the other on the Mount of the Ascension, near Jerusalem. She also embellished the sacred grotto with rich ornaments. This sojourn in Jerusalem proved the starting-point of the legend first recorded by Rufinus as to the discovery of the Cross of Christ.

Constantine I, in 327, improved Drepanum, his mother's native town, and decreed that it should be called Helenopolis, it is probable that the latter returned from Palestine to her son who was then residing in the Orient. Constantine was with her when she died, at the advanced age of eighty years or thereabouts (Eusebius, "Vita Const.", III, xlvi). This must have been about the year 330, for the last coins which are known to have been stamped with her name bore this date. Her body was brought to Constantinople and laid to rest in the imperial vault of the church of the Apostles. It is presumed that her remains were transferred in 849 to the Abbey of Hautvillers, in the French Archdiocese of Reims, as recorded by the monk Altmann in his "Translatio". She was revered as a saint, and the veneration spread, early in the ninth century, even to Western countries. Her feast falls on 18 August.

(See The Catholic Encyclopedia: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07202b.htm)

Cleisthenes
CTGaeFolNico.jpg
1403g, Constantine I (the Great), early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. (Nicomedia)22 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D. Bronze follis, RIC 12, aVF, Nicomedia mint, 2.760g, 22.0mm, 0o, 313 - 317 A.D. Obverse: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right; Reverse: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, G right, SMN in exergue; scarce.

The Emperor Constantine I was effectively the sole ruler of the Roman world between 324 and 337 A.D.; his reign was perhaps one of the most crucial of all the emperors in determining the future course of western civilization. By beginning the process of making Christianity the religious foundation of his realm, he set the religious course for the future of Europe which remains in place to this very day. Because he replaced Rome with Constantinople as the center of imperial power, he made it clear that the city of Rome was no longer the center of power and he also set the stage for the Middle Ages. His philosophical view of monarchy, largely spelled out in some of the works of Eusebius of Caesarea, became the foundation for the concept of the divine right of kings which prevailed in Europe.

Constantine was not a "Christian convert" in any traditional sense. He was not baptized until close to death, and while that was not an uncommon practice, the mention of Christ in his speeches and decrees is conspicuous by its absence. Eusebius, Church historian and Constantine biographer, is responsible for much of the valorization of Constantine as the Christian Emperor. The somnambulant "sign" in which Constantine was to become victor at the Milvian Bridge is, not so surprisingly, revealed to posterity long after the "fact." Throughout his reign, Constantine continues to portray himself on coins as a sun god (Freeman, Charles. Egypt, Greece and Rome: Civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean; Second Edition. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2004. 582). Above all, Constantine was a pragmatist. It would be cynical to egregiously disavow his commitment to Christianity, but it would be equally wrong to think that he would allow Christianity to meddle in the governance of his empire. As he reputedly told a group of bishops, "You are bishops of those within the church, but I am perhaps a bishop appointed by God of those outside." Whatever the motives for his decision to support Christianity, Christianity benefitted from the arrangement. So, too, did Constantine. It was a match made in heaven.
J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

For perhaps the best Constantine The Great site on the web, see Victor Clark's Constantine The Great Coins: http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/
Cleisthenes
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1409a, Julian II "the Philosopher," February 360 - 26 June 363 A.D.142 viewsJulian II, A.D. 360-363; RIC 167; VF; 2.7g, 20mm; Constantinople mint; Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, helmeted & cuirassed bust right, holding spear & shield; Reverse: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; CONSPB in exergue; Attractive green patina. Ex Nemesis.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Julian the Apostate (360-363 A.D.)

Walter E. Roberts, Emory University
Michael DiMaio, Jr., Salve Regina University

Introduction

The emperor Flavius Claudius Julianus reigned from 360 to 26 June 363, when he was killed fighting against the Persians. Despite his short rule, his emperorship was pivotal in the development of the history of the later Roman empire. This essay is not meant to be a comprehensive look at the various issues central to the reign of Julian and the history of the later empire. Rather, this short work is meant to be a brief history and introduction for the general reader. Julian was the last direct descendent of the Constantinian line to ascend to the purple, and it is one of history's great ironies that he was the last non-Christian emperor. As such, he has been vilified by most Christian sources, beginning with John Chrysostom and Gregory Nazianzus in the later fourth century. This tradition was picked up by the fifth century Eusebian continuators Sozomen, Socrates Scholasticus, and Theodoret and passed on to scholars down through the 20th century. Most contemporary sources, however, paint a much more balanced picture of Julian and his reign. The adoption of Christianity by emperors and society, while still a vital concern, was but one of several issues that concerned Julian.

It is fortunate that extensive writings from Julian himself exist, which help interpret his reign in the light of contemporary evidence. Still extant are some letters, several panegyrics, and a few satires. Other contemporary sources include the soldier Ammianus Marcellinus' history, correspondence between Julian and Libanius of Antioch, several panegyrics, laws from the Theodosian Code, inscriptions, and coinage. These sources show Julian's emphasis on restoration. He saw himself as the restorer of the traditional values of Roman society. Of course much of this was rhetoric, meant to defend Julian against charges that he was a usurper. At the same time this theme of restoration was central to all emperors of the fourth century. Julian thought that he was the one emperor who could regain what was viewed as the lost glory of the Roman empire. To achieve this goal he courted select groups of social elites to get across his message of restoration. This was the way that emperors functioned in the fourth century. By choosing whom to include in the sharing of power, they sought to shape society.

Early Life

Julian was born at Constantinople in 331. His father was Julius Constantius, half-brother of the emperor Constantine through Constantius Chlorus, and his mother was Basilina, Julius' second wife. Julian had two half-brothers via Julius' first marriage. One of these was Gallus, who played a major role in Julian's life. Julian appeared destined for a bright future via his father's connection to the Constantinian house. After many years of tense relations with his three half-brothers, Constantine seemed to have welcomed them into the fold of the imperial family. From 333 to 335, Constantine conferred a series of honors upon his three half-siblings, including appointing Julius Constantius as one of the consuls for 335. Julian's mother was equally distinguished. Ammianus related that she was from a noble family. This is supported by Libanius, who claimed that she was the daughter of Julius Julianus, a Praetorian Prefect under Licinius, who was such a model of administrative virtue that he was pardoned and honored by Constantine.

Despite the fact that his mother died shortly after giving birth to him, Julian experienced an idyllic early childhood. This ended when Constantius II conducted a purge of many of his relatives shortly after Constantine's death in 337, particularly targeting the families of Constantine's half-brothers. ulian and Gallus were spared, probably due to their young age. Julian was put under the care of Mardonius, a Scythian eunuch who had tutored his mother, in 339, and was raised in the Greek philosophical tradition, and probably lived in Nicomedia. Ammianus also supplied the fact that while in Nicomedia, Julian was cared for by the local bishop Eusebius, of whom the future emperor was a distant relation. Julian was educated by some of the most famous names in grammar and rhetoric in the Greek world at that time, including Nicocles and Hecebolius. In 344 Constantius II sent Julian and Gallus to Macellum in Cappadocia, where they remained for six years. In 351, Gallus was made Caesar by Constantius II and Julian was allowed to return to Nicomedia, where he studied under Aedesius, Eusebius, and Chrysanthius, all famed philosophers, and was exposed to the Neo-Platonism that would become such a prominent part of his life. But Julian was most proud of the time he spent studying under Maximus of Ephesus, a noted Neo-Platonic philospher and theurgist. It was Maximus who completed Julian's full-scale conversion to Neo-Platonism. Later, when he was Caesar, Julian told of how he put letters from this philosopher under his pillows so that he would continue to absorb wisdom while he slept, and while campaigning on the Rhine, he sent his speeches to Maximus for approval before letting others hear them. When Gallus was executed in 354 for treason by Constantius II, Julian was summoned to Italy and essentially kept under house arrest at Comum, near Milan, for seven months before Constantius' wife Eusebia convinced the emperor that Julian posed no threat. This allowed Julian to return to Greece and continue his life as a scholar where he studied under the Neo-Platonist Priscus. Julian's life of scholarly pursuit, however, ended abruptly when he was summoned to the imperial court and made Caesar by Constantius II on 6 November 355.

Julian as Caesar

Constantius II realized an essential truth of the empire that had been evident since the time of the Tetrarchy--the empire was too big to be ruled effectively by one man. Julian was pressed into service as Caesar, or subordinate emperor, because an imperial presence was needed in the west, in particular in the Gallic provinces. Julian, due to the emperor's earlier purges, was the only viable candidate of the imperial family left who could act as Caesar. Constantius enjoined Julian with the task of restoring order along the Rhine frontier. A few days after he was made Caesar, Julian was married to Constantius' sister Helena in order to cement the alliance between the two men. On 1 December 355, Julian journeyed north, and in Augusta Taurinorum he learned that Alamannic raiders had destroyed Colonia Agrippina. He then proceeded to Vienne where he spent the winter. At Vienne, he learned that Augustudunum was also under siege, but was being held by a veteran garrison. He made this his first priority, and arrived there on 24 June 356. When he had assured himself that the city was in no immediate danger, he journeyed to Augusta Treverorum via Autessioduram, and from there to Durocortorum where he rendezvoused with his army. Julian had the army stage a series of punitive strikes around the Dieuse region, and then he moved them towards the Argentoratum/Mongontiacum region when word of barbarian incursions reached him.

From there, Julian moved on to Colonia Agrippina, and negotiated a peace with the local barbarian leaders who had assaulted the city. He then wintered at Senonae. He spent the early part of the campaigning season of 357 fighting off besiegers at Senonae, and then conducting operations around Lugdunum and Tres Tabernae. Later that summer, he encountered his watershed moment as a military general. Ammianus went into great detail about Julian's victory over seven rogue Alamannic chieftains near Argentoratum, and Julian himself bragged about it in his later writing. After this battle, the soldiers acclaimed Julian Augustus, but he rejected this title. After mounting a series of follow-up raids into Alamannic territory, he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia, and on the way defeated some Frankish raiders in the Mosa region. Julian considered this campaign one of the major events of his time as Caesar.

Julian began his 358 military campaigns early, hoping to catch the barbarians by surprise. His first target was the Franks in the northern Rhine region. He then proceeded to restore some forts in the Mosa region, but his soldiers threatened to mutiny because they were on short rations and had not been paid their donative since Julian had become Caesar. After he soothed his soldiers, Julian spent the rest of the summer negotiating a peace with various Alamannic leaders in the mid and lower Rhine areas, and retired to winter quarters at Lutetia. In 359, he prepared once again to carry out a series of punitive expeditions against the Alamanni in the Rhine region who were still hostile to the Roman presence. In preparation, the Caesar repopulated seven previously destroyed cities and set them up as supply bases and staging areas. This was done with the help of the people with whom Julian had negotiated a peace the year before. Julian then had a detachment of lightly armed soldiers cross the Rhine near Mogontiacum and conduct a guerilla strike against several chieftains. As a result of these campaigns, Julian was able to negotiate a peace with all but a handful of the Alamannic leaders, and he retired to winter quarters at Lutetia.

Of course, Julian did more than act as a general during his time as Caesar. According to Ammianus, Julian was an able administrator who took steps to correct the injustices of Constantius' appointees. Ammianus related the story of how Julian prevented Florentius, the Praetorian Prefect of Gaul, from raising taxes, and also how Julian actually took over as governor for the province of Belgica Secunda. Hilary, bishop of Poitiers, supported Ammianus' basic assessment of Julian in this regard when he reported that Julian was an able representative of the emperor to the Gallic provincials. There is also epigraphic evidence to support Julian's popularity amongst the provincial elites. An inscription found near Beneventum in Apulia reads:
"To Flavius Claudius Julianus, most noble and sanctified Caesar, from the caring Tocius Maximus, vir clarissimus, for the care of the res publica from Beneventum".

Tocius Maximus, as a vir clarissimus, was at the highest point in the social spectrum and was a leader in his local community. This inscription shows that Julian was successful in establishing a positive image amongst provincial elites while he was Caesar.

Julian Augustus

In early 360, Constantius, driven by jealousy of Julian's success, stripped Julian of many troops and officers, ostensibly because the emperor needed them for his upcoming campaign against the Persians. One of the legions ordered east, the Petulantes, did not want to leave Gaul because the majority of the soldiers in the unit were from this region. As a result they mutinied and hailed Julian as Augustus at Lutetia. Julian refused this acclamation as he had done at Argentoratum earlier, but the soldiers would have none of his denial. They raised him on a shield and adorned him with a neck chain, which had formerly been the possession of the standard-bearer of the Petulantes and symbolized a royal diadem. Julian appeared reluctantly to acquiesce to their wishes, and promised a generous donative. The exact date of his acclamation is unknown, but most scholars put it in February or March. Julian himself supported Ammianus' picture of a jealous Constantius. In his Letter to the Athenians, a document constructed to answer charges that he was a usurper, Julian stated that from the start he, as Caesar, had been meant as a figurehead to the soldiers and provincials. The real power he claimed lay with the generals and officials already present in Gaul. In fact, according to Julian, the generals were charged with watching him as much as the enemy. His account of the actual acclamation closely followed what Ammianus told us, but he stressed even more his reluctance to take power. Julian claimed that he did so only after praying to Zeus for guidance.

Fearing the reaction of Constantius, Julian sent a letter to his fellow emperor justifying the events at Lutetia and trying to arrange a peaceful solution. This letter berated Constantius for forcing the troops in Gaul into an untenable situation. Ammianus stated that Julian's letter blamed Constantius' decision to transfer Gallic legions east as the reason for the soldiers' rebellion. Julian once again asserted that he was an unwilling participant who was only following the desire of the soldiers. In both of these basic accounts Ammianus and Julian are playing upon the theme of restoration. Implicit in their version of Julian's acclamation is the argument that Constantius was unfit to rule. The soldiers were the vehicle of the gods' will. The Letter to the Athenians is full of references to the fact that Julian was assuming the mantle of Augustus at the instigation of the gods. Ammianus summed up this position nicely when he related the story of how, when Julian was agonizing over whether to accept the soldiers' acclamation, he had a dream in which he was visited by the Genius (guardian spirit) of the Roman state. The Genius told Julian that it had often tried to bestow high honors upon Julian but had been rebuffed. Now, the Genius went on to say, was Julian's final chance to take the power that was rightfully his. If the Caesar refused this chance, the Genius would depart forever, and both Julian and the state would rue Julian's rejection. Julian himself wrote a letter to his friend Maximus of Ephesus in November of 361 detailing his thoughts on his proclamation. In this letter, Julian stated that the soldiers proclaimed him Augustus against his will. Julian, however, defended his accession, saying that the gods willed it and that he had treated his enemies with clemency and justice. He went on to say that he led the troops in propitiating the traditional deities, because the gods commanded him to return to the traditional rites, and would reward him if he fulfilled this duty.

During 360 an uneasy peace simmered between the two emperors. Julian spent the 360 campaigning season continuing his efforts to restore order along the Rhine, while Constantius continued operations against the Persians. Julian wintered in Vienne, and celebrated his Quinquennalia. It was at this time that his wife Helena died, and he sent her remains to Rome for a proper burial at his family villa on the Via Nomentana where the body of her sister was entombed. The uneasy peace held through the summer of 361, but Julian concentrated his military operations around harassing the Alamannic chieftain Vadomarius and his allies, who had concluded a peace treaty with Constantius some years earlier. By the end of the summer, Julian decided to put an end to the waiting and gathered his army to march east against Constantius. The empire teetered on the brink of another civil war. Constantius had spent the summer negotiating with the Persians and making preparations for possible military action against his cousin. When he was assured that the Persians would not attack, he summoned his army and sallied forth to meet Julian. As the armies drew inexorably closer to one another, the empire was saved from another bloody civil war when Constantius died unexpectedly of natural causes on 3 November near the town of Mopsucrenae in Cilicia, naming Julian -- the sources say-- as his legitimate successor.

Julian was in Dacia when he learned of his cousin's death. He made his way through Thrace and came to Constantinople on 11 December 361 where Julian honored the emperor with the funeral rites appropriate for a man of his station. Julian immediately set about putting his supporters in positions of power and trimming the imperial bureaucracy, which had become extremely overstaffed during Constantius' reign. Cooks and barbers had increased during the late emperor's reign and Julian expelled them from his court. Ammianus gave a mixed assessment of how the new emperor handled the followers of Constantius. Traditionally, emperors were supposed to show clemency to the supporters of a defeated enemy. Julian, however, gave some men over to death to appease the army. Ammianus used the case of Ursulus, Constantius' comes sacrum largitionum, to illustrate his point. Ursulus had actually tried to acquire money for the Gallic troops when Julian had first been appointed Caesar, but he had also made a disparaging remark about the ineffectiveness of the army after the battle of Amida. The soldiers remembered this, and when Julian became sole Augustus, they demanded Ursulus' head. Julian obliged, much to the disapproval of Ammianus. This seems to be a case of Julian courting the favor of the military leadership, and is indicative of a pattern in which Julian courted the goodwill of various societal elites to legitimize his position as emperor.

Another case in point is the officials who made up the imperial bureaucracy. Many of them were subjected to trial and punishment. To achieve this goal, during the last weeks of December 361 Julian assembled a military tribunal at Chalcedon, empanelling six judges to try the cases. The president of the tribunal was Salutius, just promoted to the rank of Praetorian Prefect; the five other members were Mamertinus, the orator, and four general officers: Jovinus, Agilo, Nevitta, and Arbetio. Relative to the proceedings of the tribunal, Ammianus noted that the judges, " . . . oversaw the cases more vehemently than was right or fair, with the exception of a few . . .." Ammianus' account of Julian's attempt at reform of the imperial bureaucracy is supported by legal evidence from the Theodosian Code. A series of laws sent to Mamertinus, Julian's appointee as Praetorian Prefect in Italy, Illyricum, and Africa, illustrate this point nicely. On 6 June 362, Mamertinus received a law that prohibited provincial governors from bypassing the Vicars when giving their reports to the Prefect. Traditionally, Vicars were given civil authority over a group of provinces, and were in theory meant to serve as a middle step between governors and Prefects. This law suggests that the Vicars were being left out, at least in Illyricum. Julian issued another edict to Mamertinus on 22 February 362 to stop abuse of the public post by governors. According to this law, only Mamertinus could issue post warrants, but the Vicars were given twelve blank warrants to be used as they saw fit, and each governor was given two. Continuing the trend of bureaucratic reform, Julian also imposed penalties on governors who purposefully delayed appeals in court cases they had heard. The emperor also established a new official to weigh solidi used in official government transactions to combat coin clipping.

For Julian, reigning in the abuses of imperial bureaucrats was one step in restoring the prestige of the office of emperor. Because he could not affect all elements of society personally, Julian, like other Neo-Flavian emperors, decided to concentrate on select groups of societal elites as intercessors between himself and the general populace. One of these groups was the imperial bureaucracy. Julian made it very clear that imperial officials were intercessors in a very real sense in a letter to Alypius, Vicar of Britain. In this letter, sent from Gaul sometime before 361, the emperor praises Alypius for his use of "mildness and moderation with courage and force" in his rule of the provincials. Such virtues were characteristic of the emperors, and it was good that Alypius is representing Julian in this way. Julian courted the army because it put him in power. Another group he sought to include in his rule was the traditional Senatorial aristocracy. One of his first appointments as consul was Claudius Mamertinus, a Gallic Senator and rhetorician. Mamertinus' speech in praise of Julian delivered at Constantinople in January of 362 is preserved. In this speech, Claudius presented his consular selection as inaugurating a new golden age and Julian as the restorer of the empire founded by Augustus. The image Mamertinus gave of his own consulate inaugurating a new golden age is not merely formulaic. The comparison of Julian to Augustus has very real, if implicit, relevance to Claudius' situation. Claudius emphasized the imperial period as the true age of renewal. Augustus ushered in a new era with his formation of a partnership between the emperor and the Senate based upon a series of honors and offices bestowed upon the Senate in return for their role as intercessor between emperor and populace. It was this system that Julian was restoring, and the consulate was one concrete example of this bond. To be chosen as a consul by the emperor, who himself had been divinely mandated, was a divine honor. In addition to being named consul, Mamertinus went on to hold several offices under Julian, including the Prefecture of Italy, Illyricum, and Africa. Similarly, inscriptional evidence illustrates a link between municipal elites and Julian during his time as Caesar, something which continued after he became emperor. One concrete example comes from the municipal senate of Aceruntia in Apulia, which established a monument on which Julian is styled as "Repairer of the World."

Julian seems to have given up actual Christian belief before his acclamation as emperor and was a practitioner of more traditional Greco-Roman religious beliefs, in particular, a follower of certain late antique Platonist philosophers who were especially adept at theurgy as was noted earlier. In fact Julian himself spoke of his conversion to Neo-Platonism in a letter to the Alexandrians written in 363. He stated that he had abandoned Christianity when he was twenty years old and been an adherent of the traditional Greco-Roman deities for the twelve years prior to writing this letter.

(For the complete text of this article see: http://www.roman-emperors.org/julian.htm)

Julian’s Persian Campaign

The exact goals Julian had for his ill-fated Persian campaign were never clear. The Sassanid Persians, and before them the Parthians, had been a traditional enemy from the time of the Late Republic, and indeed Constantius had been conducting a war against them before Julian's accession forced the former to forge an uneasy peace. Julian, however, had no concrete reason to reopen hostilities in the east. Socrates Scholasticus attributed Julian's motives to imitation of Alexander the Great, but perhaps the real reason lay in his need to gather the support of the army. Despite his acclamation by the Gallic legions, relations between Julian and the top military officers was uneasy at best. A war against the Persians would have brought prestige and power both to Julian and the army.

Julian set out on his fateful campaign on 5 March 363. Using his trademark strategy of striking quickly and where least expected, he moved his army through Heirapolis and from there speedily across the Euphrates and into the province of Mesopotamia, where he stopped at the town of Batnae. His plan was to eventually return through Armenia and winter in Tarsus. Once in Mesopotamia, Julian was faced with the decision of whether to travel south through the province of Babylonia or cross the Tigris into Assyria, and he eventually decided to move south through Babylonia and turn west into Assyria at a later date. By 27 March, he had the bulk of his army across the Euphrates, and had also arranged a flotilla to guard his supply line along the mighty river. He then left his generals Procopius and Sebastianus to help Arsacius, the king of Armenia and a Roman client, to guard the northern Tigris line. It was also during this time that he received the surrender of many prominent local leaders who had nominally supported the Persians. These men supplied Julian with money and troops for further military action against their former masters. Julian decided to turn south into Babylonia and proceeded along the Euphrates, coming to the fortress of Cercusium at the junction of the Abora and Euphrates Rivers around the first of April, and from there he took his army west to a region called Zaitha near the abandoned town of Dura where they visited the tomb of the emperor Gordian which was in the area. On April 7 he set out from there into the heart of Babylonia and towards Assyria.

Ammianus then stated that Julian and his army crossed into Assyria, which on the face of things appears very confusing. Julian still seems to be operating within the province of Babylonia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. The confusion is alleviated when one realizes that,for Ammianus, the region of Assyria encompassed the provinces of Babylonia and Assyria. On their march, Julian's forces took the fortress of Anatha, received the surrender and support of several more local princes, and ravaged the countryside of Assyria between the rivers. As the army continued south, they came across the fortresses Thilutha and Achaiachala, but these places were too well defended and Julian decided to leave them alone. Further south were the cities Diacira and Ozogardana, which the Roman forces sacked and burned. Soon, Julian came to Pirisabora and a brief siege ensued, but the city fell and was also looted and destroyed. It was also at this time that the Roman army met its first systematic resistance from the Persians. As the Romans penetrated further south and west, the local inhabitants began to flood their route. Nevertheless, the Roman forces pressed on and came to Maiozamalcha, a sizable city not far from Ctesiphon. After a short siege, this city too fell to Julian. Inexorably, Julian's forces zeroed in on Ctesiphon, but as they drew closer, the Persian resistance grew fiercer, with guerilla raids whittling at Julian's men and supplies. A sizable force of the army was lost and the emperor himself was almost killed taking a fort a few miles from the target city.
Finally, the army approached Ctesiphon following a canal that linked the Tigris and Euphrates. It soon became apparent after a few preliminary skirmishes that a protracted siege would be necessary to take this important city. Many of his generals, however, thought that pursuing this course of action would be foolish. Julian reluctantly agreed, but became enraged by this failure and ordered his fleet to be burned as he decided to march through the province of Assyria. Julian had planned for his army to live off the land, but the Persians employed a scorched-earth policy. When it became apparent that his army would perish (because his supplies were beginning to dwindle) from starvation and the heat if he continued his campaign, and also in the face of superior numbers of the enemy, Julian ordered a retreat on 16 June. As the Roman army retreated, they were constantly harassed by guerilla strikes. It was during one of these raids that Julian got caught up in the fighting and took a spear to his abdomen. Mortally wounded he was carried to his tent, where, after conferring with some of his officers, he died. The date was 26 June 363.

Conclusion

Thus an ignominious end for a man came about who had hoped to restore the glory of the Roman empire during his reign as emperor. Due to his intense hatred of Christianity, the opinion of posterity has not been kind to Julian. The contemporary opinion, however, was overall positive. The evidence shows that Julian was a complex ruler with a definite agenda to use traditional social institutions in order to revive what he saw as a collapsing empire. In the final assessment, he was not so different from any of the other emperors of the fourth century. He was a man grasping desperately to hang on to a Greco-Roman conception of leadership that was undergoing a subtle yet profound change.
Copyright (C) 2002, Walter E. Roberts and Michael DiMaio, Jr. Used by permission.

In reality, Julian worked to promote culture and philosophy in any manifestation. He tried to reduce taxes and the public debts of municipalities; he augmented administrative decentralisation; he promoted a campaign of austerity to reduce public expenditure (setting himself as the example). He reformed the postal service and eliminated the powerful secret police.
by Federico Morando; JULIAN II, The Apostate, http://www.forumancientcoins.com/NumisWiki/view.asp?key=Julian%20II

Flavius Claudius Iulianus was born in 331 or maybe 332 A.D. in Constantinople. He ruled the Western Empire as Caesar from 355 to 360 and was hailed Augustus by his legions in Lutetia (Paris) in 360. Julian was a gifted administrator and military strategist. Famed as the last pagan emperor, his reinstatement of the pagan religion earned him the moniker "the Apostate." As evidenced by his brilliant writing, some of which has survived to the present day, the title "the Philosopher" may have been more appropriate. He died from wounds suffered during the Persian campaign of 363 A.D. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.




2 commentsCleisthenes
Nicomedia_RIC_VII_032,_142_Crispus_AE-3-Follis_D-N-FL-IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES_PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAES-S_palm-left-field_S-dot_SMN_r2_317-20-AD_Q-001_19mm_3,80ga-s.jpg
142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 032, AE-3 Follis, palm/S over•//SMN, PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, R2!!95 views142 Crispus (317-326 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VII 032, AE-3 Follis, palm/S over•//SMN, PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, R2!!
avers:- D-N-FL-IVL-CRISPVS-NOB-CAES, 5b, B4, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- PROVIDEN-TIAE-CAES-S, Jupiter stg. left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on sceptre, holding Victory on globe. Palm in the left field at foot, S over • in right field.
exergo: palm/S over•//SMN, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,80g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 317-320 AD., ref: RIC-VII-32, p604, R2!!
Q-001
quadrans
Constantius-II_AE-3_CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-C_GLOR-IA-EXERC-ITVS_SMNGamma_RIC-VII-189-p-633-7-B5_Nicomedia_330-33-AD_R2_Q-001_7h_17,5mm_1,93g-s.jpg
145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 189, AE-3 Follis, -/-//SMNΓ, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, R2!64 views145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 189, AE-3 Follis, -/-//SMNΓ, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, R2!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- GLOR-IA-EXER-CITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards.
exe: -/-//SMNΓ, diameter: 17,5mm, weight: 1,93g, axis: 7h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 330-335 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-189-p-633, R2!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Constantinus-II__AE-3-Follis_CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-C_GLOR-IA-EXER-CITVS_SMNB_RIC-VII-189-p-633_2nd-off-7-B5_Nicomedia_330-5AD_R1_Q-001_axis-11h_16,5-17,5mm_2,52g-s.jpg
145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 189, AE-3 Follis, -/-//SMNB, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, R1!184 views145 Constantinus-II. (316-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-340 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VII 189, AE-3 Follis, -/-//SMNB, GLORIA EXERCITVS, Two soldiers with two standards, R1!
avers:- CONSTANTINVS-IVN-NOB-C, Laureate, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- GLOR-IA-EXER-CITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards.
exe: -/-//SMNB, diameter: 16,5-17,5mm, weight: 2,52g, axis: 11h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 330-335 A.D., ref: RIC-VII-189-p-633, R1!
Q-001
quadrans
Constantius-II__AE-3-silvered_DN-CONSTAN-TIVS-PF-AVG_FEL-TEMP-RE-PARATIO_Gamma_SMNA_RIC-VIII-084-p-478-Cs1-D3_Nicomedia_351-55-AD__Q-001_6h_21,5-24mm_5,11ga-s~1.jpg
147 Constantius II. (324-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-361 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 084, AE-2 Follis, Γ/-//SMNA, FELTEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing falling enemy,141 views147 Constantius II. (324-337 A.D. Caesar, 337-361 A.D. Augustus), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 084, AE-2 Follis, Γ/-//SMNA, FELTEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing falling enemy,
avers:- D N CONSTAN TIVS P F AVG, Cs1, D3, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
rever:- FEL TEMP RE PARATIO, Soldier spearing falling enemy horseman who wears Phrygian helmet and is reaching backwards; shield on ground to right .
exergo: Γ/-//SMNA, diameter: 21,5-24mm, weight: 5,11g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 351-55 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-084, p-478,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RI 148a img.jpg
148 - Galerius - RIC VI Nicomedia 54a48 viewsObv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, Genius standing left
Minted in Nicomedia, (SMNΔ in exe.), Group IVbetween December A.D. 308 and May A.D. 310
References:– RIC VI Nicomedia 54a (Common)
maridvnvm
RI_151o_img.jpg
151 - Maximinus II Daia - Follis - RIC VI Nicomedia 71b 6 viewsFollis
Obv:– IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– GENIO AVGVSTI, Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys at waist, left hand holding cornucopiae and right hand holding patera, from which liquid is flowing, sacrificing over lighted altar
Minted in Nicomedia (_ | E // SMN).
Reference(s) – RIC VI Nicomedia 71b (Rated C)
maridvnvm
Julianus-II__AE-1-28_DN-FL-CL-IVLI-ANVS-PF-AVG_SECVRITAS-REIPVB_x-NIKO-x_Nikomedia-360-63_RIC-216_Q-001_0_00g-s.jpg
153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 120, AE-1, -/-//NIKA * ??, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #165 views153 Julianus II. (360-363 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC VIII 120, AE-1, -/-//NIKA * ??, SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, R!, #1
avers: D N FL CL IVLI ANVS P F AVG (J8), Bearded, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right (D3).
reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
exergue: -/-//NIKA * ??, diameter: 27-28mm, weight: g, axis: h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 361-363 A.D., ref: RIC-VIII-120, R!
Q-001
quadrans
RI 155v img.jpg
155 - Licinius - RIC VII Nicomedia 02414 viewsObv:– IMP LICINIVS AVG, Laureate, draped bus left, globe and sceptre in left hand, mappa in right hand
Rev:– IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe and sceptre
Minted in Nicomedia (Palm in left field, E in right field, SMN in exe.) in A.D. 317-320
References:– RIC VII Nicomedia 24 (Scarce)
maridvnvm
Valentinianus-I_AE-Follis_DN-VALENTINIANVS-P-F-AVG_RESTITVTOR-REIPVBLICAE_SMNA_RIC-IX-7a1A_C-30_Nicomedia-367-375_Q-001_0h_25-25,5mm9,18g-s.jpg
155 Valentinianus I. (364-375 A.D.), RIC IX 007a1A, Nicomedia, AE-1, RESTITVTOR-REIPVBLICAE, -/-//SMNA, Emperor standing front, Rare (2R) !! #1129 views155 Valentinianus I. (364-375 A.D.), RIC IX 007a1A, Nicomedia, AE-1, RESTITVTOR-REIPVBLICAE, -/-//SMNA, Emperor standing front, Rare (2R) !! #1
avers:- D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers: RESTITVTOR REIPVBLICAE, Emperor standing front, looking right, in military dress, holding labarum and Victory on globe.
exergo: -/-//SMNA, diameter: 25,0-25,5mm, weight: 9,18g, axis:0h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 367-375 A.D., ref: RIC-IX-7a1A, p-251, C-30, 2R!!
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RI 157f img.jpg
157 - Licinius II - RIC Nicomedia 03452 viewsObv:– D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, holding victory on globe and scepter
Minted in Nicomedia (palm | • / E / SMN). A.D. 317-320
Reference:– RIC VII Nicomedia 34 (R1)
maridvnvm
Valentinianus-II__AE-2_DN-VALENTINIANVS-PF-AVG_GLORIA-RO-MANORVM_SMNA_RIC-IX-40a_C-_Nicomedia_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
159 Valentinianus II. (375-392 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC IX 040a, -/-//SMNA, AE-2 Follis, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor in galley left, #171 views159 Valentinianus II. (375-392 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC IX 040a, -/-//SMNA, AE-2 Follis, GLORIA ROMANORVM, Emperor in galley left, #1
avers:- D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, helmeted, draped, cuirassed bust right, shield in left hand, spear pointing forward in right hand.
revers:- GLORIA-RO-MANORVM, Emperor standing facing,head right, right hand raised, chlamys flying behind, in galley left, piloted by seated Victory. (T in left field?).
exergo: -/-//SMNA, diameter: 22mm, weight: 3,76g, axis: 5h, Scarce!
mint: Nicomedia, date: 383-388 A.D., ref: RIC-IX-40a, p-,
Q-001
quadrans
Valentinianus-II__AE-4_DN-VALENTINIANVS-PF-AVG_SALVS-REIPVBLICAE_chi-rho_SMNB_RIC-IX-45a-2_P-262C-30_Nicomedia-388-392_Q-001_axis-0h_12,5-13mm_1,36g-s.jpg
159 Valentinianus II. (375-392 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC IX 045a-2, Chi-Rho/-//SMNB, AE-2 Follis, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing right, #184 views159 Valentinianus II. (375-392 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC IX 045a-2, Chi-Rho/-//SMNB, AE-2 Follis, SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing right, #1
avers:- D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory advancing right, dragging captive (leaning) and carrying trophy on shoulder, Chi-Rho in the left field.
exergo: Chi-Rho/-//SMNB, diameter: 12,5-13mm, weight: 1,36g, axis: 0h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 388-392 A.D., ref: RIC-IX-45a-2, p-262,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_169m_img.jpg
169 - Constans - AE2 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 7028 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs.
Minted in Nicomedia, officina B; (//SMNB), A.D. 348-351 A.D.
Reference:– RIC VIII Nicomedia 70
maridvnvm
RI_170eq_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 06333 viewsAE2
Obv:- D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:- FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman wears a Phrygian cap and falls forward clutching horse's neck
Minted in Nicomedia (* | _ // SMNA). A.D. 348-351
References:- RIC VIII Nicomedia 63 (R).

5.89 gms. 22.76 mm. 0 degrees
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170ay_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 06724 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, holding globe in right hand
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor bare headed & in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives in Phrygian helmets kneeling, facing each other before him
Minted in Nicomedia (//SMNE).
Reference:- RIC VIII Nicomedia 67
maridvnvm
RI_170df_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 07124 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right, holding globe in right hand
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor bare headed & in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives in Phrygian helmets kneeling, facing each other before him
Minted in Nicomedia (* | _ //SMNG).
Reference:- RIC VIII Nicomedia 71 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170br_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE2 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 084 34 viewsAE2
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP R-EPARATIO, Helmeted soldier left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield at ground to right. Horseman turns to face the soldier, and reaches his left arm up towards him. He wears a Phrygian hemlet
Minted in Nicomedia (Gamma | _ //SMN Gamma).
Reference:– RIC VIII Nicomedia 84
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_170dz_img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - AE3 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 096/10425 viewsAE3
Obv:– D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, Pearl diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is bare headed and reaches back towards the emperor
Minted in Nicomedia (//SMNG).
Reference:- RIC VIII Nicomedia 96/104 (C)
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 170d img.jpg
170 - Constantius II - RIC VII Heraclea 15828 viewsObv:– FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
Rev:– PROVIDENTIAE CAES•, Campgate, two turrets, with 6 rows of bricks, star above, pediment below
Minted in Nicomedia. left field, SMNS in exe.
Reference:– RIC VII Nicomedia 158 (S)
maridvnvm
IMG_4384~0.jpg
173. Crispus (317-326 A.D.)23 viewsAv.: DN FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES
Rv.: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS
Left: Palm / Right: dot over A
Ex.: SMN

AE Follis silvered Ø18-20 / 3.1g
RIC VII 32 Nicomedia
RIC Rarity rating R2!
Juancho
Zeno_AE-8_monogram_RIC-958cf-X_Q-001_axis-6h_8mm_0,88g-s.jpg
174 Zeno ( 476-491 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC X 964, -/-//NIC (?), AE-4, Monogram (type:1) in wreath, R !!, #180 views174 Zeno ( 476-491 A.D.), Nicomedia, RIC X 964, -/-//NIC (?), AE-4, Monogram (type:1) in wreath, R !!, #1
avers:- (Legend ???), Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
revers:- Monogram (type:1) in wreath,
exe: -/-//NIC (?), diameter: 8 mm, weight: 0,88 g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: A.D., ref: RIC X 964, p-314,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_175o_img.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3/4 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 97 24 viewsAE3/4
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching back towards the emperor (Rider with hair straight up, no beard, reaching (hair type not in RIC))
Minted in Nicomedia (//SMN Delta),
Reference:– RIC VIII Nicomedia 97 var (hairstyle/headwear)

Ex Lanz. Ex Kunker 288, ex. Collection Dr. Rainer Pudill

3,13 g. 16.55 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
RI_175o_img~0.jpg
175 - Constantius Gallus - AE3/4 - RIC VIII Nicomedia 97 25 viewsAE3/4
Obv:– DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, Bare, bust draped and cuirassed right
Rev:– FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Soldier spearing fallen horseman, who is bare headed, reaching back towards the emperor (Rider with hair straight up, no beard, reaching (hair type not in RIC))
Minted in Nicomedia (//SMN Delta),
Reference:– RIC VIII Nicomedia 97 var (hairstyle/headwear)

Ex Lanz. Ex Kunker 288, ex. Collection Dr. Rainer Pudill

3,13 g. 16.55 mm
1 commentsmaridvnvm
17s-Constantine-II-Her-020.jpg
17s. Constantine II: Heraclea.23 viewsAE3, 317, Heraclea mint.
Obverse: D N FL CL CONSTANTINVS NOB C / Laureate bust of Constantine II, facing left, hilding globe, sceptre, and mappa.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS / Campgate with three turrets.
Mint mark: MHTE
3.03 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #20; PBCC #951; Sear #17140.

This coin has many small flecks of silver across it surfaces which are apparently all that is left of the original silvering. The very small bust is characteristic of the mints at Heraclea, Cyzicus, and Nicomedia where it was used from time to time with the junior caesars.
Callimachus
RI 189a img.jpg
189 - Eudoxia - RIC X Arcadius 10229 viewsAE3
Obv:– AEL EVDOXIA AVG, Diademed bust right, draped
Rev:– SALVS REIPVBLICAE, Victory seated right on cuirass, pointing one hand at a shield inscribed with the Chi-Rho as she balances it atop a column with her other hand
Minted in Nicomedia (SMNA in exe.) A.D. 401-403
RIC X Arcadius 102 (R)
maridvnvm
IMG_4313~0.jpg
189. Procopius (365-366 A.D.)21 viewsAv.: DN PROCOPIVS PF AVG
Rv.: REPARATIO FEL TEMP
Left: dot / Right: chi-rho at top right
Ex.: SMN gamma

AE Follis Ø18 / 3.3g
RIC IX 10 Nicomedia
RIC Rarity rating R3!
Juancho
nicomedia.jpg
1967 viewshill132
nicomedia1.jpg
197 Crispus8 viewsobv: FL IVL CRIS_PVS NOB laur. drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: MNA
hill132
nicomedia2.jpg
198 Constantine I10 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG three string pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNr
hill132
nicomedia3_copy.jpg
19923 viewshill132
nicomedia3.jpg
199 Constantine II15 viewsobv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C laur. dr. cuir. bust r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNS
hill132
ElagabDenEleg.jpg
1bz Elagabalus_215 views218-222

Denarius

Laureate, horned & draped bust rightt, IMP ANTONINVS PIVS AVG
Elagabalus standing left, sacrificing from patera over lit tripod altar, holding branch, star in field left, SVMMVS SACERDOS AVG

RIC 146

The Historia Augusta, in the life of Caracalla, notes: Bassianus lived for forty-three years and ruled for six. . . . He left a son, who afterward received, like his father, the name Antoninus Marcus Antoninus Elagabalus; for such a hold had the name of the Antonines that it could not be removed from the thoughts of the people, because it had taken root in the hearts of all, even as had the name of Augustus.

In the life of Macrinus is recorded: Now there was a certain woman of the city of Emesa, called [Julia] Maesa or Varia; she was the sister of Julia, the wife of [Septimius] Severus Pertinax the African, and after the death of Antoninus Bassianus she had been expelled from her home in the palace through the arrogance of Macrinus. . . . This woman had two daughters, [Julia Soaemias] and [Julia] Mamaea, the elder of whom was the mother of Elagabalus; he assumed the names Bassianus and Antoninus, for the Phoenicians give the name Elagabalus to the Sun. Elagabalus, moreover, was notable for his beauty and stature and for the priesthood which he held, and he was well known to all who frequented the temple, and particularly to the soldiers. To these, Maesa, or Varia as she was also called, declared that this Bassianus was the son of Antoninus, and this was gradually made known to all the soldiers. Maesa herself, furthermore, was very rich (whence also Elagabalus was most wasteful of money), and through her promises to the soldiers the legions were persuaded to desert Macrinus. . . .

Finally, when he received the imperial power, he took the name Antoninus and was the last of the Antonines to rule the Roman Empire. . . . He was wholly under the control of his mother [Soaemias], so much so, in fact, that he did no public business without her consent, although she lived like a harlot and practised all manner of lewdness in the palace. For that matter, her amour with Antoninus Caracalla was so notorious that Varius, or rather Elagabalus, was commonly supposed to be his son. . . . In short, when Elagabalus' message was read in the senate, at once good wishes were uttered for Antoninus and curses on Macrinus and his son, and, in accordance with the general wish and the eager belief of all in his paternity, Antoninus was hailed as emperor. . . .

After he had spent the winter in Nicomedia, [218-219] living in a depraved manner and indulging in unnatural vice with men, the soldiers soon began to regret that they had conspired against Macrinus to make this man emperor, and they turned their thoughts toward his cousin Alexander, who on the murder of Macrinus had been hailed by the senate as Caesar. . . . Among the base actions of his life of depravity he gave orders that Alexander, whom he had formally adopted, be removed from his presence, saying that he regretted the adoption. Then he commanded the senate to take away from Alexander the name of Caesar. But when this was announced to the senate, there was a profound silence. For Alexander was an excellent youth, as was afterwards shown by the character of his rule, even though, because he was chaste, he was displeasing to his adoptive father he was also, as some declare, his cousin. Besides, he was loved by the soldiers and acceptable to the senate and the equestrian order. Yet the Emperor's madness went the length of an attempt to carry out the basest design; for he despatched assassins to kill Alexander. . . . The soldiers, however, and particularly the members of the guard, either because they knew what evils were in store for Elagabalus, or because they foresaw his hatred for themselves, formed a conspiracy to set the state free. First they attacked the accomplices in his plan of murdering Alexander. . . . Next they fell upon Elagabalus himself and slew him in a latrine in which he had taken refuge.
Blindado
DiocletianAntConcordMil.jpg
1ds Diocletian13 views284-305

AE antoninianus

Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust, right, IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG
Zeus and Diocletian, CONCORDIA MILITVM

RIC 284B

According to the Historia Augusta, after the death of Numerian: Then a huge assembly was held and a tribunal, too, was constructed. And when the question was asked who would be the most lawful avenger of Numerian and who could be given to the commonwealth as a good emperor, then all, with a heaven-sent unanimity, conferred the title of Augustus on Diocletian. . . . He was at this time in command of the household-troops, an outstanding man and wise, devoted to the commonwealth, devoted to his kindred, duly prepared to face whatever the occasion demanded, forming plans that were always deep though sometimes over-bold, and one who could by prudence and exceeding firmness hold in check the impulses of a restless spirit. This man, then, having ascended the tribunal was hailed as Augustus, and when someone asked how Numerian had been slain, he drew his sword and pointing to Aper, the prefect of the guard, he drove it through him, saying as he did so, "It is he who contrived Numerian's death.''

Eutropius summarized a long and important reign: DIOCLETIAN, a native of Dalmatia, [was] of such extremely obscure birth, that he is said by most writers to have been the son of a clerk, but by some to have been a freedman of a senator named Anulinus. . . . He soon after overthrew Carinus, who was living under the utmost hatred and detestation, in a great battle at Margum, Carinus being betrayed by his own troops, for though he had a greater number of men than the enemy, he was altogether abandoned by them between Viminacium and mount Aureus. He thus became master of the Roman empire; and when the peasants in Gaul made an insurrection, giving their faction the name of Bagaudae, and having for leaders Amandus and Aelianus, he despatched Maximian Herculius, with the authority of Caesar, to suppress them. Maximian, in a few battles of little importance, subdued the rustic multitude, and restored peace to Gaul. . . .

Diocletian promoted MAXIMIAN HERCULIUS from the dignity of Caesar to that of emperor, and created Constantius and Maximian Galerius Caesars, of whom Constantius is said to have been the grand-nephew of Claudius by a daughter, and Maximian Galerius to have been born in Dacia not far from Sardica. That he might also unite them by affinity, Constantius married Theodora the step-daughter of Herculius, by whom he had afterwards six children, brothers to Constantine; while Galerius married Valeria, the daughter of Diocletian; both being obliged to divorce the wives that they had before. . . .

Diocletian, meanwhile, besieging Achilleus in Alexandria, obliged him to surrender about eight months after, and put him to death. He used his victory, indeed, cruelly, and distressed all Egypt with severe proscriptions and massacres. Yet at the same time he made many judicious arrangements and regulations, which continue to our own days. . . .

Diocletian was of a crafty disposition, with much sagacity, and keen penetration. He was willing to gratify his own disposition to cruelty in such a way as to throw the odium upon others; he was however a very active and able prince. He was the first that introduced into the Roman empire a ceremony suited rather to royal usages than to Roman liberty, giving orders that he should be adored, whereas all emperors before him were only saluted. He put ornaments of precious stones on his dress and shoes, when the imperial distinction had previously been only in the purple robe, the rest of the habit being the same as that of other men. . . .

But when Diocletian, as age bore heavily upon him, felt himself unable to sustain the government of the empire, he suggested to Herculius that they should both retire into private life, and commit the duty of upholding the state to more vigorous and youthful hands. With this suggestion his colleague reluctantly complied. Both of them, in the same day, exchanged the robe of empire for an ordinary dress, Diocletian at Nicomedia, Herculius at Milan, soon after a magnificent triumph which they celebrated at Rome over several nations, with a noble succession of pictures, and in which the wives, sisters, and children of Narseus were led before their chariots. The one then retired to Salonae, and the other into Lucania.

Diocletian lived to an old age in a private station, at a villa which is not far from Salonae, in honourable retirement, exercising extraordinary philosophy, inasmuch as he alone of all men, since the foundation of the Roman empire, voluntarily returned from so high a dignity to the condition of private life, and to an equality with the other citizens. That happened to him, therefore, which had happened to no one since men were created, that, though he died in a private condition, he was enrolled among the gods.
Blindado
MaximianusFollisGenio.jpg
1dt Maximianus20 views286-305, 306-308, 310

Quarter Follis

Laureate head, right, IMP C M A MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
Genius standing left, with modius on head, cornucopia & patera, GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, SIS in exergue

RIC 146

Eutropius records: [Diocletian] thus became master of the Roman empire; and when the peasants in Gaul made an insurrection, giving their faction the name of Bagaudae, and having for leaders Amandus and Aelianus, he despatched Maximian Herculius, with the authority of Caesar, to suppress them. Maximian, in a few battles of little importance, subdued the rustic multitude, and restored peace to Gaul. . . . While disorder thus prevailed throughout the world, while Carausius was taking arms in Britain and Achilleus in Egypt, while the Quinquegentiani were harassing Africa, and Narseus was making war upon the east, Diocletian promoted MAXIMIAN HERCULIUS from the dignity of Caesar to that "of emperor, and created Constantius and Maximian Galerius Caesars. . . .

Maximian the emperor, brought the war to an end in Africa, by subduing the Quinquegentiani, and compelling them to make peace. . . .

Herculius was undisguisedly cruel, and of a violent temper, and showed his severity of disposition in the sternness of his looks. Gratifying his own inclination, he joined with Diocletian in even the most cruel of his proceedings. But when Diocletian, as age bore heavily upon him, felt himself unable to sustain the government of the empire, he suggested to Herculius that they should both retire into private life, and commit the duty of upholding the state to more vigorous and youthful hands. With this suggestion his colleague reluctantly complied. Both of them, in the same day, exchanged the robe of empire for an ordinary dress, Diocletian at Nicomedia, Herculius at Milan, soon after a magnificent triumph which they celebrated at Rome over several nations, with a noble succession of pictures, and in which the wives, sisters, and children of Narseus were led before their chariots. The one then retired to Salonae, and the other into Lucania.

But after the death of Constantius, CONSTANTINE, his son by a wife of obscure birth, was made emperor in Britain, and succeeded his father as a most desirable ruler. In the meantime the praetorian guards at Rome, having risen in insurrection, declared MAXENTIUS, the son of Maximian Herculius, who lived in the Villa Publica not far from the city, emperor. At the news of this proceeding, Maximian, filled with hopes of regaining the imperial dignity, which he had not willingly resigned, hurried to Rome from Lucania. . . , and stimulated Diocletian by letters to resume the authority that he had laid down, letters which Diocletian utterly disregarded. Severus Caesar, being despatched to Rome by Galerius to suppress the rising of the guards and Maxentius, arrived there with his army, but, as he was laying siege to the city, was deserted through the treachery of his soldiers.

The power of Maxentius was thus increased, and his government established. Severus, taking to flight, was killed at Ravenna. Maximian Herculius, attempting afterwards, in an assembly of the army, to divest his son Maxentius of his power, met with nothing but mutiny and reproaches from the soldiery. He then set out for Gaul, on a planned stratagem, as if he had been driven away by his son, that he might join his son-in-law Constantine, designing, however, if he could find an opportunity, to cut off Constantine, who was ruling in Gaul with great approbation both of the soldiers and the people of the province, having overthrown the Franks and Alemanni with great slaughter, and captured their kings, whom, on exhibiting a magnificent show of games, he exposed to wild beasts. But the plot being made known by Maximian's daughter Fausta, who communicated the design to her husband, Maximian was cut off at Marseilles, whence he was preparing to sail to join his son, and died a well-deserved death. . . .
Blindado
LiciniusFollisIovi.jpg
1ea Licinius16 views308-324

Follis

Laureate head, right, IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG
Jupiter standing left with thunderbolt and sceptre, eagle at foot with wreath in its beak, A over μ (Mu) over dot in right field, dot SIS dot in ex, IOVI CONSERVATORI

RIC 225a var

According to Zonaras: Maximinus took as colleague in his rule Licinius, who derived his lineage from the Dacians and was the brother-in-law of Constantine the Great. After he had made him colleague in his sovereignty and left him in Illyricum to defend the Thracians, who were being plundered by barbarians, he himself proceeded to Rome, to battle against Maxentius. Then, being suspicious of his own soldiers and fearing lest they desert to the enemy, he desisted from battle and departed. He regretted his appointment of Licinius, first plotted secretly against him, and then openly joined battle with him. He attacked him, was repulsed, defeated, and fled, and in his flight did away with himself. . . .

Eutropius adds: CONSTANTINE, being a man of great energy, bent upon effecting whatever he had settled in his mind, and aspiring to the sovereignty of the whole world, proceeded to make war on Licinius, although he had formed a connexion with him by marriage, for his sister Constantia was married to Licinius. And first of all be overthrew him, by a sudden attack, at Cibalae in Pannonia, where he was making vast preparations for war; and after becoming master of Dardania, Maesia, and Macedonia, took possession also of several other provinces.

There were then various contests between them, and peace made and broken. At last Licinius, defeated in a battle at Nicomedia by sea and land, surrendered himself, and, in violation of an oath taken by Constantine, was put to death, after being divested of the purple, at Thessalonica.
Blindado
ConstantinusFollisSol.jpg
1ec_2 Constantine the Great16 views307-337

Follis

Laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right, IMP CONSTANTINVS PF AVG
Sol standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, raising right hand and holding globe in left hand, captive to left. Mintmark RQ.

RIC VII 52

According to Zonaras: Constans, in the eleventh year of his reign since he had been proclaimed Caesar, having ruled gently and mildly, came to the end of his life while residing in Britain, having, because of his goodness, bequeathed grief for himself among those he ruled, first having appointed successor the elder of his own sons, namely Constantine the Great, whom he begat by his first wife. He also had by his second wife, Herculius’ daughter Theodora, other sons, Constantinus, Hannibalianus, and Constantius. Constantine the Great was preferred over them, since they were judged by their father to be unsuited for sovereignty. . . . Constantine, when he was still a lad, was actually given by his father as a hostage to Gallerius, in order that, serving as a hostage, at the same time he be trained in the exercise of the soldierly art.

Eutropius summarizes: CONSTANTINE, being a man of great energy, bent upon effecting whatever he had settled in his mind, and aspiring to the sovereignty of the whole world, proceeded to make war on Licinius, although he had formed a connexion with him by marriage,5 for his sister Constantia was married to Licinius. And first of all be overthrew him, by a sudden attack, at Cibalae in Pannonia, where he was making vast preparations for war; and after becoming master of Dardania, Maesia, and Macedonia, took possession also of several other provinces.

There were then various contests between them, and peace made and broken. At last Licinius, defeated in a battle at Nicomedia by sea and land, surrendered himself, and, in violation of an oath taken by Constantine, was put to death, after being divested of the purple, at Thessalonica.

At this time the Roman empire fell under the sway of one emperor and three Caesars, a state of things which had never existed before; the sons of Constantine ruling over Gaul, the east, and Italy. But the pride of prosperity caused Constantine greatly to depart from his former agreeable mildness of temper. Falling first upon his own relatives, he put to death his son, an excellent man; his sister's son, a youth of amiable disposition; soon afterwards his wife, and subsequently many of his friends.

He was a man, who, in the beginning of his reign, might have been compared to the best princes; in the latter part of it, only to those of a middling character. Innumerable good qualities of mind and body were apparent in him; he was exceedingly ambitious of military glory, and had great success in his wars; a success, however, not more than proportioned to his exertions. After he had terminated the Civil war, he also overthrew the Goths on various occasions, granting them at last peace, and leaving on the minds of the barbarians a strong remembrance of his kindness. He was attached to the arts of peace and to liberal studies, and was ambitious of honourable popularity, which he, indeed, sought by every kind of liberality and obligingness. Though he was slow, from suspicion, to serve some of his friends,6 yet he was exceedingly generous towards others, neglecting no opportunity to add to their riches and honours.

He enacted many laws, some good and equitable, but most of them superfluous, and some severe. He was the first that endeavoured to raise the city named after him to such a height as to make it a rival to Rome. As he was preparing for war against the Parthians, who were then disturbing Mesopotamia, he died in the Villa Publica, at Nicomedia, in the thirty-first year of his reign, and the sixty-sixth of his age.

Zosimus described Constantine's conversion to Christianity: For he put to death his son Crispus, stiled (as I mentioned) Caesar, on suspicion of debauching his mother-in-law Fausta, without any regard to the ties of nature. And when his own mother Helena expressed much sorrow for this atrocity, lamenting the young man's death with great bitterness, Constantine under pretence of comforting her, applied a remedy worse than the disease. For causing a bath to be heated to an extraordinary degree, he shut up Fausta in it, and a short time after took her out dead. Of which his conscience accusing him, as also of violating his oath, he went to the priests to be purified from his crimes. But they told him, that there was no kind of lustration that was sufficient to clear him of such enormities. A Spaniard, named Aegyptius, very familiar with the court-ladies, being at Rome, happened to fall into converse with Constantine, and assured him, that the Christian doctrine would teach him how to cleanse himself from all his offences, and that they who received it were immediately absolved from all their sins. Constantine had no sooner heard this than he easily believed what was told him, and forsaking the rites of his country, received those which Aegyptius offered him ; and for the first instance of his impiety, suspected the truth of divination.
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ValentinianIIAE3UrbsRom.jpg
1et Valentinian II18 views373-392

AE3, Nicomedia

Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust rightt, D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG
Roma seated on cuirass, holding spear and Victory on globe, VRBS ROMA

The SMN mintmark indicates that the coin was minted in Nicomedia, but RIC does not list this reverse type for that mint.

Sim to RIC 51

Zosimus reports: Valentinian being dead, the tribunes Merobaudes and Equitius, reflecting on the distance at which Valens and Gratian resided, the former being in the east, and the latter left by his father in the western part of Gaul, were apprehensive lest the Barbarians beyond the Ister should make an effort while the country was without a ruler. They therefore sent for the younger son of Valentinian, who was born of his wife the widow of Magnentius, who was not far from thence with the child. Having clothed him in purple, they brought him into the court, though scarcely five years old. The empire was afterwards divided between Gratian and the younger Valentinian, at the discretion of their guardians, they not being of age to manage their own affairs. The Celtic nations, Spain, and Britain were given to Gratian; and Italy, Illyricum, and Africa to Valentinian. . . .

Affairs being thus situated in the east, in Thrace, and in Illyricum, Maximus, who deemed his appointments inferior to his merits, being only governor of the countries formerly under Gratian, projected how to depose the young Valentinian from the empire, if possible totally, but should he fail in the whole, to secure at least some part. . . . he immediately entered Italy without; resistance, and marched to Aquileia. . . . This so much surprised Valentinian, and rendered his situation so desperate, that his courtiers were alarmed lest he should be taken by Maximus and put to death. He, therefore, immediately embarked,and sailed to Thessalonica with his mother Justina, who, as I before mentioned, had been the wife of Magnentius, but after his decease was taken in marriage by the emperor Valentinian on account of her extraordinary beauty. She carried along with her her daughter Galla. After having passed many seas, and arriving at Thessalonica, they sent messengers to the emperor Theodosius, intreating him now at least to revenge the injuries committed against the family of Valentinian. He was astonished at hearing of this, and began to forget his extravagance, and to lay some restraint on his wild inclination for pleasure. . . . Theodosius then delivered to Valentinian as much of the empire as his father had possessed; in which he only acted as he was enjoined by his duty to those who so merited his kindness. . . .

intelligence was brought that the emperor Valentianian was no more, and that his death happened in this manner: Arbogastes, a Frank, who was appointed by the emperor Gratian lieutenant to Baudo, at the death of Baudo, confiding in his own ability, assumed the command without the emperor's permission. Being thought proper for the station by all the soldiers under him, both for his valour and experience in military affairs, and for his disregard of riches, he attained great influence. He thus became so elevated, that he would speak without reserve to the emperor, and would blame any measure which he thought improper. This gave such umbrage to Valentinian. . . .

Eugenius became the sincere friend of Arbogastes, who had no secret which he did not confide to him. Recollecting Eugenius, therefore, at this juncture, who by his extraordinary learning and the gravity of his conversation seemed well-adapted for the management of an empire, he communicated to him his designs. But finding him not pleased with the proposals, he attempted to prevail on him by all the arts he could use, and entreated him not to reject what fortune so favourably offered. Having at length persuaded him, he deemed it advisable in the first place to remove Valentinian, and thus to deliver the sole authority to Eugenius. With this view he proceeded to Vienna, a town in Gaul, where the emperor resided; and as he was amusing himself near the town in some sports with the soldiers, apprehending no danger, Arbogastes gave him a mortal wound.
Blindado
IMG_2944.JPG
2 Constantius II9 viewsConstantius II AE3. D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, globe in hand / FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, emperor bare headed and in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives wearing Phrygian helmets kneeling, leaning to the left before him, star in left field. Mintmark SMNA

Nicomedia
RIC VIII 71
Randygeki(h2)
Tib_Constantine_Follis.jpg
20. Tiberius II8 viewsTiberius II
AE follis, Nicomedia

DM TIb CONSTANT PP AVG, crowned, mantled bust facing, holding mappa and eagle-tipped sceptre, cross above eagle / Large m, ANNO left, cross above, regnal year to right, mintmark
NIKOA.

SB 441, MIB 35 VF
1 commentsSosius
nicomedia4.jpg
200 Constantine I11 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG three string pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNB
hill132
nicomedia5.jpg
201 Constantine I7 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG three string pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNA
hill132
IMG_6965~0.JPG
201. Theodosius II (402-450 A.D.) 28 viewsAv.: DN THEODOSIVS PF AVG
Rv.: GLORIA ROMANORVM
Behind bust: star
Ex.: SMNA

AE Follis Ø15 / 1.5g
RIC X 147 Nicomedia
Juancho
nicomedia6.jpg
202 Constantine I11 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIA AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: MNA
hill132
nicomedia7.jpg
203 Contantine I8 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNB
hill132
nicomedia8.jpg
204 Constantine I10 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above, double base
ex: SMNA
hill132
nicomedia9_copy.jpg
20520 viewshill132
nicomedia9.jpg
205 Constantine I10 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMN(epsilon)
hill132
nicomedia10.jpg
206 Constantine I8 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNB
hill132
nicomedia11.jpg
207 Constantine I11 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNA
hill132
nicomedia12.jpg
208 Constantine I10 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrent star above
ex: SMN(delta)
hill132
nicomedia13.jpg
209 Constantine I11 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMN(delta)
hill132
20c-Constantine-Nic-043.jpg
20c. Constantine: Nicomedia.31 viewsAE3, 321-324, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG / Radiate bust of Constantine.
Reverse: IOVI CONSERVATORI / Jupiter standing, holding Victory; eagle at left, captive at right.
Mint mark: SMNB
2.83 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #43; PBCC #1004; Sear #15950.
Callimachus
nicomedia14.jpg
210 Constantine II8 viewsobv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C laur. drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNA
hill132
nicomedia15.jpg
211 Constantine I8 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNA
hill132
nicomedia16.jpg
212 Constantius II18 viewsobv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C bare-headed drp. cuir bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMN(delta)
hill132
nicomedia17.jpg
213 Constantine I9 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TIVS AVG laur. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex:SMNA
hill132
nicomedia18_copy.jpg
21417 viewshill132
nicomedia18.jpg
214 Constantius II15 viewsobv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C laur drp. cuir. bust l.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAES(dot) campgate with two turrents star above
ex: NB
hill132
nicomedia19.jpg
215 Constantine I12 viewsobv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C laur. drp. cuir. bust r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNr
hill132
nicomedia20~0.jpg
21631 views1 commentshill132
nicomedia20.jpg
216 Constantine I18 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrets star above
ex: SMN(delta)
1 commentshill132
nicomedia21.jpg
217 Constantine I27 viewsobv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG pearl dia. head r.
rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG campgate with two turrents star above
ex: SMNB
hill132
22110.jpg
22110 Constantine/Campgate4 viewsConstantine I/Campgate
Obv: CONSTAN_TINVS AVG
Pearl-diademed head right
Rev: PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG
Campgate with six rows, two turrets, no doors, star above, 5 Rows
SMNS in exergue
Mint:Nicomedia 19.7mm 2.89g
AE3, 328-329, Nicomedia, Officina 6
RIC VII, 153
Ex Frascatius
Blayne W
24o-Constantine-II-Nic-123.jpg
24b. Constantine II: Nicomedia.34 viewsAE3, 325-26, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C / Laureate bust of Constantine II facing left.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE CAESS / Camp gate with two turrets, star above.
Mint mark: MNΓ
3.60 gm., 19 mm.
RIC #123; LRBC #1104/05; Sear #17247.
1 commentsCallimachus
24g-Constantine-Nic-153.jpg
24g. Constantine: Nicomedia.15 viewsAE3, 328 - 329, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG / Diademed bust of Constantine.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE AVGG / Camp gate with two turrets, star above.
Mint mark: SMNS
2.63 gm., 17.5 mm.
RIC #153; LRBC #1107; Sear #16260.
Callimachus
IMG_2612.JPG
3 Constans33 viewsConstans
AE3, D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand. / FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs. Star in upper left field. Mintmark SMNA.

Nicomedia
RIC VIII 72
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
ConVIINico90~0.jpg
307-337 AD - Constantine I - RIC VII Nicomedia 090 - PROVIDENTIAE AVGG48 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 324-325 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
Emperor Constantine
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG
The Emperors have foresight.
Camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above, six stone layers.
Exergue: SMNE (Nicomedia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VII Nicomedia 90; VM 85
2.41g; 19.3mm; 330°
Pep
MaxIIVINico74b.jpg
309-313 AD - Maximinus II Daia - RIC VI Nicomedia 074b - GENIO AVGVSTI27 viewsEmperor: Maximinus II Daia (r. 309-313 AD)
Date: ca. 312 AD (later)
Condition: VF/Fine
Denomination: Follis

Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG
Imperator Caesar Galerius Valerius Maximinus Wise and Dutiful Emperor
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: GENIO A-VGVSTI
Genius of the Emperors.
Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, right holding patera (from which liquor flows), left cornucopiae; to left, altar.
"*" over "A" in right field
Exergue: SMN (Nicomedia mint, 1st officina)

RIC VI Nicomedia 74b; VM 8
4.21g; 21.3mm; 180°
Pep
coin398.JPG
322. Numerian30 viewsMarcus Aurelius Numerius Numerianus was the younger son of the later emperor Carus, born in about AD 253.
Numerian and his elder brother Carinus were raised to the rank of Caesar in AD 282, soon after their father became emperor.

In AD 282 Numerian accompanied his father to the Danube to defeat the Sarmatians and the Quadi.
Then in December AD 282 or January AD 283 Carus took Numerian with him on his expedition against the Persians to re-conquer Mesopotamia. Meanwhile Carinus stayed in Rome to rule the west.

When Carus died, Numerian succeeded him, thereby becoming joint emperor with his brother Carinus who had been granted the rank of Augustus shortly before Carus' death.

At first, immediately after his father's death, Numerian sought to continue the Persian campaign.
Apparently this was much favoured by Arrius Aper, the prefect of the praetorians and suspect in Carus' death. Conditions for war were favourable. The Persian side was still thought to be weak. But Numerian's initial efforts were not followed by success.
Numerian was to all effect appeared more of an intellectual than a man of war. He wrote poetry, some of which won him critical acclaim in his day.
This lack of ruthless military talent might well have been the reason why Carinus alone had been promoted Augustus, while Numerian remained Caeasar (junior emperor).
And so, after these initial setbacks, Numerian decided it unwise to continue the war.
He sought instead to return back to Rome and the army was not displeased to pull back into Syria were it spent the winter of AD 283.
Thereafter the army set out on its march back west through Asia Minor (Turkey).
Numerian fell ill near Nicomedia, suffering from an eye disease, which he might have caught while still on campaign in Mesopotamia with his father. The illness was explained with severe exhaustion (Today it is believed this was a serious eye infection. This left him partly blind and he had to be carried in a litter.

Somewhere at this time it is believed Arrius Aper, Numerian's own father in-law, had him killed. It;s widely believed that Aper hoped that it would be assumed that Numerian had simply succumbed to his illness and that he, the praetorian prefect, would succeed to the throne in his place.
But why he should have kept up the charade that Numerian was still alive remains a mystery. Perhaps he was waiting for he right moment.
For several days the death went unnoticed, the litter being carried along as usual. Soldiers inquired about their emperor's health and were reassured by Aper, that all was well and that Numerian simply was too ill to appear in public.

Eventually though the stench of the corpse became too much. Numerian's death was revealed and the soldiers realized that Rome had lost yet another emperor (AD 284).

Had it been Aper who hoped to fill the vacancy, then it was Diocletian (still known as Diocles at the time), commander of the imperial bodyguard, who emerged the victor. It was Diocletian who was made emperor by the troops after Numerian's death. It was he who sentenced Aper to death and even executed the sentence himself. Therefore it was he who, benefited most from the deaths of Carus and Numerian. And in his role as body guard he held a key position, enabling him to prevent or enable any action against the emperor. Hence it is unlikely that Diocletian did not have anything to do with the murder of Numerian.

Numerian Antoninianus / Numerian with globe and spear

Attribution: RIC 361
Date: 282-283 AD
Obverse: M AVR NVMERIANVS NOB C, radiate bust r.
Reverse: PRINCIPI IVVENTVT, Numerian l. holding globe and spear
Size: 22.39 mm
Weight: 3.5 grams
Description: A nice ant of a scarcer emperor while serving as Caesar
ecoli
CsIIVIINico191.jpg
324-337 AD - Constantius II as Caesar - RIC VII Nicomedia 191 - GLORIA EXERCITVS27 viewsCaesar: Constantius II (Caes. 324-337 AD)
Date: 330-335 AD
Condition: VF
Size: AE3

Obverse: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
Flavius Julius Constantius Noble Caesar
Bust right; laureate, draped and cuirassed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Glory of the Army.
Two soldiers, helmeted, standing looking at one another, reversed spear in outer hands, inner hands on shield resting on ground; between them, two standards.
Exergue: SMNE (Nicomedia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VII Nicomedia 191; VM 72
2.42g; 17.9mm; 0°
Pep
CSIIVIIINico6.jpg
337-361 AD - Constantius II - RIC VIII Nicomedia 006 - GLORIA EXERCITVS32 viewsEmperor: Constantius II (r. 337-361 AD)
Date: 337-340 AD
Condition: VF
Size: AE4

Obverse: D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG
Our Lord Constantius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Head right; rosette-diademed

Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
Glory of the Army.
Two helmeted soldiers facing, heads turned towards each other; each holds an inverted spear and rests on a shield; between them, a standard.
Exergue: SMNE (Nicomedia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VIII Nicomedia 6
1.71g; 16.4mm; 330°
Pep
CsIIVIIINico89.jpg
337-361 AD - Constantius II - RIC VIII Nicomedia 089 - FEL TEMP REPARATIO24 viewsEmperor: Constantius II (r. 337-361 AD)
Date: 351-355 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG
Our Lord Constantius Dutiful and Wise Emperor
Bust right; laureate, draped and cuirassed
"Δ" behind bust

Reverse: FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO
The restoration of happy times.
Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right; horseman is beardless and wears cap; he turns to face soldier and extends right arm.
Exergue: SMNE (Nicomedia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VIII Nicomedia 89; VM 90
3.95g; 18.2mm; 345°
Pep
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4 Constantius II30 viewsConstantius II
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right / FEL TEMP REPARATIO, radiate phoenix standing right on globe. SMNS in ex
RIC VIII Nicomedia 73A R3
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
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405. CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar53 viewsBorn March 31st, Emperor Flavius Valerius Constantius may have come into the world ca. 250. His family was from Illyricum. In the army he served as a protector, tribunus, and a praeses Dalmatiarum. During the 270s or the 280s, he became the father of Constantine by Helena, his first spouse. By 288 he was the Praetorian Prefect of the western emperor Maximianus Herculius.

On 1 March 293 Diocletian appointed Galerius as his Caesar (junior emperor) in the east and Constantius as the Caesar of Maximianus Herculius. Caesar in the west. Both Caesars had the right of succession. In order to strengthen the dynastic relationship between himself and Herculius., Constantius put aside his wife Helena and married Theodora, the daughter, or perhaps stepdaughter, of Maximianus Herculius. The union was fruitful and of it there were six issue: Flavius Dalmatius, Julius Constantius, Hannibalianus, Constantia, Anastasia, and Eutropia. To strengthen his bond with Galerius and Diocletian in the east, Constantius allowed Galerius to keep his son Constantine as a hostage for his good behavior.

In the remainder of the time that he was a Caesar, Constantius spent much of his time engaged in military actions in the west. In the summer of 293 Constantius expelled the troops of the usurper Carausius from northern Gaul; after Constantius' attack on Bononia (Boulogne), Carausius was murdered. At the same time he dealt with the unrest of the Germans. In 296 he invaded Britain and put down the revolt of the usurper Allectus. Between 300 and 305 A.D. the Caesar campaigned successfully several times with various German tribes. It is worth noting in passing, that while his colleagues rigidly enforced the "Great Persecution in 303," Constantius limited his action to knocking down a few churches.

On 1 May 305 Diocletian, at Nicomedia, and Maximianus Herculius, at Mediolanum (Milan), divested themselves of the purple, probably because of the almost fatal illness that Diocletian contracted toward the end of 304. Diocletian forced Maximianus to abdicate. They appointed as their successors Constantius and Galerius, with Severus and Maximinus Daia as the new Caesars. The retired emperors then returned to private life. Constantius, as had his predecessor, ruled in the west, while Galerius and Daia ruled in the east. Almost as soon as he was appointed Augustus, he crossed to Britain to face incursions by the Picts where he died at York on 25 July 306 with his son at his side.


CONSTANTIUS I, as Caesar. 293-305 AD. Æ Follis (9.24 gm). Lugdunum mint. Struck 301-303 AD. CONSTANTIVS NO[B CAE]S, laureate and draped bust right, holding spear over right shoulder and shield at left / [GENIO POPV]LI ROMANI; altar-B/PLC. RIC VI 136a. VF, brown patina, some silvering. Ex CNG
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405a. Helena104 viewsFlavia Iulia Helena, also known as Saint Helena, Saint Helen, Helena Augusta, and Helena of Constantinople, (c.248 - c.329) was the first wife of Constantius Chlorus, and the mother of Emperor Constantine I. She is traditionally credited with finding the relics of the True Cross.

Many legends surround her. She was allegedly the daughter of an innkeeper. Her son Constantine renamed the city of Drepanum on the Gulf of Nicomedia as 'Helenopolis' in her honor, which led to later interpretions that Drepanum was her birthplace.

Constantius Chlorus divorced her (c.292) to marry the step-daughter of Maximian, Flavia Maximiana Theodora. Helena's son, Constantine, became emperor of the Roman Empire, and following his elevation she became a presence at the imperial court, and received the title Augusta.

She is considered by the Orthodox and Catholic churches as a saint, famed for her piety. Eusebius records the details of her pilgrimage to Palestine and other eastern provinces. She is traditionally credited (but not by Eusebius) with the finding of relics of the True Cross (q.v.), and finding the remains of the Three Wise Men, which currently reside in the Shrine of the Three Kings at Cologne Cathedral. Her feast day as a saint of the Orthodox Christian Church is celebrated with her son on May 21, the Feast of the Holy Great Sovereigns Constantine and Helen, Equal to the Apostles. Her feast day in the Roman Catholic Church falls on August 18.

At least 25 sacred wells currently exist in Britain that were dedicated to her. She is also the patron saint of Colchester.

Helena Follis. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right / SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, holding branch in right hand; PTR(crescent) in ex.
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406. Galerius40 viewsChristians had lived in peace during most of the rule of Diocletian. The persecutions that began with an edict of February 24, 303, were credited by Christians to the influence of Galerius. Christian houses of assembly were destroyed, for fear of sedition in secret gatherings.

Detail of the Arch of Galerius in Thessaloniki.In 305, on the abdication of Diocletian and Maximian, he at once assumed the title of Augustus, with Constantius his former colleague, and having procured the promotion to the rank of Caesar of Flavius Valerius Severus, a faithful servant, and (Maximinus II Daia), his nephew, he hoped on the death of Constantius to become sole master of the Roman world. Having Constantius' son Constantine as guest at Galerius' court in the east helped to secure his position.

His schemes, however, were defeated by the sudden elevation of Constantine at Eboracum (York) upon the death of his father, and by the action of Maximianus and his son Maxentius, who were declared co-Augusti in Italy.

After an unsuccessful invasion of Italy in 307, he elevated his friend Licinius to the rank of Augustus, and moderating his ambition, he retired to the city Felix Romuliana (near present day Gamzigrada,Serbia/Montenegro)built by him to honor his mother Romula, and devoted the few remaining years of his life "to the enjoyment of pleasure and to the execution of some works of public utility."

It was at the instance of Galerius that the last edicts of persecution against the Christians were published, beginning on February 24, 303, and this policy of repression was maintained by him until the appearance of the general edict of toleration, issued from Nicomedia in April 311, apparently during his last bout of illness, in his own name and in those of Licinius and Constantine. Lactantius gives the text of the edict in his moralized chronicle of the bad ends to which all the persecutors came, De Mortibus Persecutorum ("On the Deaths of the Persecutors", chapters 34, 35). This marked the end of official persecution of Christians.

Galerius as Caesar, 305-311AD. GENIO POPVLI ROMANI reverse type with Genius standing left holding scales and cornucopia
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410. Licinius I42 viewsFlavius Galerius Valerius Licinianus Licinius (c. 250 - 325) was Roman emperor from 308 to 324.

Of Dacian peasant origin, born in Moesia Superior, Licinius accompanied his close friend the Emperor Galerius on the Persian expedition in 297. After the death of Flavius Valerius Severus, Galerius elevated Licinius to the rank of Augustus in the West on November 11, 308. He received as his immediate command the provinces of Illyricum, Thrace and Pannonia.

On the death of Galerius, in May 311, Licinius shared the entire empire with Maximinus Daia, the Hellespont and the Bosporus being the dividing line.

In March 313 he married Flavia Julia Constantia, half-sister of Constantine, at Mediolanum (now Milan), the occasion for the jointly-issued "Edict of Milan" that restored confiscated properties to Christian congregations though it did not "Christianize" the Empire as is often assumed, although it did give Christians a better name in Rome. In the following month (April 30), Licinius inflicted a decisive defeat on Maximinus at Battle of Tzirallum, after Maximinus had tried attacking him. He then established himself master of the East, while his brother-in-law, Constantine, was supreme in the West.

In 314 his jealousy led him to encourage a treasonable enterprise in favor of Bassianus against Constantine. When his actions became known, a civil war ensued, in which he was first defeated at the battle of Cibalae in Pannonia (October 8, 314), and next some 2 years later (after naming Valerius Valens co-emperor) in the plain of Mardia (also known as Campus Ardiensis) in Thrace. The outward reconciliation left Licinius in possession of Thrace, Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt, but he later added numerous provinces to Constantine's control.

In 324 Constantine, tempted by the "advanced age and unpopular vices" of his colleague, again declared war against him, and, having defeated his army at the battle of Adrianople (July 3, 324), succeeded in shutting him up within the walls of Byzantium. The defeat of the superior fleet of Licinius by Flavius Julius Crispus, Constantine’s eldest son, compelled his withdrawal to Bithynia, where a last stand was made; the battle of Chrysopolis, near Chalcedon (September 18), resulted in his final submission. He was interned at Thessalonica under a kind of house arrest, but when he attempted to raise troops among the barbarians Constantine had him and his former co-emperor Martinianus assassinated.

O: IMP LICINIVS AVG; Emperor, facing left, wearing imperial mantle, holding mappa and globe.
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG; Jupiter standing left holding Victory; palm to left, epsilon in right field, SMN in exergue. Sear 3804, RIC Nicomedia 24 (Scarce), Failmezger #278. Remarkable detail on this nicely silvered Late Roman bronze, ex Crisp Collection.

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45720 viewsLeo I
AE4
Obv: DN LEO PERPET AV
Diademed draped bust right
Rev: No legend apart from NIC in exergue
Emperor standing right holding cross and raising captive
Nicomedia mint
cf RIC X 708

The obverse legend appears to terminate AV, instead of AVG
mauseus
Diocletian_Black.jpg
49 Diocletian RIC 2926 viewsDIOCLETIAN 284-305 AD. AE large silvered follis. Nicomedia mint, 303-304 AD. (28mm, 8.6g) Obv: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right. Rev: GENIO POPVLI ROMANI, Genius standing left, pouring a libation from patera & holding cornucopiae, SMN in exergue.
RIC 29

Ex: Incitatus Coins
Paddy
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501. Constantine I Nicomedia GLORIA EXERCITVS19 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 188
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501. Constantine I Nicomedia Gloria Exeritvs 17 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS

RIC VII Nicomedia 188 R1 for SMNS

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501b. Crispus IOVI CONSERVATORI Nicomedia11 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 48 R2

Ex-Varangian
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502. Constantine II Nicomedia GLORIA EXERCITVS10 viewsDN CONSTAN-TINVS PF AVG
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS

RIC VIII Nicomedia 5 c
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504. Constantius II Campgate Nicomedia 11 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 158 R4
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504. Constantius II Campgate Nicomedia16 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 124 S
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504. Constantius II Campgate Nicomedia17 viewsNicomedia

Titular see of Bithynia Prima, founded by King Zipoetes. About 264 B.C. his son Nicodemes I dedicated the city anew, gave it his name, made it his capital, and adorned it with magnificent monuments. At his court the vanquished Hannibal sought refuge. When Bithynia became a Roman province Nicomedia remained its capital. Pliny the Younger mentions, in his letters to Trajan, several public edifices of the city — a senate house, an aqueduct which he had built, a forum, the temple of Cybele, etc. He also proposed to join the Black Sea with the Sea of Marmora by a canal which should follow the river Sangarius and empty the waters of the Lake of Sabandja into the Gulf of Astacus. A fire then almost destroyed the town. From Nicomedia perhaps, he wrote to Trajan his famous letter concerning the Christians. Under Marcus Aurelius, Dionysius, Bishop of Corinth, addressed a letter to his community warning them against the Marcionites (Eusebius, "Hist. Eccl.", IV, xxiii). Bishop Evander, who opposed the sect of the Ophites (P.L., LIII, 592), seems to have lived at the same time. Nicomedia was the favorite residence of Diocletian, who built there a palace, a hippodrome, a mint, and an arsenal. In 303 the edict of the tenth persecution caused rivers of blood to flow through the empire, especially in Nicomedia, where the Bishop Anthimus and a great many Christians were martyred. The city was then half Christian, the palace itself being filled with them. In 303, in the vast plain east of Nicomedia, Diocletian renounced the empire in favour of Galerius. In 311 Lucian, a priest of Antioch, delivered a discourse in the presence of the judge before he was executed. Other martyrs of the city are numbered by hundreds. Nicomedia suffered greatly during the fourth century from an invasion of the Goths and from an earthquake (24 Aug., 354), which overthrew all the public and private monuments; fire completed the catastrophe. The city was rebuilt, on a smaller scale. In the reign of Justinian new public buildings were erected, which were destroyed in the following century by the Shah Chosroes. Pope Constantine I visited the city in 711. In 1073 John Comnenus was there proclaimed emperor and shortly afterwards was compelled to abdicate. In 1328 it was captured by the Sultan Orkhan, who restored its ramparts, parts of which are still preserved.

RIC VII Nicomedia 158 R2

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504. CONSTANTIUS II Campgate Nicomedia22 viewsCONSTANTIUS II, as Caesar. 324-337 AD. Æ Follis (19mm - 3.21 g). Nicomedia mint. Struck 328-9 AD. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped and cuirassed bust left / PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS•, camp-gate with no doors and two turrets, star above; SMNB. RIC VII 158 note; LRBC -. Good VF, green patina with some spotty silvering. R5
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504. Constantius II Nicomedia GLORIA EXERCITVS8 viewsRIC VIII Nicomedia 11 C2

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508. Julian II VOTA Sirmium9 viewsSirmium

Sirmium was one of the oldest cities in Europe. Archaeologists have found a trace of organized human life dating from the 5000 BC.

When the Romans conquered the city in the 1st century BC, Sirmium already was a settlement with a long tradition.

In the 1st century, Sirmium gained a status of a colony of the citizens of Rome, and became a very important military and strategic location in Pannonia province. The war expeditions of Roman emperors Traian, Marcus Aurelius, and Claudius II, were prepared in Sirmium.

In 103, Pannonia was split into two provinces: Upper Pannonia and Lower Pannonia, and Sirmius became the capital city of Lower Pannonia.

In 296, Diocletian operated a new territorial division of Pannonia. Instead of previous two provinces, there were four new provinces established in former territory of original province: Pannonia Prima, Pannonia Valeria, Pannonia Savia and Pannonia Secunda. Capital city of Pannonia Secunda was Sirmium.

In 293, with the establishment of tetrarchy, the Roman Empire was split into four parts; Sirmium become one of the four capital cities of Roman Empire, the other three being Trier, Mmediolanum, and Nicomedia. During the tetrarchy, Sirmium was the capital of emperor Galerius. With the establishment of praetorian prefectures in 318, the capital of the prefecture of Illyricum was Sirmium. Sirmium was capital of this prefecture until 379, when the prefecture was divided politically into Eastern and Western Illyricum. The western part (including Sirmium) was included into prefecture of Italia. The eastern part of Illyricum remained a separate prefecture with the capital in Thessalonica.

The city also was an important Christian centre. Several Christian councils were held in Sirmium.

008. Julian II Sirmium

RIC VIII Sirmium 108 ASIRM???

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512. Procopius149 viewsProcopius (326 - May 27, 366), was a Roman usurper against Valentinian I, and member of the Constantinian dynasty.

According to Ammianus Marcellinus, Procopius was a native of Cilicia. On his mother's side, Procopius was cousin of Emperor Julian.

Procopius took part in the emperor Julian's campaign against the Persian Empire in 363. He was entrusted of leading 30,000 men towards Armenia, joining King Arsaces, and later return to Julian camp. At the time of Julian's death, there were rumors that he had intended Procopius to be his successor, but when Jovian was elected emperor by the Roman army, Procopius went into hiding to preserve his life. The ancient historians differ on the exact details of Procopius' life in hiding, but agree that he returned to public knowledge at Chalcedon before the house of the senator Strategius suffering from starvation and ignorant of current affairs.

By that time, Jovianus was dead, and Valentinian I shared the purple with his brother Valens. Procopius immediately moved to declare himself emperor. He bribed two legions that were resting at Constantinople to support his efforts, and took control of the imperial city. Shortly after this he proclaimed himself Emperor on September 28, 365, and quickly took control of the provinces of Thrace, and later Bithynia.

Valens was left with the task of dealing with this rebel, and over the next months struggled with both cities and units that wavered in their allegiance. Eventually their armies met at the Battle of Thyatira, and Procopius' forces were defeated. He fled the battlefield, but was betrayed to Valens by two of his remaining followers. Valens had all three executed May 27, 366.


Procopius - Usurper in the east, 365-6 , AE-3, Nicomedia mint


2.90g

Obv: Bust of Procopius, beared left "DN PROCOPIVS PF AVG"

Rev: Procopius standing head right, foot resting on a prow and leaning on a shield. "REPARATIO FEL TEMP" "SMNG" in the exergue.

RIC 10
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1JustinI518AD.jpg
518-527 AD, Justin I25 viewsAe; 29mm; 18.03g

DN IVSTINVS PP AVG
diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right; cross above

Large M, cross above, star in left and right field, A below
NIKM in exergue

DO 29a.2
Nicomedia Mint, July 518- Dec 522, 1st Officina
Robin Ayers
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518-527 Justin I - follis from Nicomedia53 viewsMinted in Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey), in 518-527.
Ginolerhino
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52. Julian II.25 viewsAE 1, 363, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: DN FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG / Diademed bust of Julian II.
Reverse: SECVRITAS REIPVB / Bull standing, two stars above.
Mint mark: NIKΓ between two palm leaves.
8.79 gm., 28 mm.
RIC #121; LRBC #2319; Sear #19159.
Callimachus
3JustinianI527AD.jpg
527-565 AD, Justinian I36 viewsAe Follis; 30mm; 16.15g

DN ISTINI-ANVS PP AVG
Helmeted, draped and cuirassed facing bust, holding globe with cross in right hand, cross in left

Large M, ANNO to the left, cross above, XXXI to right, B below
NIKO in exergue

SB201 (year 31), DOC 137b, MIB 113a
Nicomedia mint
1 commentsRobin Ayers
Denario_Heliogabalo_RIC_188_1.jpg
53-02 - HELIOGABALO (218 - 222 D.C.)34 viewsAR Denario 17 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELICTAS" – Galera navegando a toda vela sobre las olas de izquierda a derecha con 7 remeros, en popa Acrostilium (Adorno/decoración de las antiguas galeras romanas), piloto y estandarte militar (Vexillum), a proa un mástil. “TEMP” en el exergo.

Este reverso conmemora el triunfal regreso a Roma de Heliogábalo desde Nicomedia, donde había asumido como Cónsul ya derrotado Macrinus

Acuñada 218 - 219 D.C.
Ceca: Antioquia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #188 Pag.42 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7510 Pag.603 – BMCRE Vol.5 #277 - Cohen Vol.IV #27 Pag.326 - RSC Vol. III #27a Pag.111 - DVM #26 Pag.207 - Thirion LME #348
1 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_188_Denario_Heliogabalo.jpg
53-10 - HELIOGABALO (218 - 222 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 17 mm 2.2 gr.

Anv: "ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "FELICTAS" – Galera navegando a toda vela sobre las olas de izquierda a derecha con 7 remeros, en popa Acrostilium (Adorno/decoración de las antiguas galeras romanas), piloto y estandarte militar (Vexillum), a proa un mástil. “TEMP” en el exergo.

Este reverso conmemora el triunfal regreso a Roma de Heliogábalo desde Nicomedia, donde había asumido como Cónsul ya derrotado Macrinus

Acuñada 218 - 219 D.C.
Ceca: Antioquia
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #188 Pag.42 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #7510 Pag.603 – BMCRE Vol.5 #277 - Cohen Vol.IV #27 Pag.326 - RSC Vol. III #27a Pag.111 - DVM #26 Pag.207 - Thirion LME #348
mdelvalle
21-Galerius-Nic-54a.jpg
54 Galerius as Augustus: Nicomedia follis.22 viewsFollis, 308 - 310 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG / Laureate bust of Galerius.
Reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI CMH / Genius standing, pouring from patera and holding cornucopiae.
Mint mark: SMND
6.61 gm., 24.5 mm.
RIC #54a; PBCC #964; Sear #14508.

The meaning of the CMH ligature in the reverse inscription is a mystery. It is found on coins from the mints of Nicomedia and Cyzicus. It is generally thought to refer to the value of the coin. One possible suggestion is that it means 100 (C) sestertii struck at a new weight of 48 to the pound (Greek M = 40; Greek H = 8).
Callimachus
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565-578 AD, Justin II & Sophia18 viewsAe Follis; 28-29mm; 11.87g

DNIVSTI-NVS PP AVG
Justin & Sophia, seated facing on double throne

ANNO in left field, cross/Large M/I, U in right field
NIKO in exergue

SB369; Nicomedia mint
Robin Ayers
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79- Licinius-627 viewsPost reform Radiate, 308-324 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG, Radiate cuirasse bust right.
Rev:IOVI CONSERVATORI , Jupiter standing left holding Victory, Phoenix on shoulder, Captive and Eagle at feet, XII(gamma) in right field.
SMNA in exergue.
20mm
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80- Licinius-738 viewsSilvered AE3, 308-324 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP LICINVS AVG, Bust left wearing imperial mantle and holding globe and mappa.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing holding Victory on globe and scepter, palm at feet, (gamma) in field.
SMN in exergue.
20mm
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97-Constantine-7.JPG
97-Constantine The Great -7-S23 viewsAE Follis, 313-317 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI, Jupiter facing , head left, holding victory on globe and sceptre. Eagle at feet with wreath in beak. E in right field.
SMN in exergue.
20mm, 3.0gm
RIC 12, R1
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99-Constantine The Great-921 viewsAE Radiate, 321-324 AD, Nicomedia mint.
Obv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS PF AVG, Radiate , draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI , Jupiter standing, Holding Victory on globe and scepter. Eagle left with wreath in beak, Captive seated right. X/II(gamma) in right field.
SMNB in exergue.
20mm, 2.8gm.
RIC 43
jdholds
Follis Galeria Valeria RIC Nicomedia 57.jpg
A114-10 - GALERIA VALERIA (308 - 311 D.C.)36 viewsAE Follis 24 x 25 mm 6.6 gr.
Hija de Diocleciano y esposa de Galerio.

Anv: "GAL VALERIA AVG" - Busto con diadema, túnica y collar, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENERI VICTRICI CMH(Ligadas)" - Venus de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, portando una manzana en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y levantando su velo con mano izquierda. "SMNA" en exergo.

Acuñada 308 - 310 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: C

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Nicomedia) #57 Pag.562 - Cohen Vol.VII #13 Pag.130 - DVM #3 var Pag.282 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7303.c. var. Pag.77
mdelvalle
Follis Maximino II RIC Nicomedia 69b.jpg
A116-12 - MAXIMINO II Como Augusto solo (311 - 313 D.C.)38 viewsAE Follis 20 mm 4.2 gr.
Sobrino de Galerio.

Anv: "IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de sus dos brazos, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "SMN" en exergo, "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 311 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.2da.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VI (Nicomedia) #69b var (Sin águila a izq.) Pag.566 - Cohen Vol.VII #117 Pag.152 - DVM #16 Pag.283 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III NO LISTADA
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Cuarto_Follis_Maximino_II_Antioch_Vagi_2955.jpg
A116-30 -Acuñacion Civica Anonima Semi-Autonoma (311 - 312 D.C.)39 viewsAE15 ¼ de Follis o Nummus 19 x 15 mm 1.2 gr.
Moneda tradicionalmente atribuida a Julian II hasta que J.Van Heesch en su artículo “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza”, publicado en el Numismatic Chronicle vol.153 Pags. 66 y subsiguientes (1993), realiza un detallado estudio de este tipo de acuñación cívica anónima del cuarto siglo, donde demuestra que estas monedas se acuñaron bajos los auspicios de Maximino II Daya conmemorando “La Gran Persecución” de los Cristianos y por consiguiente la Victoria Pagana, al honrar con ellas a los antiguos dioses grecorromanos Júpiter, Apolo, Tyche, y Serapis. Recordemos que en dicha persecución (desde finales del 311 a finales del 312 D.C.) se cerraron Iglesias, encarcelando y/o desterrando a los cristianos. Esta campaña fue particularmente fuerte en Nicomedia, Antioquia y Alejandría, los tres centros principales del Imperio de Oriente. Estas persecuciones menguaron al año siguiente posiblemente como resultado de la preocupación de Maximino II al provocar abiertamente a los Emperadores Asociados de Occidente Constantino I y Licinio I.

Anv: "IOVI CONS - ERVATORI" – Júpiter semidesnudo, sentado en un trono a izquierda, portando globo en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y largo cetro vertical en la izquierda.
Rev: "VICTOR - IA AVGG" – Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando guirnalda en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y hoja de palma en la izquierda. "ANT" en exergo y "B" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 311 - 312 D.C.
Ceca: Antiochia (Off. 2da.)

Referencias: Cohen Vol.VIII #53 Pag.49 (Julián II) (10f) - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #7952 Pag.94 – Vaggi #2955 - J.Van Heesch “The last Civic Coinages and the Religious Police of Maximinus Daza (1993)” #2.
mdelvalle
Follis Licinio I RIC Nicomedia 15Z.jpg
A119-10 - LICINIO I (308 - 324 D.C.)38 viewsAE Follis 26 x 22 mm 3.9 gr.
Moneda doblemente golpeada, se visualiza en la leyenda del anverso entre las 10 y 12 hs. y en el reverso en el exergo

Anv: "IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG" - Cabeza laureada, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IOVI CONSERVATORI" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. Aguila con una corona en el pico parada a sus piés, a izquierdo con la cabeza vuelta hacia Júpiter. "SMN" en exergo, "N/Z" en campo derecho.

Acuñada 313 - 317 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.7ma.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #15 Pag.601 - Cohen Vol.VII #70 Pag.196 - DVM #15 var Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8009.d. Pag.138
mdelvalle
Follis Licinio II RIC Nicomedia 34A.jpg
A120-15 - LICINIO II Como Cesar de Licinio I (317 - 324 D.C.)34 viewsAE Follis reducido 18 x 17 mm 2.4 gr.

Anv: "D N VAL LICIN LICINIVS NOB C" - Busto laureado, con coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PROVIDENTIAE CAESS" - Júpiter desnudo de pié a izquierda, su manto (Chlamys) colgando de su hombro izquierdo, portando Victoriola en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y un largo cetro vertical en mano izquierda. "SMN" en exergo, "·/A" en campo derecho y "Palma" en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 317 - 320D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #34 Pag.605 - Cohen Vol.VII #39 Pag.219 - DVM #7 Pag.286 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8052.a. Pag.143
mdelvalle
Centenional_Constantino_I_RIC_VII_Nicomedia_153.jpg
A121-27b - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)46 viewsAE3 Centenional 19 mm 3.1 gr.

Anv: "CONSTAN-TINVS AVG" - Cabeza con diadema de perlas, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG" - Puerta de campamento, sin puertas ni ventanas, dos torres, " * " arriba, siete capas de piedras. "SMNΕ" en exergo.

Acuñada 328/9 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: C2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #153 Pag.625 - Cohen Vol.VII #454 Pag.281 - DVM #85 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8271. Pag.168
mdelvalle
Centenional Constantino I RIC VII Nicomedia 188.jpg
A121-64 - Constantino I "El Grande" (307 - 337 D.C.)56 viewsAE3 Centenional 17 x 18 mm 1.7 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG" - Busto con diadema rosetada, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos DOS estandartes. "SMNΔ" en exergo.

Acuñada 330 - 335 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: C1

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #188 Pag.633 - Cohen Vol.VII #254 Pag.258 - DVM #93 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8276.j. Pag.169 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3886
mdelvalle
Centenional Conmemorativa RIC VII Nicomedia 205E.jpg
A121B-30 - Acuñaciones Conmemorativas Roma - Constantinopla43 viewsAE4 Centenional 17 x 16 mm 1.4 gr.

Anv: "VRBS ROMA" - Busto de Roma vistiendo yelmo coronado, con penacho de pluma, coraza y manto imperial, viendo a Izquierda.
Rev: "GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS" - Dos Soldados de pié enfrentados, sosteniendo un escudo y una lanza vertical invertida cada uno. Entre ellos UN estandarte."SMNε" en exergo.

Acuñada 336/7 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.5ta.)
Rareza: R4

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #205 Pag.635 - Cohen Vol.VII #1 Pag.327 - DVM #8 Pag.292 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8312.d. Pag.175 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3891
mdelvalle
Centenional Fausta RIC VII Nicomedia 131.jpg
A122-05 - Fausta (324 - 326 D.C.)38 viewsAE3 Centenional 21 x 19 mm 3.3 gr.
Hija de Maximiano y esposa de Constantino I.

Anv: "FLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG" - Busto a cabeza desnuda y pelo ondeado, vistiendo túnica, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SPES REI-PVBLICAE" - Emperatriz de pié de frente, viendo a izquierda, velada su cabeza sostiene en brazos a sus hijos Constantino II y Constancio II. "MNΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 325/6 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: R3

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #131 Pag.621 - Cohen Vol.VII #15 Pag.336 - DVM #6 Pag.293 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8326.r.2. Pag.175 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3903
1 commentsmdelvalle
Centenional Helena RIC VII Nicomedia 159G.jpg
A123-05 - Helena (318 - 328 D.C.)32 viewsAE3 Centenional 18 mm 2.6 gr.
Esposa/Concubina de Constancio I Cloro y madre de Constantino I.

Anv: "FL HELENA AVGVSTA" - Busto con diadema en forma de banda decorada por cadenas de perlas, vistiendo túnica y collar formado por dos hiladas de perlas, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE" - Securitas/Helena de pié a izquierda, portando una rama en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y bajo y sosteniendo su vestido con mano izquierdo. "SMNΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 328/9 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #159 (Por la forma de la diadema) Pag.626 - Cohen Vol.VII #13 Pag.97 - DVM #3 Pag.293 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8334.l.3. Pag.178 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3908
mdelvalle
Centenional Helena RIC VIII Constantinopolis 49D.jpg
A123-08 - Helena (318 - 328 D.C.)45 viewsAE3 Centenional 18 x 17 mm 2.9 gr.
Esposa/Concubina de Constancio I Cloro y madre de Constantino I.

Anv: "FL HELENA AVGVSTA" - Busto con diadema consistente en una línea de perlas, vistiendo túnica y collar formado por una hilada de perlas, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE" - Securitas/Helena de pié a izquierda, portando una rama en la mano de su brazo derecho extendido y bajo y sosteniendo su vestido con mano izquierdo. "MNΔ" en exergo.

Acuñada 325/6 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.4ta.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #129 Pag.621 - Cohen Vol.VII #13 Pag.97 - DVM #3 Pag.293 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8334.l.2. Pag.178 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3908
1 commentsmdelvalle
Centenional_Constantino_II_RIC_VII_Nicomedia_157.jpg
A128-12 - Constantino II Como Cesar de Constantino I (316/7 - 337 D.C.)33 viewsAE3 Centenional 18 x19 mm 2.5 gr.

Anv: "CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C" - Busto laureado, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "PROVIDEN-TIAE CAES°" - Puerta de campamento, sin puertas ni ventanas, dos torres, " * " arriba, seis filas de piedras. "SMNA" en exergo.

Acuñada 328 - 329 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC Vol.VII (Nicomedia) #157 Pag.626 - Cohen Vol.VII #165 Pag.384 - DVM #38 Pag.295 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8442.j Pag.189
mdelvalle
Centenional Constante RIC VIII Nicomedia 51G.jpg
A129-40 - Constante (337 - 350 D.C.)39 viewsAE4 Centenional reducido 13 mm 1.2 gr.

Anv: "[CONSTA]-NS P F AVG" - Cabeza con diadema de perlas, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VOT XX MVLT XXX" - Leyenda en 4 líneas dentro de una corona de laureles. "SMNΓ" en exergo.

Acuñada 347/8 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.3ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.VIII (Nicomedia) #51 Pag.475 - Cohen Vol.VII #197 Pag.435 - DVM #60 Pag.297 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #8592.c. Pag.206 - Sear RCTV (1988) #3972 - LRBC #1150
mdelvalle
Nummus Valentiniano II RIC IX Nicomedia 45a.jpg
A141-14 - Valentiniano II (375 - 392 D.C.)39 viewsAE4 Nummus 12 x 11 mm 0.8 gr.
Hijo de Valentiniano I, Augusto jr. de Occidente con su Padre y Graciano su medio hermano hasta 383 D.C. y luego Augusto Sr. hasta 392 D.C.

Anv: "[D]N VAL[ENTINIANVS P F AVG]" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SALVS REI-PVB]LICAE" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando trofeo apoyado en su hombro con mano derecha y arrastrando por los pelos a un cautivo con su mano izquierda. "SMNA" en exergo.

Acuñada 388 - 392 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Nicomedia) #45a Pag.262 - Cohen Vol.VIII #30 Pag.143 - DVM #47 Pag.312 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9185.g.var Pag.284 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4167
mdelvalle
Nummus Valentiniano II RIC IX Nicomedia 45aB.jpg
A141-15 - Valentiniano II (375 - 392 D.C.)38 viewsAE4 Nummus 13 mm 0.9 gr.
Hijo de Valentiniano I, Augusto jr. de Occidente con su Padre y Graciano su medio hermano hasta 383 D.C. y luego Augusto Sr. hasta 392 D.C.

Anv: "DN VALENTINIANVS P F AVG" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-PVBLICAE" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando trofeo apoyado en su hombro con mano derecha y arrastrando por los pelos a un cautivo con su mano izquierda. "SMNB" en exergo.

Acuñada 388 - 392 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.2da.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Nicomedia) #45a Pag.262 - Cohen Vol.VIII #30 Pag.143 - DVM #47 Pag.312 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9185.g.var Pag.284 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4167
mdelvalle
Nummus Teodosio I RIC IX Nicomedia 48a.jpg
A142-10 - Teodosio I (375 - 392 D.C.)51 viewsAE4 Nummus 12 mm 1.2 gr.
Augusto Sr. de Oriente desde 379 D.C., con Graciano Sr. de Occidente hasta 383 D.C. y con Valentiniano II hasta 392 D.C.

Anv: "DN THEODO-SIVS P F AVG" - Busto con diadema de perlas, coraza y Paludamentum (capote militar) sobre ella, viendo a derecha.
Rev: "SALVS REI-[PVBLIC]AE" - Victoria avanzando a izquierda, portando trofeo apoyado en su hombro con mano derecha y arrastrando por los pelos a un cautivo con su mano izquierda. "SMNA" en exergo y " + " en campo izquierdo.

Acuñada 388 - 394 D.C.
Ceca: Nicomedia (Off.1ra.)
Rareza: S

Referencias: RIC Vol.IX (Nicomedia) #45b Pag.262 ó #48a Pag.263 - Cohen Vol.VIII #30 Pag.158 - DVM #40 Pag.313 - Salgado MRBI Vol.III #9231.g.var Pag.288 - Sear RCTV (1988) #4188
mdelvalle
sb834yr725mm745g.jpg
AE follis Heraclius, SB 834 26 viewsObverse: Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, dd NN hERACLIVS ET hERA CON, Heraclius, on left and Heraclius Constantine on right, cross between their heads, each wearing crown and chlamys and each holding cross on globe
Reverse:Large M, ANNO to left, cross or chi-rho above, regnal year to right GI (7), officina letter below "delta" mintmark NIKO.
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 616/7 CE
Sear 834
25mm, 7.45g
wileyc
sear_369.jpg
AE follis Justin II SB 36948 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between thier heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal yr XI cross above in exergus NIKO
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 574-575 CE
Sear; 369 DO 92-103
28mm 11.31 gm
2 commentswileyc
sb369yr930mm1247g.jpg
AE follis Justin II SB 369 Off A, regnal yr 918 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG (or similar) Justin, on l., and Sophia on r. Both seated facing on double throne, nimbate, he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre.
Reverse: ANNO to l., cross above Lg. M, B officinae, regnal yr GIII (9) NIKO in ex.
Mint:Nicomedia
Date: 573/ CE
Sear 369, DO 92-103
30mm, 12.47 gm
wileyc
s_201.jpg
AE follis Justinian I (large) SB 20168 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINANVS PP AVG Hemeted and cuir, bust facing, holding gl. cr, and shield; to r., cross.
Reverse: Large M, between ANNO and regnal year XXXII, Cross above, Pfficina letter "B" below. In exergue NIKO
Date; 558/9 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 201 DO 115-39
32MM 17.15GM
wileyc
sb511_26mm1146g.jpg
AE follis Maurice Tiberius SB 511a12 viewsObv: DN TIb CONSTANT PP AV or someother combination blundered, Crowned, cuir. bust facing, holding gl. cr. and shield;
Rev: Large M between ANNO (blundered) and regnal yr (III), cross above, NIKO below (N is blundered).
Mint: Nicomedia
Yr:584/5 CE
Sb 511a
26mm, 11.46g
wileyc
sb51229mm1079g.jpg
AE follis Maurice Tiberius, SB 51219 viewsObv: DN MAVRIC>TIbER PP A or similar usually incomplete. Helmeted or crowned (crowned here) and cuir, bust facing holding gl cuir and shield.
Reverse: Large M ANNO to rt., cross above, NIKO in exergue, regnal yr (XIII) yr 13
Date 595/5 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear 512 DO 95-108
29mm, 10.79g
wileyc
sear_370.jpg
AE half follis Justin II SB 37025 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large K between ANNO and regnal yr IIII cross above, blow NI
Date:568/9 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 370 DO 104-15
22mm 4.85 gm
wileyc
sb_370.jpg
AE half follis Justin II SB 37019 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large K between ANNO and regnal yr G cross above, below NI
Date:570/1 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 370 DO 104-15
21/25mm 6.41 gm
wileyc
sb37026mm354gyr6.jpg
AE half follis Justin II SB 37016 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large K between ANNO and regnal yr 6 (G) cross above, below NI
Date:570/1 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 370 DO 104-15
26mm 3.54 gm
wileyc
sb370yr620mm394g.jpg
AE half follis Justin II SB 37023 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large K between ANNO and regnal yr 6 (G) cross above, below NI
Date:570/1 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 370 DO 104-15
20mm 3.94 gm
wileyc
sb20226mm927g.jpg
AE half follis Justinian I SB 20222 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG or similar, Diad., draped and curi. bust r.
Reverse: Large K to rt N long cross I, B officina letter to r.
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 527-565 CE
26mm, 9.27g
Sear 202, DO 112
wileyc
sear_663.jpg
AE half follis Phocas21 viewsObverse: DM FOCA PER AVG or similar, crowned, bust facing wearing consular robes and holding mappa and cross
Reverse: XX, cross above, III (regnal yr) to r. NIKO in ex
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 604/5 CE
Sear 663 DO 63-8
25mm 3.47
Thin ragged flan
wileyc
constantinus_1_2.jpg
AE3 Constantine I the Great24 viewsConstantine I the Great
CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, P head of Constantine
PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, SMNB in ex.
Nicomedia RIC VII Nicomedia 153 C1 328-329
Sebastiaan v
crispusnir2.jpg
AE3 Crispus. PROVIDENTIAE CAESS. Nicomedia. Officinae NOT IN RIC11 viewsFL IVL CRISPVS NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left.

PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, campgate with 2 turrets, 6 layers, star above, no doors.

Mintmark: SMN delta

RIC VII 92 Officinae NOT IN RIC
Weir D
Aelia_Flaccilla_RIC_28.JPG
Aelia Flaccilla, RIC 289 viewsAEL FLACCILLA AVG
SALUS REIPVBLICAE
AE4, 10mm, 1.15g
Diademed, draped bust right
Victory seated right on cuirass, pointing one hand at shield inscribed with Chi-Rho, balanced atop a column
SMNΓ in ex.
Nicomedia mint
novacystis
Anastasius_new.jpg
Anastasius I27 viewsObv: Head of Anastasius facing right
Rev: Anastasius Monogram
Minted: Constantinople or Nicomedia, 491-518AD
Size: 8mm, 0.56g
Notes: Although a tiny and not so good example, this coin will always have a place in my collection, as it is my first coin and one I cleaned from a cull batch. This was cleaned while at sea on patrol for the Vancouver Olympics.
ickster
Anastasius_I_SBCV_41.JPG
Anastasius I, SBCV 4112 views[DN ANASTASIVS PF AVG]
Diademed, draped bust right
Large K, long Cross left with NI to sides, star right
Nicomedia
AE half follis - small module, 20mm, 2.78g
novacystis
Antoninus_Pius_Hermes_Nicomedia.JPG
Antoninus Pius Hermes Nicomedia26 viewsAntoninus Pius, Nicomedia Bithynia, 18mm, 3.4g, Rec Gen II - S. 525, 66 and 67
OBV: ΑΥΤ ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟΣ, Laureate bust right
REV: MHTROPOL NIKOMHDEI, Veiled Hermes standing on base,
facing, wearing mantle, crossing arms in front of chest; to l. at his feet, caduceus
Romanorvm
Antoninus_Pius_Serpent_on_Galley~0.JPG
Antoninus Pius Serpent on Galley71 viewsAntoninus Pius, Nicomedia, 138 - 161 AD, Bithynia, 18mm, 3.61g
OBV: AYT KAICAP - ANTWN [INOC], Laureate head right.
REV: NEIKOMHDEIAC MHTPOPOLEWC, Coiled serpent right atop forepart of galley right.
Not in BMC___, von Aulock___, SNG Copenhagen__, RPC IV,
Righetti -, Leypold -, Kleinasiatische Münzen -, Lindgren -

An obverse die match sold in Lanz Auction 97, Lot 622

Extremely Rare
4 commentsRomanorvm
4412_4413.jpg
Antoninus Pius, Diassarion, MHTPOΠΟΛΕ NEIKOMHΔΕΙ NEΩΚΟΡ9 viewsAE Diassarion
Antoninus Pius
Caesar: 138AD
Augustus: 138 - 161AD
22.1mm 5.80gr, 7h.
O: AVT ΚΑΙCΑΡ ANTΩNEINOC; Laureate head, right.
R: MHTPOΠΟΛΕ NEIKOMHΔΕΙ NEΩΚΟΡ; Tyche seated left, wearing kalathos, holding rudder and cornucopia.
Nicomedia, Bithynia
Rec Gen 62; SNG Cop 555; RPC online 5595 temp.
Agora Auctions, Auction #30, Lot 087
4/14/15 4/3/17
Nicholas Z
00585.jpg
Arcadius (RIC 26, Coin #585)19 viewsRIC 26 (C), AE2, Nicomedia, 378 - 383 AD.
OBV: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG; Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right, holding spear and shield, hand of God above holding wreath.
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM (star SMN delta); Emperor holding spear and shield on ground, standing facing, head left, captive kneeling left.
SIZE: 22.5mm 5.28g
MaynardGee
433_Arcadius_SMNG.jpg
Arcadius - AE 43 viewsNicomedia
19.1.383 - 25.8.383 AD
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
D N ARCADIVS P F AVG
within wreath:
VOT / V
SMNΓ
RIC IX Nicomedia 37c
1,32g
Johny SYSEL
ARCADIUS-4.jpg
ARCADIUS -438 viewsObv: D N ARCADIVS P F AVG pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right

Rev: VIRTVS EXERCITI Emperor standing left head right holding spear and resting left hand on shield Victory standing beside him crowns him with wreath held in right hand

Exe: SMNA Nicomedia mint 383-388 AD

Ref: RIC IX, 62 1.8 g 18mm Dug in Syria
Matthew Raica
coin421.JPG
Arcadius Nicomedia GLORIA ROMANORVM6 viewsRIC IX Nicomedia 46b C
ecoli
arcadius_com.JPG
Arcadius RIC IX nicomedia 44c47 viewsAE 24 mm 6.3 grams 383-388 AD
OBV :: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG. Pearled diadem, draped and cuirased bust right
REV :: VIRTVS E-XERCITI. Emperor standing right holding standard in right, globe in left hand. left foot resting on leaning captive
EX :: SMN
RIC IX nicomedia 44c
RIC rated Scarce
from uncleaned lot 04/2008
Johnny
Arcadi.jpg
Arcadius RIC IX Nicomedia 44c43 viewsobv. DN ARCADIVS PF AVG
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
rev. VIRTVSE - ECERCITI
emperror standing right, stepping om captive, holding labarum and globe
branch in field left
ex. SMN Gamma
mint Nicomedia
Holger G
6309_6310.jpg
Arcadius, AE3, CONCORDIA AVGGG10 viewsAE3
Arcadius
Augustus: January 19, 383 - May 1, 408AD
Issued: August 9, 378 - August 25, 383AD
18.5 x 17.5mm 1.90gr 7h
O: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG; Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed small bust, right.
R: CONCOR-DIA AVGGG; Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, holding long scepter and globe; prow under right foot.
Exergue: (Palm branch), angled left, left field; ligate HN, right field; SMNA, below.
Nicomedia Mint
Rated R4
RIC IX Nicomedia 31c
ancientcoinmarket (GAC Auctions) 323130564919
3/19/18 4/04/18
Nicholas Z
Arcadius_RIC_27.JPG
Arcadius, RIC 2716 viewsDN ARCADIVS PF AVG
GLORIA ROMANORVM
AE2, 23mm, 4.70g
Pearl diademed, draped bust right
Emperor standing facing holding labarum and globe
SMNB in ex.
Nicomedia mint
novacystis
aricxOR.jpg
Arcadius, RIC IX Nicomedia 45c17 viewsNicomedia mint, Arcadius, 388-392 A.D. AE, 13mm 1.43g, RIC IX Nicomedia 45c
O: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG, pearl diadem, draped, and cuirassed, bust r.
R: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory advancing l., dragging captive, trophy on shoulder
Ex: SMNA
casata137ec
arcadio_salvs_3_nicom.jpg
Arcadius, salvs reipvblicae, Nicomedia, AE418 viewsantvwala
arcadio_virtvs_ex_nicomedia.jpg
Arcadius, Virtvs Exerciti, Nikomedia, AE315 viewsantvwala
Arcadius,_VIRTVS_EXERCITI,_victory_crowning,_Nicomedia,_395-401_AD.jpg
Arcadius, VIRTVS EXERCITI, victory crowning, Nicomedia, 395-401 AD13 viewsRIC X 62
2.2g / 18mm _6.34
Antonivs Protti
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti 1.jpg
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti85 viewsArcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

D N ARCADI-VS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
ARCADIVS: Arcadius
PF: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI, Victory of the army. Referring to the courage of the army

VIRTVS: Victory
EXERCITI: Army

Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and shield, Victory right crowns him

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 15 mm.

Mint: ANTΓ, Antioch,Γ Officina Gamma (Gamma, 3. rd), struck 395-401 A.D. RIC X 70

Comment:
This type was struck AD 395-401 for Arcadius and Honorius in Heraclea, Constantinopolis, Nicomedia, Cyzicus, Antiochia and Alexandria.
John Schou
Arcadius- Virtus Exerciti.jpg
Arcadius- VIRTVS EXERCITI112 viewsArcadius, 19 January 383 - 1 May 408 A.D.

Obverse:
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right

D N ARCADI-VS P F AVG

DN: Dominus Noster, our lord
ARCADIVS: Arcadius
PF: Pius Felix, Pious and happy
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
VIRTVS EXERCITI, Victory of the army. Referring to the courage of the army

VIRTVS: Victory
EXERCITI: Army

Emperor standing left, head right, holding spear and shield, Victory left crowns him

Domination: Bronze AE 3, size 17mm.

Mint: SMNA, Nicomedia, Officina A (Alpha, 1 st.), struck 395-401 A.D

Comment:
This type was struck AD 395-401 for Arcadius and Honorius in Heraclea, Constantinopolis, Nicomedia, Cyzicus, Antiochia and Alexandria. With the mintmark I have problems. It could be Heraclea or Nikomedia. If it is Heraclea then it would be RIC X, 58. But that type has the dot on the right(!) field, what one can see on the pic pl.4 too! For Nicomedia I found the following footnote: SMNA, dot on right field (L.2440, Sardis 1981, 183 no.829) also cited; perhaps Heraclea misread, confirmation required.
Important for my coin is only the dot in the left rev. field. The other dots belong to the shield and the drapery of Victoria I think. So your type belongs to the series of AD 395-401, but with the dot in the left field it is not listed in RIC!
The ex. On my coin looks like SMNA . But the type of Nicomedia mentioned in the footnote of RIC has the dot in the right field too and RIC supposed that it is a misread SMHA. All other types listed for Nicomedia have no dots at all. So there are some mysteries around my coin!
1 commentsJohn Schou
ARCADIUS-1.jpg
ARCADIUS-145 viewsObv: D N ARCADIVS P FA AVG pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right

Rev: SALVS REIPVBLICAE Victory dragging captive left with trophy on shoulder

Exe: chi rho/dotSMNΓ Nicomedia mint

Ref: RIC IX 45c 1.1g 13mm Dug in Bulgaria
Matthew Raica
Arcadius_AE_4,_Nicomedia.JPG
Arcadius: GLORIA ROMANORVM - Three emperors10 viewsArcadius AE4 - Three Emperors Standing, Mint: Nicomedia (SMN…), AE4, Obv: DN ARCADIVS PF AVG - Diad., dr. and cuir. bust r., Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM - Three emperors standing, with co-emperors Honorius and Theodosius II. ex oa, photo credit oa.Podiceps
Constantine_I_37.jpg
B138 viewsConstantine I “The Great” AE3

Attribution: RIC VII 117, Thessalonica
Date: AD 320-321
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG, VOT dot XX in wreath with star at top,
TSEVI in exergue
Size: 18.5 mm
Weight: 3.0 grams

"When men commend my services, which owe their origin to the inspiration of Heaven, do they not clearly establish the truth that God is the cause of the exploits I have performed? Assuredly they do, for it belongs to God to do whatever is best, and to man, to perform the commands of God." - Constantine To the Assembly of the Saints 26

Constantine fought his battles under the banner of the cross and with Christian standards. This is quite a shift from the mentality of his predecessors who were overtly pagan. After his defeat of Licinius I in AD 324, Constantine established himself as the master of the entire Roman Empire, and suddenly changed his entire demeanor as sole ruler. He seemed to have acquired a self-righteousness about him. He moved the capital of the empire to a new city in Byzantium named, aptly, Constantinople. This further diminished the importance of Rome and Italy in the entire scope of things. In fact, he even disbanded the praetorian guard which had played an undeniably central role in the appointment of numerous previous emperors. In AD 326, he had his son Crispus executed for commiting adultery. His wife, Fausta, also died when the temperature of her bath was turned up and she subsequently suffocated on the steam. Despite these instances of questionable judgement, Constantine's reputation remained unscathed. Constantine proved to be an able administrator, but was often criticized by critics and supporters alike for his heavy taxation. When it came to the military, he excelled. His restructuring of the military was also criticized at first, but Constantine proved these doubts wrong with his military successes. Although Constantine waged several victorious campaigns against the Alemanni, Goths, and Sarmatians, much of the land he won was soon lost after his death. One of his most ambitious military endeavors occurred in the latter years of his reign. Constantine planned to Christianize Persia and even went to the lengths of appointing his nephew Hannibalianus as "King of Armenia" intending to give him rule over Persia. He never saw these plans come to fruition, however, because he became terminally ill. Before his death at Ankyrona on May 22, AD 337, Constantine had himself baptized by the bishop of Nicomedia. He was buried in Constantinople in a customized mausoleum called the Church of the Holy Apostles. His sons divided the empire amongst themselves as follows: Constantine II took the west, Constantius II the east, and Constans Italy and the Upper Danube. A fourth heir, Constantine's nephew Flavius Dalmatius II was given control of Greece and the Lower Danube. So ended the legacy of one of the most influential emperors Rome had ever produced: Constantine the Great.
9 commentsNoah
B_002_Iustin_I__(518-527_A_D_),__AE-Pentanummia_DN-IVSTINVS-P-AVG_Christogram-Large-N-left-and-Epsilon-right-_SB-92-p-49-Nicomedia_Q-001_6h_12,5-13,5mm_1,81ga-s.jpg
B 002 Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0092, N/Є//--, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia, #166 viewsB 002 Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0092, N/Є//--, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia, #1
avers: D N IVSTI NVS P AVG (Incomplete), Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large Chrisogram, N left Є right.
exergue: N/Є//--, diameter:12,5-13,5mm, weight: 1,81g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0092, p-49,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
B_002_Justin_I__(518-527_A_D_),__AE-Pentanummia_DN-IVSTINVS-P-AVG_Christogram-Large-N-left-and-E-right-two_pellets-beneath_SB-93-p-49-Nicomedia_Q-001_6h_13mm_2,01ga-s.jpg
B 002 Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0093, N/E//••, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia, 105 viewsB 002 Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0093, N/E//••, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia,
avers: D N IVSTI NVS P AVG (Incomplete), Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
reverse: Large Chrisogram, N left E right.
exergue: N/E//••, diameter: 13mm, weight: 2,01g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0093, p-49,
Q-001
quadrans
Tib-Constant_AE-36_DN-TIB-CONS-TANT-P-P-AVG_m_ANNO_VI_NIKO-B_SB-441_Q-001_36mm_17_06g-s.jpg
B 007 Tiberius II. Constantine (578-582 A.D.), SB 0441, -/NIKOB, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicomedia, Year UI,288 viewsB 007 Tiberius II. Constantine (578-582 A.D.), SB 0441, -/NIKOB, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicomedia, Year UI,
avers:- Dn TIb CONS TANT P P AVG, Facing bust of Tiberius, holding mappa and eagle tipped scepter, wearing consular robes.
revers:- Large M Exe: NIKO-B - Cross above, regnal date to right (6-th year, 579/80 A.D.) and ANNO to left. (Nicomedia).
exe: A/N/N/O/VI//NIKOB, diameter: 36mm, weight: 17,06g, axis-h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 579-80 A.D., ref: SB-441,
Q-001
3 commentsquadrans
Maurice-Tiberius_AE-31_-----TIBER-PP_M_ANNO_VI_NIKO_B_SB-0512_Q-001_11_34g.jpg
B 008 Maurice Tiberius (582-602 A.D.), SB 0512, B/NIKO, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicodemia, Year UII,177 viewsB 008 Maurice Tiberius (582-602 A.D.), SB 0512, B/NIKO, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicodemia, Year UII,
avers:- D N MAVRIC TIbER P P A, helmeted and cuirassed or crowned and cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield ( TIBER P P )
revers:- "M" ANNO/UII/B, Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year VI to right, officina letter B below; mintmark NIKO, Nicomedia
exe: ANNO/UII//NIKO, diameter: 30-31mm, weight:11,34g, axis: h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: 587 A.D., ref: SB-0512,
Q-001
quadrans
Phocas-602-610-AD_AE-Follis_Om-FO---_Phocas_and_Leontinastg_faceing_M_ANNO_I_NIKO-B_SB---p-_Nicomedia_Q-001_6h_29,5mm_12,84g-s.jpg
B 010 Phocas (602-610 A.D.), SB 0657, -/NIKOB, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicomedia, Year I, 88 viewsB 010 Phocas (602-610 A.D.), SB 0657, -/NIKOB, AE-Follis (40 Nummia), Nicomedia, Year I,
avers:- Om FO(CA INPER AV or similar) but instead of this have confused overstrucked text, Phocas on left, holding cross on globe and Leontia, nimbate, on right, holding sceptre topped by cross, standing, cross between their heads .
revers:- "m" ANNO/I, Large m, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year (I) to right; (no letter below), mintmark NIKOB,
exergo: ANNO/I//NIKOB, diameter: 29,5mm, weight:12,84g, axis:6h,
mint:Nicomedia, date: 602? A.D., ref: Sear 0657, p-147; DOC 53b; MIBE 68
Q-001
quadrans
Basiliscus_and_Marcus_nummus_RIC_X_1032-1033.jpg
Basiliscus and Marcus (RIC X 1032-1033)17 viewsBasiliscus (-476/7) Eastern Roman Emperor (475-476), joint rule with his son Marcus. Æ Nummus. Constantinople or Nicomedia mint. Obverse: diademed bust right, (D N bASIL) ET MAR (P AVG). Reverse: Two emperors nimbate enthroned facing, holding globe in right hand. RIC X 1032-3 (R3, R4).Jan
Overstrike_BCC_B11.jpg
BCC B1132 viewsByzantine Period _ Caesarea Maritima
Heraclius 610-641 CE
AE Follis with overstrike.
Obv:Facing bust of Heraclius ...AV[G]
At 7h: XX[XX], above: ANNO To right: I (part of NIKO?)
Rev:Large M, to right II, above, cross,
below Γ, in ex CON. To left: traces
of legend from base coin ...P AVG
Base coin: Phocas 602-610 CE,
Uncertain mint/year
35x30mm. 11.94gm. Axis:240
SB 804? over SB 659 Nicomedia?
v-drome
Phocas_Half_BCC_B13.jpg
BCC B1315 viewsByzantine Period - Caesarea
Phocas 602-610 CE
AE Half Follis, Nicomedia Mint
Obv:DN FOCAS P P AVG
Facing bust, holding cross in left
hand, mappa in right.
Rev: XX, no cross above,
to right III, in ex. NIKOB
29x25mm. 6.30gm. Axis:180
SB 663v. (no cross)
Below the mintmark is a cross shaped
object which may be an artifact of an
earlier strike.
v-drome
constantine_max.jpg
BCC Lr14x22 viewsLate Roman BCC Lr14x
Constantine I 306-337 CE
AE 3 Nicomedia mint
Obv:CONSTANTI -NVS MAX AVG
Laural and rosette diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITUS
Two soldiers standing facing inward, holding spears, shields, and two standards
between them, dot on banners.
[SM]N delta in ex.
16.5mm 2.13gm. Axis:315
RIC VII 188,D
v-drome
constantine_div_BCC_Lr34.jpg
BCC Lr3427 viewsLate Roman BCC Lr34
Constantine I 306-337 CE
AE 4 Constantinople mint
Obv:DV CONSTANTI-NVS P T AVGG
Veiled head right.
Rev:VN-MR (Veneranda Memoria)
Constantine veiled and standing right.
In ex:SMN (epsilon, dot) Struck 347-348 CE
14mm.1.65gm. Axis:0
RIC VIII 57 rare
Nicomedia Mint
v-drome
constantius_fel_temp_1.jpg
BCC Lr427 viewsLate Roman
Constantius II 337-361CE
Obv:DN CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Dia. draped, and cuir. bust rt.
Rev:FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Soldier std left, spearing fallen horseman
bare head, hair straight up, reaching back.
Mint mark off-flan (prob. Nicomedia)
AE 16mm 1.61gm. Axis:0
v-drome
Valentinian_II_Lr47.jpg
BCC LR4723 viewsLate Roman
Valentinian II 375-392 CE
Obv:D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG
Pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust rt.
Rev:SALVS REI-PVBLICAE
Victory walking left, dragging captive, and
carrying trophy. No staurogram in field.
In ex: SM(NB?) Nicomedia?
AE 13mm 1.18gm. Axis:180
Possible ref: RIC IX 45
v-drome
LR50_Theo_II.jpg
BCC LR5024 viewsLate Roman
Theodosius II 402-450CE
Obv:[DN THE]ODOS[IVS P F AVG]
Pearl diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust rt.
Rev:CONCOR-[DIA AVGG]
Cross. In ex: SMN (B? )
Officina uncertain. RIC X ?
Nicomedia Mint
AE 11.5mm 0.62gm. Axis:210
v-drome
Bithynia.jpg
Bithynia12 viewsAs a Roman province, the boundaries of Bithynia frequently varied, and it was commonly united for administrative purposes with the province of Pontus. This was the state of things in the time of Trajan, when Pliny the Younger was appointed governor of the combined provinces, a circumstance to which we are indebted for valuable information concerning the Roman provincial administration. Under the Byzantine Empire Bithynia was again divided into two provinces, separated by the Sangarius, to the west of which the name of Bithynia was restricted.

The most important cities were Nicomedia and Nicaea. The two had a long rivalry with one another over which city held the rank of capital. Both of these were founded after Alexander the Great; but at a much earlier period the Greeks had established on the coast the colonies of Cius (modern Gemlik); Chalcedon (modern Kadıköy), at the entrance of the Bosporus, nearly opposite Byzantium (modern Istanbul; and Heraclea Pontica (modern Karadeniz Ereğli), on the Euxine, about 120 miles (190 km) east of the Bosporus.
ancientone
Septimius-Severus_AE-26-Nicomedia-in-Bithynia_AVK-L-CE_T-CEVHPOC-laureate-head-right_NIKOMH-_E_N-_IC-NE_KO-P_N-_ctastyle-temple-with-Countermark_BMC-41_Q-001_26-27mm_11,37g-s.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia, 049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), AE-26, BMC-41 Temple,86 viewsBithynia, Nicomedia, 049 Septimius Severus (193-211 A.D.), AE-26, BMC-41 Temple,
avers:- AVK-L-CEΠT-CEVHPOC, Laureate head right.
revers:- NIKOMH-ΔEΩN-ΔIC-NEΩKO-PΩN, Ο Ctastyle temple with Countermark.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 26-27mm, weight:11,37g, axis:1h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: ?? , ref: BMC-41,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Severus-Alexander_AE-22_M-AYP-_________C-K______-__N_Q-001_axis-xh_xxmm_x,xg-s.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia, 062 Severus Alexander (222-235 A.D.), AE-22, NI-KO/MH−ΔЄ/Ω−N/ΔIC NЄΩ/K, Octastyle temple,81 viewsBithynia, Nicomedia, 062 Severus Alexander (222-235 A.D.), AE-22, NI-KO/MH−ΔЄ/Ω−N/ΔIC NЄΩ/K, Octastyle temple,
avers:- M-AYP-ΑΛΕΞΑΝΔΡΟC-K, Laureate head right.
revers:- ΝΙ−ΚΟ / ΜΗ−ΔЄ / Ω−Ν / ΔΙC ΝЄΩ / Κ, octastyle temple set on two-tiered base, pellet in pediment.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 22mm, weight: 9,07g, axis: 5h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: 222-235 A.D., ref: ,
Q-001
quadrans
064_Julia-Mamaea_AE-19_Q-001_axis-7h_19mm_3,47g-s.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia, 064 Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?, Not listed ???,80 viewsBithynia, Nicomedia, 064 Julia Mamaea ( ??-235 A.D.), AE-19, NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
avers:- IOVΛIA-MAMAIA-AVG,
revers:- NIKOMHΔЄΩN-ΔIC-NЄΩK, Astakos ?,
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 19mm, weight: 3,47g, axis: 7h,
mint: Bithynia, Nicomedia, date: ??? A.D., ref: Not listed ???,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
piusnicomedia.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Antoninus Pius AE18. Demeter33 viewsCity; Province; Region Nicomedia; Bithynia-Pontus; Bithynia
Date 138–161
Obverse design Laurate head of Antoninus Pius, r.
Obverse inscription ΑΥΤO ΚΑΙΣΑΡ ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟΣ
Reverse design veiled Demeter standing, facing, head, l., holding short sceptre and two ears of corn
Reverse inscription ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩΣ ΝΕΩΚΟΡ ΝΕΙΚΟΜΗΔΕΙ
Metal Bronze
Average diameter 17 mm
Average weight 2.98 g
Type reference McClean III, 7510, pl. 257.3
1 commentsancientone
perinthos.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Caracalla AE2642 viewsBithynia, Nicomedia. Caracalla AE26. ANTWNEINOC AYGOYCTOC, Caracalla right with inscription in between radiate crown / [NIKOMHDEWN]DIC NEW[KOPWN], goddess seated left holding two temples. Obverse. Rec. gén. pl. 94.28, Same rev. type as pl. 94.7ancientone
Phil1NicomMerge1.JPG
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Philip I. SNG von Aulock 829.72 viewsÆ28. Bithynia, Nicomedia. Philip I (AD 244-249), radiate head, draped and cuirassed bust to r. M • IOVΛIOC • ΦIΛI-Π-Π[OC AVG] (VG ligate) or “Marcus Julius Philippus Augustus.” Countermark CAP/Γ in round punch (Howgego 560) or "Sardis, 3 assaria." Rev., Nude statue of Heracles stg. atop girlanded cippus, head to r, holding lionskin in l. arm, and supported by club with r. hand. NIKOMH[ΔE]ΩN - ΔIC NEΩK[OP] (ΩN ligate). SNG von Aulock 829. Ex Marcus Gruss 8-25-2009.

Same dies as Jochen’s example:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-32987
1 commentsMark Fox
sevalexnicomedia2.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Severus Alexander AE24. Athena55 viewsPRO: BITHYNIA
PO : NICOMEDIA
PZ : Between 222 and 235
TIG: NEWKORWN TRIS
Obverse
VSG: M AYR SEYH ALEXANDROS S
VT : PORTRAIT MAN R / SEV. ALEXANDER
VA : RADIATE / CLOTHES
Reverse
RSG: NIKOMHDEWN TRIS NEWKORWN
RT : WOMAN STANDING HL(1) / ATHENA(1)
RA : PATERA(1) / HELMET / SPEAR(1) / SHIELD
Technical details
M : AE
GR : 27(1)
Bibliographical references
ZIT: WADD RG S554,290(1) / COLL FLORENZ(1)
Additional remarks
FR : VS: M AYR SEYH ALEXANDROS S RS: NIKOMHDEWN TRIS NEWKORWN
ancientone
nicomediaCaracalla.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Caracalla Ae2415 viewsObv: ANTΩNINOC AYΓOVCTOC Laureate head l.
Rev: NI[KOMH] ΔEΩN Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia.
24mm, 7.0g.
ancientone
Clipboard12~1.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Marcus Aurelius AE27.54 viewsObv: AVT K M AVR ANTWNEINOC, laureate head right.
Rev: MHTR NEWKO NEIKOMH, turreted, veiled and draped bust of Tyche right, two corn-ears at neck.
1 commentsancientone
septhygia.jpg
Bithynia, Nicomedia. Septimius Severus AE22. Hygieia65 views22mm and 4.2gm.
Obv. AVKLCEP CEVHROC. Bust of Severus r.
Rev. [DIC NEWK]OP - WN NIKOMHDE around, W - N across field. Hygieia standing r. feeding serpent.

Recueil général records no type of Hygieia holding and feeding serpent at Nicomedia for SS, Domna, Caracalla, or Geta.
ancientone
nikaia_domitian_BMC20.jpg
Bithynia, Nikaia, Domitian, BMC 2040 viewsDomitian, AD 81-96
AE 26, 8.54g
obv. AYT DOMITIANOS KAISAR SEBA GER
Bust, laureate, r.
rev. TON KTISTH NEIKAIEIS PRWTOI THS EPARX
Head of Herakles, bearded, laureate, l.
RPC 239; BMC 20
rare, VF, deep green patina

The metropolis of Bithynia was in fact Nicomedia but Nicaea raises a claim upon that title as is shown by a coin issued under Domitian with the legend "the Nikaians, the first of the eparchias". From this claim emerged a legal dispute which finally was decided by Valens in that way, that Nicaea and Nicomedia both was allowed to call themselve the first city of Bithynia but that only Nicomedia was the metropolis. But this vain title was useless: By the new arrangement of the provinces Chalcedon became the metropolis of the anterior Pontus. It's known a discourse from Dion of Prusa - who lived in the time of Domitian - in which he challenged the Nicomedians to peace with the Nicaeans.
1 commentsJochen
Sev_Alex_Nicomedia_Astakos.jpg
Bithynia, Nikomedia; Astakos, nude to hips r. head l. right foot on prow; AE 1824 viewsSeverus Alexander, Bithynia, Nikomedia, AE 18; laureate bust right/ Astakos, nude to hips, standing right, head left, right foot on prow, holding scepter in left arm and pointing with left hand backwards. Astakos was one of the ktistes of Astakos, ancestor of Nikomedia. He was worshipped until Roman times.Podiceps
Broken2.jpg
Broken28 viewsUnknown (348-358 CE)
Diademed bust of emperor, right/Roman soldier spearing a barbarian. Legend: Fel Temp Reparatio.
Nicomedia Mint.

Belisarius
julian_bull_qq22.jpg
Bull - Julian II The Apostate616 viewsDN FL CL IVLI-ANVS PF AVG
SECVRITAS REI PVB
(feather)NIKB.(feather)
RIC VIII 122 Nicomedia

Bull, head facing, standing right; above, two stars

There is still some dirt on this coin which is what shows the mottled appearance. The coin is in remarkable condition, however with high relief and detail.

--Fred (Roscoedaisy)
3 commentsroscoedaisy
justin_sofia.png
BYZANTINE EMPIRE JUSTIN II & SOPHIA 565-578Ad.5 viewsFollis struck at Nicomedia (Copper, 12.92 grams, 30 mm)
Obverse: Justin II and his wife Sophia seated on double throne facing
Justin holds globe with cross, Sophia a cross
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and yI/II. Cross above, A between legs, NIKO in exergue
Reference: Sear 369
Britanikus
Sear-45.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Anastasius I (491-518 CE) Æ Pentanummium, Nicomedia (Sear 45; DOC 44; MIB 54)12 viewsObv: DN ANA-STASIVS PP AVG or similar; Bust facing right with diadem, cuirass and paludamentum
Rev: Large Є; to right N
Quant.Geek
Sear-83.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin I (518-527 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 83; DOC 28b; MIB 35; Berk 65)10 viewsObv: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG; Bust of Emperor facing right, diademed in cuirass and paludamentum
Rev: Large M, star to left, cross above, star to right, officina letter; NIKM in exergue
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Sear-369.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578) AE Follis, Nicomedia (Sear-369)35 viewsObv: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG.
Justin, holding globus cruciger, and Sophia, holding cruciform scepter, seated facing on double throne, both crowned.
Rev: Large M between A/N/N/O and IIII; above, cross; beneath, A; in exergue, NIKO.
SpongeBob
Sear-369(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear-369)11 viewsObv: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG; Justin, holding globus cruciger, and Sophia, holding cruciform scepter, seated facing on double throne, both crowned
Rev: Large M between A/N/N/O and III; above, cross; beneath, A; in exergue, NIKO
Quant.Geek
Sear-369(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear-369)7 viewsObv: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG; Justin, holding globus cruciger, and Sophia, holding cruciform scepter, seated facing on double throne, both crowned
Rev: Large M between A/N/N/O and Ч; above, cross; beneath, A; in exergue, NIKO
Quant.Geek
Sear-371(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578) Æ Pentanummium, Nicomedia (Sear 371; DOC 116; MIBE 49)5 viewsObv: Monogram of Justin II
Rev: Large Є; in field to right, N
Dim: 13 mm, 1.51 g, 12 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-371.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justin II (565-578) Æ Pentanummium, Nicomedia (Sear 371; DOC 116; MIBE 49)6 viewsObv: Monogram of Justin II
Rev: Large Є; in field to right, N
Dim: 14 mm, 2.26 g, 6 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-201(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 15 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)22 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/Ч;below A; NIKO in exergue
Dim: 41.19 mm, 22.92 g, 6 h
Quant.Geek
Sear-201.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 22 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)54 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/X/II;below B; NIKO in exergue
1 commentsSpongeBob
Sear-201(2).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Follis, Nicomedia, RY 29 (Sear 201; DOC 135b; MIBE 113a)9 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large M, above, cross; to left A/N/N/O; to right X/X/Ч/II/II;below A; NIKO in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-202.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 202; DOC 112; MIBE 109)8 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large K; to left, large cross dividing N and I; to right B
Quant.Geek
Sear-203(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565 CE) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 16 (Sear 203; DOC 143; MIBE 116b)20 viewsObv: Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large K; staurogram above, date across field; NI in exergue
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Sear-205.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Decanummium, Nicomedia, RY 32 (Sear 205; DOC 157; MIBE 118)8 viewsObv: DN IVSTINI-ANVS PP AVG; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large I; A/N/N/O to left, cross above, X/X/X/II to right; NIK in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-199(1).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 199; DOC 110; MIBE 105)10 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M; cross above and flanking, B below; NIKM in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-199.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (Sear 199; DOC 110; MIBE 105)26 viewsObv: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: Large M; cross above and flanking, B below; NIKM in exergue
2 commentsQuant.Geek
Sear-203(3).jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 16 (Sear 203; DOC 236; MIBE 153)20 viewsObv: D N IVSTINI-ANVS P P AVI; Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and shield; cross to right
Rev: Large K; cross above, A/N/N/O and XЧ in field; CH in exergue
Dim: 30 mm, 10.28 g, 11 h
1 commentsQuant.Geek
Sear-203.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Justinian I (527-565) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia, RY 32 (Sear-203; DOC-154; MIBE-116a)18 viewsObv: D N IVSTINIANVS P P AVG. Helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger and decorated shield; cross right in field.
Rev: Large K between ANNO - XXXII, cross above; NI below


SpongeBob
Sear-516.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Maurice Tiberius (582-602) Æ Pentanummium, Nicomedia (Sear 516; MIB 83; DOC 118)13 viewsObv: D N mAVRI or similar; Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust of Maurice Tiberius to right
Rev: Large Є; to left N
Dim: 18 mm, 1.78 g, 6 h
1 commentsQuant.Geek
MIBE-V69a.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Phocas (602-610) Æ Follis, Nicomedia (MIBE V69a; CNR 18/3, p. 6)10 viewsObv: dmFOCA[S P]ЄR [AVG]; crowned bust of Focas facing, wearing consular robes, holding mappa and eagle-tipped scepter; crown with pendilia; all within wreath border
Rev: Large XXXX; ANNO above, III right; NIKOA in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-661.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Phocas (602-610) Æ Half Follis, Nicomedia (Sear-661; DOC 61; MIBE 71)8 viewsObv: Phocas, holding globus cruciger, and Leontia, holding cruciform scepter, standing facing; cross above
Rev: Large XX; cross above; NIKOB in exergue
Quant.Geek
Sear-441.jpg
Byzantine Empire: Tiberius II Constantine (578-582) AE Follis, Nicomedia (Sear-441)23 viewsObv: D m TIb CONSTANT P P AVC.
Crowned bust facing, wearing consular robes and holding mappa and eagle-tipped sceptre; above eagle, cross.
Rev: Large m between A/N/N/O and GI; above, cross; in exergue, NIKO B.
1 commentsSpongeBob
06208q00.jpg
Byzantine, Focas, Follis, Nicomedia, Unpublished year II consular type with mappa and eagle-scepter1404 viewsBronze follis, Hahn 69a (only years 3 and 4 noted), DO 56-60 (lists only years 3 - 7), gVF, 11.48g, 32.0mm, 45o, Nicomedia mint, 603-604 A.D.; obverse d N FOCAS PERP AVG, bust facing wearing consular robes and crown with cross on circlet, mappa in right, eagle tipped scepter in left; reverse XXXX, ANNO above, II right, NIKOA in exergue1 comments
Justin-I-518-527_AE-Pentanummia_DN-IVSTINVS-P-AVG_Christogram-Large-N-left-and-E-right-two_pellets-beneath_SB-93-p-49-Nicomedia_Q-001_6h_13mm_2,01ga-s.jpg
Byzantine, Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0093, N/E//••, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia, 169 viewsB 002 Justin I. (518-527 A.D.), SB 0093, N/E//••, AE-Pentanummia, Nicomedia,
avers:- D N IVSTI NVS P AVG (Incomplete), Pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
revers:- Large Chrisogram, N left E right.
exe: N/E//••, diameter: 13mm, weight: 2,01g, axis: 6h,
mint: Nicomedia, date: A.D., ref: SB 0093, p-49,
Q-001
quadrans
JustinIIS369.JPG
BYZANTINE, Justin II 565-578 Nicomedia64 viewsObv: Emperor and Empress Enthroned, DNIVSTI-NVSPPAVG
Rev: Large M, Anno 5, Cross Above, Oficina A, NIKO in exergue
Sear 369
Laetvs
Justinian_I.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I 57 viewsJustinian I
AE Decanummium
Obv: DNIVSTINIANVSPPAV - Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: No legend - Large I: ANNO to left, cross above and XXII to right
Exergue: NIK
Mint: Nicomedia (549-550)
Wt.3.18g
Size: 16 mm
References: SB 205
Jorge C
justinian_ae30-2.jpg
BYZANTINE, Justinian I, Follis, Nicomedia15 viewsJustinian

AE 30mm
seaotter
Z4723LG.jpg
CAMPGATE, Constantine I, Nicomedia103 viewsAttribution: RIC 153 (RIC VII)

Mint: Nicomedia, Officina 3, SMNΓ

Date: 328-329 AD

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
Pearl-diademed head right

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG
Campgate with six rows, two turrets, no doors, star above, top and bottom rows empty blocks
SMNΓ in exergue

Size: 18mm x 19mm

Weight: 2.99 grams
AnemicOak
ConVIINico90.jpg
CAMPGATE, Constantine I, Nicomedia RIC 90245 viewsEmperor: Constantine I (r. 307-337 AD)
Date: 324-325 AD
Condition: Very Fine
Size: AE3

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
Emperor Constantine
Bust right; laureate

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG
The Emperors have foresight.
Camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above, six stone layers.
Exergue: SMNE (Nicomedia mint, fifth officina)

RIC VII Nicomedia 90; VM 85
2.41g; 19.3mm; 330°
Pep
CJSII-0730h.jpg
CAMPGATE, CONSTANTINE I, RIC VII 153 of Nicomedia SMNΔ452 viewsCONSTANTINVS AVG; PROVIDENTIAE AVGG; SMNdelta; Diademed (triple row of perales) head right; two turreted campgate with star above, 6 rows of blockscscoppa
4715.jpg
CAMPGATE, Constantine II, Nicomedia93 viewsAttribution: RIC 157 (RIC VII)

Mint: Nicomedia, SMNA

Date: 337-340 AD

Obverse: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, plain diadem, draped, cuirassed bust right

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAES pellet, SMNA in exergue, camp gate with 2 turrets & star

Size: 19.52mm

Weight: 3.1 grams
AnemicOak
Costantino_I_Haeraclea_Tammaro.jpg
Campgate: Costantino I, AE3, zecca di Heraclea II officina26 viewsConstantine AE Follis, (struck 317 AD), Haeraclea mint, II officina
AE, 2,9 gr, 19 mm, R1
D/ IMP CONSTA-NTINVS AVG, laureate and draped bust left, holding mappa in right hand & globe with sceptre in left hand
R/ PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with three turrets, no door, six layers. Mintmark SMHB.
RIC VII 28 Haeraclea
Nota: la H in ex assomiglia a una N (Nicomedia) , ma è senz'altro H perché Haeraclea è l'unica zecca che ha prodotto un campgate associato a questo tipo di busto rivolto a sx
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (8 marzo 2013, numero catalogo 187); ex collezione Nicola Tammaro (Napoli, Italia, fino al 2013), ex Alistair MacKay collection (Rothwell, Northamptonshire, Uk, fino al 2012)
paolo
1Costantino_I_Nicomedia_unite.jpg
Campgate: Costantino I, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia, II officina 20 viewsConstantine I AE3. Nicomedia mint, II officina (324-325 AD)
AE, 2,6 gr, 18 mm
D/ CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right
R/ PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets & star above, no door, SMNB in ex
Ric VII 90b Nicomedia
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (8 marzo 2013, numero catalogo 188); ex collezione Nicola Tammaro (Napoli, Italia, fino al 2013)
paolo
1Campgate_barbarica.jpg
Campgate: Costantino II, AE3, prototipo argenteo (o barbarica), tipo zecca Nicomedia 20 viewsConstantine II as Caesar AE3
AE, gr 1,3, mm 17,02
D/ CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C. Laurated bust left, draped & cuirassed
R/ PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, camp gate with two turrets & a star above, MNB in ex
RIC VII Nicomedia 123
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (dal 1 febbraio 2013, numero catalogo 173); ex David Connors collection (Mount Vernon, WA Usa dal 2012); ex hoard turco-siriano (prima del 2012)
Nota: risponde al tipo dei prototipi di argentei, cioè "monete" di prova. L'alternativa è che sia una barbarica
paolo
1inattr.jpg
Campgate: Costantino II, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia13 viewsCostantino II, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia
AE, 2,727 gr, 19,8 mm, 180°
D/ CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left
R/ PROVIDENTIA CAESS, campgate with two turrets, star above, no door, SMNgamma
RIC VII 93 Nicomedia
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, 17 febbraio 2014, numero catalogo 196), ex FAC (Morehead City, Usa, fino al 2013)
paolo
1Costantino_II_Heraclea_SMH__unita.jpg
Campgate: Costantino II, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia III officina9 viewsConstantinus II (337- 340 AD), campgate, Nicomedia mint, III officina
AE, 2,70 gr. 19,80 mm. NC
D/ CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, busto a sinistra
R/ PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, campgate, SMNΓ in ex
RIC VII Nicomedia RIC 93
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia dal 27 marzo 2016, numero catalogo 248); ex collezione Andrea Vanni (Firenze , Italia, fino al marzo 2016); ex Savoca coins (Monaco, Germania, fino al 21 dicembre 2015)
paolo
Costanzo_Ant.jpg
Campgate: Costanzo II, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia, I officina25 viewsConstantius II as Caesar AE3, Nicomedia mint
AE, 3,5 gr, 17,61 mm, R5
D/ FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate bust left, draped & cuirassed
R/ PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS dot, campgate with 7 layers, two turrets and star above, MNA in ex
RIC VII 128 Nicomedia
Nota: se il segno dell'officina in R/ fosse Delta (4° officina), avrebbe i caratteristici trattini di intersezione all'apice, che qui mancano. Quindi l'ultima lettera in ex è senz'altro A (1° officina)
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia, dal 12 marzo 2014, numero catalogo 206), ex David Connors collection (Mount Vernon, WA Usa, fino al 2014)
paolo
1Costanzo_II_Nicomedia_delta.jpg
Campgate: Costanzo II, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia, IV officina11 viewsConstantius II, Nicomedia mint, IV officina (328-329 AD)
AE3, 3.052 gr, 19.8mm, 0°, aVF
D/ FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
R/ PROVIDENTIAE CAES•, campgate with seven rows, two turrets, star above, MN∆ in ex
RIC VII Nicomedia 128, LRBC 1106
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma Italia dal 29 novembre 2014, numero catalogo 226), ex FAC (Morehead City NC, Usa, fino al novembre 2014), ex Butte College Foundation (Oroville, CA, Usa fino al 2013), ex Henry Clay Lindgren collection (San Francisco State University, CA , Usa)
paolo
1Crispo_Nicomedia.jpg
Campgate: Crispus, AE3, zecca di Nicomedia, II officina11 viewsCrispus, AE3, Nicomedia mint (325-326 A.D), II officina
AE, 2.347 gr, 19.0 mm, 315°, aVF , S
D/ FL IVL CRISPVS NOB C, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left
R/ PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, campgate with two turrets, star above, MNB in ex
RIC VII Nicomedia 122
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo (Roma, Italia dal 20 settembre 2014, numero catalogo 222), ex FAC (Morehead City NC, Usa, fino al 2014)
paolo
CMK_002.jpg
Caracalla112 viewsNicomedia,Bithynia-AE 23 of Marcus Aurelius (or Verus?). Youthful head of Caracalla in an oval cmk on reverse.Cassius
235.jpg
Caracalla (?), head right169 viewsBITHYNIA. Nicomedia. Commodus. Æ 24. A.D. 177-192 (?). Obv: (...)VAN-TΩN(...) or similar. Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right. Rev: MH(TNEΩKOPΩN), NEIK(OMHΔ) in ex., or similar. Eagle standing left, head turned back, fighting with snake; prow in ex. Ref: SNG Cop 565 for reverse for Commodus Caesar. Defacement of portrait (damnatio). Axis: 195°. Weight: 9.82 g. CM: Laureate imperial head right (Caracalla?), in circular punch, 6.5 mm. Howgego 67 (48 pcs). Note: May have been applied because Caracalla spent his birthday 4/4 215 in Nicomedia. Collection Automan.1 commentsAutoman
182.jpg
Caracalla (head of)137 viewsBITHYNIA. Nicomedia. Marcus Aurelius. Æ 24. A.D. 161-169. Obv: (AYTKAIM)AVP-ANTΩ(NINOC). Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; countermark on neck. Rev: (AVTKAIΛ)AVP-OYHP(OCNIKOM). Head of Lucius Verus right. Ref: SNG Aul 761; BMC 23; Sear GIC 1703. Axis: 195°. Weight: 8.59 g. CM: Laureate head of emperor right, in circular punch, 6.5 mm. Howgego 67 (48 pcs). Note: May have been applied because Caracalla spent his birthday 4/4 215 in Nicomedia; Other specimens have the countermark applied to the reverse, but this coin has an imperial portrait on both sides, so the rev-obv. distinction may not have been an easy one for the person applying the countermark. Collection Automan.Automan
Caracalla__10.jpg
CARACALLA AE23 RG 234; WADD RG S546,234(1-3), Tyche35 viewsOBVERSE: Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
REVERSE: NIKOMHDEΩN ΔIC NEΩKOPΩN, Tyche standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
7.1g, 23mm

Struck at BITHYNIA, Nicomedia, 198-217 AD
2 commentsLegatus
max pagan com.JPG
Civic Issue under Maximinus II 23 viewsAE 14.8 mm 1.33 grams 310-312 AD
1/4 Nummus
OBV :: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Zeus sitting left on throne holding scepter in left and glode in right hands
REV :: VICTOR-IA AVGG. Nike walking left holding wreath in right hand, palm in left. Delta in left , Epsilon in right fields
EX :: unknown
Minted in Antioch ?
Vagi 2955, Sear ( under Julian II) 4080
purchased 04/2008

Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information taken from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
civic issue.jpg
Civic Issue under Maximinus II49 viewsAnonymous Civic Issue during the time of Maximinus II, AE Quarter Follis, c.310-312, Antioch, Officina 10
GENIO AN_TIOCHENI
Tyche, turreted and veiled, seated facing on rock, river-god Orontes swimming in front
APOLLONI-SANCTO
Apollo standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, lyre in left
I in right field
SMA in exergue
16mm x 17mm, 1.65g
RIC VI, --; Vagi 2954
purchased 09/09/2007
Note: The Civic Issues of Antioch, Alexandria and Nicomedia were thought to have been produced by Julian II when RIC VI was written, therefore the entire series is missing. This series was produced during the period of Christian persecution by Maximinus II, Diocletian and Galerius and the Antioch issues portray important local statues: the Tyche erected by Eutychides (a pupil of Lysippus), the Apollo by Bryaxis of Athens and possibly the Zeus Nikephoros of the Temple of Apollo at Daphne which Antiochos IV commissioned for his great festival of 167 BC.

Historical information from Coinage of the Roman Empire, Vol II, p.516 by David Vagi
Johnny
commodus_02.jpg
Commodus AE from Nicomedia32 viewsObv: ...IOC KOMODOC K - Youthful bare bust of Commodus right, wearing cuirass and paludamentum.
Rev: Turreted Tyche seated left, holding small temple with eight columns in right hand and sceptre in left; NEIKOMHDEIA ... in exergue.
Mint: Nicomedia
Ref: Help please
Notes: Help with references as well as reading the legends would be much appreciated.
1 commentsoa
CommodusCM.jpg
Commodus Provincial Countermark39 views[Α Κ?] Μ ΑΥ ΚΟ ΑΝΤΩΝΙΝΟΣ
laureate head of Commodus, r.

ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟ ΝΕΩ ΝΙΚΟ
seafaring hero (an Argonaut?) standing with foot on prow, r., head, l., extending r. hand, holding transverse sceptre

Countermark of "young Emperor" facing right (Caracalla?)

177–192 AD
Nicomedia Bithynia-Pontus; Bithynia

REC 152

SOLD
Titus Pullo
Constans_RIC_VIII_Nicomedia_70_neu.jpg
Constans 44 viewsAE2 (5.3g - 22mm)
obv. D N CONSTANS P F AVG
pearl diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, globe in right
rev. FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Soldier leading barbarian from hut under tree
ex. SMNA
mint Nicomedia
RIC VIII Nicomedia 70
HG
hut.jpg
Constans19 views337-350 A.D.
AE2, Billon centenionalis
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe in right hand
3.80 gm, 21 mm
D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG
FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO
Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs. Hut 2 type
SMNA in ex.
RIC VIII Nicomedia 70
Nicomedia mint, officina 1; 348-351 A.D.
Jaimelai
00651.jpg
Constans (RIC 202, Coin #651)7 viewsRIC 202 (R2), AE3, Nicomedia, 336 - 337 AD.
OBV: FL CONSTANS NOB CAES; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust left.
REV: GLORIA EXERCITVS (SMNS); Two soldiers standing facing with one standard between them.
SIZE: 16.7mm 1.66g
MaynardGee
Constans_wreath.jpg
Constans - AE 430 views?
347-348 AD
rosette-diadem head right
D N CONSTA_NS P F AVG
VOT / XX / . / MVLT / XXX within wreath
??
RIC VIII (Heraclea 48, 52, Constantinople 70, Nicomedia 52, Nicomedia 59, Cyzicus 52, 58)
1,15 g 16-14 mm
Johny SYSEL
Constans2_opt.jpg
CONSTANS AE Centenionalis RIC VIII 72, FELTEMP REPARATIO16 viewsOBV: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand
REV: FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs., Star in upper left field, SMNA in ex.
3.8g, 20mm

Minted at Nicomedia
Legatus
Constans_10_opt.jpg
CONSTANS AE Centenionalis RIC VIII 72, FELTEMP REPARATIO12 viewsOBV: D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand.
REV: FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO, Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs., Star in upper left field, SMNA in ex.
3.9g, 20mm

Minted at Nicomedia
Legatus
Constans.jpg
Constans AE23. 347-348 AD. Nicomedia45 viewsObverse: DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right
Reverse: FEL TEMP-REPARATIO, Emperor standing left on galley, holding Phoenix on globe and labarum , piloted by Victory, star in right field,
Mintmark: SMNA

References: RIC VIII Nicomedia 64, rated Rare.
23mm, 5.4 grams.
1 commentsCanaan
AAGSb_small.png
Constans AE34 viewsConstans. 337-350 AD.

Nicomedia. 337-340 AD.

15mm., 1.66g.

D N CONSTA-NS P F AVG. Head of Constans, rosette-diademed, right

GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS. Two soldiers, helmeted, draped, cuirassed, facing front, heads toward each other, each holding inverted spear in outer hand and resting inner hand on shield; between them, a standard. MintMark: -/-//SMNA.

References: RIC VIII Nicomedia 14

AAGS
RL
Constans9_opt.jpg
CONSTANS AE4 RIC VIII 55, Vota10 viewsOBV: DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG, pearl-diademed head right
REV: VOT XX MVLT XXX in four lines within wreath. Mintmark: SMH dot
2.4g, 15mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 347-8 AD
Legatus
constans~0.jpg
Constans AE4. 347-348 AD. Nicomedia.4 viewsObv: DN CONSTANS PF AVG, rosette-diademed head right.
Rev: VOT XX MVLT XXX within wreath.

Mintmark SMN Delta dot.

RIC VIII Nicomedia 59, Rated Rare.
Britanikus
Constans Gloria Exercitvs.jpg
Constans Gloria Exercitvs78 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Obverse: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right

DN CONSTANS P F AVG, Our Lord and emperor Constans Pious and happy

DN: Dominus Nostre, Our Lord

CONSTANS: Constans

PF: PIUS FELIX, Pious and happy

AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse
GLORIA EXERCITVS, The glory of the army

GLORIA: Glory
EXERCITVS: Army

Two soldiers holding spears and shields on ground flanking standard,

Domination: Bronze AE 4, 15 mm.

Mint: SMNA, Nicomedia, RIC VIII Nicomedia 12, rated scarce.
John S
coins226.JPG
Constans Nicomedia VOTA10 viewsDN CONSTA-NS PF AVG
VOT XX MVLT XXX
SMNS dot
RIC VIII Nicomedia 59 R
ecoli
constantius19.jpg
Constans RIC 19 Nicomedia20 viewsConstans AE 3/4
Obverse: CONSTAN TIVS AVG, rosette diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears in one hand and resting the other hand on shield with one standard between them.
SMN episilon in ex. Nicomedia mint 14.75 mm., 1.1 g
NORMAN K
Constans VOT XX MVLT XXX RIC 52.jpg
Constans VOT XX MVLT XXX RIC VIII Nicomedia 52130 viewsAE4, 16mm, 1.39g.

Obverse: DN CONSTA-NS PF AVG rosette-diademmed head R.

Reverse: VOT/XX/MVLT/XXX within wreath.

Exe SMN?

RIC VIII 52 Nicomedia, 347-8, Scarce.
Robert_Brenchley
constans59.jpg
Constans, RIC VIII 59 Nicomedia15 viewsConstans, AE 4, 347-348 CE.
Obverse: CONSTANS PF AVG, diademed bust right.
Reverse: VOT XX MVLT XXX WITHIN WREATH.
Mintmark SMN (gamma) (dot) Nicomedia, 13.5mm, 1.6 g.




NORMAN K
hut_k.jpg
Constans, AD 337-35021 viewsAE Follis, 20mm, 3.0g, 6h; Nicomedia mint, 2nd officina, AD 348-351
Obv.: D N CONSTANS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, holding globe in right.
Rev.: FEL TEMP REPARATIO; Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head turned to left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downward, between the soldier’s legs // SMNB
Reference: RIC VIII Nicomedia 72, p. 476
From the YOC Collection
1 commentsJohn Anthony
4880_4881.jpg
Constans, AE2, FEL TEMP REPARATIO7 viewsAE2
Constans
Caesar: 333 - 337AD
Augustus: 337 - 350AD
Issued:
O: DN CONSTANS PF AVG; Diademed (pearls), draped and cuirassed bust, left, holding globe.
R: FEL TEMP REPARATIO; Constans standing left, holding labarum and resting hand on a shield; two seated captives at left. Constans stepping on leg of nearer captive.)
Exergue: (Dot)SMKA
Aorta: B4, O10, R5, T9, M6.
RIC VIII Nicomedia 67
Nicholas Z
CONSTNS-8-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constans, Nicomedia RIC VIII-072(A)15 viewsAE2
Nicomedia mint, 348-350 A.D.
20mm, 3.22g
RIC VIII-72

Obverse:
D N CONSTANS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed, globe in right hand, bust left.

Reverse:
FEL TEMP REPARATIO
* in left field.
SMNA
Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head turned to left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldiers legs.
rubadub
Constans Victoriae.jpg
Constans- Victoriae Avg65 viewsConstans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Obverse:
Head right and pearl-diademed

D N CONSTANS P F AVG

D N: Dominus Noster, Our Lord, in the context of our lord and ruler of the Roman people.
CONSTANS: Constans
P F: Pius Felix
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
Victoria AVG

Constans, 9 September 337 - 19 January 350 A.D.

Obverse:
Head right and pearl-diademed

D N CONSTANS P F AVG

D N: Dominus Noster, Our Lord, in the context of our lord and ruler of the Roman people.
CONSTANS: Constans
P F: Pius Felix
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Reverse:
Victoria AVG

Victoria: Victory
AVG: Augustus, emperor

Victory standig left, holding laurel wreath and branch.

Domination: Bronze, AE 4, size 14 mm,

Mint: It starts with SM, so Constantinopolis is doubtful. SMALA I think is too long for the space
Browsing through RIC VIII I found the following possibilities:
RIC VIII, Heraclea 43; ex. SMHA
RIC VIII, Constantinopolis 64; ex. CONSA
RIC VIII, Nicomedia 47; ex. SMNA
RIC VIII, Cyzicus 37; ex. SMKA
RIC VIII, Antiochia 66; ex. SMALA


Comments:

0. The Victory sticks out, and the lettering on the reverse is extremely odd.
1. The overall style seems (to me) a little off.
2. There seems to be a raised edge or lip.
3. While Victory is in high relief, the exergue line and most of the exergue are not there.
4. As Evan noted; the style of the legend.
5. Such a long neck this constans..

While any of these things by themselves probably wouldn’t raise any of my doubts, together they do. I could be totally off here but I just have a bad feeling about this one.
1 commentsJohn Schou
Constantin_RIC_VIII_45_Nicomedia.jpg
Constantin Nicomedia 1 viewsDivus Constantine I, AE4, c. 342, First Group, Nicomedia, Officina 1
Obv.: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG
Veiled head right.
Rev.: IVST-VEN MEM
Aequitas draped standing l., holding balance in r. hand, scroll in left.
SMNA in exergue

RIC VIII 45 (Nicomedia)
14mm, 1,23g
klausklage
constantine.JPG
Constantine11 viewsAE3
AD 309-337
Nicomedia
SMNA
RIC VIII 48?
JRoME
11160471_945192425514808_1813171480_n.jpg
Constantine30 viewsConstantine AE Follis. 326-327 AD. CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right / PROVIDENTIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets and star above, Mintmark NDelta

Nicomedia
RIC VII 144,Delta
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
025.JPG
Constantine I54 viewsConstantine I AE reduced Follis. 317-320 AD.

Near full silvering on obv.

IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate, draped bust left, holding mappa in left hand, globe and sceptre in right / IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, holding Victory on globe and leaning on eagle-tipped sceptre, palm to left, Z to right, SMN in ex. Nicomedia
RIC VII 23
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
Constantine_I_RIC_188.JPG
Constantine I "the Great," 307 - 337 AD 35 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Constantine facing right, seen from the front.

Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers helmeted, standing facing, looking as one another holding reversed spears in outer hands, inner hands on shields resting on the ground, between them are two standards; SMNΔ in exergue.

Billon Centenionalis, Nicomedia mint, 4th Officina, 330 - 335 AD

2.5 grams, 18 mm, 180°

RIC VII Nicomedia 188, S16356, VM 93
1 commentsSPQR Coins
Constantine_-_camp_MNG.jpg
Constantine I - AE 3 (follis)9 viewsNicomedia
325-326 AD
laureate head right
CONSTAN_TINVS AVG
Camp gate with 2 turrets and 8 layers, star above
PROVIDEN_TIAE AVGG
MNΓ
RIC VII Nicomedia 121
2,45g
Johny SYSEL
Constantine_I_Nicomedia_RIC_12.jpg
Constantine I - [Nicomedia RIC VII 12]65 viewsSilvered follis, 3.24g, 20mm, 0 degree, Nicomedia mint, 307-337 A.D.

Obv. - IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, laureate head right

Rev. - IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, nude except for chlamys, holding Victory on globe in right and leaning on sceptre in left, eagle with wreath in beak at feet left, Z to right, SMN in ex.

Great centering, full legends, and purchased for the marvelous reverse

80%+ silvering
___________

Purchased from Rhodes Ancient Coins
4 commentsrenegade3220
cons_camp_1_9_24_res.jpg
CONSTANTINE I -- CAMPGATE12 views307 - 337 AD
struck 328 -329 AD
AE Follis 19.5 mm; 2.57 g
O: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right
R: PROVIDENTIAE AVGG, camp gate with two turrets, no door, star above, seven stone layers, SMNB in exergue.
Nicomedia mint
laney
con_iovi_branch_8_26.jpg
CONSTANTINE I -- IOVI25 views307 - 337 AD
Struck 317 - 320 AD
AE 20 mm 2.98 g
O: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate bust left, holding scepter and mappa
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing left, holding scepter and globe with Victory, palm branch"-S in fields,
SMN in exergue
Nicomedia
RIC VII 23 v. (R2 RARE)
laney
Constantine_II_Nicomedia.jpg
Constantine I AD307-AD33737 viewsDie Axis zero degrees

Nicomedia mint
1 commentsPaul D3
Constantine_I_25.jpg
CONSTANTINE I AE3 Follis, RIC VII 188, GLORIA EXERCITVS27 viewsOBV: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them with dots on banners. SMNS in ex.


Minted at Nicomedia, 330-35 AD
Legatus
Constantine_I_5_opt.jpg
CONSTANTINE I AE3, RIC VII 90,B, Campgate10 viewsOBV: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right
REV: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets & star above, no door, SMNB in ex
2.9g, 19mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 324-5 AD
Legatus
constantine-posthumous-1-reshoot.jpg
Constantine I AE419 viewsRoman Imperial, Divus Constantine I AE4, 15mm, 1.5g

Obverse: D V CONSTANTI-NVS P T AVGG, Veiled head of Constantine right.

Reverse: VN-MR to left and right of shrouded figure of emperor facing. Mintmark: SMNA. "Venerable Memory"

Reference: RIC VIII Nicomedia 48
Gil-galad
Constantine_I_19_opt.jpg
CONSTANTINE I AE4, RIC VIII 18, Hand of God26 viewsOBV: D V CONSTANTI-NVS P T AVGG, veiled head right
REV: No legend, emperor veiled to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaches down to him, star in top centre. Mintmark: SMN?
1.6g, 14mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 337-40 AD
Legatus
Constantine_I_12_opt.jpg
CONSTANTINE I AE4, RIC VIII 48, Togate & Veiled21 viewsOBV: D V CONSTANTI-NVS P T AVGG, veiled head of Constantine right
REV: VN-MR to left and right of shrouded figure of emperor facing. SMNA in ex.
1.5g, 15mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 337-55 AD
1 commentsLegatus
coin116.JPG
Constantine I Campgate Nicomedia14 viewsConstantine I
CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG
PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG
SMNA or Delta
RIC VII Nicomedia 156
(R4 if Delta, most likely, R5 if A)


ecoli
Constantine_I_Jupitor.JPG
Constantine I Jupitor24 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 12, from dane's spread sheet
Looks similar to Nicomedia RIC VI 69c, Constantine Follis. AD 311.
OBV: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG, Laureate head ridht
REV: IOVE CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory & scepter, eagle at foot left, Greek_Deltaright, SMN in ex.
on the wildwinds site
Looks more like Greek_Gamma in the r. field WinkThe attribution to Turkey is not correct because there existed no Turkey at that time.
It does appear to be RIC VI Nicomedia 69c although only officina B is given in RIC. However, the other letters in the RIC 69 group are A,
Greek_Gamma, and Greek_Delta, so it seems the authors of RIC just hadn't seen any specimens of 69c with these letters.
These coins were minted between May 311 and May 313. The use of SMN as the mint signature does happen to start here but is not really time specific.
Romanorvm
coins166.JPG
Constantine I Nicomedia 16 viewsCONSTAN-TINVS AVG
PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG

SMNS

RIC VII Nicomedia 153 R1
ecoli
coins317.JPG
Constantine I Nicomedia GENIO AVGSTI9 viewsIMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS PF AVG
GENIO AV-GSTI
May 311-May 313
RIC VI, Nicomedia 69 R2
ecoli
qqq8.JPG
Constantine I Nicomedia IOVI CONSERVATORI32 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 12 R2
ecoli
Constantine I PROVIDENTIAE AVGG RIC 90.jpg
Constantine I PROVIDENTIAE AVGG RIC VII Nicomedia 9045 viewsAE3, 20mm, 2.50g.

Obverse: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head R.

Reverse: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, gate with 2 turrets, 6 rows, no door, star above.

Exe: SMNB (Nicomedia, Officina 2).

RIC VII 90, 324-5, R1.
Robert_Brenchley
constantine campgate com.JPG
constantine I RIC VII Nicomedia 15348 viewsAe 18mm 2.8g
OBV :: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG. Pearled diademed without rosette, head right
REV :: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG. Campgate with 6 rows, no door, 2 turrets and star above
EX :: SMN Gamma (Nicomedia)
RIC VII Nicomedia 153
RIC rated Scarce
from unclean lot 10/07
2 commentsJohnny
060808campgate01.jpg
Constantine I RIC VII Nicomedia 15329 viewsConstantine I
Ob: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, Pearl diademed head right
Rv: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, 2 turret camp gate, 6 layers, star above, no door
Ex: SMN delta
Nicomedia
RIC VII Nicomedia 153

From Helvetica: RIC describes the diadem as "triple pearl diadem with rosette at front" although coins of this type sometimes do not have the rosette at the front (examples in the collections of cscoppa and Mayadigger of the Forvm, plus one sold on ebay in March 07 by biggyg2)
Scotvs Capitis
Constantine_Campgate.jpg
Constantine I the Great RIC VII Nicomedia 14430 viewsobv.CONSTAN-TINVS AVG
laureate head right
rv. PROVIDENTIA AVGG
campgate with two towers, star above
ex. N/A
mint Nicomedia
Holger G
Constantine I AE3, 347-348 AD, Nicomedia.JPG
Constantine I, 347-348 AD, Nicomedia43 viewsConstantine I, AD 306-337
AE3 - 16mm
Nicomedia, 347-348AD
veiled, draped, cuirassed bust right
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
Constantine shrouded, standing right
UN-MR
RIC VIII Nicomedia 57
SMNI dot in ex.
R
Ardatirion
const4.jpg
Constantine I, AD 307-33731 viewsAE follis, 19mm (3.09 gm),

CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right / PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above and 6 stone layers; NE in exergue. Nicomedia mint, Struck AD 326-327.

RIC VII, 144 Nicomedia (pg. 623).
socalcoins
4812_4813.jpg
Constantine I, AE4, NO LEGEND; Constantine I riding Quadriga Right, Hand of God above.4 viewsAE4
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: Posthumously, September, 337 - April, 340AD
15.0 x 14.0mm
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVG; Veiled bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Constantine I, riding quadriga right, hand of God above.
Exergue: SMNS(Dot)
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 3383: B95, O71, R256, T42, M11.
2/19/17
Nicholas Z
4816_4817.jpg
Constantine I, AE4, NO LEGEND; Constantine I riding Quadriga Right, Hand of God above.3 viewsAE4
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: Posthumously, September, 337 - April, 340AD
14.0 x 13.0mm
O: DV CONSTANTINVS PT AVG; Veiled bust, right.
R: NO LEGEND; Constantine I, riding quadriga right, hand of God above.
Exergue: SMNΓ
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 3884: B95, O71, R256, T42, M11.
2/19/17
Nicholas Z
5422_5423.jpg
Constantine I, Follis, GLORIA EXERCITVS10 viewsAE Follis
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: 330 - 335AD
17.0mm 2.50gr
O: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG; Diademed (rosettes), draped and cuirassed bust, right.
R: GLORIA EXERCITVS; Two soldiers on either side of two standards, each holding a spear and resting a hand on a shield.
Exergue: SMNΓ
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 769: B18, O9, R87, T220, M11.
okta2000-2013 272019275255
10/27/15 1/31/17
Nicholas Z
6758_6759.jpg
Constantine I, Follis, IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG11 viewsAE Follis
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: 317 - 320AD
19.4mm 3.12gr 6h
O: IMP CONSTA-NTINVS AVG; Diademed (pearls), mantled bust left, holding mappa in right hand, scepter on globe in left hand.
R: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG; Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand, scepter in left.
Exergue: Palm, left field; Z, right field; SMN, below line.
Nicomedia Mint
RIC VII Nicomedia 23, Z
Aorta: 3069: B82, O53, R103, T150, M11.
balbinusnumismatica2009/Peter Poros 183232292257
5/28/18 8/8/18
Nicholas Z
4968_4969.jpg
Constantine I, Follis, PROVIDENTIAE AVGG5 viewsAE Follis
Constantine I
Caesar: 306 - 307AD
Augustus: 307 - 337AD
Issued: 325 - 326AD
20.5 x 18.5mm
O: CONSTANTINVS AVG; Laureate head, right.
R: PROVIDENTIAE AVGG; City gate with two turrets, star above; no door, seven layers of brick.
Exergue: MNA
Nicomedia Mint
Aorta: 1502: B59, O4, R148, T12, M11.
ancientcollectibles 221797664812
6/17/15 2/3/17
Nicholas Z
CONTINE1-28-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantine I, Nicomedia RIC VII-090.A21 viewsAE3
Nicomedia mint, 324-325 A.D.
19mm, 3.27g
RIC VII-90

Obverse:
CONSTANTINVS AVG
Laureate head right.

Reverse:
PROVIDENTIAE AVGG
SMNA
Campgate , two turrets, no doors, Star above, varying number of stone layers.
rubadub
CONTINE1-29-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantine I, Nicomedia RIC VII-188.Δ18 viewsAE3
Nicomedia mint, 330-335 A.D.
19mm, 2.44g
RIC VII-188

Obverse:
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
Rosette-diadem , draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS
SMNΔ
Two soldiers, helmeted, looking at one another, reversed spear in outer hands, inner hands on shields resting on ground; between them two standards.
rubadub
CONTINE1-30-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantine I, Nicomedia RIC VII-199.Γ23 viewsAE3/4
Nicomedia mint, 336- 337 A.D.
16mm, 1.72g
RIC VII-199

Obverse:
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
Rosette-diadem , draped, cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
GLORIA EXERCITVS
SMNΓ
Two soldiers, helmeted, looking at one another, reversed spear in outer hands, inner hands on shields resting on ground; between them one standard.
rubadub
56 Constantine Ia.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 12, Nicomedia33 viewsObv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Bust: Laureate head right
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and leaning on eagle-tipped scepter. Eagle with wreath in beak at feet left.
Exe: SMN "B" in field right
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 313-317 AD
Denom: Follis
Ref: RIC VII 12
Rated "R1"
Bluefish
Const1 56.jpg
Constantine I, RIC VII 12, Nicomedia38 viewsObv: IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Bust: Laureate head right
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI
Jupiter standing left holding Victory on a globe and scepter. Eagle with wreath in beak at feet left.
Exe: SMN gamma in field right
Date: 313-317 AD
RIC VII 12
Denom: Follis
Rated "R2"
Bluefish
Constantin_II_RIC_36.jpg
Constantine II - AE3 (Nicomedia) RIC 3630 viewsConstantine II. AE3, Nicomedia mint, 317-320 AD; 3.17g; obv. D N FL CL CONSTANTINVS NOB C, laureate draped bust right; rev. PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe & scepter, palm branch left, a dot over B right, SMN in ex. RIC VII 36.Bartosz Awianowicz
Costantine2.jpg
Constantine II 337-340 A.D.34 views
Metal: Bronze
Diam: 16 mm.
Weight: 1.6 gr.

OBV: Constantine II, Elder son of Constantine The Great :Diademed and cuirassed bust facing Right
OBV-LEGEND: CONSTANTINVSIVNNOBC
Marks-OBV: None

REV: Two helmeted soldiers standing with spears & shields, facing one standard between them.
REV-LEGEND : GLOR IAEXER ITUS
Marks-REV: In Exergue: SMNA also Alignment shifted 180 (Obv and Rev. are upside down one to aother)

Source : N/A
Age: 337-340 A.D.
Mint: Nicomedia *
*Nicomedia Nicomedia (Greek: Νικομήδεια, modern İzmit in Turkey) was founded by Nicomedes I of Bithynia at the head of the Gulf of Astacus which opens to the Propontis. The city was founded in 712 BC and, in early Antiquity, was called Astacus or Olbia. After being destroyed, it was rebuilt by Nicomedes I in 264 BC under the name of Nicomedia, and has ever since been one of the most important cities in northwestern Asia Minor. Hannibal came to Nicomedia in his final years and committed suicide in nearby Libyssa (Diliskelesi, Gebze). The historian Arrian was born there. Nicomedia was the metropolis of Bithynia under the Roman Empire, and Diocletian made it the eastern capital city of the Roman Empire in 286 when he introduced the Tetrarchy system. Nicomedia remained as the eastern (and most senior) capital of the Roman Empire until co-emperor Licinius was defeated by Constantine the Great at the Battle of Chrysopolis (Üsküdar) in 324. Constantine mainly resided in Nicomedia as his interim capital city for the next six years, until in 330 he declared the nearby Byzantium as Nova Roma, which eventually became known as Constantinople (present-day Istanbul). Constantine died in a royal villa at the vicinity of Nicomedia in 337. Owing to its position at the convergence of the Asiatic roads leading to the new capital, Nicomedia retained its importance even after the foundation of Constantinople.[1]

However, a major earthquake on 24 August 358 caused extensive devastation to Nicomedia and was followed by a fire which completed the catastrophe. Nicomedia was rebuilt, but on a smaller scale.[2] In the sixth century under Emperor Justinian the city was extended with new public buildings. Situated on the roads leading to the capital, the city remained a major military center, playing an important role in the Byzantine campaigns against the Caliphate.[3]

From the 840s on, Nicomedia was the capital of the thema of the Optimatoi. By that time, most of the old, seawards city had been abandoned and is described by the Arab geographer Ibn Khurdadhbeh as lying in ruins. The settlement had obviously been restricted to the hilltop citadel.[3] In the 1080s, the city served as the main military base for Alexios I Komnenos in his campaigns against the Seljuk Turks, and the First and Second Crusades both encamped there. The city was held by the Latin Empire between 1204 and ca. 1240, when it was recovered by John III Vatatzes. It remained in Byzantine control for a further century, but following the Byzantine defeat at the Battle of Bapheus in 1302, it was threatened by the rising Ottoman beylik. The city was twice blockaded by the Ottomans (in 1304 and 1330) before finally succumbing in 1337.[3]



Ref : Ric VII 189
Michel C2
Constantine_II_Sirmium.jpg
Constantine II AD 337-AD34021 viewsDie Axis 350 degrees
RIC 189
mint Nicomedia Beta
1 commentsPaul D3
constantine_II.jpg
Constantine II AE333 viewsAE3. 325-326 AD. CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left / PROVIDENTIAE CAESS (dot), campgate, two turrets & star above, MNG in ex.

Nicomedia RIC VII 123,G
Tanit
H13a.jpg
Constantine II AV Solidus129 viewsConstantine II AV Solidus. Nicomedia. 324 AD. CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C, laureate draped and curiassed bust right / PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS, Prince standing left, looking right, in military dress, holding parazonium on l. arm, standard with eagle holding wreath in r. hand; to r., another standard with hand. RIC 74

EXTREMELY RARE - Only two other examples cited by RIC, both in museum collections.
EXTEMELY FINE
SPLENDID STYLE

Ex. Stock Münzen & Medaillen AG Basel
From a small hoard discovered around 1980 in Egypt.
Ex. Hess-Divo 2007
3 commentsTrajan
coin118.jpg
Constantine II Nicomedia RIC VII 93 Scarce15 viewsConstantine II Nicomedia RIC VII 93 Scarce
AE3. 324-325 AD. CONSTANTINVS IVN
NOB C, laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left
/ PROVIDENTIAE CAESS, campgate with
two turrets, star above, no door, SMNgamma in ex.
Coin #118
cars100
aza.jpg
Constantine II, Nicomedia RIC VII 189 23 viewsConstantine II, 324-340 C.E., AE3
Obverse : CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C. Laureate bust right, cuirassed
Reverse : GLOR-IA EXERCITVS-ITVS. Two soldiers facing and holding a spear two standards between them.
SMN in ex. Nicomedia 17.7 mm., 2.9 g.
NORMAN K
constantine II, 206.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII 189, Nicomedia46 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS IVN NOB C
Bust: Laureate and cuirassed bust right
Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS
2 soldiers standing to either side of 2 standards.
Exe: SMNB
Date 330-340 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "R1"
Bluefish
291 Constantine II.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VII 36, Nicomedia29 viewsObv: DN FI CL CONSTANTINVS NOB C
Bust: Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev: PROVIDENTIA CAESS
Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter.
Exe: SMN (dot) and retrograde "Z" in field right, palm branch in field left
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 317-320 AD
Denom: Ae3
Ref: RIC VII 36
Rated "R2"
Bluefish
Con2 160.jpg
Constantine II, RIC VIII 6, Nicomedia35 viewsObv: D N CONSTANTINVS P F AVG
Bust: Rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS
2 soldiers standing to either side of one standard.
Exe: SMN
Date: 330-340 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "C"
Bluefish
Constantine_Nicomedia_A.png
Constantine Nicomedia A8 viewsConstantine I AE follis. 324-325 AD. CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right / PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets and star above, no door. Mintmark SMNA. RIC VII 90Ajax
Constantine.jpg
Constantine the Great25 views307 - 337 A.D.
Posthumous issue
AE 4, veiled, draped bust right
1.80 g, 16 mm
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
reverse no legend
Emperor veiled, to right in quadriga, the hand of God reaches down to him
SMNΔ in ex,
RIC VIII Nicomedia 18
Nicomedia mint, 337-340 A.D.
Jaimelai
Const_I_Camp.JPG
Constantine the Great58 viewsConstantine I - Nicomedia Mint - AE3 - RIC VII 90,E

O: CONSTAN-TINVS AVG, laureate head right

R: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets & star above, no door, SMNε in ex.

3.2g, 18.5mm, 180 degree die axis, 324-325AD.
1 commentsBiancasDad
CONST_2_STANDARDS.JPG
Constantine the Great69 viewsConstantine I - Nicomedia Mint - AE3 - RIC VII 188

O: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right

R: GLORIA EXERCITVS, two soldiers standing inward facing two standards between them, holding spears & shields, SMNA in ex.

2.3g, 16.8/17.9mm, 0 degree die axis, 330-335AD
1 commentsBiancasDad
CONST_I_G_EXER.JPG
Constantine the Great38 viewsConstantine I - Nicomedia Mint - Officina 2 - AE3 - RIC VII

O: CONSTANTI_NVS MAX AVG, rosette-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

R: GLOR_IA EXERC_ITVS, two soldiers standing facing, helmeted heads turned toward each other, reversed spear in outer hand, inner hand resting on shield, two standards between them with pellet on banner, SMNB in exergue

2.8g, 18.5mm, 135 degree die axis, 330-335AD
BiancasDad
TC-06~0.jpg
Constantine the Great (306-337)14 viewsAE3, A.D. 324-325, Nicomedia, 18mm, 2.91g, RIC VII, 90.
CONSTANTINVS AVG. Laureate head right.
PROVIDENTIAE AVGG. Campgate, 2 turrets, 5 layers, star above; SMNS in ex.
Marti Vltori
nmnm.jpg
Constantine the Great RIC 188 Nicomedia13 viewsCONSTANTINE THE GREAT . 307-337 AD. Bronze Follis, 15.7 mm., 1.0 gm.
Obverse: CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG - Diademed bust right, draped and cuirassed.
Reverse: GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two soldiers standing, holding spears and shields; two standards between them. SHNA in ex. RIC 188 (Nicomedia mint, struck 330-335).
NORMAN K
Constantine2.jpg
Constantine the Great, (307-337)63 viewsConstantine the Great, Nicomedia mint 324-325
Obv: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right
Rev: PROVIDEN-TIAE AVGG, camp-gate with no doors and two turrets, star above
SMNA in ex.
RIC VII 154
2 commentsblot-sven
0640-325np_noir.jpg
Constantine the Great, Follis - *201 viewsNicomedia mint, 2nd officina, c. AD 311
IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG; Laureate head right
VIRTVTIE-XERCITVS Mars/Virtus advancing right in military dress, holding transverse spear and shield ; trophy over shoulder. B in right field. SMN in exergue.
4.88 gr, 22 mm
RIC-, C-, Roman coins -
RIC lists this type only for Licinius and Maximinus . "Iovi Conservatori and Virtuti Exercitus both appear for Licinius and Maximinus, emissions for the former being the more scarce: coinage for Constantine is extremely rare. Date, c. 311". Coin should be listed after NICOMEDIA 70c.
Please see Victor Clarks website for further information at :http://www.constantinethegreatcoins.com/unlisted/
3 commentsPotator II
0640-510np_noir.jpg
Constantine the Great, Posthumous AE3132 viewsNicomedia mint, 2nd officina
D V CONSTANTINVS PT AVGG, veiled bust right
Anepigraph, Constantine the great in a Quadriga right, SMNS at exergue
2.19 gr
Ref : Cohen # 760, LRBC # 1132
1 commentsPotator II
Constantine The Great- City of Rome Commemorative.jpg
Constantine The Great- City of Rome Commemorative61 viewsConstantine the Great, early 307 - 22 May 337 A.D.

Obverse:
City of Rome Commemorative, 330 - 338 A.D.

Helmeted bust of Roma left wearing imperial ornamental mantle, visored and crested helmet.

VRBS ROMA, The City of Rome

VRBS: City
ROMA: Rome

Comment:
Much less common than the wolf and twins reverse type.

Reverse:
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, The glory of the army

GLOR-IA : Glory
EXERC-ITVS: Army

Two soldiers standing facing one another, each holding spear and resting hand on shield on ground, standard in center.


Domination: Bronze AE4, size 15-16 mm

Mint: the last letter its a Δ (Delta, fourth Officina) , if thats so.. RIC VIII Heraclea 28, rated S. 330-333 or 335.

Comments:
There are three possible mints for this coin. It all depends on the third letter.
SMH( ) - Heraclea
SMN( ) - Nicomedia
SMK( ) - Cyzicus

Heraclea had 5 officinae working at this time. Nicomedia had 4 and Cyzicus had 6.
John Schou
cons_comm_1.jpg
CONSTANTINOPOLIS (NICOMEDIA MINT)39 viewsca. 330 - 340 AD
AE 18mm 2.16 g
O: CONSTANTINOPOLI - crested, laureate helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left in imperial mantle & holding scepter.
R: Victory with open wings standing left, right foot on a vessel's prow holding scepter & leaning on shield
SMNA IN EXE
NICOMEDIA MINT
laney
261- Constantinopolis, Nicomedia 1.JPG
Constantinopolis, Nicomedia 124 viewsAE3, 330-346 AD, Nicomedia
Obverse: CONSTANTINOPOLI, Helmeted, cuirassed bust of Constantinople left
Reverse: Victory on prow.
SMN(Delta) in exergue
RIC 196
18mm, 2.3gm
Jerome Holderman
constantinus_i-_ric_56.jpg
Constantinus I - RIC VI 5611 viewsNicomedia 308-10 AD
Constantine, as Filius Augustorum, AE Follis. 308-10 AD.
VAL CONSTANTINVS FIL AVG, laureate head right /
GENIO CAESARIS CMH, Genius standing left, pouring liquor from patera,
SMNS in ex.
xokleng
constantinus_-golriaexe_.jpg
Constantinus I - RIC VII 18826 viewsNicomedia AD 330-335
Constantine Ae3.
CONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, laurel and rosette diademed,
draped & cuirassed bust right/
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, Two soldiers standing inward facing each other, holding spear,
shield & two standards between them, dot on banners,
SMN? in ex.
xokleng
constantinus_i_-_nicomedia-vot.jpg
Constantinus I - RIC VII 607 viewsHeraclea 324 AD.
Constantine I AE3.
CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right /
DN CONSTANTINI MAX AVG around VOT XX star in wreath,
SMH(E) in ex.
xokleng
coin_5_quart.jpg
CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG (the 1st) / GLORIA EXERCITVS AE3/4 follis (306-337 A.D.)17 viewsCONSTANTI-NVS MAX AVG, (laurel and?) rosette diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers standing inward facing each other, holding spears, shields and two standards between them, "dot" (clearly filled) on banners. Mintmark: SMNE (?) in exergue.

AE3/4, 16.5-17mm, 2.46g, die axis 12 (medal alignment), material: bronze/copper-based alloy

MAX AVG = Maximus Augustus, the Great Emperor, Gloria Exercitus (noun + genitive) "The Glory of the Army", SMNE = Sacra Moneta Nicomedia, "officina epsilon", i. e. workshop#5.

Limiting information to only what is known for sure: the legends with the particular breaks, two standards and four-letter mintmark starting with SM, we conclude that this is definitely Constantine I, and only 3 mints are possible: SMN... Nicomedia (RIC VII Nicomedia 188), SMH... Heraclea (RIC VII Nicomedia 111) and SMK... Cyzicus (RIC VII Cyzicus 76-79). All are minted in 330-335 A.D. If the mintmark is indeed SMN..., two variations are listed: rosette-diademed and laurel- and rosette-diademed (laurels typically designated by longish shapes and rosettes as squares with dots). Since the obverse is worn, it is difficult to judge which one is the case here. One can definitely see the rosettes, but as for laurels... probably, not. Officina may be E or S, but I think E fits better.

Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus, aka Constantine the Great, aka Saint Constantine, born 27 Feb c. 272 to Flavius Valerius Constantius (aka Constantius I), a Roman Army officer of Illyrian origins, and a Greek woman of low birth Helena (aka Saint Helena). His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian and Galerius. In 305, Constantius raised himself to the rank of Augustus, senior western emperor, and Constantine was recalled west to campaign under his father in Britannia (Britain). Constantine was acclaimed as emperor by the army at Eboracum (modern-day York) after his father's death in 306 AD, and he emerged victorious in a series of civil wars against Emperors Maxentius and Licinius to become sole ruler of both west and east by 324 AD. He did so many a great deed that there is no point to list them here. Best known for (having some sort of Christ-related mystical experience in 312, just before the decisive Battle of the Milvian Bridge with Maxentius) being the first Roman Emperor to convert to Christianity and for being a champion of this faith, in particular, he played an influential role in the proclamation of the Edict of Milan in 313, which declared religious tolerance for Christianity in the Roman empire, and called the First Council of Nicaea in 325 that produced the statement of Christian belief known as the Nicene Creed. Died 22 May 337, famously being baptized on his deathbed. Succeeded by his 3 sons: Constantine II, Constantius II and Constans.
Yurii P
CG.PNG
Constantius Gallus19 viewsConstantius Gallus
Obv. DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES bare-headed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev. REPARATIO
No beard, Phrygian helmet, Spearing horse man, ·S· in left field.
Mintmark off flan, so References can be: RIC Cyzikus 103, or RIC Nicomedia 962. But most likely Alexandria RIC74
Canaan
constantius_gallus_ae2_1.jpg
constantius gallus AE225 viewscleaned up

Constantius Gallus DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES BDC
FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO reaching Phrygian helmet, bearded
SMN delta Gamma Nicomedia Nicomedia 85 22-23 mm C yes
1 commentsJames b4
const_gallus_nikomedia_87.jpg
Constantius Gallus, RIC VIII, Nicomedia 8734 viewsConstantius Gallus, Caesar AD 351-354, cousin of Constantius II
AE - Centenionalis, 5.4g, 23mm
Nicomedia, 5th officina, 15.3.351 - winter 354
obv. DN FL CL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES
Bust, draped, bare-headed, r.
rev. FEL TEMP RE - PARATIO
Soldier, holding shield, stabbing with his spear horseman, who lies on his fallen horse l., clutching
with l. hand mane of horse, extends r. hand to soldier; the horseman is unbearded and wears
helmet (RIC type FH 3 reaching)
in upper left field Gamma
in ex. .SMNE
RIC VIII, Nicomedia 87; LRBC 2303
F+/about VF

The spear has an obvious swelling in its middle. Wether this is an intentional technical feature of the
weapon or only an invention of the die cutter is not clear.
Jochen
Constantius II 3.jpg
Constantius II16 viewsObv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
Rev : PROVIDENTIAE CAES* ; camp gate.

RIC VII Nicomedia 127
Tanit
2530432.jpg
Constantius II13 viewsConstantius II. AD 337-361. Æ Centenionalis (20mm, 3.92 g, 6h). Nicomedia mint, 3rd officina. Struck AD 348-351. Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust left, holding globe / Emperor standing left, holding labarum and grounded shield; two captives to left; SMNΓ. RIC VIII 67; LRBC 2289. 2 commentsTLP
CONSTANTIUS_II_8_LAYER.JPG
Constantius II21 viewsConstantius II - Nicomedia Mint - Officina 4 - AE3 - RIC VII 128

O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate bust left, draped & cuirassed

R: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS dot, campgate with 8 layers, two turrets and star above, MNΔ in exergue

3.7g, 18.7mm, 0 degree die axis, 325-326AD
BiancasDad
00constantiuscamgate.jpg
CONSTANTIUS II53 viewsAE 3. Nicomedia 324-325 AD. 3,17 grs. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. FL IVL CONSTANTIUS NOB C / Campgate with two turrets,six layers ,no doors,star above. PROVIDENTIAE CAESS. In exergue SMN delta.
RIC VII 94.
1 commentsbenito
00constantiuscamgate~0.jpg
CONSTANTIUS II19 viewsAE 3. Nicomedia 324-325 AD. 3,17 grs. Laureate draped and cuirassed bust right. FL IVL CONSTANTIUS NOB C / Campgate with two turrets,six layers ,no doors,star above. PROVIDENTIAE CAESS. In exergue SMN delta.
RIC VII 94.
benito
CONSTANTIUS_2_CAMPGATE.JPG
Constantius II35 viewsConstantius II - Nicomedia Mint - Officina 4 - AE3 - RIC VII 94

O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust left

R: PROVIDEN_TIAE CAESS, campgate with six rows, two turrets, no doors, star above, top and bottom rows empty blocks, SMNΔ in exergue

3.9g, 19.4mm, 30 degree die axis, 324-325AD
1 commentsBiancasDad
CONSTANTIUS_II_CAMPGATE.JPG
Constantius II40 viewsConstantius II - Nicomedia Mint - Officina 1 - AE3 - RIC VII 124

O: F L IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate draped, cuirassed bust left

R: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS, campgate, 2 turrets, 6 layers, star above, no doors, MNA in exergue

3.3g, 18mm, 180 degree die axis, 325-326AD
BiancasDad
Constantius_II_RIC_VIII_Nicomedia_67.jpg
Constantius II50 viewsAE 2 (3,38 gr - 19 mm)
obv. D N CONSTAN-TIVS P F AVG
pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust left, globe in right
rev. FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Emperor standing left, labarum in right, resting left on shield, stepping on two kneeling barbarians
in exergue SMNA
mint Nicomedia
Struck 348-351 AD
RIC VIII Nicomedia 67
2 commentsHolger G
image~1.jpg
Constantius ii19 viewsGold solidus nicomedia mint 351 adCaesarincarnate
image~2.jpg
Constantius ii23 viewsGold solidus nicomedia mint 351 ad,ric 74, obv pearl-diademed draped cuirassed bust of Constantius ii facing right, rev Gloria Rei pvblicae Roma seated facing, constantinopolis facing left, supporting between them wreath containing vot xxx mvlt xxxx in four lines, Roma holding spear in left.Caesarincarnate
Constantius II fel temp smn delta com.JPG
Constantius II SMN Delta96 viewsAE 21mm 6.1 grams
OBV :: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG. Pearled diadem, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: FEL TEMP REPARATIO. Soldier spearing fallen horseman. Gamma in left field
EX :: SMN Delta
RIC VII Nicomedia 84
Ric rated C3
from uncleaned lot 10/07
Johnny
00228.jpg
Constantius II (RIC 128, Coin #228)12 viewsRIC 128, AE3, Nicomedia, 328-329 AD.
Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left.
Rev: PROVIDENTIAE CAES dot (MNS) Campgate with two turrets and star above.
Size: 19.1mm 3.12gm
MaynardGee
00296.jpg
Constantius II (RIC 128, Coin #296)11 viewsRIC 128, Silvered AE3, Nicomedia, 328-329 AD.
Obv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C Laureate, draped & cuirassed bust left..
Rev: PROVIDENIAE CAES dot (MNB) Campgate with two turrets and star above..
Size: 19.6mm 3.44gm
MaynardGee
costanzo_II_nicomedia_ric_49.jpg
Constantius II - Nicomedia13 viewsVOT XX MVLT XXX
Ric VIII Nicomedia 49
antvwala
088.jpg
Constantius II AE Folles86 viewsRIC VII 191 D(elta), Nicomedia
2.27 g, 17 mm
F L IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them
SMND(elta) in exergue
R1
From a pile of uncleaned coins!
Mark Z2
Constantius II AE3, 337-340 AD, Nicomedia.JPG
Constantius II AE3, 337-340 AD, Nicomedia40 viewsConstantius II, AD 337-361
AE3, 13mm
Nicomedia, 337-340 AD
laureate head only right
DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG
two soldiers facing with one standard
GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS
SMN gamma dot
RIC VIII Nicomedia 8
S

not recorded as having dot
Ardatirion
c2feltemp03-.jpg
CONSTANTIUS II centenionalis AD348-35022 viewsobv: D.N.CONSTANTIVS.PF.AVG (pearl-diadem, draped & cuirassed bust left, globe in hand)
rev: FEL.TEMP.REPARATIO / [S]MNΓ (emperor bare headed and in military dress standing, holding standard with chi-rho on banner in his right hand, resting left hand on shield, two bound captives wearing pointed caps kneeling, leaning to the left before him)
ref: RIC VIII-Nicomedia71
4.21g, 19mm
berserker
Constantius_II_FT_Nicomedia~0.JPG
Constantius II FT Nicomedia29 viewsConstantius II (AVG 348-61) AE 17 / FEL TEMP Type. 17mm, 2.3g, Nicomedia 351 - 355 AD
OBV: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG. Diademed bust r.
REV: FEL TEMP REPARATIO. Soldier spearing fallen horseman. SMNE.
RIC-VIII-96 Rated C-3.
Romanorvm
Constantius_II_FT_Nicomedia_2~0.JPG
Constantius II FT Nicomedia 232 viewsConstantius II, Nicomedia, 337 - 361 AD
Obverse: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO Roman soldier spearing fallen horse rider; Gamma in left field; SMNA in exergue
22.04mm, 6.4g, unattributed
Very Heavy for the period.
Backwards S in SMNA

RARE
Romanorvm
image~1.jpeg
Constantius II Half Centenionalis Fel Temp Reparatio Phoenix on Globe47 viewsAE Half Centenionalis
Constantius II, 337-361 CE
Diameter: 17 mm, Weight: 2.90 grams, Die Axis: 6h

Obverse: D N CONSTANTIVS PF AVG
Diademed and draped bust to right.

Reverse: FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Ornately nimbate phoenix standing right on globe, star in field to right.

Mint: SMNB, star in field: Nicomedia

Notes:
- Nicomedia is a rare mint for the Fel Temp Reparatio phoenix on globe type, and this B emission is not listed in RIC.
- There were likely at least 12 officiniae emissions from Nicomedia in the years 349 and 350 CE, but all seem to have been relatively small outputs. I have only been able to view two other different officiniae (both also star in field), and these too show the distinctive Nicomedia nimbus design. This is in contrast to Antioch, were some emissions possess a spectacular nimbus, while others were engraved with a design similar to other mints. Nicomedia may have followed the same pattern, but there are currently to few published specimens to tell.
- This example has a small vertical cut on the reverse splitting the tail feathers of the Phoenix.


Ex Germania Inferior Numismatics (Netherlands), 2016
2 commentsPharsalos
c2feltemp04-.jpg
CONSTANTIUS II majorina AD351-35533 viewsobv: D.N.CONSTANTIVS.PF.AVG (pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right)
rev: FEL.TEMP.REPARATIO / SMNA (emperor standing left on prow of ship piloted by Victory, holding globe with phoenix)
ref: RIC-, C.32, Rare
mint: Nicomedia
4.03g, 22mm
not in RIC
berserker
Constantius_II_Gloria.jpg
Constantius II Nicomedia Gloria Exercitvs54 viewsConstantius II
Reigned AD 337 – 361
Coin Struck AD 337-341
AE 4 Follis
Nicomedia mint
RIC VIII Nicomedia 11

O: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG,
rosette diademed bust right

R: GLORIA EXERCITVS two soldiers standing to either side of one standard, SMNB in exergue
2 commentsGao
Constantius_II_OBV.JPG
Constantius II Obv6 viewsContstantius II; 337-361 AD
Bronze; AE3 Nicomedia mint
OBV: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier right & looking left, spears a fallen long-haired horseman who reaches back towards the soldier, SMN in ex
(RIC VIII 104)
Philip G
Constantius_II_REV.JPG
Constantius II Rev4 viewsContstantius II; 337-361 AD
Bronze; AE3 Nicomedia mint
OBV: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
REV: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, soldier right & looking left, spears a fallen long-haired horseman who reaches back towards the soldier, SMN in ex (RIC VIII 104)
Philip G
const campgate 2 com.JPG
Constantius II RIC VII Nicomedia 9463 viewsAe 20 mm 3.1g 324-325 AD

OBV :: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C . Laureated draped and cuirassed bust left
REV :: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAESS. Campgate with 2 turrets, no door. star above. 7 rows of blocks
EX :: SMN Delta ( Nicomedia )
RIC VII Nicomedia 94
RIC rated R1
from uncleaned lot 10/2007
1 commentsJohnny
constantiusII_nicomedia67.jpg
Constantius II RIC VIII, Nicomedia 6798 viewsConstantius II, AD 337-361, son of Constantine I
AE - Follis, 4.35g, 19.26mm
Nicomedia 4th officina, AD AD 347-348
obv. DN CONSTAN - TIVS PF AVG
bust, draped and cuirassed, pearl-diademed, l., holding globe in r. hand
rev. FEL TEMP - REPARATIO
Emperor in military dress standing l., holding standard with Chi-Rh on banner
and resting l. hand on shield; in front of Emperor are two captives standing
(var. a)
exergue: SMN Delta
RIC VIII, Nicomedia 67; C.41; LRBC 2289
VF+, nice sandpatina; found in Syria
2 commentsJochen
Constantius_II_RIC_67.JPG
Constantius II, 337 - 361 AD45 viewsObv: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust of Constantius II facing right, holding a globe.

Rev: FEL TEMP REPARATIO, Emperor in military dress, standing left, holding a standard with Chi-Rho on banner, resting his left hand on a shield and placing his foot on one of two captives before him, SMNΔ in exergue.

Billon Follis, Nicomedia mint, 348 - 351 AD

3.9 grams, 20.3 mm, 180°

RIC VIII Nicomedia 67, VM 87
1 commentsSPQR Matt
8874_8875.jpg
Constantius II, AE3, PROVIDENTIAE CAES (dot), NS0 viewsAE3
Constantius II
Caesar: 324 - 337AD
Augustus: 337 - 361AD
Issued: 326 - 327AD
21.0 x 19.5mm 2.30gr 6h
O: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C; Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust, left.
R: PROVIDEN-TIAE CAES (dot); City gate with two turrets, star above, seven layers of bricks, doors closed.
Exergue: NS, below line.
Nicomedia Mint
Sear 17649; RIC VII Nicomedia 147; Aorta: 2327: B42, O25, R41, T2, M12.
numis-kimel/Anna Kimelova 283447423000
4/12/19 5/14/19
Nicholas Z
CONTIUS2-31-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RIC VII-94(Δ)27 viewsAE3
Nicomedia mint, 324-325 A.D.
20mm, 2.31g
RIC VII-94

Obverse:
FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.

Reverse:
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS
SMNΔ
Camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above, varying number of stone layers.
rubadub
CONTIUS2-32-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RIC VIII-067(Δ)23 viewsAE2 Centenionalis
Nicomedia mint, 348-351 A.D.
20mm, 4.40g
RIC VIII-67

Obverse:
D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed, globe in right hand, bust left.

Reverse:
FEL TEMP REPARATIO
SMNΔ
Emperor in military dress standing left, holding standard with Chi-Rho on banner and resting left hand on shield; in front of emperor are two captives standing.
rubadub
CONTIUS2-33-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RIC VIII-084(Γ)21 viewsAE2
Nicomedia mint, 351-355 A.D.
23mm, 3.05g
RIC VIII-84

Obverse:
D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right.

Reverse:
FEL TEMP REPARATIO
Γ in field
SMNΓ
Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground at right. Horseman is beardless and wears cap; he turns to face soldier, and extends right arm.
rubadub
CONTIUS2-34-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RIC VIII-104(S)24 viewsAE3
Nicomedia mint, 355-361 A.D.
17mm, 1.25g
RIC VIII-104

Obverse:
D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Pearled-diademed, draped and cuirassed, bust right.

Reverse:
FEL TEMP REPARATIO
SMNS
Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground right. Horseman is beardless and wears cap; he turns to face soldier, and extends right arm.
rubadub
CONTIUS2-35-ROMAN~0.jpg
Constantius II, Nicomedia RICVIII-107(Γ)21 viewsAE4
Nicomedia mint, 355-361 A.D.
16mm, 1.83g
RIC VIII-107

Obverse:
D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Pearled-diademed, draped and cuirassed, bust right.

Reverse:
FEL TEMP REPARATIO
A in field
SMNΓ
Helmeted soldier to left, shield on left arm, spearing falling horseman; shield on ground right. Horseman is beardless and wears cap; he turns to face soldier, and extends right arm.
rubadub
4.PNG
Constantius II, Nicomedia.14 viewsConstantius II, Nicomedia. AE4 15mm (Thickness 2mm) Weight ?

Obverse: DN CONSTAN-TIVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right

Reverse:FEL TEMP RE-PARATIO, soldier spearing fallen horseman who is bearded, wearing a bowl-shaped, brimmed helmet, reaching backwards. Gamma in left field
discwizard
188.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VII 158, Nicomedia36 viewsObv: FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
Bust: Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left
Rev: PROVIDENTIAE CAES (DOT)
Campgate, no door, two turrets, star above. 7 layers.
Exe: SMN delta
Date: 324-361 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "R1"
Bluefish
313 Constantius II.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VIII 11, Nicomedia52 viewsObv: DN CONSTANTIVS PF AVG
Bust: Laureate and rosette-diademed head right
Rev: GLORIA EXERCITVS
Two soldiers standing to either side of two standards
Exe: SMNB
Date: 330-341 AD
Mint: Nicomedia
Denom: Ae3
Ref: RIC VIII 11
Rated "C2"
Bluefish
81.jpg
Constantius II, RIC VIII 112, Nicomedia27 viewsObv: D N CONSTANTIVS P F AVG
Bust: Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right
Rev: SPES REIPVBLICE
Emperor standing left holding reversed spear and patera.
Exe: SMNB
Date: 355-361 AD
Denom: Ae3
Rated "C"
Bluefish
prx~0.JPG
Constantius II. (337-355 AD)17 viewsAE3 (325-326 AD)
Obv. FL IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C
Rev. PROVIDENTIAE CAES
mint: Nicomedia
RIC VII 128
Misak33
cr15.JPG
CRISPUS 12,5 denarii Nicomedia82 viewsD N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES
Laureated, draped and cuirassed bust right
IOVI CONS - ERVATORI
Jupiter standing left, leaning on sceptre with eagle,Victory on globe in right hand, eagle holding wreath to left, captive on ground to right
/XII Gamma / SMNGamma
Nicomedia mint
RIC. VII, 48 r2
2 commentsgb29400
Crispus5_opt.jpg
CRISPUS AE3, RIC VII 32, Jupiter16 viewsOBV: D N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: PROVIDEN TIAECAESS Jupiter stg. l., chlamys across l. shoulder, leaning on scepter, holding Victory on globe. In field to l., palm branch; in field to r., dot A; in exergue, SMN
2.92g, 18mm
Minted at Nicomedia, 317-20 AD
Legatus
crispus com.JPG
Crispus providentiae caess194 views Follis
AE 18 mm 3.2 g 317-326 AD
DN FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES laureated and draped bust right
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS Jupiter holding nike on globe raised in right hand. leaning on scepter. Palm branch at feet to left. DOT over S in right field
SMN in ex
RIC 32 Nicomedia
from uncleaned lot 10/07

6 commentsJohnny
CRISPUS-5-ROMAN.jpg
Crispus, Nicomedia RIC VII-3218 viewsAE3
Nicomedia mint, 317-320 A.D.
19mm, 3.55g
RIC VII-32, RCVv.4-16715

Obverse:
D N FL IVL CRISPVS NOB CAES
Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust left.

Reverse:
PROVIDENTIAE CAESS
Branch in left feild
. A in right field
SM N in exergue
Jupiter standing left, chlamys across left shoulder, leaning on scpetre, holding Victory on globe.
rubadub
LT-KKUT.jpg
DIOCLETIAN Argenteus42 viewsDIOCLETI-ANVS AVG, laureate head right / VICTORIAE SARMATICAE, camp-gate with open doors, surmounted by four turrets; star above door.

*, SMNG = Nicomedia.

AR Argenteus, c295, c18mm, c3.0g.

RIC25a(R3), RSC492a.

Ex. I Jones collection.
2 commentsTLP
0560-210np_noir.jpg
Diocletian, Argenteus - *154 viewsNicomedia mint, 3rd officina, AD 295-296
DIOCLETI ANVS AVG, Laureate head of Diocletian right
VICTORIAE SARMATICAE, The tetrarchs sacrifying before a campgate. SMNΓat exergue
3.3 gr
Ref : RCV # 12615 (1000), Cohen #491 var,
6 commentsPotator II
EB0537_scaled.JPG
EB0537 Commodus / Athena12 viewsCommodus, AE 26 of Bithynia, Nicomedia.
Obv: [A] K M AV[RO] ANTΩNI[N], Laureate head right.
Rev: MHT NEΩ NEIKOM H∆, Athena standing left, holding galley in right hand, spear and shield in left.
References: RPC IV 9895 (temporary).
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 10.629 grams.
EB
EB0759_scaled.JPG
EB0759 Maximinus II / Sol Invicto10 viewsMaximinus II 310-313, AE Follis, Nicomedia 311-313 AD.
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: SOLI INVICTO, Sol standing left in long robe, with raised right hand and holding up head of Serapis in left, A to left, star to right, [mintmark SMN].
References: Cf. RIC VI 77b (star over A to left).
Diameter: 22.5mm, Weight: 3.669g.
EB
EB0772_scaled.JPG
EB0772 Constantine I / Camp Gate8 viewsConstantine I 307-337, AE follis, Nicomedia, 330-335.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG, rosette-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE AVGG, campgate with two turrets, no door, star above, mintmark SMNΔ.
References: Cf. RIC VII 156 (MAX AVG on obverse).
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 3.347g.
EB
EB0774_scaled.JPG
EB0774 Constantine I / Camp Gate8 viewsConstantine I, 307-337, Nicomedia, AE Follis.
Obverse: CONSTANTINVS AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: PROVIDENTIAE AVGG, Camp gate, two turrets, no doors, star above. Mintmark MNA.
References: RIC VII 121.
Diameter: 18.5mm, Weight: 2.277g.
EB
EB0810_scaled.JPG
EB0810 Valentinian II / Victory7 viewsValentinian II 375-392, AE 4, Nicomedia.
Obverse: DN VALENTINIANVS PF AVG, pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SALVS REI-PVBLICAE, Victory walking left, holding trophy on shoulder and dragging captive beheind her. Chi-Rho in left field. Mintmark SMNB.
References: RIC IX 45a.
Diameter: 13mm, Weight: 1.253g.
EB
EB0870_scaled.JPG
EB0870 Diocletian / Genius6 viewsDiocletian 284-305, AE Follis, Nicomedia 294-295 AD.
Obverse: IMP C C VAL DIOCLETIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right.
Reverse: GENIO POPULI ROMANI, Genius standing left, holding patera and cornucopiae, SMNA in exergue.
References: RIC 29a.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 9.91g.
EB
EB0894_scaled.JPG
EB0894 Constantius II / Wreath6 viewsConstantius II, AE 4, Nicomedia.
Obverse: [D N CONSTAN]-TIVS [P F AVG] (or similar), pearl-diademed head right.
Reverse: [], VOT XX MVLT XXX in wreath, SMNS in ex.
References: -.
Diameter: 13.5mm, Weight: 1.642g.
EB
EB0954_scaled.JPG
EB0954 Justinian I / Large M1 viewsJustinian I, 527-565, AE Follis, Nicomedia, Year 30 = 556-557 AD.
Obverse: [DN IVSTINI]ANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year XXX to right, officina letter B below, mintmark NIKO.
References: SB 201, MIB I 113a.
Diameter: 32.5mm, Weight: 16.565g.
EB
EB0958_scaled.JPG
EB0958 Justin II & Sophia / Large M3 viewsJustin II & Sophia, AE Half Follis, Nicomedia mint. Year 10 = 574-575 AD.
Obverse: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, Justin on left, Sophia on right, seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate, Justin holding cross on globe, Sophia holding sceptre.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year X to right, officina letter O below, mintmark NIKO.
References: SB 369, MIB 46 a,b.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 12.74g.
EB
EB0964_scaled.JPG
EB0964 Tiberius II / Large M5 viewsTiberius II 578-582, AE Follis, Nicomedia.
Obverse: DM TIb CONSTANT PP AVG, crowned, mantled bust facing, holding mappa and eagle-tipped sceptre.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO left, cross above, regnal year Stigma I / officina I to right, mintmark NIKOA.
References: SB 441, MIB 35.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 10.572g.
EB
EB0969_scaled.JPG
EB0969 Maurice Tiberius / Large M3 viewsMaurice Tiberius, 582-602 AD, AE Follis. Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: [], helmeted and cuirassed or crowned and cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross or chi-rho above, regnal year Stigma to right, officina letter A below; mintmark NIKO.
References: Sear Byz 512, MIB 75D, 76D, 78D var (110 combinations known).
Diameter: 29.5mm, Weight: 11.501g.
EB
EB0975_scaled.JPG
EB0975 Heraclius and Son / Large M9 viewsHeraclius and Heraclius Constantine, AE Follis, Nicomedia.
Obverse: [?]P AV[?], Heraclius on left and Heraclius Constantine on right, cross between their heads, each wearing crown and chlamys and each holding cross on globe.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year IIII to right, officina letter R below, mintmark NIKo.
References: SB 834, MIB 175.
Diameter: 33mm, Weight: 13.808g.
EB
EB0976b_scaled.JPG
EB0976 Heraclius / Large M's4 viewsHeraclius AE follis, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: Helmeted, draped, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross.
Reverse: Large M, overstruck on another Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year III to right, officina letter A below, mintmark [NI]K.
References: Cf. SB 833, MIB 174.
Diameter: 33.5mm, Weight: 11.17g.
EB
EB0977_scaled.JPG
EB0977 Heraclius / Large M2 viewsHeraclius AE follis, Nicomedia mint.
Obverse: Helmeted, draped, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year II to right, officina letter B below, mintmark NIKO.
References: Cf. SB 833, MIB 174.
Diameter: 28.5mm, Weight: 10.329g.
EB
Elagabalus-RIC-195~0.jpg
Elagabalus.111 viewsDenarius, 218-219 AD, Antioch mint.
Obv: ANTONINVS PIVS FEL AVG / Laureate bust of Elagabalus.
Rev: SANCT DEO SOLI ELAGABAL / Slow quadriga bearing the conical stone of Emesa, on which is an eagle, surrounded by four parasols.
2.41 gm., 17 mm.
RIC #195.

Elagabalus was a high priest of the local ba'al of Emesa, Syria, at the time he was proclaimed emperor. This deity was named El-Gabal, and was worshiped in the form of a large, black, conical-shaped stone, which was probably a meteorite. When Elagabalus moved to Rome, he took this god with him. After a long overland journey from Emesa, Elagabalus and his entourage entered Rome in 219. The black stone was carried on a cart pulled by white horses. It was decorated with an eagle, and shaded by four parasols. Elagabalus, dressed in his priestly robes, walked backwards in front of this cart to show his reverence for his deity.

The entry of their new emperor into the city shocked the people of Rome. They soon realized that he fully intended to continue in his duties as High Priest to El-Gabal, and that his worship was to be imposed on the whole Empire. The the temple of Jupiter (Jove) in Rome was turned into the temple of El-Gabal. The religious excesses of the reign finally ended with the murder of Elagabalus. Under the new emperor, Severus Alexander, the temple was cleansed, rededicated to Jupiter, and El-Gabal sent back home to Emesa.

This coin commemorates the journey of El-Gabal to Rome and his entrance into the city. The legend on the reverse translates "Holy Sun-God Elagabal." Silver denarii with this reverse type all seem to be in the "Eastern" style so numismatists generally assign them to the mint at Antioch. It is possible, though, that they could have been minted by a mint that traveled with Elagabalus on his journey from Emesa to Rome, spending the winter of 218-219 in Nicomedia.
1 commentsCallimachus
1__Eudoxia.jpg
Eudoxia D.404 AD5 viewsRef: RIC X 80
Denom: AE3; Mint: Nicomedia; DATE: 398-401
Obverse: AEL EVDO-XIA AVG - Bust, pearl-diademed, draped, wearing necklace and earrings, crowned by hand of God
Rev: GLORIA RO-MANORVM - Empress enthroned facing forward, arms crossed over breast, crowned by hand of god
Right Field : +
Exergue: SMNA
Size: 16 mm
Cleaned
brian l
Eudoxia_Gloria_Romanorum_RIC_80.jpg
Eudoxia Gloria Romanorum RIC 8014 viewsEudoxia, Nicomedia, 400 - 404 AD, 18mm, RIC X #80
OBV: AEL EVDO-XIA AVG, pearl-diademed and draped bust right being crowned by the hand of God (Manus Dei)
REV: GLORIA RO-MANORVM, Eudoxia seated facing, hands on breast, being crowned by the hand of God (manus Dei) ; cross in right field
seated facing, hands on breast, being crowned by manus Dei ; cross
SMNA in exergue
Romanorvm
Eudoxia_Victory~0.JPG
Eudoxia Victory13 viewsAttribution: Eudoxia
Obv: AELEVDOXIAAVG- Diademed, draped bust right, being crowned by Hand of God
Rev: SALVSREIPVBLICAE- Victory seated right, holding shield with Chi-Rho design on column

Forvm:
Yes and could be either Nicomedia (SMNA) RIC Nicomedia 102 (S) or Cyzicus(SMKA) RIC Cyzicus 103 (R). It depends on the third letter from
the mintmark which is not clear from my desktop
Wildwinds:
Aelia Eudoxia, AE3, 400-404, Cyzicus, Officina 1

RARE
Romanorvm
fhc7.JPG
Falling horseman83 viewsAll 15 official mints.
Alexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
4 commentsRandygeki(h2)
P1019853.JPG
Fausta, Augusta 324 - 325 A.D. Nicomedia mint. 19-20mm10 viewsFausta, Augusta 324 - 326 A.D. Nicomedia mint.
Obv. FLAV MAX - FAVSTA AVG, draped bust right hair waived, bun at back, wearing pearl necklace.
Rev. SPES REIP-VBLICAE, Fausta standing facing, looking left, holding infants Constantine II and Constantius II, SMNA in ex.
Ref. RIC VII 97 var
Lee S
fausta030801.jpg
Fausta, Nicomedia28 viewsFLAV MAX FAVSTA AVG
Mantled and bareheaded bust right with waved hair

SPES REI-PVBLICAE
Empress (as Spes) standing facing, looking left, head veiled, and holding two children in her arms.

MN(epsilon)

RIC 131 Nicomedia; LRBC 1093
Ae 19mm; 2.50g
arizonarobin
fhlbld.jpg
Fel Temp Reparatio Fallen Horseman157 viewsAlexandria
Amiens
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Sirmium
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
Barbaous Mint
3 commentsRandygeki(h2)
hon.JPG
Flavius Honorius Augustus AE2 RIC IX Nicomedia 46c 27 viewsPearl diademed draped cuirassed bust right DN HONORIVS PF AVG/Honorius standing facing head right holding standard and globe. SMN Γ Nicomedia mint 392-5 AD

Accordingly John was invested with the episcopal dignity on the 26th of February, under the following consulate, which the Emperor Honorius celebrated with public games at Rome, and Eutychian, then Prætorian prefect, at Constantinople.
Socrates Scholasticus (c. 379-c. 450)
Ecclesiastical History

Bohemian
mauriciu_M10.JPG
Follis27 viewsFollis, 588-589, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 12.2g, 29mm, black patina.1 commentsvercingetorix
mauriciu_M9.JPG
Follis33 viewsFollis, consular type, 601-602, Nicomedia, 1st officina, overstruck on a previous consular follis either Tiberius II Constantine or Maurice from Antioch; 11.7g, 29mm, orange sand patina.vercingetorix
Justin II 575.jpg
Follis of Justin II and Sophia38 viewsMinted in Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) in 575-6.
Ginolerhino
Justinien 539.jpg
Follis of Justinian42 viewsMinted in Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) in 539-40.
Ginolerhino
frthuts.jpg
FTR Huts46 viewsAlexandria
Antioch
Aquileia
Arles
Constantinople
Cyzicus
Heraclea
Lyons
Nicomedia
Rome
Siscia
Thessalonica
Trier
1 commentsRandygeki(h2)
GALVALER-1.jpg
Galeria Valeria, daughter of Diocletian, wife of Galerius. Augusta, 293(?)-311 CE.165 viewsÆ Follis (26 mm, 6.64 gm). Nicomedia mint, 308-310 CE.
Obv: GAL VAL-ERIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right.
Rev: VENERI VI-CTRICI CMH, Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and drapery; in exergue, SMNA.
RIC VI 57; Sear 3730 var.
EmpressCollector
00469.jpg
Galerius (RIC 54a, Coin #469)14 viewsRIC 54a, AE Follis, Nicomedia, 308 - 310 AD.
Obv: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG Laureate head right.
Rev: GENIO AVGVSTI CMH (SMNA) Genius standing right, patera in right and cornucopiae in left.
Size: 26.5mm 6.30gm
MaynardGee
Galerius_2.jpg
GALERIUS AE Follis12 viewsOBVERSE: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right
REVERSE: GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, Genius standing left, modius on head, chlamys over shoulder, holding patera and cornucopiae, SMNA in ex
Struck at Nicomedia 295 AD
7.6g, 26mm
RIC VI 54a, A
Legatus
galerius-reshoot-1.jpg
Galerius AE Follis, Nicomedia mint, 305-311 AD15 viewsRoman Imperial, Galerius AE Follis, Nicomedia mint, 305-311 AD, 5.7g, 27.45mm

Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, Laureate head right.

Reverse: GENIO AVGVSTI CMH, Genius standing left, holding cornucopiae and patera, SMNA or SMNΔ in ex. RIC 54a of Nicomedia, Cohen 42. Note: RIC 54a/66a for officinae A and Δ are identical. Only coins from officinae B, Γ, Ɛ and ς were struck later.

Reference: RIC VI Nicomedia 54a/66a
Gil-galad
Coin1001_quad_sm.jpg
Galerius Concordia Militum Ӕ post-reform radiate fraction (295 - 299), Cyzicus mint1 viewsGAL VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB CAES, radiate, draped (?) and cuirassed bust right / CONCORDIA MI-LITVM + KB in lower centre, Prince (the left figure) standing right in military dress, holding parazonium or baton of imperium, receiving small Victory with a wreath and palm branch on globe from naked Jupiter (the right figure) standing left holding tall scepter.

Ӕ, 20mm, 2.36g, die axis 6h, base metal seems red, high copper content.

Galerius ruled as Caesar from 293 to 305, but most sources give minting years for this type of coin as 295-299.

RIC VI Cyzicus 19b (18b?), Sear 3713. 19b has cuirassed and draped bust, 18b -- only cuirassed. I think the edge of the military cape on the shoulder means it is draped in this case, but distinction seems very vague to me. Looking at coins identified as 18b and 19b I cannot see any clear pattern, it seems that many are confused in this respect just like myself.

GALerius VALerius MAXIMIANUS NOBilitas CAESar (in this era the title of "junior" emperor while Augustus was a "senior" one), CONCORDIA MILITVM = [Dedicated to] harmony with the soldiers, K = Kysikos (Cyzicus) mint, B = officina Beta (workshop #2). The figure to the right is naked except for a cape, so it is a god, the sceptre points to him being Jupiter, the ruler of gods. Jupiter is also typically associated with Victory, he was often depicted with Victory in the right hand and sceptre in the left. The line across his head probably designates a wreath, also a common feature of Jupiter. Victory holds her common attributes, the triumphal wreath and a palm branch, the orb she stands on represents the world (thus meaning dominion over it). Round Earth was a firmly established concept in Roman times. The left figure, the prince (Galerius in this case) is identified by his full battle dress and the hand-held short elongated shape, which is either the ivory baton of imperium (the high command) or, more likely, a parazonium, a long triangular dagger, typically cradled in the bearer's left arm. A Roman parazonium blade tended to be leaf shape and approximately 15"-19" long. It was a ceremonial weapon, a mark of high rank, used to rally the troops.

GALERIUS, * c. 250, near Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) or in a Dacian place later called Felix Romuliana (Gamzigrad, Serbia) † late Apr or early May 311 (aged ~60), Serdica, Dacia Ripensis (Sofia, Bulgaria) ‡ 1 Mar or 21 May 293 – 1 May 305 (as Eastern Caesar, under Diocletian), 1 May 305 – late Apr or early May 311 (as Eastern Augustus with many co-emperors).

Galerius was born of humble parentage and had a distinguished military career. On March 1, 293, he was nominated as Caesar by Diocletian, the supreme ruler of the empire, to help him govern the East. Galerius divorced his wife and married Diocletian’s daughter, Valeria. After ruling from Egypt from 293 to 295, Galerius assumed command of defensive operations against the Sasanians in 297. After being defeated, he then won a decisive victory that increased his influence with Diocletian. Galerius next proceeded to the Balkans and won numerous victories in the region. A staunch pagan, he persuaded the emperor to initiate the persecution of the Christians at Nicomedia in 303.

When Diocletian abdicated on May 1, 305, Galerius became Augustus of the East, ruling the Balkans and Anatolia. Since Galerius had arranged the appointment of two of his favourites, Maximinus (his nephew) and Flavius Valerius Severus, to be Caesars in both East and West, he was in effect the supreme ruler. When Constantius Chlorus died in 306, Galerius insisted that Severus govern the West as Augustus, but he grudgingly conceded the subordinate title of caesar to Chlorus’s son, Constantine, who was correctly suspected of Christian sympathies. Galerius’s supremacy was, however, short-lived. Severus was soon overthrown (306) and killed by Maxentius (son of the former emperor Maximian). Galerius invaded Italy but was forced to retreat. In 308 he induced Diocletian and Maximian to meet him at Carnuntum on the Danube and to declare Maxentius a usurper. On November 11, Galerius proclaimed as Augustus of the West his friend Licinius, who had effective control only in the region of the Danube.

A ruthless ruler, Galerius imposed the poll tax on the urban population and maintained the persecution of the Christians. In the winter of 310–311, however, he became incapacitated with a horrible disease. Fearing, perhaps, that his illness was the vengeance of the Christian God, he issued on April 30, 311, an edict grudgingly granting toleration. Shortly afterward he died. He was succeeded by his nephew Maximinus Daia.

Diocletian's money reform of 293.

Trying to fight the runaway inflation that he did not understand and to return people's faith in Roman coins, Diocletian did a complete overhaul of the Roman monetary system. He introduced a new theoretical base monetary unit called the denarius communis or d.c. (only rarely represented by actual coins, one example being old pre-Aurelian antoniniani still in circulation, valued now at 1 d. c., another – minted only on a small scale 1.5g coin with the reverse legend VTILITAS PVBLICA, "for public use"). Then he started minting new types of coins including a gold aureus of new purity and weight standard (1/60 pound of pure gold), a quality silver coin, argenteus, roughly similar to the early imperial denarius in size and weight, a new billon coin, of a copper alloy but with a small fraction of silver mostly in the form of coating, roughly similar to the old antoninianus when it was just introduced, however bearing now a laureate rather than a radiate bust. This type of coin is now commonly referred to as a follis or a nummus. Finally, a new radiate bronze coin, now referred to as a "radiate fraction" or a radiatus was introduced, similar to the early imperial aes in value, but much smaller in weight and size. There were also rare issues of ½ and ¼ nummus coins, mostly in connection to some celebration. Interestingly, the obverses of these new coins were chosen to represent some identical "generic" image of a "good emperor" independent of the actual likeness of the August or Caesar in whose name they were issued, thus affirming the unity of all the tetrarchy rulers. Very roughly one may think of a new radiatus as a price of one loaf of bread, a new argenteus as a very good daily wage, and a new aureus as a price of a good horse. An approximate relationship between these units was as follows: 1 aureus ≈ 20 argentei ≈ 1000 d.c. (some scholars prefer 25 argentei and 1250 d.c.); 1 argenteus ≈ 5 nummi ≈ 50 d.c.; 1 nummus ≈ 5 radiati ≈ 10 d.c.; 1 radiatus ≈ 2 d.c. Of course we know that this reform was ineffective and inflation continued, so all these values were constantly shifting due to changing markets. Diocletian himself stopped minting argenteus in c. 305, and Constantine in his monetary reforms only re-established a new and highly successful gold standard, solidus (1/72 pound of pure gold, surprisingly actually first introduced also by Diocletian in 301, but only as a pilot version). As for billon and bronze coins, "folles" or "nummi", they were minted in all shapes and sizes all over the 4th century, often horribly debased by inflation, and their values at each point can only be guessed. It seems that in later times up to 1000 small bronze coins were sealed in a leather pouch to produce a reasonable unit of payment, thus giving rise to the name follis (lit. "bag" in Latin), which is now anachronistically applied to many billon and bronze coins of the late 3d and 4th century.
Yurii P
galerius_ric_54_a_delta.jpg
Galerius RIC 54 a D11 viewsNicomedia
24 mm, 4.9 g.
MP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
GENIO AVGVSTI CMH
SMND in ex.
xokleng
galerius-ric_54_a_Gama.jpg
Galerius RIC 66 G15 viewsNicomedia
23 mm, 6.7 g.
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG
GENIO AVGVSTI CMH
SMNG in ex.
xokleng
42.jpg
Galerius, AD 305-31129 viewsAE Follis, 27.08mm (6.46 gm).

IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS P F AVG, laureate head right / GENIO POPV-LI ROMANI CMH (monogram), Genius standing left, modius on head, naked but for chlamys over left shoulder, holding patera in right hand and cornucopiae in left; SMNA in exergue. Nicomedia mint, struck AD 307.

RIC VI, 51 Nicomedia (pg. 561).
socalcoins
Galerius- GENIO AVGVSTI CMH new.jpg
Galerius- Genio49 viewsGalerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

Obverse:Laureate head right
IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMIANVS PF AVG

IMP: Imperator,
C: Caes,
GAL: Galerius
MAXIMIANVS: Maximianus
PF: Pius Felix
AVG: Agustus

Reverse:
GENIO AVGVSTI CMH

Genio: Genius
AVGVSTI: Agustus
CMH: ??

Showing:Genius standing left holding patera in right and cornucopia in left


Domination: Follis, Bronze, size 25 mm

Mint: SMN (Nicomedia) A (alpha)

CMH:

In his book Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity, 294-364 AD., Failmezger proposes the following definition for CMH:

"At the same time, the weight of the bronze coins dropped and 48 coins are now struck to the pound. The mint of Nicomedia issues coins with CMH added as a suffix to the legend on the reverse. This may be interpreted taht this coin has a value of 100 (C- centum) sestertii struck at a new weight of 48 to the pound (Greek letter M for 40, Greek letter H for. This may further support the 25 DC value of the coin theory (see #'s 191, 192, 199, 200, 211, 213). The continued use of CMH at the mint of Cyzicus in the year 311 AD may mean that even thought the weight of the nummus was reduced again from 48 to 72 to the pound, the value remianed constant at 100 sestertii or 25 DC (#192)."

He does say that this is just speculation and that alternative views may be possible.
John Schou
constantius_II_nicomedia.jpg
GLORIA EXERCITVS, Nicomedia10 viewsConstantius II AE3. F L IVL CONSTANTIVS NOB C, laureate, draped, cuirassed bust right / GLOR-IA EXERC-ITVS, two soldiers holding spears and shields with two standards between them, SMNG in ex. RIC Nicomedia. Ex FORVMPodiceps
theod_I_nicomedia.jpg
GLORIA ROMANORVM, Nicomedia, SMNA6 viewsTheodosius I, AE2, Nicomedia Mint, Officina 1, 382-395 A.D. Size and weight: 21x23mm, 5.16g. 
Obverse: Pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right. 
D N THEODO-SIVS P F AVG 
Reverse: Emperor standing facing, head right, a tall standard in his right hand and a globe in his left. 
GLORIA ROMANORVM 
Exergue: SMNA 
Reference: RIC IX Nicomedia 46a. Ex MoremothPodiceps
Constantine I, Gloria Romanorvm.jpg
Gloria Romanorvm- Constantinople- RIC 23272 viewsObv: CONSTANTINVS MAX AVG
Rev: GLORIA ROMANORVM Roma seated l. holding Victory on globe and scepter;
CONS in ex., in field l..

Constantinople
327-8 AD, 3.11g. officina =3(s),
RIC-23, C-263 (3 Fr.).
Reduced follis.
Ex. HJB

Scarce reverse type which was used on bronze coins only at Constantinople and on gold coins (mostly multiples) at Constantinople, Trier and Nicomedia. 0
4 commentswolfgang336
GRATIAN-3.jpg
Gratian Nicomedia Unlsted34 viewsObv:D N GRATIA-NVS P F AVG
pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left
Rev: GLORIA RO-MANORVM
Gratian advancing right with labarum & dragging captive
SMNB in ex.
17mm 1.9 gm
unlisted left bust
OWL365
790.jpg
HADRIAN49 viewsAR cistophoric tetradrachm . Nicomedia , after 128 AD. 10,74 grs. Laureate head right . IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG PP. / Octastyle temple set on three tiered podium,pellet within. ROM SP AVG across frieze. COM BIT across fields.
RIC 461b. RSC 240b. Unrecorded reverse die.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
benito
00hadrianbyth.jpg
HADRIAN59 viewsAR cistophoric tetradrachm . Nicomedia , after 128 AD. 10,74 grs. Laureate head right . IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG PP. / Octastyle temple set on three tiered podium,pellet within. ROM SP AVG across frieze. COM BIT across fields.
RIC 461b. RSC 240b. Unrecorded reverse die.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
3 commentsbenito
mauriciu_K2.JPG
Half-follis32 viewsHalf-follis, 591-592, Nicomedia, 1st officina, 21mm, 4.6g.vercingetorix
Helena F.JPG
Helena (325-326 AD)15 viewsObv. FL HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right

Rev. SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE, Securitas standing left, holding branch in right hand

RIC VII, Nicomedia 129, rated R4
Marjan E
7.jpg
HELENA AE3 - SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE - MNΓ - Nicomedia7 viewspannonii
5~0.jpg
HELENA AE3 - SECVRITAS REIPVBLICE - SMNΓ - Nicomedia8 viewspannonii
6.jpg
HELENA AE3 - SECVRITAS REIPVLICE - SMNΓ - Nicomedia10 viewspannonii
HELENA-1.jpg
Helena, 1st (?) wife of Constantius I, mother of Constantine the Great. Augusta, 324-328/30 CE.163 viewsÆ 3 (18 mm, 2.94 gm). Nicomedia mint, 325-326 CE.
Obv: F L HELENA AVGVSTA, diademed bust right.
Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVLICE, Securitas standing left, lowering branch, raising robe with r. hand; MNGamma in exergue.
RIC 129; Cohen 11; Sear4 3908 var.
EmpressCollector
14_Heraclius.jpg
Heraclius (A.D. 610 - 641)4 viewsAE Follis, A.D. 615 - 616, Nicomedia, 28mm, 9.46g, ~200°, SB 834.
Obv: dd NN hERACLIVS ET hERA CON. Heraclius left, Heraclius Constantine right, cross between, wearing crowns and chlamys and holding cross on globe.
Rev: Large M, ANNO to left, cross or chi-rho above, regnal year to right, officina letter below, mintmark NIK or NIKO.
Marti Vltori
sb834,29mm1183gpir.jpg
Heraclius, AE follis, SB 8347 viewsObverse: dd NN hERACLIUS ET hERA CON usually fragmentary, Heraclius Constantine on r., and Empress Martina on L., all stg. facing each wearing crown and chlamys, holding gl. cr. in rt hand. between heads cross.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO regnal yr 3 (III), cross above NIKO in exergue.
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 612/3 CE
Sear 834 DO 158-60
19mm, 11.83g
wileyc
Heraclius,_SBCV_834.JPG
Heraclius, SBCV 8349 viewsdd NN hERACLYS ET hERA CON
Heraclius left and Constantine Heraclius right, standing, facing, each holding globus cruciger
Large M, Chi-Rho above, ANNO left III right, B below
NIKO in ex.
AE follis, 32mm, 8.87g
Minted Nicomedia, 612-613
novacystis
heraclius.jpg
HERACLIUS; A.D. 610-641. Æ Follis. Nicomedia. Sear 83313 viewsHERACLIUS; A.D. 610-641. Æ Follis. 30mm, 12g; Rev. Large M, + above, ANNO to left, I to right, B below, NIKO in exergue, mint of Nicomedia. Struck over follis of Tiberius Constantine. Sear BCV 833.Podiceps
coin56.JPG
Honorius9 viewsDN HONORI-VS PF AVG
GLORI-A ROMA-NORVM
SMNB
RIC X Nicomedia 146 C
ecoli
honorius b com.JPG
Honorius RIC X 6350 viewsAE 16 mm 2.0 grams 395-401 AD
OBV :: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG. Pearled diadem draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: VIRTVS-EXERCITI.emperor standing left, head right, holding spear with left hand on shield. Victory, standing beside him crowning him with wreath
EX :: SMNB (Nicomedia)
RIC X 63
RIC rated C2
from uncleaned lot 11/2007
1 commentsJohnny
RIC_Honorius_Gloria_Romanorum_RIC_IX_Nicomedia_46c.JPG
Honorius (Flavius Honorius) (393-423 A.D.)24 viewsRIC IX Nicomedia 46c

AE3, 18-20 mm

Nicomedia mint, third officina, struck 393-395 A.D.

Obv: DN HONORIVS PF AVG, pearl diadem, draped, cuirassed bust right.

Rev: GLORIA-ROMANORVM, emperor standing facing, head right holding standard and globe, SMNΓ in exergue.

RIC rarity c
Stkp
Honorius3.jpg
HONORIUS AE2 RIC ?, GLORIA ROMANORVM27 viewsOBV: D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV: GLORIA ROMANORVM, emperor standing, head right, holding labarum & globe, star in right field, SMNA in ex.


Minted at Nicomedia, 392-5 AD
Legatus
honoriusff.jpg
Honorius, 395-42321 viewsAE3, 18mm, 1.9g; Nicomedia mint
Obv.: D N HONORI-VS P F AVG, helmeted and cuirassed facing bust holding spear over shoulder and shield decorated with cross.
Rev.: CONCORDI-A AVGG, Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head left, holding scepter and Victory // SMNK
Reference: RIC X, 92 (p. 248)
Notes: sold to Eng, 11/15
John Anthony
coin91.JPG
Honorius, Nicomedia9 viewsDN HONORIVS PF AVG
GLORIA-ROMANORVM
SMN gamma
RIC IX Nicomedia 46c
ecoli
hRICX63_OR.jpg
Honorius, RIC X Nicomedia 6315 viewsNicomedia mint, Honorius, 395-401 A.D. AE, 18.5mm 2.74g, RIC X Nicomedia 63
O: DN HONORI-VS PF AVG pearl diademed, draped, cuirassed
R: VIRTVS-EXERCITI Victory facing l., crowning Emperor
Ex: SMNA
casata137ec
constans_nico_70.jpg
Hut type, Nicomedia SMNA8 viewsConstans, Billon centenionalis, Hut type, Nicomedia Mint, Officina 1, AD 348-351. 20x21mm, 4.74g. 
Obverse: Pearl-diademed, draped, cuirassed bust left, globe in right hand 
D N CONSTAN-S P F AVG 
Reverse: Helmeted soldier, spear in left hand, advancing right, head left; with his right hand he leads a small bare-headed figure from a hut beneath a tree. The spear points downwards, between the soldier's legs. 
FEL TEMP REPA-RATIO 
Exergue: SMNA 
Reference: RIC VIII Nicomedia 70. It has the typical Nicomedia tree and full, clear mint mark. Ex MoremothPodiceps
Maximinus_II_Daia_39.jpg
I130 viewsMaximinus II AE Follis

Attribution: RIC 66c Nicomedia
Date: AD 309-313
Obverse: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head r.
Reverse: GENIO AV-GVSTI CH, nude Genius standing l. pouring out patera w/ r. hand and holding cornucopia w/ l., SMNA in exergue
Size: 22 mm
Weight: 5.7 grams

“But Daia, who had only recently been picked up from looking after cattle in the forests, had at once become a guardsman, then an officer of the guard, soon afterwards a tribune, and then the next day a Caesar, and he now received the east to crush and trample underfoot… He would squander money too on anything, without discrimination or limit… He would also take away people’s goods while they were still alive and give them to any of his own followers who sought other people’s property. But his capital vice, in which he surpassed all who have ever lived, was his appetite for seduction… By the end, he had introduced the practice of allowing no one to marry a wife without his permission, so that he himself could sample every marriage in advance…” – Lactantius On the Deaths of the Persecutors 19, 37-38

After the suicide of Maximian and, later, the death of Galerius, Maximinus Daia made a bid for emperor. He and his primary rival, Licinius I came to terms and decided to divide the provinces. Licinius was to control the Balkans, while Maximinus was given Asian Minor and the eastern provinces. Maximinus then resumed the persecution of Christians which had ceased under Galerius’ orders only six months before. In AD 313, however, Maximinus found himself in a final confrontation with his rival Licinius. They met on the plain of the River Ergenus, near Hadrianopolis in Thrace. Constantine (the Great) joined forces with Licinius for the battle. Although Maximinus’ forces numbered over twice as many as his opponents’ (70,000 men), he was not the superior tactician. Maximinus fled the battle dressed as a peasant and headed to Tarsus. This was to no avail, for a few months later, he was under siege by land and sea. Poison proved to be Maximinus Daia’s choice to avoid capture. He drank a poison which was slow acting and took four days of pain and suffering to kill him.
5 commentsNoah
constantine_I_69_nicomedia.jpg
IOVI CONSERVATORI; RIC 69c Nicomedia15 viewsConstantine the Great, 306-337 AD. Æ follis 20mm, IMP C FL VAL CONSTANTINVS P F AVG - Laureate head right / IOVI CONSERVATORI - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and scepter, at feet left, an eagle; SMN / S in exe. RIC 69c Nicomedia Podiceps
juliano-touro1.jpg
IVLIANVS II - RIC 12215 viewsNicomedia 361-362 A.D.
27 mm. 7.1g

RIC 122 Julian II AE1. DN FL CL IVLI-ANVS P F AVG,
pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
SECVRITAS REI-PVB, Bull standing right, two stars above.
(branch)NIKB(branch) in ex.
xokleng
Julian_II.JPG
Julian II 'The Philosopher' (as Augustus)76 views361-363 AD
AE3 (19.8mm, 3.12g)
O: Diademed, helmeted and cuirassed bust left, holding shield and spear; DN FL CL JVLIANVS AVG.
R: VOT X MVLT XX in four lines within wreath; NIK[A] below.
Nicomedia mint, officina A.
RIC VIII Nicomedia, 123; ERIC II Julian 422; Elmer 132; Sear 4074v
Some smoothing, re-patinated.
ex Nemesis Ancients

"The end and aim of the Cynic philosophy, as indeed of every philosophy, is happiness, but happiness that consists in living according to nature, and not according to the opinions of the multitude. "
~ Julian
3 commentsEnodia
ju113.jpg
Julian II, RIC 113 Nicomedia, 355-360 CE 10 viewsJulian II "the Apostate,"
Bronze AE 4
Obverse: D N IVLA-NVS NOB CAESAR, bare-headed draped and cuirassed bust right.
Reverse: SPES REPVBLICAE, Emperor standing left in military dress holding a globe and spear. 15.5 mm., 2.4 g.
NORMAN K
jricviii119OR.jpg
Julian II, RIC VIII (Nicomedia) 11917 viewsNicomedia mint, Julian II, A.D. AE, 27mm 7.16g, RIC VIII (Nicomedia) 119
O: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG, Pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right
R: SECVRITAS REIPVB, Bull standing right, two stars above
Ex: palm branch-SMNB-palm branch

casata137ec
TC-14.jpg
Julian the Apostate (A.D. 360-363)21 viewsAE Follis AE1, A.D. 361-363, Nicomedia, 29.5mm, 8.41g, 180°, RIC VIII 121.
Obv: D N FL CL IVLIANVS P F AVG. Diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: SECVRITAS REIPVB. Bull standing right, two stars above; NIKB in ex.
Joseph D5
coin447.jpg
Justin I Æ Follis19 viewsJustin I AE Follis. Nicomedia mint. Sear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb0088
D N IVSTI_NVS P P AVG, pearl-diademed, draped & cuirassed bust right / large M between two crosses, cross above, B below, NIKM in ex. Coin #447
cars100
justinus_imit.JPG
Justin I follis-imitation89 viewsImitation after a follis of Justinus I, possibly the Gepids. Nicomedia mint, 3rd officina, 27mm, 9.3g. The coin is under the official weight, the style is crude and bears an unexistend 3rd officina from Nicomedia.vercingetorix
Justin_I,_SBCV_83.JPG
Justin I, SBCV 8318 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, stars to sides, A below
NIKm in ex.
Nicomedia
AE follis, 32mm, 15.90g
novacystis
Justin_I,_SBCV_88.JPG
Justin I, SBCV 8814 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above and to sides, A below
NIKm in ex.
Nicomedia
AE follis, 31mm, 14.07g
novacystis
Justin_I,_SBCV_91.JPG
Justin I, SBCV 9115 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large K, long Cross left with NI to sides, A right
Nicomedia
AE half follis, 26mm, 8.61g
novacystis
20170808_141958.jpg
Justin I. 518-527. Æ follis (31.8 mm, 16.20 g, 7 h). Nicomedia mint.10 viewsObv. D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, diademed, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev. Large M between two stars, cross above, B below; NIKM in exergue.
References: SBV 83; DOC 28b.


35mm and 14.23 grams.
Canaan
0_006.JPG
Justin II 18 viewsSear Byzantine Coins and their Values # sb0369

Justin II Æ Follis. Nicomedia mint. D N IVSTI NVS P P AVI, Justin, on left, holding globus cruciger, and Sophia, on right, holding cruciform scepter / large M, ANNO to left, regnal year right, NIKO in ex.
Randygeki(h2)
justin_sophia.jpg
Justin II & Sophia, AE Half Follis, Nicomedia mint. Year 10 = 574-575 AD.12 viewsObverse: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, Justin on left, Sophia on right, seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate, Justin holding cross on globe, Sophia holding sceptre.
Reverse: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year X to right, officina letter A below, mintmark NIKO.
References: SB 369, MIB 46 a,b.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 11.16g.
Britanikus
Justin_II___Sophia,_Half_Follis,_large_K,_Nicomedia,_565-578_AD,_year_4.JPG
Justin II & Sophia, Half Follis, large K, Nicomedia, 565-578 AD, year 430 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Justin left, cross on globe, Sophia right, scepter
seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate, cross between their heads
large K, ANNO left, IIII right,
NI in ex.
SB 370
7.0g / 24mm _500
Antonivs Protti
justin_II_follis.jpg
JUSTIN II A.D. 565-578; Æ Follis; Nicomedia; Sear 36912 viewsJUSTIN II A.D. 565-578; Æ Follis, 12.2g, 30mm. Rev. Large M, + above, ANNO to left, GIII to right, A below. NIKO in exergue, mint of Nicomedia. Sear BCV 369, Ratto 855. Podiceps
Justin_II_1_opt.jpg
JUSTIN II AE Half Follis SB 369, Large M16 viewsOBV: D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, Justin on left, Sophia on right, seated facing on double-throne, both nimbate, Justin holding cross on globe, Sophia holding sceptre, sometimes with cross between their heads, sometimes with vine pattern below
REV: Large M, ANNO to left, cross above, regnal year to right, officina letter below, mintmark NIKO
12.9g, 29mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 565-78 AD
Legatus
Justin_II_and_Sophia,_SBCV_369.JPG
Justin II and Sophia, SBCV 36920 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, u right, B below
NIKO in ex.
Minted Nicomedia, 569-570
AE follis, 30mm, 11.85g
novacystis
Justin_II_and_Sophia,_SBCV_369(SIII_A).JPG
Justin II and Sophia, SBCV 36920 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, uI/II right, A below
NIKO in ex.
Minted Nicomedia, 573-574
AE follis, 29mm, 13.18g
novacystis
Justin_II_and_Sophia,_SBCV_369(SI_D).JPG
Justin II and Sophia, SBCV 36917 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, uI right, Δ below
NIKO in ex.
Minted Nicomedia, 571-572
AE follis, 30mm, 11.68g
novacystis
Justin_II_and_Sophia,_SBCV_369(S_B).JPG
Justin II and Sophia, SBCV 36913 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large M, Cross above, ANNO left, u right, A below
NIKO in ex.
Minted Nicomedia, 570-571
AE follis, 29mm, 12.99g
novacystis
Justin_II_and_Sophia,_SBCV_370.JPG
Justin II and Sophia, SBCV 37012 viewsDN IVSTINVS PP AVG
Seated, facing figures of Justin and Sophia
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, SI / II right, NI below
Minted Nicomedia, 573-574
AE half follis, 23mm, 4.59g
novacystis
sb369,29mm1485gpir.jpg
Justin II, AE follis, SB 36910 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between thier heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal yr XI cross above in exergus NIKO
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 574-575 CE
Sear; 369 DO 92-103
29mm 14.85 gm
wileyc
sb369,28mm1325gpir.jpg
Justin II, AE follis, SB 36910 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between thier heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal yr GIII (yr 9) cross above, Officina letter "B" in exergus NIKO
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 574-575 CE
Sear; 369 DO 92-103
28mm 13.25 gm
wileyc
sb369,27mm1327gpir.jpg
Justin II, AE follis, SB 3698 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between thier heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal yr XIII (yr 13) cross above, Officina letter "A" in exergus NIKO
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 577/8CE
Sear; 369 DO 92-103
27mm 13.27 gm
wileyc
sb369,26mm1402gpir.jpg
Justin II, AE follis, SB 3697 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between thier heads.
Reverse: Large M between ANNO and regnal yr G (yr ) cross above, Officina letter "B" in exergus NIKO
Mint: Nicomedia
Date: 570/1 CE
Sear; 369 DO 92-103
26mm 14.02 gm
wileyc
sb370_23mm7_01gpir.jpg
Justin II, AE half follis, SB 3697 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINVS PP AVG ( or similar) Justin on L., Sophia on r., seated facing on double throne, both nimbate; he holds gl. cr., she holds cruciform sceptre sometimes with a cross between their heads.
Reverse: Large K between ANNO and regnal yr G cross above, below NI
Date:570/1 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear: 370 DO 104-15
23mm 7.01 gm
wileyc
new_coins2.jpg
Justin II, with Sophia. 565-578. Æ Follis . Nicomedia mint.18 viewsObv. Justin and Sophia seated facing on double throne, holding globus cruciger and cruciform scepter, respectively; cross above, vine pattern in exergue
Rev. Large M; cross above, date across field; A//NIKO.
References: DOC 101c; MIBE 46b var.SBCV 369.
30mm, 13.2 g
Canaan
byzantineP_copy.jpg
Justinian I (?)44 viewsJustinian I. 527-565. Æ Follis (30mm, 17.08 g, 6h). Nicomedia mint, 2nd officina. Struck AD 527-538. Diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Large M flanked by two crosses; cross above; B officina, NIKM in ex.. DOC 110; SB 199.

Gifted.
Molinari
sear_205.jpg
Justinian I AE decanummium SB 20566 viewsObverse: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG (usually incomplete) Diad., dr. and cuir bust r.
Reverse: Large I, cross above, ANNO to l., to r. numerals representing regnal yr (XXXGI) 37
Date: 563/4 CE
Mint: Nicomedia
Sear 205, DO 155-63
15mm 2.59gm
wileyc
justinian_I_dekanummium.jpg
Justinian I AE Decanummium. Nicomedia9 viewsJustinian I AE Decanummium. Nicomedia mint. DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, diademed, draped & cuirassed bust r. / Large I surmounted by cross; to l., ANNO; below, monogram; in exergue, NIK; to r., Year XXX; 2,3 g, 14 mm. Sear 205.Podiceps
a53.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Nicomedia Sear 20327 viewsTask_Force
a76.jpg
Justinian I AE half follis Nicomedia Sear20230 viewsTask_Force
Justinian1_opt.jpg
JUSTINIAN I AE Half Follis SB 0203, Large K20 viewsOBV: DN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG, helmeted, cuirassed bust facing, holding cross on globe and shield with horseman motif, cross to right
REV: Large K, ANNO to left, chi-rho above, regnal year XVIIII to right, mintmark NI
10.2g, 25mm

Minted at Nicomedia, 545-6 AD
Legatus
justinian_XIII.JPG
Justinian I follis99 viewsFollis, 539-540, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 21,1g, 45mm, superbe heavy green patina.1 commentsvercingetorix
Justinian_I,_SBCV_198.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 19814 viewsDN IVSTINIAN PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, star left, Cross right, B below
NIKM in ex.
Nicomedia mint
AE follis, 31mm, 17.25g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_199.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 19914 viewsDN IVSTINIAN PP AVG
Diademed, draped bust right
Large M, Cross above, Crosses left and right, B below
NIKM~ in ex.
Nicomedia mint
AE follis, 31mm, 17.31g
novacystis
Justinian_I,_SBCV_203.JPG
Justinian I, SBCV 20310 viewsDN IVSTINIANVS PP AVG
Diademed, cuirassed bust facing, holding globus cruciger, Cross in right field
Large K, Cross above, ANNO left, u/XII/II right, NI below
Nicomedia, minted 564-565 AD
AE half follis, 26mm, 9.31g
novacystis
justin2_M4.JPG
Justinus II follis65 viewsFollis, 574-575, Nicomedia, 2nd officina, 12.6g, 28mm, chocolate patina.vercingetorix
Late-Roman_AE-3-Follis_INCUSE_GLOR-IA-EXERC-ITVS_SMNK_Q-001_19mm_2,11g-s.jpg
Late Roman AE-3-Follis, Brockage, Incuse, Revers !!!83 viewsLate Roman AE-3-Follis, Brockage, Incuse, Revers !!!
avers:-
revers:- GLOR IA EXERC ITVS, Two soldiers standing either side of two standards.
exergo: -/-//SMN?, diameter: 19,0 mm, weight: 2,11g, axis: h,
mint: Nicomedia , date: , ref: ,
Q-001
quadrans
099n.jpg
Laureate bust right158 viewsBITHYNIA. Nicaea. Commodus. Æ 24. A.D. 177-192. Obv: (M•)AV•KO-ANTΩ(NINOC) or similar. Bare headed and draped bust right. Rev: NIK(A)-IEΩN. Turreted and veiled head of Tyche right; countermark on head. Ref: BMC 45 var. Axis: 225°. Weight: 6.22 g. CM: Laureate bust right , in circular punch, 6 mm. Howgego 65, 66 or 67 (?). Note: The coin can not be neatly assigned to either category. Howgego 65 (130 pcs) was applied to the obverse. Howgego 66 (47 pcs), which was applied to the reverse, was applied only to later coins. Howgego 67 (48 pcs) was also applied to the reverse, but almost exclusively to coins of Nicomedia. However, the reverse of this coin may have been mistaken for an obverse since it depicts bust of Tyche! Collection Automan.Automan
097n.jpg
Laureate head right (Caracalla?)139 viewsBITHYNIA. Nikomedia. Septimius Severus. Æ 22. A.D. 193-211. Obv: ACEΠTI-CEVHPOCΠ. Laureate bust right. Rev: NIKO(MH)ΔEΩNΔICNEΩKO(PΩN). Female deity standing left, holding uncertain items; countermark at lower right. Ref: BMC – Axis: 360°. Weight: 5.42 g. CM: Laureate head right (Caracalla?), in circular punch, 5 mm. Howgego 67 (48 pcs). Note: May have been applied because Caracalla spent his birthday 4/4 215 in Nicomedia. Collection Automan.Automan
Leo_I_-_a.jpg
Leo I16 viewsObv: D N LEO PERPET AVG, his laureate and draped bust right
Rev: Emperor standing right, holding scepter, hand on captive
Size: 10mm, 1.3g
Id: Possibly RIC X 698 (Heraclea, SMA in exergue) or RIC X 708 (Nicomedia, NIC in exergue)
Notes: A relatively obscure obverse / reverse combination
ickster
TC-08.jpg
Licinius (A.D. 308 - 324)18 viewsAE Follis, AD 313-317, Nicomedia, 23mm, 2.95g, 180°, RIC VII 13.
Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG. Laureate head right.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI. Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter; eagle to left; Δ right and SMN in ex.
Joseph D5
Licinius_13N.jpg
Licinius - AE follis17 viewsNicomedia
313-317 AD
laureate head right
IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG
Jupiter standing left, holding Victory and scepter; eagle to left
IOVI CONS_ERVATORI
Z
SMN
RIC VII Nicomedia 13
3,68 g 21,5-19 mm
Johny SYSEL
LiciniusHerculi.jpg
Licinius HERCVLI VICTORI100 viewsMP C LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG
Leureated head right

HERCVLI - VICTORI * //SMN

Hercules standing right, leaning on club with lion's skin

Follis struck in Nicomedia
22 mm ; 4,88 g; axis 180°
Not in RIC.

full silvering
1 commentsgb29400
licinius_I_iovi_conservatori_nico_ric15_R.jpg
Licinius I11 viewsIovi Conservatori
Ric Nicomedia 15
antvwala
Licinius_I.jpg
Licinius I (308-324 AD), AE Reduced FOLLIS49 viewsObv: IMP LICINIVS AVG ; Laureate bust left wearing imperial mantle and holding mappa.
Rev: IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG ; Jupiter standing left holding Victory & scepter , Delta in right field , SMN in exergue.

2.81 g .

NICOMEDIA MINT. RIC VII, 24 (R1) , RARE

From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
4 commentsSam
licinius.jpg
Licinius I - Follis38 viewsMint of Nicomedia
IMP LICINIVS AVG
IOVI CONSERVATORI AVGG / Z // SMN
317 320 AD
3,69gr
ref: RIC 24
byzancia
AAGUw_small.png
Licinius I AE follis3 viewsLicinius I. 308-324 AD.

Nicomedia. 321-324 AD.

20mm., 2.71g.

IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG. Bust of Licinius, radiate, draped, cuirassed, right

IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Jupiter, nude, chlamys draped across left shoulder, standing left, holding Victory on globe in right hand and leaning on eagle-tipped sceptre with left hand; to left, eagle holding wreath; to right, captive. X on III. Mintmark SMNA.

References: RIC VII Nicomedia 44; Sear 15223?

AAGU
RL
Comb30032017115821.jpg
Licinius I AE follis. Nicomedia.14 viewsObv. IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right.
Rev. IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on
globe and sceptre, eagle at foot with wreath in beak,
Captive to right.
XIII in right field.
Mintmark SMN? (Most likely Gamma).
RIC VII Nicomedia 44; Sear 15223
Canaan
coin80.jpg
Licinius I AE Follis.RIC VII 44 321-324 AD 10 viewsLicinius I AE Follis.RIC VII 44 321-324 AD
Nicomedia IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG,
radiate draped & cuirassed bust right / IOVI
CONSERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding
victory, eagle left, captive right, X/IIG to right,
SMNG in ex. Coin #80
cars100
coin964.JPG
Licinius I IOVI CONS-ERVATORI Nicomedia8 viewsIMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVG
IOVI CONS-ERVATORI

RIC VII Nicomedia 44 R2
ecoli
a31.jpg
Licinius I IOVI CONSERVATORI Nicomedia36 viewsLicinius AD 308-324 Follis "Jupiter, protect and save us." Obv: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG - Laureate head right. Rev: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI - Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe and scepter, at feet, left, an eagle with wreath in beak. Exe: SMN / (gamma) Nicomedia mint: AD 313-317 = RIC VII, 13 ecoli
coin528.JPG
Licinius I IOVI CONSERVATORI Nicomedia14 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 15 R2

ecoli
coin539.JPG
Licinius I IOVI CONSERVATORI Nicomedia 8 viewsLicinius I Follis. AD 313-317. IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS P F AVG, Laureate head right / IOVI CONS-ERVATORI, Jupiter standing left, holding Victory on a globe & scepter, at feet, left, an eagle with wreath in beak. Ric 13
ecoli
coin552.JPG
Licinius I IOVI CONSERVATORI Nicomedia10 viewsRIC VII Nicomedia 44 R2
ecoli
licin com.JPG
Licinius I RIC VII Nicomedia 4468 viewsAE 19 mm 2.7 grams 321-324
OBV :: IMP C VAL LICIN LICINIVS PF AVGRadiate, draped and cuirassed bust right
REV :: IOVI CONS-ERVATORI. Jupiter standing left chalmyacross left shoulder , holding Victory on globe and leaning on eagle-tipped sceptre eagle with wreath left field , X over II Mu over captive right field
EX :: SMN delta ( Nicomedia )
RIC VII Nicomedia 44
RIC rated R1
from uncleaned lot 03/2008

This coin has deep pits on the obverse . better to leave well enough alone on this one as the patina would have been ruined trying to fix it

Johnny