Classical Numismatics Discussion Members' Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register.

Members' Gallery Home | Member Collections | Last Added | Last Comments | Most Viewed | Top Rated | My Favorities | Search Galleries
Search results - "Lucina"
CRISPINA-3.JPG
Crispina, wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.216 views As or Dupondius (25mm), Rome mint, 180-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing l., holding patera and scepter.
RIC-680, Sear-6018, BMC-433, Cohen-24.
EmpressCollector
EB0474_scaled.JPG
EB0474 Crispina / Juno Lucina11 viewsCrispina, AE As, 178-191 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO LVCINA, S-C across field, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter.
References: RIC III Commodus 680; Cohen 24; BMC 433.
Diameter: 24mm, Weight: 12.931 grams.
EB
LUCILLA-2.jpg
Juno Lucina, the protectress of midwives and childbirth.281 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.
AR denarius (18mm, 3.24g), Rome mint, 166 CE.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing. l., holding baby in swaddling clothes in left arm.
RIC-771, Sear-5485, BMC-313, Cohen-38.

Lucina is the Roman name for the Greek goddess, Eileithyia, who was the protectress of midwives and who assisted during birth. She was later identified with Hera or Artemis. On Roman coins, Lucina is identified as an aspect of the goddess Juno associated with light and childbirth, during which she eased the pain and made sure all went well. Coins portraying Lucina may commemorate a birth in the Imperial family or that the help of the goddess had been invoked. She is usually portrayed with or holding children. A variety of objects may accompany her, sometimes a patera and scepter--attributes of Juno--or more commonly, a flower.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
SALONINA-7.JPG
Juno Regina, the Queen of the Gods.236 viewsSalonina, wife of Gallienus. Augusta, 254-268 CE.
Silvered antoninianus (21.1 mm), Uncertain Eastern mint, 260-268 CE.
Obv: SALONINA AVG, diademed & draped bust right on crescent.
Rev: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at her feet.
RIC-92; Cohen-67.

Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown hoding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
EmpressCollector
48327q00.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)51 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno Lucina standing facing, head left, extending right, infant in left.
Rome
3.07g
18.9mm
RIC III 771, RSC II 38

Originally the goddess of childbirth, Lucina later became an epithet for Juno as the one who brings children into the light. The line, Juno Lucina, fer opem, serva me, obsecro, (Juno Lucina, help me and give me strength, I beg of you) written by the Roman playwright Terence in Andria, exemplifies the custom for expectant mothers to address their prayers unto her.
2 commentsMat
0151-320np_noir.jpg
Lucilla, Sestertius 111 viewsRome mint, ca.166-169 AD.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right
IVNONI REGINAE (sic !) Juno Lucina seated left holding flower and a baby
22.85 gr
12/10/13 - 0280

Potator II
LUCINA.JPG
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.165 views Sestertius (31mm), Rome mint, AD 166.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE SC, Juno Lucina seated left, holding flower and an infant in swaddling clothes.
RIC 1747, BMC 1154, Sear 5504, Cohen 37.
EmpressCollector
bpAnto1R3Crispina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, AE Dupondius59 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Laureate and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
Dupondius, 15.4 gm, 25.2 mm, RIC 680
Comment: Juno Lucina is especially associated with childbirth and newborns in the Imperial family.
Massanutten
TitusRaven~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Titus Denarius RIC 13192 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
TitusRaven.jpg
Titus / Tripod, Ravens, Dolphin RIC 13189 viewsTitus AR Denarius Rome Mint, 80 AD
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Tripod, with fillets streaming out l. and r., on which are ravens r. and l., and in the center, dolphin over wreath: ('exuviae' of Apollo, for 'pulvinar' of Apollo and Diana (?)).
- RIC 131 (R), BMC 82, RSC 323a

Reka Devnia hoard, recording only 3 specimens with ravens and the dolphin and 24 specimens of the regular type with only the dolphin. The dolphin, ravens, laurel and tripod are all symbols of Apollo. His most famous attribute is the tripod, the symbol of his prophetic powers. It was in the guise of a dolphin that Apollo brought priests from Crete to Delphi, explaining Apollo's cult title "Delphinios" and the name of the town. He dedicated a bronze tripod to the sanctuary and bestowed divine powers on one of the priestesses, and she became known as the "Pythia." It was she who inhaled the hallucinating vapors from the fissure in the temple floor, while she sat on a tripod chewing laurel leaves. After she mumbled her answer, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
4 commentsNemonater
   
10 files on 1 page(s)