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Search results - "Juno"
DenCnCornelioBlasio.jpg
25 viewsDenarius, 112/111 B.C. Rome Mint
CN. CORNELIVS CN.F. BLASIO - Gens Cornelia
Obv.:Mars, helmeted, right (or Scipio Africanus), CN. BLASIO CN.F. before (var. N retrograde), bucranium behind. XVI (in monogram) above
Rev.: Juno, Jupiter being crowned by Minerva; letter Θ in field, ROMA in ex.
Gs. 3,25 mm. 20,6x18,4
Crawford 296/1c, Sear RCV 173, Grueber 626



Maxentius
DenThorioBalbo.jpg
30 viewsDenarius - 105 BC.
L. THORIVS BALBVS - Gens THORIA
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin. I.S.M.R. (Iunoni Sospitae Magnae Reginae)behind
Rev.:Bull charging right, T above, L THORIVS / BALBVS below.
Gs. 3,75 mm. 19,7x21,3
Craw. 316/1, Sear RCV 192
1 commentsMaxentius
DenLProcilius.jpg
34 viewsDenarius - 80 BC.
L. PROCILIVS - Gens PROCILIA
Obv.: Bust of Jupiter right, S C behind
Rev.: L PROCILI F, Juno Sospita advancing right with sheild and spear. Serpent before.
Gs. 3,9 mm. 18,2x18,9
Craw.379/1, Sear RCV 306

1 commentsMaxentius
DenRoscioFabato.jpg
32 viewsDenarius Serratus 64 or 62 BC. - Mint of Rome
L. ROSCIVS FABATVS - Gens Roscia
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, L ROSCI below, symbol behind (Shield)
Rev.:Girl standing right feeding serpent before, symbol to left (helm), FABATI in ex.
gs. 3,9 mm. 18,2x17,4
Crawford 412/1; Sear RCV 363, Grueber I 3394.



1 commentsMaxentius
DenCRenio.jpg
17 viewsDenarius - 138 BC. - Rome mint
C. RENIVS - Gens Renia
Obv.:Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
Rev.: Juno Caprotina in biga of goats right, C RENI below goats, ROMA in ex.
Crawf. 231/1, Sear RCV 108, Grueber I 885
Maxentius
DenSerratoLPapio.jpg
23 viewsDenarius Serratus - 79 BC - Rome mint
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind (amphora with two handles and string)
Rev.:Gryphon dancing right, symbol below (ampulla), L PAPI in ex.
Gs. 3,8 mm. 18,28x19,64
Crawf. 384/1, Sear RCV 311, Grueber 2977

1 commentsMaxentius
lot943919.jpg
18 viewsFaustina II. Silver Denarius (3.27 g), Augusta, AD 147-175. Rome, under Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, AD 161-164/5. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Faustina II right, with single circle of pearls around head. Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing facing, head left, holding patera and scepter. RIC -; BMC -; RSC -. Unpublished in the standard references without the peacock. Normally a peacock is shown standing at the feet of Juno on the reverse. On this coin, the bird is missing.Quant.Geek
fauiirm.jpg
Annie Galeria Faustina II 20 viewsObverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right hair in bun.
Reverse: Juno seated left holding patera in the right hand and a traverse rod in the left.
26.5 mm., 11.1 g.
Sold 5-2018
NORMAN K
ThoriusBalbus.jpg
#L. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius32 viewsRome mint. ISMR behind, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress / L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue, bull charging right.

"The obverse refers to the the cult of Juno Sospita at Lanuvium, the moneyer's birthplace. The reverse is likely a play on the moneyer's name (Taurus sounds like Thorius). Cicero described L. Thorius Balbus as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. This is one of the most common republican denarii." -- Roman Silver Coins edited by David Sear and Robert Loosley
ancientone
tessera~2.jpg
39 viewsROME
PB Tessera. (18mm, 3.09 g)
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder and cornucopia
Juno standing left, holding patera and long scepter
Rostowzew -; Milan 324

Ex Phil DeVicchi Collection
Ardatirion
00006x00~3.jpg
11 viewsROME
PB Tessera (18mm, 4.04 g)
Juno(?) standing left, holding patera and scepter
CVV/QQQ
Rostovtsew 2586

Ex Classical Numismatic Group 55 (13 September 2000), lot 1201 (part of)
Ardatirion
faustina_i_4_28.jpg
(0138) FAUSTINA I23 views(wife of Antoninus Pius)
FAUSTINA SR.
d. ca. 141 AD
AE 27 mm 12.43 g
O: DIVA FAVSTINA
DRAPED BUST RIGHT
R: AETER[NITAS] SC
JUNO STANDING FACINGM, HEAD LEFT, RAISING RIGHT HAND AND HOLDING SCEPTER
COHEN 29
laney
crispina_2.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA24 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE 25 mm 11.20 g
O: BUST R
R: JUNO STANDING L HOLDING SCEPTER AND PATERA, PEACOCK AT FEET S.C
laney
crispina.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA34 views(wife of Commodus)
CRISPINA
d. 184
AE DUPONDIUS 14.04 g
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
BUST OF CRISPINA RIGHT
R: IVNO L[V]CINA SC
JUNO STANDING LEFT HOLDING A PATERA AND SCEPTER
laney
CRISPINA_JUNO.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA28 views(wife of Commodus)
AE 23 mm max. 8.07 g
177 - 182 AD (d. 182)
O: CRISIPINA, HEAD R
R: [IVNO REGINA] S C, Juno standing l. holding patera and scepter.
laney
CRISPINA_05_27.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA19 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE 25 mm max., 9.37 g
O: BUST R
R: JUNO STANDING L HOLDING SCEPTER AND PATERA
laney
0009.jpg
0009 - Denarius Papia 79 BC107 viewsObv/Head of Juno Sospita r., wearing goatskin, symbol behind.
Rev/Gryphon dancing r., symbol below, L PAPI in ex.

Ag, 19.9mm, 3.82g
Moneyer: L. Papius.
Mint: Rome.
RRC 384/1 [dies o/r: 211/211] - Syd. 773 - Calicó 1057 - RCV 311 - RSC Papia 1 - Cohen Papia 1
ex-Numismática Saetabis
1 commentsdafnis
0018.jpg
0018 - Denarius Thoria 105 BC51 viewsObv/ISMR, head of Juno Sospita r. in goat skin.
Rev/Bull charging r., C above, THORIVS below, BALBVS in ex.

Ag, 20.0mm, 3.93g
Moneyer: L. Thorius Balbus.
Mint: Gallia Cisalpina.
RRC 316/1 [dies o/r: 450/562] - Syd. 598 - BMCRR 1615 - Calicó 1300 - Cohen Thoria 1 - RCV 192 - RSC Thoria 1
ex-CNG
1 commentsdafnis
0171.jpg
0171 - Denarius Julia Soaemias16 viewsObv/ IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA, draped bust of Julia Soaemias r.
Rev/IVNO REGINA. Juno, veiled, standing r., holding long scepter in l.h. and palladium on extended r.h.

Ag, 19.1mm, 3.61g
Mint: Rome.
RIC IV.II/237 [C] - BMCRE V/42 - Cohen 3
ex-Auctiones, e-auction 11, lot #75
dafnis
0207_RRR464_2.jpg
0207 - Denarius Carisia 46 BC18 viewsObv/ Head of Juno Moneta r.; behind, MONETA.
Rev/ Coinage tools, laurel wreath around; above, T CARISIVS.

Ag, 18.1 mm, 3.89 g
Mint: Roma
RRC 464/2 [120/133]
ex-Ibernumis, private sale
1 commentsdafnis
RIC_584_Julia_Domna.JPG
021. Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta.54 viewsAE Sestertius. Rome mint

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG

Rev. Juno standing peacock at feet IVNONEM SC.

Rome Mint, 211-217.

RIC 585. gVF
LordBest
RSC 35 Mamaea.JPG
028. Julia Mamaea, mother or Severus Alexander. AR Denarius. Juno.34 viewsAR Denarius. Rome mint.

Obv. Draped bust right IVLIA MAMAEA AVG

Rev. Juno standing left holding staff and patera, peacock at feat IVNO CONSERVATRIX.

RSC 35, RIC 343. EF
LordBest
033_Sabina_(--136_A_D_),_RIC_II_395,_AR-Denar,_SABINA__AVGVSTA,__IVNONI_REGINAE,_RSC-43,_BMCRE_940,_136_AD,_Q-001,_6h,_17-19mm,_3,24g-s.jpg
033 Sabina (???-136 A.D.), RIC II 0395, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//--, •IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left, #152 views033 Sabina (???-136 A.D.), RIC II 0395, Rome, AR-Denarius, -/-//--, •IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left, #1
Wife of Hadrian.
avers: SABINA• AVGVSTA, Her bust diademed and draped right, hair in a plait behind.
reverse: •IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,0-19,0mm, weight: 3,24g, axes: 6h,
mint: Roma, date: 136 A.D., ref: RIC II 395, RSC 43, BMCRE 940,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
038.jpg
034 TREBONIANUS GALLUS7 viewsEMPEROR: Trebonianus Gallus
DENOMINATION: Antoninianus
OBVERSE: IMP CAE C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, radiate and draped bust right
REVERSE: IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left, holding corn-ears and sceptre
DATE: 251-253 AD
MINT: Roma
WEIGHT: 3.79 g
RIC: 35
Barnaba6
Faustina_sen_Ag-Den_DIVA-FAV-STINA_AETER-NITAS_RIC-III-AP-351_C-32_Rome_141-AD_Q-001_6h_17,5-19,5mm_2,50g-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0344 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, #165 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0344 (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, #1
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAV-STINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- AETER-NITAS, Juno standing left, hand raised, holding scepter.
exerg: -/-//-- , diameter: 17,5-19,5mm, weight: 2,50g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 148-161 A.D., ref: RIC-III-344 (Antoninus Pius)p- , C-26,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Faustina_sen_Ag-Den_DIVA-FAV-STINA_AETE-R-NITAS_RIC-III-AP-344_C-32_Rome_141-AD_Q-001_6h_17-17,5mm_2,88ga-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0344var. (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, Unofficial, or ancient imitation !!!74 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 0344var. (A.Pius), Rome, AR-Denarius, AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, Unofficial, or ancient imitation !!!
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAV-STINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- AETE-R-NITAS, Juno standing left, hand raised, holding scepter.
exerg: -/-//-- , diameter: 17-17,5mm, weight: 2,88g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 148-161 A.D. ???, ref: RIC-III-344 ??? (Antoninus Pius)p- , C-26,
Q-001
quadrans
Faustina_sen_AE-Sest_DIVA-FAVSTINA_I-V-N-O_S-C_RIC-III-AP-1143_C-210_Rome_141-AD_Q-001_axis-h_31mm_x,xxg-s.jpg
036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1143 (A.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, IVNO, Juno,105 views036 Faustina Senior (100-141 A.D.), RIC III 1143 (A.Pius), Rome, AE-Sestertius, IVNO, Juno,
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAVSTINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- I-V-N-O, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 31mm, weight: x,xxg, axis: h,
mint: Rome, date: after 141 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1143 (Antoninus Pius)p-165 , C-210,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO_S-C_RIC-III-_(Marc_Aur_)-1744-p353_C-33_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_axis-0h_24-26mm_10,72g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock, 143 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1744 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 24-26mm, weight: 10,72g, axis: 0h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1744 (Marc.Aur.), p-353, C-33.,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Lucilla_AE-As_LVCILLA_AVGVSTA_IVNO-REGINA_S-C_RIC-III-(M_Aur)-1752-p_C-_Rome_166-67-AD_Q-001_6h_23-26mm_9,44g-s.jpg
040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock, 87 views040 Lucilla ( c.149-182 A.D.), RIC III 1752 (Marc.Aur.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left and peacock,
Wife of Lucius Verus.
avers:- LVCILLA_AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet, peacock, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 23-26mm, weight: 9,44g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 166-67 A.D., ref: RIC-III-1752 (Marc.Aur.), p-, C-.,
Q-001
quadrans
RI 045a img.jpg
045 - Sabina denarius - RIC 39572 viewsObv:– SABINA AVGVSTA, Diademed and draped bust right, hair in queue down neck
Rev:– IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left with patera & scepter
Mint – Rome
Reference RIC 395
maridvnvm
Sabina-RIC-395a.jpg
049. Sabina.28 viewsDenarius, ca 134 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: SABINA AVGVSTA / Diademed bust of Sabina.
Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE / Juno standing, holding patera and sceptre.
3.64 gm., 18 mm.
RIC 395a; Sear #3921.
Callimachus
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_IVNO_Roma-RIC-IV-I-559_p-168_RSC-82_BMC-38_200-AD_Q-001_6h_18mm_3,70ga-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #174 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #1
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,70g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-001
quadrans
Julia-Domna_AR-Den_IVLIA-AVGVSTA_IVNO_Roma-RIC-IV-I-559_p-168_RSC-82_BMC-38_200-AD_Q-002_11h_18-19mm_2,49ga-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #276 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #2
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 18-19mm, weight: 2,49g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-002
quadrans
RIC_IV-I_559,_Julia-Domna,_AR-Den,_IVLIA_AVGVSTA,_IVNO,_Roma,_RSC-82,_BMC-38,_Sear-6588,_200_AD,_Q-003,_1h,_17,7-18,5mm,_3,42g-s.jpg
050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #358 views050 Julia Domna (170-217 A.D.), RIC IV-I 559, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO, Juno standing left, #3
avers: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Bust draped right.
reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at feet, left, a peacock.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 17,7-18,5mm, weight: 3,42g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 209 A.D., ref: RIC IV-I 559, p-168, RSC 082, BMC 038, Sear 6588,
Q-003
2 commentsquadrans
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Roscius-Fabatus_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-lizard-behind-L_ROSCI-below_Girl-Snake-in-ex-FABATI_Crawford-412-1_Syd-915_Rome_64-BC_Q-001_axis-1h_17,5-19,5mm_3,00g-s.jpg
064 B.C., L. Roscius Fabatus, Rebublic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 412/1, Rome, Maiden and Snake, FABATI,85 views064 B.C., L. Roscius Fabatus, Rebublic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 412/1, Rome, Maiden and Snake, FABATI,
avers:- Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress; L ROSC below; behind, lizard,
revers: - Maiden standing right, feeding snake holding itself erect before her, control symbol tortoise walking right on own ground line in left field, FABATI in exergue.
exerg: -/-//FABATI, diameter: 17,5-19,5 mm, weight: 3,00g, axis: 1h,
mint: Rome, date: 64 B.C., ref: Crawford 412/1,,
Q-001
quadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG_IVNO-AVGVSTAE_RIC-_C-_Q-001_h_mm_g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 341, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left, #1113 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 341, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left, #1
avers: IVLIA MA MAEA AVG, Diademed bust right, draped.
revers: IVNO AV GVSTAE, Juno seated left, holding flower and short sceptre.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 19,0-20,0mm, weight: 2,60g, axis: 7h,
mint: Rome, date: 231 A.D., ref: RIC IV-II 341, p-98, RSC 32, BMC 755, Sear (2000-2002) 8211,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG_IVNO-CONSERVATRIX_RIC-343_C-35_Q-001_18mm_3_02g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #190 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #1
avers:- IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG, Draped, bust right.
revers:- IVNO-CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; peacock to left.
exerg: -/-//, diameter: 18mm, weight: 3,02g, axis:- h,
mint: Rome, date: 222-235 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-II-343, p-98, C-35,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG_IVNO-CONSERVATRIX_RIC-343_C-35_Q-002_7h_18mm_2,42g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #274 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #2
avers:- IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG, Draped, bust right.
revers:- IVNO-CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; peacock to left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18mm, weight: 2,42g, axis:7 h,
mint: Rome, date: 222-235 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-II-343, p-98, C-35,
Q-002
quadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AR-Den_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG_IVNO-CONSERVATRIX_RIC-343_C-35_Q-003_1h_18-18,5mm_2,50ga-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #363 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 343, Rome, AR-Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, #3
avers:- IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVG, Draped, bust right.
revers:- IVNO-CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; peacock to left.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 2,50g, axis:1h,
mint: Rome, date: 222-235 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-II-343, p-98, C-35,
Q-003
quadrans
Iulia-Mamaea_AE-Sest_IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVGVSTA_FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE_RIC-668_C-8_232AD_Q-001_axis-0h_29-31mm_22,74g-s.jpg
064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 668, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Juno standing left,122 views064 Iulia Mamaea (190-235 A.D.), RIC IV-II 668, Rome, AE-Sestertius, FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Juno standing left,
avers:- IVLIA-MAMAEA-AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right.
revers:- FECVNDITAS-AVGVSTAE, Fecunditas standing left extending hand to a child left and holding a cornucopiae, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 29-31mm, weight: 22,74g, axis:-0h,
mint: Rome, date: 232 A.D.,ref: RIC-IV-II-668, p-, C-8,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
RI_065ba_img.jpg
065 - Julia Domna denarius - RIC 56026 viewsObv:– IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev:– IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet left, peacock
Minted in Rome. A.D. 196-211
Reference:– RIC IV 560
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Lucilla-RIC-772.jpg
065. Lucilla.17 viewsDenarius, 164-169 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA / Bust of Lucilla.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA / Juno standing, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at her feet.
3.01 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #482; Sear #5487.
Callimachus
1126_P_Sabina_RPC717A.jpg
0717 THRACE, Perinthus. Sabina Hera standing11 viewsReference.
RPC III 717 var. (no altar).

Obv. СΑΒΙΝΑ СΕΒΑСΤΗ
Draped bust right.

Rev. ΠΕΡΙΝΘΙΩΝ
Hera standing left, holding sceptre and patera over lighted altar to left.

4.6 gr
20 mm
6h

Note.
Hera was the wife and older sister of Zeus. She was as goddess of women and marriage. Juno was her equivalent in Roman mythology.
okidoki
RI 076a img.jpg
076 - Julia Maesa denarius - RIC 25463 viewsObv:- IVLIA MAESA AVG, Bare head right
Rev:– IVNO, Juno veiled standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
References:- RIC 254, RSC 16
2 commentsmaridvnvm
RI 079c img.jpg
079 - Julia Mamaea denarius - RIC 34329 viewsObv:– IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev:– IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno, diademed, veiled, standing half-left, with patera & scepter & peacock at feet
References:– RIC 343, RSC 35
maridvnvm
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Papius_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-Griphon_leaping-r-Amphora_L_PAPI-ex_ROMA_Craw_-384-1_Syd-773_Rome_79-BC_Q-001_axis-6h_18,5mm_3,35g-s.jpg
079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 108, Gryphon leaping right, Unknown with Whip, L•PAPI,309 views079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 108, Gryphon leaping right, Unknown with Whip, L•PAPI,
avers: Head of Juno Sospita right; behind, water-bottle,
reverse: Gryphon leaping right, below Amphora with strap (suitcase), L•PAPI,
exergue: -/-//L•PAPI, diameter: 18,5mm, weight: 3,35g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 B.C., ref: Crawford 384/1, Sydenham 773, RRC 108 var,
Q-001
"This is the "flask/square basket" type, Crawford pair type 108; Babelon pair type 18." by Helvetica, Thank you!
1 commentsquadrans
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Papius_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-Griphon_leaping-r-_L_PAPI-ex_ROMA_Craw_-384-1_Syd-773_Rome_79-BC_Q-002_axis-6h_18-18,5mm_3,57g-s.jpg
079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 110, Gryphon leaping right, water-flask, L•PAPI,171 views079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 110, Gryphon leaping right, water-flask, L•PAPI,
avers:- Head of Juno Sospita right; behind, water-flask,
reverse: Gryphon leaping right, below water-flask, L•PAPI,
exergue: -/-//L•PAPI, diameter: 18-18,5mm, weight: 3,57g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 B.C., ref: Crawford 384/1, Sydenham-773, RRC 110, BMCRR 110, Babelon unlisted,
Q-001
1 commentsquadrans
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Papius_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-Griphon_leaping-r-_L_PAPI-ex_ROMA_Craw_-384-1_Syd-773_Rome_79-BC_Q-003,_6h,_17-19,5mm,_3,62g-s.jpg
079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 139, Gryphon leaping right, Unknown with Whip, L•PAPI,128 views079 B.C., L. Papius, Republic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 384/1, RRC 139, Gryphon leaping right, Unknown with Whip, L•PAPI,
avers: Head of Juno Sospita right, unknown symbol behind.
reverse: Gryphon leaping right, below Whip, L•PAPI in exergue.
exergue: -/-//L•PAPI, diameter: 17,0-19,5mm, weight: 3,62g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 79 B.C., ref: Crawford 384/1, Sydenham-773, RRC 139var., Babelon 54.,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
Rep_AR-Den-Ser_L_Procilius_Head-Juno-Sospita-r_-S_C-beh__Juno-Sospita-in-biga-r_-b_snake-L_PROCILI_F__ROMA_Craw_-379-2_Syd-772_Rome_80-BC_Q-001_axis-6h_17,5-19,5mm_3,85g-s.jpg
080 B.C., L. Procilius, Rebublic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 379/2, Rome, Juno Sospita in biga right, Snake, L.PROCILI.F,83 views080 B.C., L. Procilius, Rebublic AR-Denarius Serratus, Crawford 379/2, Rome, Juno Sospita in biga right, Snake, L.PROCILI.F,
avers:- Head of Juno Sospita right; behind, S.C,
revers: - Juno Sospita in biga right, holding shield and spear; below, snake; in ex. L.PROCILI.F.
exerg: -/-//L•PROCILI•F, diameter: 17,5-19,5mm, weight: 3,85g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 80 B.C., ref: Crawford 379/2, Sydneham-772,
Q-001
quadrans
Etruscilla_AR-Ant_HER-ETRVSCILLA-AVG_IVNO-REGINA_RIC-IV-III-57-p127_AD_Q-001_axis-1h_21mm_4,44g-s.jpg
080 Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 057, Rome, IVNO REGINA, #1,66 views080 Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 057, Rome, IVNO REGINA, #1,
avers:- HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed, draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock her foot.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 21 mm, weight: 4,44 g, axis: 1 h,
mint: Rome, date: 249-251 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-57, p127, C-14,
Q-001
quadrans
Etruscilla_AR-Ant_AETRVSCILLA-AVG_IVNO-REGINA_RIC-IV-III-57-p127_AD_Q-002_axis-6h_21,5-22,5mm_5,12g-s.jpg
080 Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 057, Rome, IVNO REGINA, #2,82 views080 Herennia Etruscilla (?? A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 057, Rome, IVNO REGINA, #2,
avers:- HER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed, draped bust right on crescent.
revers:- IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock her foot.
exe: -/-//--, diameter: 21,5-22,5 mm, weight: 5,12 g, axis: 6 h,
mint: Rome, date: 249-251 A.D., ref: RIC-IV-III-57, p127, C-14,
Q-002
quadrans
Treb-Gallus_AR-Ant_IMP-C-C-VIB-TREB-GALLVS-AVG_dot_IVNO-MARTIALIS_dot_RIC-83_C-_Antioch-3rd_-iss__251-53-AD_Q-001_11h_20,5-23mm_4,63g-s.jpg
083 Trebonianus Gallus (251-253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 083, Antioch, IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left, 94 views083 Trebonianus Gallus (251-253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 083, Antioch, IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left,
avers: IMP-C-C-VIB-TREB-GALLVS-AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right "•" belowe the bust.
revers: IVNO-MARTIALIS, Juno seated left, holding corn ears and sceptre.
exe: -/-//•, diameter: 20,5-23 mm, weight: 4,63g, axis: 11h,
mint: Antioch, 3rd. issue, date: 251-253 A.D., ref: RIC IV-III 083,
Q-001
quadrans
084_Volusian_(251-253_A_D_),_AR-Ant_,_IMP_CAE_C_VIB_VOLVSIANO_AVG,_IVNONI_MARTIALI,_RIC_IV_177,_Q-001_1h,21-22mm,3,04g-s.jpg
084 Volusian (251-253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 177, Rome, IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated left, Very Rare!153 views084 Volusian (251-253 A.D.), AR-Antoninianus, RIC IV-III 177, Rome, IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated left, Very Rare!
avers: IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
reverse: IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated left, wearing kalathos, holding corn-ears and globe.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 21,0-22,0 mm, weight: 3,04 g, axis: 1h, Very Rare!
mint: Rome, date: 251-253 A.D., ref: RIC IV-III 177, p-,
Q-001
4 commentsquadrans
A-09_Rep_AR-Den_L_Rubrius-Dossenus_Head-Juno-r_-DOS-behind_Triump_-quadr_-r_-dec-eagle-thund__L_RVBRI__Crawf_-348-2_Syd-706_Rome_87-BC_Q-001_11h_15,5-17,5mm_3,78gx-s.jpg
087 B.C., L. Rubrius Dossenus, AR-Denarius, Crawford 348/2, Rome, L.RVBRI, Victory in quadriga right, Rubria 2, #163 views087 B.C., L. Rubrius Dossenus, AR-Denarius, Crawford 348/2, Rome, L.RVBRI, Victory in quadriga right, Rubria 2, #1
avers:- Veiled and diademed head of Juno right, wearing ear-ring and necklace, with sceptre on left shoulder, DOS behind .
revers:- Triumphal chariot with side panel decorated with eagle on a thunderbolt, above, Victory with wreath flying right, In exergue, L.RVBRI.
exerg: -/-//L.RVBRI, diameter: 15,5-17,5mm, weight: 3,78g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: 87 B.C., ref: Crawford-348-2, Syd-706, Rubria 2,
Q-001
quadrans
091_Salonina,_Billon-Ant,_SALONINA_AVG,_IVNO_REGINA,_star-,_RIC_V-I_Not-in,_Gobl-1619f,_Antioch,_AD,_Q-001,_0h,_20-23mm,_3,30g-s.jpg
091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), Antioch, Göbl 1619f, RIC V-I Not in, AR-Antoninianus, */-//--, IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, #153 views091 Salonina (? - 268 A.D.), Antioch, Göbl 1619f, RIC V-I Not in, AR-Antoninianus, */-//--, IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, #1
avers: SALONINA AVG, Diademed draped bust right on crescent.
reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding scepter right and patera left. Peacock at feet left. Star in left field.
exergue: */-//--, diameter: 20,0-23,0mm, weight: 3,30 g, axis: 0h,
mint: Antioch, date: 253-260 A.D., ref: RIC V-I Not in RIC, Göbl-1619f,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
RI_100h_img.jpg
100 - Trebonianus Gallus - RIC 0832 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG, Radiate, draped cuirassed bust right
Rev– IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left, holding corn ears and sceptre
Minted in Antioch. A.D. 251 - 253
Reference:– RIC 83. RSC 47

Weight 4.86g. 22.50mm. 0 degrees
maridvnvm
105_B_C_,_L_Thorius_Balbus,_AR-den,_ISMR,_Head_of_Juno_Sospita_r_,_L_THORIVS_BALBVS,_Bull_r_,_K,_Cr_316-1,_Syd-598,_Thoria_1,_Sear_192,_Q-001,_6h,_18,5-20,5mm,_3,74g-s.jpg
105 B.C., L.Thorius Balbus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 316/1, Rome, L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, #1128 views105 B.C., L.Thorius Balbus, Republic AR-Denarius, Crawford 316/1, Rome, L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, #1
avers: ISMR abbreviated legend behind the head of Juno Sospita right, wearing a goat-skin headdress.
reverse: L•THORIVS/BALBVS in two line, Bull charging right, control letter "K" above.
exergue: -/-//L•THORIVS/BALBVS, diameter: 18,5-20,5mm, weight: 3,83g, axis: 6h,
mint: Rome, date: 105 B.C., ref: Crawford 316/1, Sydenham 598, Sear 192, Thoria 1,
Q-001
2 commentsquadrans
coin286.JPG
105a. Faustina II38 viewsFaustina Jr

Originally promised by Hadrian to Lucius Verus, Atoninus betrothed her to his cousin Marcus Aurelius in 139; they married in 145. She was raised to an Augusta the following year. She was said to have had a lively personality, but the late and unreliable Augustan History impugns her character, relating stories of adultery with sailors and gladiators, suggesting that Commodus was either the son of a gladiator (as explanation for his interest in gladiatorial combat), or that Faustina washed herself with the blood of an executed gladiator and then lay with Aurelius in that state. Faustina went with Aurelius on his campaign to the north (170-174) and then to the East, where she died (175). Aurelius consecrated her and founded a second Puellae Faustinianae in her name.

Denarius. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO, Juno stg. front, head left, holding scepter, feeding peacock at feet out of patera. RIC 688, RSC 120
ecoli
coin194.JPG
106a. Crispina47 viewsCrispina married the sixteen year-old, Commodus in the summer of 178 and brought him, as a dowry, a large number of estates. These, when added to the Imperial holdings, gave him control of a substantial part of Lucanian territory. The actual ceremony was modest but was commemorated on coinage and largesse was distributed to the people. An epithalamium for the occasion was composed by the sophist Julius Pollux.

Upon her marriage, Crispina received the title of Augusta, and thus, became Empress of the Roman Empire as her husband was co-emperor with her father-in-law at the time. The previous empress and her mother-in-law, Faustina the Younger, having died three years prior to her arrival.

Like most marriages of young members of the nobiles, it was arranged by paters: in Crispina's case by her father and her father-in-law, Emperor Marcus Aurelius. Crispina probably meant little to her egocentric husband though she was a beautiful woman. The other possible reason being that Commodus was known to prefer the company of men. Crispina is described as being a graceful person with a susceptible heart, but there is no medal extant of her.

As Augusta, Crispina was extensively honoured with public images, during the last two years of her father-in-law's reign and the initial years of her husband's reign. She did not seem to have any significant political influence over her husband during his bizarre reign. However, she was not exempted from court politics either as her sister-in-law, Lucilla, was an ambitious woman and was reportedly jealous of Crispina, the reigning empress, due to her position and power.

Crispina's marriage failed to produce an heir due to her husband's inability, which led to a dynastic succession crisis. In fact, both Anistius Burrus (with whom Commodus had share his first consulate as sole ruler) and Gaius Arrius Antoninus, who were probably related to the imperial family, were allegedly put to death 'on the suspicion of pretending to the throne'.

After ten years of marriage, Crispina was falsely charged with adultery by her husband and was banished to the island of Capri in 188, where she was later executed. After her banishment, Commodus did not marry again but took on a mistress, a woman named Marcia, who was later said to have conspired in his murder.

Crispina, wife of Commodus, 177-192, AE Dupondius or As (24x25mm), aVF. Sear RCV 6018. Obv. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right. Rev. IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter. The coin is brown and green, on a squarish flan.
ecoli
T1356LG.jpg
108a MANLIA SCANTILLA62 viewsAE sestertius. Rome mint.
MANL SCANTILLA AVG. Draped bust right / IVNO REGINA SC. Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at feet. RIC IV 18b (Didius Julianus). VERY RARE

Check
2 commentsecoli
Rep_AR-Den_Cn_Blasio,Cornelia_CN_BLASIO_CN_F-wreath_Juno-Jupiter-Minerva_below-ROMA_Gamma_Crawford-296-1e_Syd-561b_Rome_111-12-BC_Q-001_axis-9h_17,5-19mm_3,99g-s.jpg
112-111 B.C., Cn.Cornelius Cn.F. Blasio, AR-Denarius, Crawford 296/1e, Rome,83 viewsCn.Cornelius Cn.F. Blasio (112-111 B.C.), AR-Denarius, Crawford 296/1e, Rome,
avers: CN•BLASIO•CN•F, Helmeted head of Mars right (Corinthian helmet), above the star, behind wreath.
reverse: Jupiter standing facing between Juno and Minerva, in the field Υ, below ROMA.
exergue: -/-//ROMA, diameter: 17,5-19mm, weight: 3,99g, axis: 9h,
mint: Rome, date: 111-112 B.C., ref: Crawford 296/1e, Sydenham 561b,
Q-001
quadrans
RI_122p_img.jpg
122 - Claudius II Gothicus - RIC V Antioch 212 (bust left)21 viewsAntoninianus
Obv:– IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate head left
Rev:– IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, patera in right, scepter in left, peacock at feet left
Minted in Antioch. September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.
Reference:– RIC V 212
maridvnvm
faustina1 RIC344.jpg
138-161 AD - FAUSTINA Senior AR denarius - struck after 141 AD27 viewsobv: DIVA FAVSTINA (draped bust right)
rev: AETERNITAS (Juno standing left, hand raised, holding scepter)
ref: RIC III 344 (AntPius), RSC 26 (12frcs), BMC 345
3,26gms, 17mm,
berserker
Project2.jpg
161 Faustina Jr 28 viewsFaustina Jr Denarius. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO, Juno standing front, head left, holding scepter, feeding peacock at feet out of patera. RIC 688, RSC 120, BMC 1041 commentsRandygeki(h2)
lucilla as-.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE dupondius or as26 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: IVNO REGINA / S.C. (Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet)
ref: RIC III 1752(M.Aurelius), C.44
berserker
faustinaII sest.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE sestertius - struck 161-176 AD26 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (bust right with circlet of pearls )
rev: IVNO / S.C. (Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at foot)
ref: RIC III 1645 (M.Aurelius), C.121(8fr.)
21.31gms, 33mm
berserker
faustinaII sest2.jpg
161-176 AD - FAUSTINA Junior AE sestertius - struck 161-176 AD30 viewsobv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right wearing circlet of pearls)
rev: IVNONI REGINAE (Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera & scepter; peacock standing left at feet, head reverted), S-C in field
ref: RIC III 1651 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 142, BMC 919
22.51gms, 29mm
berserker
rjb_fjun1_08_06.jpg
161a19 viewsFaustina junior
AR denarius
Obv "FAVSTINA AVGVSTA"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "IVNONI REGINAE"
Juno seated left, peacock at feet
Rome mint
RIC 698
mauseus
151-crispina dup.jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA AE dupondius - struck 177 AD29 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: IVNO LVCINA / S.C. (Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter)
ref: RIC III 680(Commodus), C.24 (3frcs)
11.53gms, 25mm
Scarce
berserker
rjb_manl_05_08.jpg
19339 viewsManlia Scantilla
AE dupondius
Obv "MANL SCANTILLA AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "IVNO REGINA SC"
Juno standing left, peacock at feet
Rome mint
RIC 19a
mauseus
rjb_domna_04_06.jpg
193c17 viewsJulia Domna
AE sestertius
Obv "IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "IVNONEM SC"
Juno standing left, peacock to left
Rome mint
RIC 585b
mauseus
193_Julia_Domna_Dupondius_RIC_845_1.jpg
193_Julia_Domna_Dupondius_RIC_845_111 viewsJulia Domna (ca. 170 – 217 AD)
AE Dupondius, Rome, 193 – 196
IVLIA DOMNA AVG;
Draped bust right
IVNO REGINA, S-C;
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
11,05 gr, 25 mm
RIC IVa, 845; BMC V, 496 (Pl. 21, 6); cp. C. 100
Ex Auctiones GmbH, eAuction 29, lot 409
ga77
193_Manlia_Scantilla_As_RIC_19a_1.jpg
193_Manlia_Scantilla_As_RIC_19a_112 viewsManlia Scantilla (? – 193 AD)
AE As/Dupondius, Rome, March 28th – early June 193 AD
MANL SCANTILLA AVG;
Draped bust right, hair elaboratley waved and coiled on back of head
IVNO REGINA, S-C;
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
8,61 gr, 21 mm
RIC IVa, 19a; BMC V, 37; C. 4; CMB I, 1

Not 100% sure it is authentic. Flan cracks look strange on the photo, but are much more convincing in hand.
ga77
image1_(3).JPG
195 Julia Maesa 23 viewsJulia Maesa (218 - 225 A.D.)
AR Denarius
O: IVLIA MAESA AVG, Draped bust right.
R: IVNO, Juno standing facing, head left, holding scepter and patera.
Antioch mint., 218 - 220 A.D.
1.97g
20mm
RIC IV 256 var. (diademed); RSC 20a
ex Mat
2 commentsRandygeki(h2)
FaustinaIIAsJuno.jpg
1bk Faustina Junior147 viewsWife of Marcus Aurelius. 131-176

As
Draped bust, left, FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Juno seated left holding the three graces and scepter, peacock at feet, IVNO SC

The daughter of Antoninus Pius, wife of Aurelius, and mother of Commodus, Faustina had a box seat to witness the end of the Golden Age. She bore Aurelius at least 13 children and accompanied him on his military campaigns, yet years later had her reputation impuned for alleged adultery.

The reverse is RIC 1400, for which only right-facing busts are listed.

From Curtis Clay: "This is a rev. type that used to be very rare, even with bust right, but quite a few specimens have emerged from Bulgaria since the fall of the Iron Curtain.

I had a specimen with bust left myself, acquired from Baldwin's c. 1970, which is now in the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford.

A VF specimen with bust left, from the same dies as yours, was in CNG E54, 4 Dec. 2002, 145 = CNG 57, 4 April 2001, 1292.

Still an interesting and scarce reverse type, and rare with bust left, a variety that is hard to find on any Roman coin of Faustina II !" Thank you, Curtis!
Blindado
CrispinaAsJuno.jpg
1bo Crispina25 viewsWife of Commodus

As

Draped bust, right, CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Juno, IVNO LVCINA

RIC 680

We know little about Crispina. The Historia Augusta notes, "[W]hen Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure. . . . His wife, whom he caught in adultery, he drove from his house, then banished her, and later put her to death."
1 commentsBlindado
jdomna dup-.jpg
211-217 AD - JULIA DOMNA as or dupondius21 viewsobv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG (draped bust right)
rev: IVNONEM /S.C. (Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet)
ref: RIC599(Caracalla) (Scarce), C.91
9.69gms, 26mm
Rare
Wife of Septimius Severus, mother of Caracalla and Geta. Caracalla murdered Geta in their mother's private apartments and Geta died in her arms. After the murder of her son Caracalla in 217, Julia Domna starved herself to death.
berserker
22012.jpg
22012 Salonina/Juno1 viewsSalonina/Juno
Obv:SALONINA AVG,
Diademed and draped bust right, resting on crescent
Rev: IVNO REGINA,
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, at foot, peacock, star in left field
Mint: Antioch 22.3mm 4.6g
RIC 92, Göbl 1619f, Sear 10641
Blayne W
22074.jpg
22074 CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS/Juno9 viewsCLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS/Juno
268-270 AD. Antoninianus
mint. Struck 268 AD.
Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG,
radiate head left
Rev: IVNO R-EGINA,
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock standing left at feet.
Mint: Antioch 19.8mm 3.5g
RIC V 212;
Blayne W
rjb_j_mam2_10_07.jpg
222b21 viewsJulia Mamaea
AR denarius
Obv "IVLIA MAMAEA AVG"
Draped bust right
Rev "IVNO CONSERVATRIX"
Juno standing left, peacock at feet
Rome mint
RIC 343
mauseus
rjb_juno_109_05_06.jpg
251b22 viewsTrebonianus Gallus 251-3 AD
AE sestertius
Obv "IMP CAES C VIBIVS TREBONIANVS GALLVS AVG"
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "IVNONI MARTIALI SC"
Juno seated left in a distyle circular temple, peacock to left
Rome mint
RIC 110a
mauseus
rjb_juno_252a_05_06.jpg
251c22 viewsVolusian 251-3 AD
AE sestertius
Obv "IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG"
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "IVNONI MARTIALI SC"
Juno seated left in a tetrastyle circular temple, peacock to left
Rome mint
RIC 252a
mauseus
rjb_juno_252b_05_06.jpg
251c21 viewsVolusian 251-3 AD
AE as
Obv "IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG"
Laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right
Rev "IVNONI MARTIALI SC"
Juno seated left in a tetrastyle circular temple, peacock to left
Rome mint
RIC 252b
mauseus
rjb_2010_02_05.jpg
270b15 viewsSeverina,
AE sestertius
Rome mint
Obv "SEVERINA AVG"
Diademed and draped bust right
Rev "IVNO REGINA"
Juno standing left holding vertical sceptre, peacock to left
-/-//Z
RIC 7; Gőbl 147
mauseus
Treb-Gallus-RIC-69.jpg
28. Trebonianus Gallus.10 viewsAntoninianus, ca 251 - 253 AD, Milan mint.
Obverse: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG / Radiate bust of Gallus.
Reverse: IVNO MARTIALIS / Juno seated, holding sceptre and ear of corn.
3.45 gm., 19.5 mm.
RIC #69; Sear #9361.
Callimachus
rjb_2011_04_01.jpg
31616 viewsL Thorius Balbus; c.105 BC
AR denarius
Obv "I.S.M.R"
Head of Juno Sospita right
Rev "L THORIVS BALBVS"
Bull charging right, O above
Rome mint
Crawford 316
mauseus
Denario FAUSTINA RIC 344.jpg
32-05 - FAUSTINA MADRE (138 - 141 D.C.)33 viewsAR Denario 18 x 16 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "DIVA FAVSTINA" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AETERNITAS" - Juno (?) / Aeternitas (La eternidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, levantando su mano derecha y portando largo cetro vertical en izquierda.

Acuñada 141 - 161 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #344D Pag.69 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4574 Pag.268 - BMCRE #345 - Cohen Vol.II #26 Pag.415 - DVM #4/3 Pag.142 - St. Vol.III #448 - RSC Vol. II #26 Pag.191
mdelvalle
RIC_344d_Denario_Faustina_I.jpg
32-05 - FAUSTINA MADRE (138 - 141 D.C.)10 viewsAR Denario 18 x 16 mm 2.8 gr.

Anv: "DIVA FAVSTINA" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "AETERNITAS" - Juno (?) / Aeternitas (La eternidad) de pié de frente viendo a izquierda, levantando su mano derecha y portando largo cetro vertical en izquierda.

Acuñada 141 - 161 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #344D Pag.69 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #4574 Pag.268 - BMCRE IV #351 Pag.53 - Cohen Vol.II #26 Pag.415 - DVM #4/3 Pag.142 - St. Vol.III #448 - RSC Vol. II #26 Pag.191
mdelvalle
Ot-Severa-RIC-127.jpg
32. Otacilia Severa.17 viewsAntoninianus, ca 245 - 247 AD, "Branch mint" (?)
Obverse: M OTACIL SEVERA AVG / Diademed bust of Severa, on a crescent.
Reverse: IVNO CONSERVAT / Juno standing, veiled, holding patera and sceptre.
4.27 gm., 21 mm.
RIC #127; Sear #9152.

RIC tentatively assigns this coin to Antioch, Sear assigns it to Rome (See RIC, vol. IV, part III, pages 54 and 64). Stylistically, this coin does not fit in with Rome and that is why RIC attributed it to Antioch. Curtis Clay recently suggested this coin is part of a small issue minted at a branch mint to produce coinage for Philip's Carpic campaign of 245-247. So at present, the mint for this coin is still open to question.
Callimachus
coin261.JPG
321a. MAGNIA URBICA16 viewsMAGNIA URBICA, wife of Carinus. Æ Antoninianus (3.30 gm). Rome mint. MAG VRBICA AVG, diademed and draped bust right on crescent / IONO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; KA. RIC V 341; Cohen 4. Fine, porous. Rare. Ex-CNGecoli
379-1_Procilia.jpg
379/1. Procilia - denarius (80 BC)5 viewsAR Denarius (Rome, 80 BC)
O/ Laureate head of Jupiter right; S C downwards behind.
R/ Juno Sospita standing right, holding shield and hurling spear; snake before; L PROCILI/F downwards behind.
3.57g
Crawford 379/1 (104 obverse dies/116 reverse dies)

* Lucius Procilius:

The life of Procilius is sparsely known. Besides, he is the only recorded member of the gens Procilia for the Republic and the lack of a cognomen further indicates a humble origin. Dictionaries often record two different Procilius (a historian and a politician), but they were possibly the same person. Since there are 35 years between this denarius and the dated events of Procilius' life, the moneyer could have been the father of the politician and historian.

Regarding Procilius the historian, none of his writings has survived, even as fragments, but he is quoted by Varro about the origin of the Lacus Curtius on the Forum (Latin Language, v. 148), Pliny the Elder on a text related to Pompey (Natural History, viii. 2), and Cicero alludes that he wrote on Greek constitutions (Atticus, ii. 2). The scope of his works must have therefore been quite extensive. In the aforementioned letter, Cicero shows his dislike for Procilius, which is perhaps related to Procilius' political role.

Indeed, in other letters, Cicero mentions that Procilius was also a Tribune of the Plebs in 56, and that he was allied to Gaius Porcius Cato (Cato the Younger's cousin) and Marcus Nonius Sufenas, also Tribunes that year. They supported Publius Clodius Pulcher, Tribune in 59 and Aedile in 56, who -- as Tribune -- had banned Cicero from Rome for his repression of the Catiline Conspiracy, hence the animosity of Cicero towards Procilius. In 56, Pulcher and the three tribunes, including Procilius, prevented the elections from taking place, in order to force an interregnum, so that Crassus and Pompey could be chosen consuls for 55 (Cassius Dio, Roman History, xxxix. 27-33).

They used violence and bribery to prevent this election and were therefore sued. Cato and Sufenas were acquitted, but Procilius was found guilty on 4 July 54 (Cicero, Atticus, iv. 15). Apparently, he was not condemned for the complete illegality of his deeds, but because he had killed a man in his house; and Cicero complains that 22 judges on 49 still wanted to absolve him. In the following letter to Atticus (ii. 16), Cicero adds that there are rumors about Sufenas and his judges, possibly about corruption, but does not give more details.

The use of Juno Sospita refers to the town of Lanuvium, where she was worshiped, probably the hometown of Procilius.

Joss
rjb_repub2_10_08.jpg
38428 viewsL Papi c.79 BC
AR denarius
Obv Head of Juno Sospita right, control mark behind
Rev "L.PAPI"
Gryphon leaping right over control mark
Rome mint
Crawford 384 (control mark pair 119)
5 commentsmauseus
1097Sabina_RIC395.jpg
395a Sabina Denarius Roma 128-136 AD Juno standing13 viewsReference.
RIC 395a; Strack 379; C. 43; BMC 940

Obv. SABINA AVGVSTA
Bust of Sabina, diademed, draped, right; hair is knotted in back and falls in waves down neck, hair also piled on top, above diadem

Rev. IVNONI REGINAE
Juno, draped, standing left, holding patera in right hand and vertical sceptre in left

3.18 gr
18 mm
6h
okidoki
RIC_560_Denario_Julia_Domna.jpg
47-04 - JULIA DOMNA (194 - 217 D.C.)11 viewsAR Denario 16.5 mm 1.9 gr.
Esposa de Septimio Severo y madre de Geta y Caracalla.

Anv: "IVLIA AVGVSTA" - Busto sin diadema y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IVNO REGINA" - Juno de pié a izquierda portando Patera en mano der. y Cetro vertical en izq., frente a ella un pavo real que la mira.

Acuñada 2da. Emisión (Grupo II) 195/8 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte I #560 Pag.168 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6589 Pag.493 - BMCRE V #42 Pag.162 (Pl.28 #1) - Cohen Vol.IV #97 Pag.113 - RSC Vol. III #97 Pag.55 - DVM #55/2 Pag.192 - Salgado II/1 #4202.b Pag.109
mdelvalle
Salonina-RIC-29.jpg
48. Salonina.16 viewsAntoninianus, 257 - 258 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: SALONINA AVG / Diademed bust of Salonina, on crescent.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA / Juno standing, holding patera and sceptre.
3.99 gm., 20 mm.
RIC #29; Sear 10640.
Callimachus
Denario Julia Mamaea RIC 343.jpg
61-02 - JULIA MAMAEA (222 - 235 D.C.)59 viewsAR Denario 20 x 18 mm 2.2 gr.
Madre de Severo Alejandro

Anv: "IVLIA MAMAEA AVG" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IVNO CONSERVATRIX" - Juno velado de pié a izquierda, portando una pátera en mano de brazo derecho extendido y cetro largo vertical en izquierda. A sus piés un Pavo Real con su cabeza viendo de recibir lo que cae de la pátera.

Acuñada 1ra.Emisión 222 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.6ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #343 Pag.98 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #8212 Pag.678 - BMCRE #43/8 - Cohen Vol.IV #35 Pag.493/4 - RSC Vol. III #35 Pag.149 - DVM #5 Pag.215
2 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_343_Denario_Julia_Mamea.jpg
61-02 - JULIA MAMAEA (222 - 235 D.C.)13 viewsAR Denario 20 x 18 mm 2.2 gr.
Madre de Severo Alejandro

Anv: "IVLIA MAMAEA AVG" - Busto vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "IVNO CONSERVATRIX" - Juno velado de pié a izquierda, portando una pátera en mano de brazo derecho extendido y cetro largo vertical en izquierda. A sus piés un Pavo Real con su cabeza viendo de recibir lo que cae de la pátera.

Acuñada 1ra.Emisión 222 D.C.
Ceca: Roma (Off.6ta.)

Referencias: RIC Vol.IV Parte II #343 Pag.98 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #8212 Pag.678 - BMCRE #43/8 - Cohen Vol.IV #35 Pag.493/4 - RSC Vol. III #35 Pag.149 - DVM #5 Pag.215
mdelvalle
SevAlex-AE26-Marcian.jpg
70. Severus Alexander.15 viewsAE 26, Marcianopolis, Moesia
Obverse: AVT K M AVP CEVH . AΛEZANΔPOC / Laureate bust of Severus Alexander.
Reverse: HΓ OVM TEPEBENTINOV MAPKIANOΠOLITΩN / Hera (Juno) standing, holding patera and sceptre.
10.71 gm., 26 mm.

This coin was minted when Um. Terventinus was Governor.
Callimachus
LPapi.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius48 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (bakers shovel), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (bakers oven) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: cooks and bakers

3.75g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

ex-ANE

Plate coin 89:www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Papius3.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius71 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (half of fat fish), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (fish) below, bead and reel border

trade guild: fishmongers

3.91g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 39

ex-ANE

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series: www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
LPapi2.jpg
79 BC L Papius Serrated denarius52 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat's skin control symbal behind (base of column), bead and reel in border

L PAPI
Gryphon leaping right control symbol (Corinthian capital) below, bead and reel border

Trade guild: Builders

3.9g

Rome
79 BC

Sear 311 RRC 89

Ex-Calgary Coin

To see the amazing variety of control marks on this series:
www.bonannocoins.com/l_papius/l_papius_db.php

SOLD to Calgary Coin June 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
Göbl_725x_Antoniniano_Salonina.jpg
83-03 - SALONINA (254 - 268 D.C.)11 viewsAE Antoniniano 20 mm 2.8 gr.
Esposa de Galieno y madre de Valeriano II y Salonino

Anv: "COR SALONINA AVG" - Busto diademado y vestido, viendo a derecha y descansando sobre una media luna.
Rev: "IVNONI CONS AVG" - Alce avanzando a izq. "B" en exergo.
Invoca la protección de Juno, ante la rebelión de Aureolo.

Acuñada 267 D.C.
Ceca: 2do. Taller de Roma

Referencias: Göbl #725x - RIC Vol.V Parte I #16 var. (Nº de oficcinae) Pag.193 - Sear RCTV Vol.III #10643 var. (Idem) Pag.327 - Cohen Vol.V #69 var. (Idem) Pag.503 - DVM #24 var. (Alce a der.) Pag.251 - RSC Vol.IV #69 var. (Nº de Officinae) Pag.113
mdelvalle
AntoseRIC608.jpg
9. Juno Sospita, goddess of Lavunium62 viewsÆ Sestertius, 28,89g, Ø 31mm, 12h, minted AD 140, Rome
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI-VS P P TR P COS III, laurate head right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE around, S C in field, Juno Sospita with goat skin head dress, advancing right preceded by snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield, pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (scarse); BMCRE 1248; Cohen 473; Foss 56

This issue is part of a series of coins struck between 140 and 144 figuring scenes from ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the godess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
1 commentsCharles S
Gallienus_32.jpg
A29 viewsGallienus Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 207k
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG; radiate bust r.
Reverse: IOVICONS AVG; goat stg. l.; stigma in exergue
Size: 17 mm
Weight: 2.5 grams

Gallienus’ coinage is perhaps best know by the issuance of his Zoo series. Each coin type depicts a mythical or real animal on the reverse as a dedication to a specific Roman deity: Diana (doe, stag, antelope/gazelle), Apollo (centaur, gryphon), Sol (Pegasus/winged horse, bull), Jupiter (goat), Liber Pater (panther/tigress), Neptune (capricorn, hippocamp), Juno (doe/elk/capreolus), Mercury (hippocamp/criocamp), Hercules (lion, boar).

“The vast majority of Zoo coins were produced at the mint of Rome, with a few rare examples coming from Siscia. Each officina produced a different coin within the series, with some producing a second, less common type also. Occasionally you'll find an animal with the "wrong" officina mark. These are fascinating, and the rarity leads us to believe that they represented mistakes, perhaps when a die engraver was transferred from one workshop to another. He gets the right animal, but the wrong officina. Or maybe one workshop was falling behind, so another was temporarily enlisted to help catch up on the quota?” – from Jim’s page on Coins of Gallienus' Zoo at http://www.ruark.org/coins/Zoo/#ZooLinks
Noah
ANTON-2.jpg
Antoninus Pius AE Sestertius RIC III 60824 viewsObv: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS PP TR P COS III
laureate head right with slight drapery on left shoulder
Rev: IVNONI SISPITAE S-C
Juno Sospita advancing right, wearing goatskin, preceded by
serpent on ground, brandishing spear and holding long shield
33mm 27gm
1 commentsOWL365
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-HYfhR9IyfMXREzR-Antoninus_Pius_4.jpg
Antoninus Pius (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius 1 viewsANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P - Laureate head right
TR POT COS III - Juno Sospita advancing right, brandishing spear and shield; serpent before
Exergue:


Mint: Rome (140-144AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 23.25g / 32mm / 360
Rarity: Extremely Rare
References:
BMCRE pg. 210
and note = Strack 887
Unpublished
RIC 608 var (legends)
Acquisition/Sale: distinctivecoins Ebay

Extremely Rare. From CNG: Strack only identified two examples, in Münich and the Vatican, but the latter of which may have a third example.

I feel very fortunate to have gotten this coin. The dealer had it listed as a 'Minerva' reverse but as I researched the reverse, I found that it was not 'Minerva' but 'Juno Sospita'.
Gary W2
AntoSe94~0.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 608, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Juno Sospita)66 viewsÆ sestertius (26.6g, 32mm, 12h) Rome, AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PI[-]VS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE (around) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248, Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex Künker Auction 153 (March 2009)

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
Antose96.jpg
Antoninus Pius, RIC 608, Sestertius of AD 140-144 (Juno Sospita)54 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.89g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE (around edge) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (Scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248; Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex iNumis, Paris, March 2009

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
crispina.jpg
As, IVNO S - C, Juno & peacock6 viewsCrispina. As, Rome, Rome 180-2 AD. 11.32g. Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA Bust draped r. Rx: IVNO S - C Juno, veiled, standing l. holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet. BM-431, C-23, RIC-679, Sear RCV II 6017. Ex Thomas D. Walker, Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
Salonina_Ivno_BCC_RI14a.jpg
BCC RI1431 viewsRoman Imperial
Salonina, wife of Gallienus
253-268 CE Antoninianus
Obv: SALONINA AVG diad.
and draped bust, on crescent.
Rev: IVNO REGINA Juno
std. left holding patera and
scepter, with peacock at feet.
22.5mm. 3.43gm. Axis:180
RIC V 30(j) Antioch Mint
v-drome
Vibo.jpg
Bruttium Vibo Valentia Semis71 views Bronze semis

head of Juno (Hera) right, wearing stephane, S (mark of value) behind

VALENTIA
Double cornucopia overflowing with grain and grapes, carnyx (control symbol) and S (mark of value) on right


Vibo Valentia mint, 193 - 150 B.C.

3.57g, 18.1 mm 270o

Mensitieri Valentia 211; HN Italy 2263; SNG ANS 483, SNG Cop 1849; BMC Italy p. 361, 16 (control described as staff ending in boar's head)

Ex-Forum from the Andrew McCabe Collection
6 commentsJay GT4
C_RENIUS.jpg
C RENIUS AR Denarius Cr231/1. Goat Biga15 viewsOBVERSE: Helmeted head of Roma right, X behind
REVERSE: Juno Capriotina in biga of goats right, C RENI below goats, ROMA in ex.
3.6g, 16mm

Struck at Rome 138 BC
Legatus
0069.jpg
C. Renius , Denarius13 viewsRRC. 231/1
138 b.c.

Juno in Biga of Goats, w. Diadem, sceptre & reigns
Ex Gorny & Mosch, Auction 232, Lot 240 - Ex Varesi, April 1990.
Norbert
C_Renius~0.jpg
C. Renius - AR denarius11 viewsRome
²144 BC
¹138 BC
head of Roma right wearing winged helmet
X
Juno Caprotina in biga of goats right holding whip, scepter and reins
C·RENI
ROMA
¹Crawford 231/1, SRCV I 108, Sydenham 432, RSC I Renia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex London Coin Galleries

Reverse refers to Lanuvium where moneyer's family came from and where the sanctuary of Juno was situated.
Johny SYSEL
C__Renius.png
C. Renius – Renia-159 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC C Renius, 138 BC, AR Denarius (3.84 gm) Helmeted head of Roma right "X" behind. Juno Caprotina in a biga of goats right "C RENI" below "ROMA" in exergue. Renia 1, Crawford 231/1, RCV 108, Syd 4321 commentsBud Stewart
C.Renius_Cr231.1.jpg
C. Renius, Crawford 231/152 viewsC. Renius, gens Renia
AR - denarius, 3.92g, 15.33mm
Rome, 138 BC
obv. Head of Roma,wearing decorated and winged Attic helmet, r.
X behind
rev. Juno Caprotina in goats biga galopping r., holding reigns and sceptre in l. hand
and whip in r. hand.
beneath C.REN[I]
in ex. ROMA
Crawford 231/1; Sydenham 432; Renia 1
VF, toned, small, struck on small flan

For more informations please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'!
Jochen
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-zg2aP0ewwCVrhb-Caligula_damnatio.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze AS1 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
Vesta SC - Vesta, veiled and draped, seated left, on throne with ornamented back and legs, holding patera in right hand and long transverse sceptre in left
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 10.40g / 28mm / 6h
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
BMCRE 46
BN 54
Cohen 27
Acquisition/Sale: indalocolecciones eBay

This coin seems to have suffered a 'Damnatio Memoriae'. It looks as if the portrait has had cut marks applied to the jaw and neck areas. Interestingly, the ancient writers said that on his assassination, the first strike to Caligula was to his jaw or neck/shoulder areas. Damnatio memoriae is a modern Latin phrase meaning "condemnation of memory", i.e., that a person is to be excluded from official accounts.


ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.

Gary W2
Gary W2
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-2WcIZv40JXVImci-Caligula_69.jpg
Caligula (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As1 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT - Bare head left
VESTA SC - Vesta Seated Left, Holding Patera & Sceptre
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-38AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 11.61g / 29mm / 180
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 38
Acquisition/Sale: timeman21 Ebay

ODERINT, DUM METUANT (LET THEM HATE, SO LONG AS THEY FEAR). — CALIGULA

From The Dictionary of Roman Coins:
Caligula, the grand nephew and murderer of Tiberius, most worthy to succeed that emperor, because of an equally infamous, though not so able a tyrant, reigned from A.D. 37 to A.D. 41.

His real appellation was Caius Caesar, but about the time of Augustus' death, he, still a child, being with the army of the lower Rhine, the soldiers, with whom he was a great favorite, were accustomed in the joking parlance of the camp, to give him the nickname of Caligula (from Caligae) because he constantly appeared in the usual military leggings.

Hence Ausonius, in his poem, referring to this cruel wretch, says --

Post hunc castrensis caligae cognomine
Caesar Successit, saevo saevior ingenio.

As emperor, however, he was always called Caius, and he considered himself insulted by the name of Caligula.

He was the youngest son of Germanicus, the nephew of Tiberius and Agrippina; born in 12 A.D. on the day before the calends of September, at Antium, as Suetonius has proved at great length (in Caligula, ch. 8). In 17 A.D., he went into Syria with his father, at whose death, within two years, he returned to Rome with his mother. After she was banished, he was transferred to his great grand-mother Julia and when she diet to his grand-mother Antonia.

In 31 A.D., after the violent deaths of his brothers Nero and Drusus, and also of Sejanus, whose plots he alone had escaped he was he was the apparent successor to the empire and invested with the Pontificate.

In 33 A.D., on the same day he assumed the toga he laid aside his beard, he was nominated questor and Tiberius invited him to Capraea. He moved in with Tiberius, feigning ignorance or indifference, regarding the murder of his relations, as though it did not concern him. He so obsequiously obeyed Tiberius the it was a common expression, that "there never was a better servant, or a worse master." (Sueton, ch. 10)

In 37 A.D., Tiberius was attacked with a severe illness from which he was recovering when Caligula, at the instigation of Maero, the praetorian prefect, put and end to his life by smothering him.

Caligula entered Rome after Tiberius' death and compelled the Senate to join him, by a Senatus Consultum, in depriving Tiberius, son Drusus junior and the elder Tiberius' heir in his last will, of his right to the empire.

The funeral ceremonies of were performed with due pomp by Caligula.

On the eighth month of his reign he was attacked with severe sickness. On his recovery, he adopted his brother Tiberius, gave him the title of Princeps Juventutis, and afterwards put him to death.

In the calends of July he entered upon the office of Consul Suffectus, as colleague to his uncle Claudius, and after two months resigned it.

In 38 A.D. he conceded to Soaemus, the kingdom of Arabians of Ituraea; to Cotys, Armenia Minor; to Polemon, the son of Polemon, his father's dominions.

Dion wrote, "In a short time he assumed so much the air of a king, that all those honors, which Augustus had accepted only when duly arrived at the sovereignty, and even then with hesitation as they were decreed from time to time, and many of which Tiberius altogether declined, were by Caligula grasped in one day, with the exception only of Pater Patriae, which, however was not long deferred."

In 39 A.D., in the calends of January, he entered his second Consulate and resigned the office in thirty days. (Sueton ch. 17)

Having exhausted the treasury by his profuse expenditure on public spectacles and other extravagances, he endeavoured to repair the deficiency by the slaughter of wealthy citizens; and then proceeded to Gaul, their to practice the like system of murder and spoliation.

The name of Germanicus does not appear on coins of this year, nor ever subsequently.

In 40 A.D., Caligula, without a colleague, entered his third consulate, at Lugdunum (Lyon), in Gaul; and resigned it on the ides of January. (Sueton. ch. 17)

Having invited over from Africa, Ptolemy, the son of Juba, he put him to death on the pretence of the young prince's ostentatious bearing. (Dion, B. lix. 25)

Proceeding to the ocean, as if about to invade Britain, he ordered his soldiers to gather shell-fish, and returned as a conqueror, laden with the spoils of the sea. (Sueton. ch. 46)

L. Vitellius, prefect of Syria, the same year, gave such a lesson to Artabanus, the Persian, who was threatening an invasion of Armenia that the later abandoned his design, and paid his adoration to the statues of Augustus and of Caligula. (Dion, I. e.)

In 41 A.D., he began hid fourth consulate, on the 7th of the ides of January. Shortly afterwards (viz. on the 9th of the calends of February), he was assassinated by the conspirators Cassius Chaerea and Cornelius Sabinus.

Caligula's accession to the empire was hailed with joy by the Roman people; but their satisfaction was based on no solid foundations, being the result rather of their deep-rooted attachment to his father Germanicus. He seeming, indeed, responded to the fond wishes of the nation, by many acts of piety, justice, and moderation. But it too soon became apparent that these virtues were not of natural growth but owed their exhibition to the policy of Tiberius, who wished through their influences to consolidate his own power in the empire. For there was not act of cruelty, folly, meanness or infamy, which this monster and madman did not delight in perpetrating. He caused his horse, whom he called Incitatus, to be introduced at dinner time, setting before him gilded corn, and drinking his health in golden cups; and he would have created him consul, had he lived long enough. He imitated all the gods and goddesses, in the adoration which he caused to be paid to him, becoming by turns Jupiter, Bacchus, Hercules, Juno, Diana, and Venus. He constructed a bridge of vessels joined together from Puteoli to Baiae, and crossing over with his troops invaded puteoli and then recrossed it in a kind of triumph, delighting in hearing himself called Alexander the Great. By his absurd and extravagant undertakings of this kind, before the year was fully expired, he had squandered the enormous sums of money left by Tiberius. (Vicies ae septics millies IIS. -- See Sestertium).

He both claimed and receive divine worship, and was the greatest blasphemer that ever lived; yet he quailed in the conviction of a deity, and crept under his bed whenever he heard thunder. With savage inhumanity he attended executions in person, and made parents behold the merciless torments inflicted on their children. He contracted and dissolved marriages with equal caprice and dishonesty. Besides his incestuous union with Drusilla, he seized and repudiated three wives, and was at last permanently attached to Caesonia a mother of children by another man, and without your or beauty, but of depravity corresponding with his own.

Other instances of his incredible cruelty and lust may be found in Suetonius, Philo, and Dion. Such infatuations are evident tokens not only of a brutal nature, but also of a distempered intellect. Nor is it possible to entertain other than supreme contempt for the base servility of the Romans, who could offer solemn adoration to a wretch openly guilty of the most detestable and unnatural crimes; and whose adage was oderint, dum metuant (Let them hate so long as they fear).

The gold and silver coins of Caligula are of considerable rarity. Sestertii are also rare. Ases are more common, yet still expensive due to popularity of collecting the infamous emperor and because they generally exhibit good workmanship. When Caligula was destroyed, the dastardly senators, who had so recently sacrificed to him, ordered all his statues to be demolished, his acts abrogated, his money melted down and his inscriptions defaced, in order that his memory might be extinguished forever. Yet this sentence has not prevented a considerable number of his coins from reaching us, though consequently, except for ases, they are of considerable rarity when in good preservation. The coins of Caligula, minted at Rome, do not exhibit Imperator as a surname. This title is used on colonial coins. The only imperial coin of Caligula bearing IMP is a denarius.

On his coins, Caligula resembles his grandfather, but is less noble and has a malignant expression. He was at great pains to cherish this horrid index of his cruel disposition.
Gary W2
CaraPautal.JPG
Caracalla, AE 28-30, Tetrassaria27 viewsAVT K M AVPH ANTONINOC
Bust cuirassed, draped, left, holding spear and shield decorated with Gorgon's head
OVLPIAC PAVTALI, Ex. AC
Juno standing, holding scepter
Pautalia, Thrace
Ruzicka 539
whitetd49
20171009_121737.jpg
CLAUDIUS II GOTHICUS. 268-270 AD. Antoninianus7 viewsObv. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left
Rev. IVNO R-EGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock standing left at feet.
References: RIC V 212;
19mm, 2.8 grams, brown patina.
Canaan
claudius_com.JPG
Claudius II RIC V-1 Antioch 212 18 viewsAE 19 mm 2.7 grams
OBV :: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG Radiate head left
REV :: IVNO REGINA. Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
EX :: unknown
RIC V ( 1 ) Antioch 212
Johnny
claudiusII com.JPG
Claudius II RIC V-1 Antioch 212 110 viewsAE 20- 21 mm 3.6 grams 268-270 AD
OBV :: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG. Radiated head left
REV :: IVNO REGINA . Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
EX :: NONE
RIC V (1) 212 Antioch
Purchased from e-bay auction 09/2007
5 commentsJohnny
2-2014-11-14_coinsnov2014.JPG
Claudius II, Juno19 viewsAntoninianus; 19.5-21mm; 3.46g

IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
Radiate draped bust right

IVNO REGINA
Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet
B in exergue

RIC 212; Cohen 133; Sear 5-11343
1 commentsRobin Ayers
IUNO_REGINA.JPG
Claudius II- IVNO REGINA12 viewsAE-Antoninian 270 n. Chr. Antiochia; Vs.:Drapierte Büste r. mit Strahlenbinde.

Rs.:Juno steht v. v., Kopf l. mit Patera und Zepter, davor Pfau. 3,98 gr - 20 mm

RIC 212; C. 134.


SkySoldier
Cn__Blasio_C__F.JPG
Cn Blasio C F AR Denarius Cr 296/1, Mars25 viewsOBV: Mars (or Scipio Afriancus), helmeted, r., CN. BLASIO CN.F. before, palm behind
REV: Juno, Jupiter being crowned by Minerva; monogram in field, ROMA in ex.
18mm

Minted at Rome, 112-111 BC
Legatus
Cornelia_19.JPG
Cnaeus Cornelius Blasio Cn.f104 viewsObv: Head of Mars (sometimes referenced as Scipio Africanus) facing right, wearing a crested Corinthian helmet, XVI in monogram above, CN BLASIO CN F before, caduceus behind.

Rev: The Capitoline Triad: Jupiter holding a scepter and a thunderbolt standing facing between Juno on the left and Minerva on the right, the latter crowns Jupiter with a laurel wreath, ROMA in exergue.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 112 - 111 BC

4 grams, 19 mm, 270°

RSC Cornelia 19, S173
1 commentsSPQR Coins
CommJunSos.JPG
Commodus, Sestertius, Rome, 177 AD37 viewsLAVREL COMMODVS AVG GERM SARM
Laureate, draped, cuirassed, right
IVNONI SOSPITAE TRP II IMP II COS PP / SC
Juno Sospita with spear and shield advancing right, snake before
RIC 1583, RCV 5762, BMC 1669
25.8 g
Last appearance of Juno Sospita on Rome coinage. Commodus was born in Lanuvium, the site of a major temple and cult image of the goddess.
whitetd49
CNGBlasio.jpg
Cr 296/1d AR Denarius Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 29 viewso: Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind
r: Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, crowned by Juno on left and Minerva on right
Cn. Blasio Cn.f. 112-111 BC. AR Denarius (17mm, 3.86 g, 6h). Rome mint. Helmeted male head (Mars or Scipio Africanus?) right; [mark of value] above, prow stem behind / Jupiter standing facing, holding scepter and thunderbolt, between Juno on left and Minerva on right, crowning Jupiter with wreath; Π between Jupiter and Minerva. Crawford 296/1d; Sydenham 561b; Cornelia 19.
2 commentsPMah
426G390Procilia.png
Cr 379/2 AR Denarius L. Procilius 5 views80 BCE
o: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; SC behind
r: Juno Sospita in biga right, hurling spear and holding shield; serpent below, L PROCILI F in ex.
Crawford 379/2; RSC Procilia 2
Serrate Denarius
3.92g. (8h).
PMah
Roma495.jpg
Cr 412/1 AR Denarius Serratus L. Roscius Fabatus 25 viewsRome, 64 BCE
o: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress; pileus of the Dioscuri surmounted by star behind, L•ROSCI below
r: Female standing right facing serpent; [control mark in left field], FABATI in ex
Crawford 412/1; Roscia 3
(3.82g, 19mm, 4h) bankers marks
I should add that I am rather fond or appreciative of bankers' marks. They show the extremely practical nature of any ancient transaction. Imagine if even a small portion of our transactions had to undergo human scrutiny at the level of negating the value of the transaction for every participant, plus the prior and succeeding transactions!
1 commentsPMah
Republik_5.jpg
Cr. 296/1, Republic, 112 BC, Cn. Cornelius Blasio26 viewsCn. Cornelius Blasio
Denar, Rome, 112 BC
Obv.: [CN. BLASIO] CN. F., helmeted head of Mars (Scipio Africanus??) right, star above
Rev.: ROMA, Jupiter, scepter in left, thunderbolt in right, between Juno and Minerva
Ag, 3.82g, 17mm
Ref.: Albert 1084, Sear 173, Crawford 296/1
Ex Lanz Numismatik
shanxi
10137v.jpg
Crawford 412/1, Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, Denarius serratus135 viewsRoman Republic (Rome mint 64 BC.), L. Roscius Fabatus.
AR Denarius (3.82 g, 18-19 mm).
Obv.: L.ROSCI , below head of Juno Sospita to right, wearing goat skin headdress; behind symbol: fountain basin.
Rev.: FABATI (in ex.), maiden standing right, feeding snake coiled erect before her; to left, well-head.
Crawford 412/1 (Symbol pair 102) ; Sydenham 915 ; Babelon Roscia 3 .

Juno Sospita was one of the names of the goddess Juno, emphasizing her role as protector of women, marriage, and childbirth ('Sospita' = 'she who saves'). The cult of Juno Sospita (or 'Sispes') was important in Lanuvium. She wore a goat-skin headdress and carried a spear and a shield.
At Lanuvium, Juno Sospita had a temple which was guarded by a serpent. Every year a maiden would offer cakes to the serpent. If it accepted, this was a sign that the girl was a virgin. Its refusal was an evil omen and a year of sterility was to be feared.
L.Roscius Fabatus was born at Lanuvium and was a "new man" (the first to ennoble his family by entering the Senate). In 55, he held the tribuneship. Roscius was co-author of a measure to further Caesar's plans for agrarian and municipal reform. He was a Caesarian legate in Gaul after 54, where he commanded the 13th legion. In 49, he held the praetorship and was involved as a messenger in the events of that year, which led to the fatal rupture between Caesar and Pompey. In one of his letters, Cicero reported Roscius was killed at the Forum Gallorum in 43 during the war of Mutina.
The coins of this moneyer are the last to exhibit edge serrations as a regular practice. He also utilized a large number of paired die control symbols, one for each side, which represented almost 250 everyday objects. In this, he appears to have taken an earlier moneyer, L.Papius, c. 78, as a model. Curiously, the moneyer's name on the coin is in the genitive, " . . . of Roscius Fabatus", perhaps implying "coinage of Roscius Fabatus."

my ancient coin database
8 commentsArminius
criju.jpg
Crispina (178-182 A.D.)82 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA,Draped bust right.
R: IVNO, Juno standing facing, head left, holding scepter and patera; to left, peacock standing left.
2.7g
19mm
Rome
RIC 283 (Commodus),RSC 021
2 commentsMat
crispina.jpg
Crispina (Augusta)48 viewsCrispina (Augusta)
AE As/Dupondius 14.28g
Ob: CRISPINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right, hair tied in bun on back of head
Rv: IVNO LVCINA - S-C across field, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter
Mint: Rome (177 AD)
Ref: RIC II 680 (Commodus); Cohen 24, Sear #5 6018; BMC 433 (Commodus)
Scotvs Capitis
00384.jpg
Crispina (RIC 680, Coin #384)13 viewsRIC 680, AE AS, Rome, 180-182 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA Draped bust right. Hair waved, rolled in front and knotted in bun on back of head.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C Juno standing left with patera and scepter.
Size: 24.6mm 8.46gm
MaynardGee
424_Crispina.JPG
Crispina - AE as or dupondius6 viewsRome
180-182 AD
draped bust right
CRISPINA__AVGVSTA
Juno standing left holding scepter and patera
IVNO LV_CINA
S C
RIC III 680, Cohen 24, BMCRE IV 433, SRCV II 6018
12,92g
Johny SYSEL
Crispina_AR_Denarius.jpg
Crispina AR Denarius (peacock)39 viewsCRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet. RSC 21, RIC 283, BMC 41 _110451 commentsAntonivs Protti
Crispina_RIC_680.JPG
Crispina, RIC 68032 viewsCRISPINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right
IVNO LVCINA
Juno standing left, holding a patera and scepter, SC in fields to sides
AE as, 25mm, 9.73g
novacystis
1 commentsnovacystis
CRISPINA-3.JPG
Crispina, wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.214 viewsÆ As or Dupondius (25mm), Rome mint, 180-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing l., holding patera and scepter.
RIC-680, Sear-6018, BMC-433, Cohen-24.
EmpressCollector
Crispa IVNO.jpg
Crispina- IVNO LVCINA61 viewsCrispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 -182 A.D.

Obverse:

CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair knotted in a bun in back

CRISPINA AVGVSTA

CRISPINA: Crispina
AVGVSTA: Augusta

Reverse:

IVNO LVCINA S C,

IVNO: Juno, goddess
LVCINA: Light
S C: Senatus Consulto


IVNO LVCINA (Goddess of light) S C, Juno standing left, holding patera (a bowl used to pour libations) and scepter

Domination:Middlle Bronze, Orichalcum Sstertius/ Dupondius, 25 mm

Mint: Rom
John Schou
Faustina_II_59.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 688 - Faustina II, Juno standing35 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bust right
Rev.: IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, patera in right, long scepter in left, peacock at feet
Ag, 3.45g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III (Marcus Aurelius) 688, CRE 190 [S]

I have two other versions of this type in my gallery:

bust with band of pearls:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-109802

different hairstyle:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144040
3 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_70.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 688 - Faustina II, Juno standing10 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bust right, without band of pearls
Rev.: IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, patera in right, long scepter in left, peacock at feet
Ag, 2.83g, 18.3mm
Ref.: RIC III (Marcus Aurelius) 688, CRE -

I have two other versions of this type in my gallery:

bust with band of pearls:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-109802

different hairstyle:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-137130
shanxi
Faustina_II_6.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.269, 688 var. - Faustina II, Juno standing40 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denarius
Augusta AD 146 - winter 175/176
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, pearl diademed bust right
Rev.: IVNO, Juno, veiled, standing left, patera in right, long scepter in left, peacock at feet
Ag, 3.26g, 16.9x19.4mm
Ref.: RIC III (Marcus Aurelius) 688 var. (hair waved with with band of pearls), CRE 188 [C]


I have two other versions of this type in my gallery:

bust without band of pearls:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-144040

bust without band of pearls, different hairstyle:
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-137130
shanxi
Faustina_II_R684_fac.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 695 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE4 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed bust right
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.30g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 695, CRE 193 [S]
shanxi
Faustina_II_25~0.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 696 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE 34 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right with circlet of pearls
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.12g, 17.3mm
Ref.: RIC III 696, CRE 192 [C]
shanxi
Faustina_II_72.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 696 var. - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE27 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair bound with a braided band
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.22g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 696 var., CRE 192 var. (hair bound with a braided band instead of pearls)
2 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_R677_fac.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 697 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE10 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, IVNONI REGINAE, Juno seated left on throne, holding patera and sceptre; to left, peacock standing left.
Ag, 3.34 g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 697, CRE 185
2 commentsshanxi
Faustina_II_23.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 698 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE 33 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right, indusium (silk chemise) visible.
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, seated left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.38g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 698, CRE 186 [C]
shanxi
Faustina_II_19.jpg
Denar, RIC 3, p.270, 698 - Faustina II, Juno, IVNONI REGINAE20 viewsFaustina Minor
AR-Denar, Rome
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right
Rev.: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, seated left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, a peacock.
Ag, 3.55g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 698, CRE-I 186 [C]
shanxi
faustina___riikinkukko.jpg
Denarius; IVNO, Juno & peacock, RIC 68817 viewsFaustina Jr. AD 145-175 Silver Denarius, 2.81g Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right Rev: IVNO - Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; at feet left, a peacock. Rome mint: AD 161-175 = RIC III, 688, page 269 - Cohen 120 – SEAR RCV II 5255kaitsuburi
faustina_sr_.jpg
Diva Faustina I Denarius34 viewsDIVA FAUSTINA SR, wife of Antoninus Pius. Died 141 AD. AR Denarius (16mm, 3.1 gm).
Obverse: DIVA FAVSTINA, Draped bust right.
Reverse: ATERNITAS, Aeternitas or Juno standing front, head left, raising hand and holding sceptre. RIC III 344; RSC 26.
NORMAN K
new_faustina.jpg
DIVA FAVSTINA 31 viewsAE Sestertius 32mm 29.65gms
Obv - draped bust right
Rev - Aeternitas or Juno standing facing, head left, raising right hand and holding sceptre
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 1102 after 146AD
Rome mint
aragon6
FSr6.jpg
DIVA FAVSTINA55 viewsAE As 24mm after 141AD
Obv - DIVA FAVSTINA - draped bust right
Rev - AETERNITAS S-C - Juno standing left with raised right hand and sceptre in left
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 1155
Mint - Rome
aragon6
FSr14.jpg
DIVA FAVSTINA34 viewsOR Sest 25mm after 141AD
Obv - DIVA FAVSTINA - draped bust right
Rev - IVNO S-C - Juno standing left with patera in right hand and staff in left
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 1143
Mint - Rome
aragon6
DOMITIAN_-_SESTERTIU.jpg
Domitian (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius 0 viewsIMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XIIII CENS PER P P - Laureate head right
IOVI VICTORI, S C - Jupiter seated left holding Victory and sceptre
Exergue:


Mint: Rome (88-89AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 22.10g / 33mm / 360
References:
RIC 633
Cohen 313
BMC 406
Acquisition/Sale: budgies-beak Ebay $0.00 8/17

Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
Gary W2
Domitan_Æ_AS_-_Jupit.jpg
Domitian (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As 1 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI - Laureate bust right, wearing aegis
IOVI - CONSERVAT, S - C - Jupiter standing left, holding thunderbolt and sceptre
Exergue:


Mint: Rome (85AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 8.84g / 26.94mm / 180
Rarity: R2-Rare
References:
RIC II 302 Rome
BMCRE 313A
Paris 336
Provenances:
Marc Breitsprecher
Acquisition/Sale: Marc R. Breitsprecher Internet $0.00 01/18
Notes: Jan 5, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Domitian, 13 September 81 - 18 September 96 A.D.
Flavius Domitianus was an effective emperor who spent much of his time in the provinces preserving order. Despite his effectiveness, he was extremely unpopular with the senatorial class at Rome. He appointed persons from the lower classes to positions of authority. Domitian's reign was marred by paranoia and cruelty in his latter years and he executed many Senators. When asked to prohibit execution of senators without a trial by peers he declined, thus dispelling the old illusions of republican government and exposing the true autocracy of his rule. In 96 A.D., he was stabbed to death in a plot, allegedly involving his own wife.

Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and god of the sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is, therefore, the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
Gary W2
domit.jpg
Domitian Denarius - Rev: Temple78 viewsDOMITIAN, 81-96 Silver Denarius.
Obv: DOMITIANVS AVG GERM, Bare head of Domitian right.
Rev: Frontal view of hexastyle temple on base with four steps; within is a statue of Jupiter, seated, flanked by statues of Juno and Minerva (= the Capitoline triad); on the central part of the pediment is a seated figure holding spear, with two additional figures on either side; on the apex of the roof is a facing quadriga with figures on either side; an eagle stands at each of the upper corners; IMP CAESAR is inscribed on the architrave.
RIC II².1 815; RIC II 207; BMC 242.
4 commentsOldMoney
Domitian_Moneta.JPG
Domitian Moneta19 viewsDomitian, 81-96 AD, Bronze AE As, RIC 493, 28mm, 9.6g
Struck 86 AD.
OBV: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM COS XII CENS PER P P, laureate bust right
REV: MONETA AVGVSTI S-C, Moneta standing left, holding scales and cornucopiae

The reverse of this coin commemorates the establishment of a new mint to replace the one that had been in the temple of Juno Moneta in AD 84.
Romanorvm
D841.JPG
Domitian RIC-841150 viewsAR Cistophorus, 9.81g
Rome mint (for Asia), 82 AD
RIC 841 (C). BMC 251. RSC 23. RPC 864 (8 spec.).
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
Acquired from Tom Cederlind, February 2013.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. It being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. Domitian completed the structure the following year and it was said no expense was spared. The building Domitian dedicated was a lavish structure, magnificent in appearance featuring Pentelic marble, gold plated doors, and a roof of gilded bronze.

This cistophorus minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor commemorates the new Temple of Jupiter Domitian bestowed on Rome. Curiously, although the building featured six columns, only four are seen here. Statues of the deities Juno, Jupiter (seated) and Minverva can be seen between the columns.

A most wonderful coin in hand.
8 commentsDavid Atherton
Domias01-2.jpg
Domitian, RIC 493, As of AD 86 (Moneta)13 viewsÆ As ((10.2g, Ø 26-28mm, 6hh), Rome, AD 86
Obv.: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM.COS XII CENS PER P P, laureate head right, aegis
Rev.: MONETA AVGVSTI (around) S C (field), Moneta standing left, holding scales right and cornucopiae left.
RIC II,1:493; Cohen 327; Foss(Roman Historical Coins) 92/25

According to Foss, this type was issued on the occasion of the establishment of a new site near the Colosseum for the Roman mint in 84, to replace that in the temple of Juno Moneta which was destroyed by fire shortly before; it is the first appearance of Moneta Augusti.
Charles S
EB0352_scaled.JPG
EB0352 Juno Sospita / L THORIVS BALBVS, Bull15 viewsL. Thorius Balbus, Denarius. 105 BC.
Obv: ISMR abbreviated legend behind head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress.
Rev: Bull charging right; L THORIVS BALBVS legend in two lines in exergue, control letter V above.
References: Crawford 316/1; Syd. 598; Thoria 1; Sear 192.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 3.929 grams.
EB
EB0445_scaled.JPG
EB0445 Faustina I / Juno11 viewsFaustina I, AE Sestertius, 141 AD.
Obv: DIVA FAVSTINA, diademed & draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO S-C, Juno standing left, holding patera & long scepter.
References: RIC 1143.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 25.64 grams.
EB
EB0456_scaled.JPG
EB0456 Faustina II / Juno7 viewsFaustina II, AE As, 161-176 AD.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Bust of Faustina the Younger, draped, hair elaborately waved and fastened in a low chignon, right.
Rev: IVNO S-C, Juno, draped, standing left, holding patera in extended right hand and sceptre in left hand; at left, peacock.
References: RIC III Marcus Aurelius 1647.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 12.897 grams.
EB
EB0472_scaled.JPG
EB0472 Crispina / Juno10 viewsCrispina, AR Denarius, 178-182 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet.
References: RIC III Commodus 283, RSC 21, BMC 41.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 2.244 grams.
EB
EB0474_scaled.JPG
EB0474 Crispina / Juno Lucina11 viewsCrispina, AE As, 178-191 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO LVCINA, S-C across field, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter.
References: RIC III Commodus 680; Cohen 24; BMC 433.
Diameter: 24mm, Weight: 12.931 grams.
EB
EB0501_scaled.JPG
EB0501 Julia Maesa / Juno7 viewsJulia Maesa, AR Denarius, 218-222 AD.
Obv: IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
References: RIC IV 254, RSC 16, BMC 67.
Diameter: 19mm, Weight: 2.888 grams.
EB
EB0507_scaled.JPG
EB0507 Julia Mamaea / Juno9 viewsJulia Mamaea, AE Sestertius, 231 AD.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO AVGVSTAE, SC below, Juno seated left, holding a flower & a baby in swaddling clothes.
References: RIC IV 683, Cohen 33, BMC 759.
Diameter: 31mm, Weight: 21.46 grams.
EB
EB0905_scaled.JPG
EB0905 Juno Sospita / Biga4 viewsL Procilius Serrate Denarius, 80 BC.
Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita right, SC behind.
Reverse: Juno Sospita in biga right, holding shield & hurling spear, snake below, L PROCILI F in ex.
References: Syd. 772, Cr379/2.
Diameter: 20mm, Weight: 3.94g.
EB
TitusSeatWeb.jpg
FAKE Titus pulvinar series FAKE93 viewsTitus. AD 79-81. Denarius 19mm 3.58g. Rome mint. Struck January-June AD 80.
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate, bearded. Head right
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, pulvinar (throne) of Jupiter and Juno: square seat, draped, surmounted by horizontal winged thunderbolt. RIC II 119; RSC 316; BMC 51
1 commentsNemonater
Faustina-sen_AR-Den_DIVA-FAV_STINA__AVG_V_STA_RIC-000_C-000_Q-001_18mm_3,06g-s~0.jpg
Faustina (I) Senior (100-141) AR denarius, AVGVSTA,175 viewsFaustina (I) Senior AR denarius
Wife of Antoninus Pius.
avers:- DIVA-FAV_STINA, Draped bust right.
revers:- AVG_V_STA, Juno standing left, holding torch and scepter. 141 (Rome).
date: 141 AD.
mint: Rome
diameter: 16-17mm
weight: 3,11g
ref: RIC-356 (Antoninus Pius) , C-96
Q-001
quadrans
divafaustina.jpg
Faustina I14 viewsAE Dupondius (138-140 CE)

Obverse: FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII PP ??????
Bust right, hair waved in several loops around head and coiled on top. ??????

Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, S-C ??????
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at foot ??????

Weight: 9,8g
Length: 25mm
Pericles J2
faustina_I_04.jpg
Faustina I AR Denarius16 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA - Bust draped right.
Rev: AETERNITAS - Juno standing right, head left, veiled, raising right hand and holding sceptre in left.
Mint: Rome
Date: After 141 AD
Ref: BMCRE 345, Cohen 26, RIC 344
oa
Faustina-1.jpg
Faustina I As48 viewsAE As

Obv: FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII P P ; Dr. bust r.
Rev: IVNONI - REGINAE/ S|C ; Juno stg. l., a peacock at her feet

C.217 (2f.) - RIC.1090 - BMC/RE.1128
R2
1 commentsTanit
Faustina I denarius, 148-161, Rome.jpg
Faustina I denarius, 148-161 AD, Rome71 viewsFaustina Sr.
AR denarius – 19mm, 2.71g
Rome, 148-161 AD
draped bust r.
DIVA FAVSTINA
Juno standing l., holding scepter, r. hand raised
AETERNITAS
RIC 344, C 26
1 commentsArdatirion
Faustina 3 D.jpg
Faustina I Sestertius27 viewsAE Sestertius. Obv.: DIVA AUSTINA ; dr. bust r. ; Rev.: IVNO SC ; Juno stg. l. holding patera and specter
(RIC 1143)
Tanit
00faustinaII.jpg
FAUSTINA II31 viewsAR denarius. 161-175 AD. Diademed and draped bust right. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA. / Juno seated left,holding patera and sceptre,peacock at feet. IVNONI REGINAE.
RIC 698 (M.Aurelius). RSC 145.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
2 commentsbenito
00faustIIJuno.jpg
FAUSTINA II75 viewsAR denarius. 161-175 AD. Diademed and draped bust right. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA. / Juno seated left,holding patera and sceptre,peacock at feet. IVNONI REGINAE. RIC 698 (M.Aurelius). RSC 145.
Ex Barry P. Murphy.
2 commentsbenito
IMG_3386.JPG
Faustina II21 viewsFaustina II, wife of Marcus Aurelius, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, Faustina to right, rocking her sweet, characteristic bun. I V N O, around Juno seated.RIC III 674 (Aurelius); MIR 18, 7-4a; BMCRE 87 (Aurelius); RSC 85. 1 commentsMolinari
00388.jpg
Faustina II (RIC 688, Coin #388)15 viewsRIC 688 (C), AR Denarius, Rome, 179 AD.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA Pearl diademed draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO Juno, veiled, standing left, patera in right, long scepter vertical in left, peacock at feet left.
Size: 19.2mm 3.14gm
MaynardGee
Faustina_Juno_1a.jpg
Faustina II * Juno, 130-176 AD. AR Denarius.58 viewsFaustina II * Juno, Silver Denarius.

Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA * Draped bust, right-facing
Rev: IV NO * Juno standing left, holding patera in right hand, arm oustretched, and sceptre in left hand; peacock at feet to her left and also left-facing.

Exergue: (Blank)

Mint: Rome
Struck: 161-176 AD. (Based on the Lanz coin, of later coiffure style).

Size: 18 mm.
Weight: 3.16 grams
Die axis: 180°

Condition: On the whole, very lovely silver, clear, sharp and bright luster overall. While there is some light wear on the reverse, the coin looks better in hand than this image shows; the patera is still quite visible, etc. The wear to the peacock has unfortunately left him rather decapitated. Similar wear has somewhat defaced Juno's left arm and her scepter.

Refs:*
RIC 688.
C. 120.
BMC 104.
MIR 17-4/c.

Tiathena
Faustina_II_sestertius.jpg
Faustina II - AE sestertius3 viewsRome
161-164 AD
diademed and draped bust right
FAVSTINA__AVGVSTA
Juno standing left, holding patera and long scepter, peacock left at her feet
IVNONI__REGINAE
S__C
RIC III MA1651, Cohen III 142
Johny SYSEL
normal_Faustina_II_IVNO~0.jpg
Faustina II denarius361 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped and diad. bust right

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno seated holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet

Rome 161-175 AD


Sear 5257
RIC 698
RSC 145

3.1g

A more mature Faustina

Ex-CNG catalog May 22, 2002 part of Lot 1711
From the Jurgen K. Schmidt collection
https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=102656
4 commentsJay GT4
Faustina fouree.jpg
Faustina II fourree14 viewsFaustina Jr Fourree
The obverse legend on the right side of the bust says FAUVSTIN?, which is consistent with a DIVA FAUVSTINA issue, the reverse appears to be AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, hand raised, holding scepter.
Tanit
FaustinaIIdenierIVNONI.jpg
Faustina II IVNONI REGINAE61 viewsFAUSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

R/ IVNONI REGINAE
Juno standing left holding patera in outstretched right hand and long sceptre in left hand; peacock at her feet.

Denarius struck 161 - 175 in Rom
Cohen 139 - RIC.696

FAUSTINA JUNIOR, daughter of Antoninus Pius and wife of Marcus Aurelius. Augusta 147-175 AD
1 commentsgb29400
Faustina_II_Juno_RIC_1651~0.JPG
Faustina II Juno RIC 165124 viewsFaustina Junior, Orichalcum Sestertius, Rome, Augusta 146 - winter 175/176 AD, 22.966g, 32.3mm, RIC III 1651, Cohen 142
OBV: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right
REV: IVNO REGINA S C, Juno standing left, patera in right,
long scepter vertical behind in left, peacock at feet left

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
Romanorvm
fauii.jpg
Faustina II RIC 140314 viewsFaustina Junior AE Dupondius
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno veiled, standing left holding patera & scepter. Peacock at feet. S C in field
25.3 mm diam., 10.9 g
NORMAN K
Faustina II IVNONI REGINAE RIC 697.jpg
Faustina II RIC 697118 viewsDenarius, 18mm, 2.60g.

Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, bareheaded and draped bust R.

Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing L with patera and sceptre, peacock at feet.

RIC 697, Common
Robert_Brenchley
faustinajrpan.jpg
Faustina II Wife of Marcus Aurelius, 147 to 175 AD Rome mint.41 viewsOrichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1646, Sear RCV 5276, weight 21g, max. diameter 28.9 mm, Rome mint 161-175 AD; Obv. FAVSTINA AVGSTA, diademed and draped bust right; Rev. IVNO SC, Juno stg. left holding patera and scepter, peacock left at feet. Dark olive patina, large corrosion pit on shoulder on Obv. 3 commentsSteve E
faustina_juno.jpg
Faustina II, AD 161-1756 viewsAR denarius, 3.3g, 17mm, 6h; Rome mint.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA; diademed, draped bust right.
Rev.: IVNONI RE-GINAE; Juno seated left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet.
Reference: RIC III Faustina Junior 698, p. 270
Notes: ex-Stacks, Public Auction Sale, June 14-15, 1971, No. 659. Sold to RZaj, 10/19/15.
John Anthony
FaustinaII1.jpg
Faustina Jr Denarius22 viewsFaustina II Denarius.
Obv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed draped bust right
Rev: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno seated left, holding patera & scepter; at feet a peacock.

RIC 697
Tanit
006-faustina.jpg
Faustina Jr Dupondius44 viewsAE Dupondius. Obv.:FAUSTINA AVGVSTA ; fr. bust r. ; Rev.: IVNO SC ; Juno stg. l., a peacock at her feet.Tanit
FaustinaJr.jpg
Faustina Jr Sestertius13 viewsFaustina Jr Æ Sestertius.
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right wearing circlet of pearls / IVNONI REGINAE S-C, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera & scepter; peacock standing left at feet, head reverted.

RIC 1651 - Cohen 142.
Tanit
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-mUwOOzkQCgR-Faustina_II_denarius.jpg
Faustina Jr. (Augusta) Coin: Wife of Marcus Aurelius- Silver Denarius 2 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right, wearing diadem.
IVNONI REGINAE - Juno standing left, holding a patera & scepter, peacock before.
Mint: Rome (139-141AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.53g / 16mm / 180
References:
RIC 695
RSC 140
Acquisition/Sale: world-coin Ebay $0.00 12/17
Notes: Jan 5, 19 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

A scarce lifetime issue.
Gary W2
Faustina_II_RIC1645.jpg
Faustina Jr. - Sestertius - RIC 164511 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO S-C, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet left
Size: 30 mm
Weight: 21,15 g
Ref: RIC III 1645 (Marcus Aurelius); Sear 5276 var (bust type)
vs1969
P1017559.JPG
Faustina Jr. Dupondius. AE22-24mm, 11,6 g. 161-180 AD11 viewsFaustina Jr. Dupondius. AE22-24mm, 11,6 g. 161-180 AD
Obv. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev. IVNO S-C, Juno standing left, peacock at her feet left.
Ref. BMC 983
Lee S
Faustina_Junior_RIC_1649.jpg
Faustina Junior23 viewsAE Sestertius ( 31mm - 22.2g)
obv. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust of Faustina Junior facing right
rev. IVNONI LVCINAE S C (in field)
Faustina as Juno, standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her
RIC (Aurelius) 1649; Sear 2000 (RCV) 5277
HolgerG
faust1.jpg
Faustina Junior Sestertius6 viewsFaustina II (wife of M. Aurelius) Æ Sestertius. Rome, AD 162.

Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, diademed and draped bust right
Rev.: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet; S-C across fields.

RIC 1646.
1 commentsTanit
FAUSTINAJR5C.png
FAUSTINA JUNIOR, AE SESTERTIUS, ROME 161-164 CE15 viewsFaustina Junior Sestertius, struck under Marcus Aurelius
Obverse: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, S C across lower field, Juno standing left, holding patera in right hand and scepter in left; at feet to left peacock.
RIC III 1645, Sear 5276
29.4 mm, 22.4g, Rome mint
NORMAN K
collage14.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno59 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; at her feet a peacock

AR Denarius;17 mm, 3.41g
RIC 696, RSC 139a
arizonarobin
faustina783.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno52 viewsFAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right wearing stephane

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno seated left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, peacock left, looking right

RIC 697
arizonarobin
2013-01-020~0.jpg
Faustina Junior, Juno51 viewsAr Denarius

FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
draped bust right

IVNO
Juno seated left holding patera and staff, peacock at her feet

RIC 689
1 commentsRobin Ayers
Favjse13-2.jpg
Faustina Junior, RIC (M. Aurelius) 1649, Sestertius of AD 161 (Emperor's growing family)53 viewsÆ Sestertius (23.38g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 161.
Obv.: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Fautina Junior facing right.
Rev.: IVNONI LVCINAE (around) S C (in field), Faustina as Juno, standing left, holding a child in her arms, two more standing left and right of her raising their right hands.
RIC (Aurelius) 1649; Sear 2000 (RCV) 5277
ex Byzantine Coin Store (via VCoins)

This type refers to the growing family of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Jr. The three girls represent the three surviving children (of a total of 7 born) around end of 159 to early 160: Annia Galeria Aurelia Faustina (age 14), Lucilla (12) and Fadilla (1).
Charles S
faustina_mater_353.jpg
Faustina Mater RIC III, 35384 viewsFaustina Mater, died 141, wife of Antoninus Pius
AR - Denar, 3.63g, 18.8mm
Rome 141 - 161 (struck after her death under Antoninus Pius)
obv. DIVA FAV - STINA
draped bust r., typical pearled hair-do
rev. AETER - NITAS
draped throne with sceptre leaning on it, peacock before
RIC III, 353; C.61
nice EF
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Peacock, the bird of Juno, here as symbol of divination
Jochen
Faustina_Senior.jpg
Faustina Senior - RIC-344 (Pius)43 viewsWife of Antoninus Pius - AR denarius (17mm, 3.48g). Rome mint. Struck after her death in AD 141. DIVA FAVSTINA . Draped bust right / AETERNITAS. Aeternitas (or Juno) standing left, extending hand and holding sceptre. Ex ANS. Ex Lhotka. RSC 26; Sear 4574; BMCRE 345; RIC III 344 (Pius)Bud Stewart
faustina_senior.jpg
Faustina Senior Sestertius24 viewsOBV: DIVA FAVSTINA
diademed & draped bust right
REV: IVNO S-C, Juno standing left
holding patera & long scepter
32mm, 20.24g
RIC 1143, Cohen 210, BMC 1531
miffy
faustina090608a.jpg
Faustina Senior, Juno34 viewsAR Denarius
3.26g;16-17mm

DIVA FAVSTINA
Draped bust right

AVGVSTA
Juno veiled, seated right, holding scepter

RIC III 363; RSC II 120, BMC 428; Sear 4585
arizonarobin
faustina.jpg
Faustina Sr AE Sestertius30 viewsOBV: Draped bust facing right, DIVA FAVSTINA
REV: Juno holding patera and scepter; IVNO, S-C
RIC 1145, 20.25 grams
A classic Roman profile
daverino
Faustina_4.jpg
FAUSTINA Sr AR Denarius1 viewsOBVERSE: DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right
REVERSE: AETERNITAS, Juno standing left, hand raised, holding scepter
Struck at Rome, 141 AD
2.9g, 17mm
RIC 344
Legatus
FavsSe05-2.jpg
Faustina Sr, RIC (A. Pius) 1143, sestertius of AD 147-161 16 viewsÆ Sestertius (25.5g, Ø32mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 141-161 (under Antoninus Pius).
Obv.: DIVA - FAVSTINA, Draped bust of Diva Faustina senior right with hair waved, adorned with pearls and curled on top.
Rev.: IVNO around, S C across field, Juno standing left right holding patera left long sceptre.
RIC (Antoninus Pius) 1143; Cohen 210; Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4629.
Charles S
Faustina_I_RIC1143.jpg
Faustina Sr. - Sestertius - RIC 114322 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA. Draped bust right
Rev: IVNO S - C. Juno standing left holding patera and scepter
Size: 30 mm
Weight: 23,7 gr
Date: 141-161 AD
Ref: RIC III 1143 (Antoninus Pius), Cohen 210
Provenance: Collection of Karl Pollak, note: "Acquired from Rich. Ramisch on 24.09.1946 for 30 schillings"
1 commentsvs1969
FAUSTINA SR.jpg
Faustina Sr., Augusta 25 February 138 - early 141, wife of Antoninus Pius41 viewsSilver denarius, RIC 344, Cohen 25, BMC 344, aEF, 3.369g, 19.3mm, 180o, Rome mint, posthumous, 141 - 161 A.D.; obverse DIVA FAVSTINA, draped bust right; reverse AETERNITAS, Juno raising hand and holding scepter1 commentsMarjan E
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Faustina Sr., RIC III-338 Rome12 viewsWife of Antoninus Pius
AR Denarius
Rome mint, 139-141 A.D.
19mm, 3.00g
RIC III-338, RSCv.2-215

Obverse:
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Bare-headed and draped bust right, hair waved and coiled on top of head.

Reverse:
IVNONI REGINAE
Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and sceptre: at feet, left, peacock.
rubadub
FSr3.jpg
FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII PP - lifetime issue 95 viewsAE As 25mm 138-141AD
Obv - FAVSTINA AVG ANTONINI AVG PII PP - draped bust right
Rev - IVNONI REGINAE S-C -Juno standing left with patera and sceptre, with peacock to left
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 1090
Mint - Rome
1 commentsaragon6
FSr2.jpg
FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - lifetime issue79 viewsAR 17mm 139-141AD
Obv - FAVSTINA AVGVSTA - draped bust right
Rev - IVNONI REGINAE - Juno standing left with patera and sceptre, peacock left
Reference - RIC III (Antoninus Pius) 338
Mint - Rome
aragon6
griffin.JPG
Gryphon27 viewsPapia Denarius AR circa 79 BC
Head of Juno Sospita r., wearing goat's skin.
Gryphon prancing r.

Craw 384.1
Ghengis_Jon
GUATEMALA_1_PESO_1894.jpg
GUATEMALA55 viewsGUATEMALA - 1 Peso, 1894, AR. Obv.: Liberty seated at stela inscribed 30 DE JUNO DE 1821, chains at base; she is holding cornucopia and scaled; REPUBLICA DE GUATEMALA around; UN PESO/A below. Rev.: Quetzal bird over scroll, crossed arms, in wreath; 0.900 1894 below. Reference: KM-210.1 commentsdpaul7
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Herennia Etruscilla, Antoninianus18 viewsHER ETRVSCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, on a crescent
IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacok at feet
3,63 gr
Cohen # 14, RCV # 9493
Potator II
herennia2.jpg
Herennia Etruscilla, Juno5 viewsHerennia Etruscilla
AR Antoninianus

HER ETRVSCILLA AVG,
diademed draped bust right on crescent

IVNO REGINA,
Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock her foot

RIC 57, RSC 14.
Robin Ayers
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Italy, Herculaneum, College of the Augustales22 viewsThe side walls of the sacellum in the College of the Augustales are painted with doors either side of a central porch which opens onto architectural elements on a white ground. Above the doors and porch are further windows containing bronze chariots driven by winged victories, placed on pedestals. The central fresco on the left wall is of Hercules standing next to Juno and Minerva

From my visit to Herculaneum in August 2015
maridvnvm
5988965.jpg
Italy, Sicily, Agrigento - Temple of Juno308 viewsbuilt in the 5. century BC and burnt in 406 BC by the Carthaginians
used for the celebration of weddings
Johny SYSEL
Agrigent_BW_2012-10-07_12-24-45.jpg
Italy, Sicily, Agrigento - Temple of Juno Lacinia106 viewsThis temple was constructed on a mostly artificial spur. It dates to c. 450 BC, measuring 38.15 x 16.90 m: it is in Doric style, peripteros 6 columns wide by 13 long, preceded by a pronaos and opisthodomos. The basement has four steps.

Current remains (including anastylosis from the 18th Century onwards) consist of the front colonnade with parts of the architrave and of the frieze. Only fragments of the other three sides survive, with few elements of the cella. The building was damaged in the fire of 406 BC and restored in Roman times, with the substitution of clay marble roof tiles with ones and the addition of a steep rise in the area where today can be seen the remains of the altar.

Nearby are arcosolia and other sepultures from Byzantine times, belonging to the late 6th century AD renovation of the Temple of Concordia into a Christian church.
Joe Sermarini
IuliaMamaea_Den_RIC_343.jpg
Iulia Mamaea - denarius RIC 34321 viewsIulia Mamaea. Silver denarius, minted in Rome, early 222 AD, 2.51g; obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right; reverse: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet left. RIC 343.Bartosz A
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IVNO AVGVSTAE3 viewsJULIA MAMAEA AR Denarius. Rev. IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left holding flower and child. 2.5gm, 19 mm. RIC 341, Sear RCV II 8211.Podiceps
Herennia_Etruscilla_4b.jpg
IVNO REGINA32 viewsHerennia Etruscilla antoninianus
Rome mint
Tibsi
julia domna final com.JPG
Julia Domna 21 viewsAR 15-16 mm 3.2 grams 193-211 AD
OBV :: IVLIA AVGVSTA. Draped bust right
REV :: IVNO REGINA. Juno standing left with patera and scepter , Peacock at feet to left
EX :: none ( rome Mint )
RIC 640, RSC 97, BMC 601
RIC rated
From uncleaned lot 06/2007
Johnny
julia.jpg
Julia Domna30 viewsOb. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev. IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled, standing left holding patera and sceptre; peacock to left
Mint (possibly) Laodicea
Heavily toned

Ref. RIC 640, RSC 97, BMC 601

Juno was a favourite patroness of the empresses and the only Emperor showing this reverse was Claudius Gothicus

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
domna.jpg
Julia Domna & peacock23 viewsJulia Domna, Silver denarius, RIC 560, RSC 97, F, Rome, 2.892g, 16.6mm, 180o, 198 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet; ex FORVMkaitsuburi
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Julia Domna & peacock (2)15 viewsJulia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D. Silver denarius, RIC IV 560, RSC III 97, Sear 1988: 1841, F, tight oval flan, Rome mint, 3.142g, 17.1mm, 180o, 196 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet. ex FORVMPodiceps
juno.jpg
Julia Domna - IVNO11 viewsJulia Domna
solid silver denarius
irregular mint
Av.: IVLIA - AVGVSTA / draped bust right
Rev.: I - V - N - O / Juno standing left, holding patera in right hand, sceptre in left; peackock at her feet left
2,72 Gr.,12 h die axis
(RIC 559, Coh. 82)
nummis durensis
J2.JPG
Julia Domna - Juno52 viewsDenarius 209
O/ IULIA - AUGUSTA Draped bust right
R/ IU-NO Juno standing half-left, holding patera and sceptre; in front, peacock standing left, head turned back
C 82 - RIC 559
Mint: Rome (6th off., 29th emission)
In 209, Septimius and his two sons leave Rome for the campaign of Britain and let the regency to the empress Julia. She will never see her husband alive.
septimus
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Julia Domna AR Denarius61 viewsJulia Domna (Augusta)
VF AR Denarius 3.40g / 17mm / -
IVLIA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right
IVNO REGINA - Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at feet
Mint: Rome (196-211 AD)
References: RIC 560; RSC 97
2 commentsScotvs Capitis
domna1.jpg
Julia Domna Denarius13 viewsJulia Domna Silver AR Denarius

Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO, Juno standing half-left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet, head turned back.

RIC 559 (Septimius Severus); Sear 6588; RSC 82

Tanit
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Julia Domna IVNO, RIC 55941 viewsJulia Domna (Augusta)
AR Denarius 3.20g / 19mm / -
Ob: IVLIA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right
Rv: IVNO - Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock standing left, head turned back.
Mint: Rome (193-217)
Ref: RIC 559; RSC 82; Sear5 #6588
Scotvs Capitis
Julia_Domna_Juno~0.JPG
Julia Domna Juno27 viewsJulia Domna - Roman Empress - wife of Severus Alexander
Silver Denarius 19mm (2.6 grams) Rome mint: 209 A.D.
Reference: RIC 559 (Septimius Severus), S 6588, C 82
IVLIAAVGVSTA - Draped bust right.
IVNO - Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter; peacock to left
Romanorvm
Julia Domna +.jpg
Julia Domna Sestertius18 viewsAE Sestertius
Obv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG ; dr. bust r.
Rev : IVNONEM S C ; Juno stg. l., a peacock at her feet.
Tanit
Julia_Domna_-_RIC_559.png
Julia Domna – RIC-55921 viewsJulia Domna AR Denarius. 209 AD. IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO, Juno standing half-left, holding patera & scepter, peacock standing left, head turned back. RIC 559; RSC 82; BMC 38; SRCV 6588Bud Stewart
juliajuno.jpg
Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D., Silver denarius25 viewsSize: 16.9 mm
Weight: 3.517 grams
197 A.D Rome mint
Obverse: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse: VESTAE SANCTAE, Vesta standing left, veiled, patera in right, scepter in left
SRCV II 6614, RIC IV 587, BMCRE V 99, RSC III 246
Marjan E
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Julia Domna, Denarius, IVNO17 viewsAR Denarius
Julia Domna
Born ca. 170AD - Died 217AD
Issued: 196 - 211AD
18.0mm 3.30gr
O: IVLIA AVGVSTA; Draped bust, right.
R: IVNO; Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock to left.
Rome Mint
RIC 559; Sear 6588; RSC 82.
Aorta: 100: B6, O2, R46, T82, M4.
Ken Dorney VCoins
6/16/17 6/24/17
1 commentsNicholas Z
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Julia Domna, Juno fouree29 viewsFouree denarius; 2.9g; 19-20mm

IVLIA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

IVNO CONSERVATRIX
Juno standing left holding pater and scepter, peacock at feet

imitates?
2 commentsRobin Ayers
DOMNA-8.jpg
Julia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, Augusta, 193-217 CE.306 viewsAE Sestertius (32 mm, 21.3 gm), Rome mint, 213 CE.
Obv: IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: IVNONEM S C, Juno standing l., holding scepter. Peacock at feet.
RIC 585b; Sear 7114v; BMC 210; Cohen 88; Hill 1345.

Ex LordBest Numismatics
3 commentsEmpressCollector
pjimage.jpg
Julia Maesa7 viewsAR Denarius, Struck 218-220 AD, Rome Mint
Obverse: IVLIA MAESA AVG, diademed, draped bust right
Reverse: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter
Reference: RIC 254, RSC 16,
BMC 67, Sear 7750
Size: 20mm, 2.8g
Justin L
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Julia Maesa (218 - 225 A.D.)82 viewsO: IVLIA MAESA AVG, Draped bust right.
R: IVNO, Juno standing facing, head left, holding scepter and patera.
Rome
3.3g
20mm
RIC 254 ,RSC 016
4 commentsMat
maesa.jpg
Julia Maesa (Augusta) AR Denarius30 viewsJulia Maesa (Augusta)
AR Denarius 2.98g
Ob: IVLIA MAESA AVG - Draped bust of Julia Maesa right
Rv: IVNO - Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre
Mint: Rome (218-223 AD)
Ref: Sear 7750, RIC 254, RSC 16, BMC 67
Scotvs Capitis
ARI-Julia_Maesa-3.jpg
Julia Maesa AD 218-224/514 viewsAR DENARIUS, RIC 254, Sear #7750

Grade: AU: Strike 4/5: Surface 5/5

Obv.: IVLIA MAESA AVG, draped bust right, in stephane.

Rev.: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre.

Julia, like her younger sister Julia Domna, was among the most important women to exercise power behind the throne in the Roman empire. Following the death of Caracalla, Julia Maesa rescued the Severan dynasty from the usurper Macrinus.
Richard M10
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Julia Maesa, Denarius - * 106 viewsDenarius struck in Rome in AD 218-220
IVLIA MAESA AVG, Bust of Maesa right
IVNO, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre
3.48 gr
Ref : RCV #7750, Cohen #16
2 commentsPotator II
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Julia Maesa, Denarius, IVNO4 viewsAR Denarius
Julia Maesa
Augusta: 218 - 224/5AD
Issued: 218 - 220AD (Under Elagabalus)
19.4mm 3.08gr, 5h
O: IVLIA MAESA AVG; Draped bust right.
R: IVNO; Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
Rome Mint
Aorta: 20: B4, O1, R8, T13, M2.
RIC 254; RSC 16; Sear 5, #7750.
Agora Auctions Sale #34 Lot 220
6/9/15 2/18/17
Nicholas Z
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Julia Mamaea7 viewsMother of Severus Alexander Ruling 222-235 AD
AR Denarius, Struck Early 222 AD, Eastern Mint
Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG (unbroken), draped bust right
Reverse: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno diademed standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
References: RIC IV 343, RSC III 35,
BMC 43, Sear 2310
Size: 20.5mm, 2.9g
Justin L
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Julia Mamaea (mother of S. Alexander) AR Denarius.5 viewsRome, AD 222-235. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right / IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Diademed and veiled figure of Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, peacock standing left. RIC 343 (Alexander); BMCRE 43 (same); RSC 35. 2.10g, 20mm, 6h. Good Very Fine. Toned, an attractive example.Chris C2
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Julia Mamaea (mother of Severus Alexander)8 viewsRIC IV-2 686, Cohen 40

AE (orichalcum) sestertius, 28-31 mm.

Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA [AVGVSTA], diademed bust right.

Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, S-C, Juno veiled standing to front, facing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet.

RIC rarity C
Stkp
Mamaea_343.jpg
Julia Mamaea - AR denarius14 viewsRome
11 Mar - 31 Dec 222 AD
draped bust right
IVLIA MAMAEA AVG
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet left
IVNO CONSERVATRIX
RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, SRCV II 8212
2,68 g 19-17 mm
Johny SYSEL
Julia_Mamaea_opt.jpg
Julia Mamaea Denarius RIC 343, Juno15 viewsOBV: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right
REV: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet left


Minted at Rome, 222 AD
Legatus
Julia_Mamaea_JG_01b.jpg
Julia Mamaea Denarius.45 viewsJulia Mamaea Denarius.
18.2 0º
Early 222 AD. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right / IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet left. RSC 35.
RIC 343
sear5 #8212
Tkonnova
Mamaea4.jpg
Julia Mamaea Denarius. 5 viewsJulia Mamaea Denarius. Early 222 AD.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet left.

RIC 343 , RSC 35.

Tanit
PM1569.jpg
Julia Mamaea, AR Denarius. AD 222. Very First Issue From Rome With Original Legend83 viewsImperial Rome, Julia Mamaea, the mother of Severus Alexander. Augusta, AD 222 - 235. AR Denarius, AD 222. Rome. 3.25g. 7h. IVLIA MAMIAS AVG, her draped bust rt. / IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing rt., looking lt., holding a patera and a sceptre, peacock at her feet. RIC 343 note (incorrect assumption about mint). EF and a beautiful example!

A very rare issue of Julia Mamea which represents the initial issue from Rome in her name, which also occurs on the sestertii and dupondii. Then MAMIAS was corrected to MAMAEA and the same IVNO CONSERVATRIX rev. type was continued in all denominations. Another interesting aspect of this coin is the pose of Juno. All the weight is placed on her left leg on this coin along with the earliest issues bearing the new spelling MAMAEA. Thereafter the bulk of the IVNO CONSERVATRIX depicts Juno placing her weight on her right leg.

As an empress collector I thank Curtis Clay for trading me this coin and alerting me to it's significance.

A very rare and interesting piece!
Fausta
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Julia Mamaea, c. AD 180 - 235 6 viewsAR denarius, 20mm, 2.4g, 6h; Rome mint.
Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG; Draped bust of Julia Mamaea right
Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX; Juno standing, draped and veiled, looking left, holding patera and long scepter, with peacock at left her feet.
Reference: RIC IVb 343, p. 98
John Anthony
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Julia Mamaea, Denarius, IVNO CONSERVATRIX19 viewsAR Denarius
Julia Mamaea
Circa 190AD - 235AD
Issued: 222 - 235AD
19.0mm
O: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG; Draped bust, right.
R: IVNO CONSERVATRIX; Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock to left.
Rome Mint
Sear 8212; BMC 43; RIC 343; RSC 35.
Aorta: 36: B4, O1, R20, T23, M2.
Jonathan Kern CICF 2013 4/3/17
1 commentsNicholas Z
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Julia Mamaea, Juno29 viewsAr denarius, 3.56g; 18-19mm

IVLIA MAMAEA AVG
draped bust right

IVNO CONSERVATRIX
Juno standing left with patera and scepter, peacock at feet

RIC 343, RSC 35, BMCRE 43
1 commentsRobin Ayers
Julia_Mamaea_Juno.jpg
Julia Mamaea, Juno with peacock, Silver Denarius * 222-235 A.D.66 views
AR Denarius

Obv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG. Draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX. Juno* standing left, holding patera in left hand and scepter in right hand, peacock at her feet to left and both left-facing.

Mint: Rome
Struck: 222 AD.

Size: 1.9 cm.
Weight: 3.1 grams.
Die axis: 0 degs.

Beautiful clear luster, with ‘minor’ shock damage to lower edge.

RIC IV/2, 343; C.35
Sear 2310
BMCR.43

* Olympian

Mamaea's imperial title was Iulia Augusta, mater Augusti nostri et castrorum et senatus et patriae, recalling the titulature of Julia Domna. Her position in the government was confirmed by the title consors imperii. Recognized as religiosissima, she had conversation with Origen while in the East as She accompanied Alexander on campaign there against the Persians in 230-231. In 235, she was with him in Germany, at Mainz, when they were assassinated by the troops, with Maximinus Thrax chosen as successor. She suffered damnatio memoriae.
Tiathena
Julia_Mamaea_RIC_A343.JPG
Julia Mamaea, mother of Severus Alexander15 viewsObv: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust of Julia Mamaea facing right.

Rev: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno, diademed and veiled, standing left, holding a patera and scepter; at her feet a peacock stands with its head turned to catch drops out of patera.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 222 AD

3.2 grams, 19 mm, 0°

RIC IVii S. Alexander 343, RSC 35, S8212, VM 5
SPQR Coins
Julia_Mamaea_RIC_341~0.JPG
Julia Mamaea, RIC 34114 viewsIVLIA MAMAEA AVG
AR denarius, 19mm, 2.39g
IVNO AVGVSTAE
Diademed draped bust right
Juno seated left holding flower and short scepter
novacystis
julia_mamaea_Boyd.jpg
Julia Mamaea, sestertius (Boyd collection)47 viewsJulia Mamaea, sesterzio, zecca di Roma
AE, 19.50 gr, 29,2 mm, EF-/VF
D/ IVLIA MAMAEA AVGVSTA busto drappeggiato a dx
R/ IVNO AVGVSTAE S C, Juno seduta a sinistra, tiene un fiore e un fanciullo in fasce
RIC 683
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (6 dicembre 2008, numero catalogo 37), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005) ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 (London, 26 settembre 2005, lotto 540), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, dal 17 febbraio 1892), ex Sotheby's (London, 17 febbraio 1892, parte del lotto 385).
paolo
JULIA_SOEMIA_Boyd.jpg
Julia Soaemia, denarius. R/ IVNO REGINA (Boyd collection)24 viewsJulia Soaemias Denarius. 220 AD.
AR, gr 2,4, 19 mm, 180°, BB
D/ IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA, draped bust right /
R/ IVNO REGINA, Juno standing right, holding scepter and palladium.
Ric 237, RSC 3
Provenienza: Berardengo collection, Rome Italy (october 2012), ex W.C. Boyd collection (july 1895?), ex Baldwins auction 42 lot 523 part (september 26, 2005), ex Paul Wells collection, Cardiff Uk (2012)
paolo
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JULIA SOAEMIAS26 viewsAR denarius. 220 AD. Draped bust right. IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA. / Juno standing right resting on sceptre and holding Palladium. IVNO REGINA.
RIC 237. RSC 3. s 7718.
benito
00soaemias~0.jpg
JULIA SOAEMIAS12 viewsAR denarius. 220 AD. Draped bust right. IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA. / Juno standing right resting on sceptre and holding Palladium. IVNO REGINA.
RIC 237. RSC 3. s 7718.
benito
juliasjuno.jpg
Julia Soaemias (219 - 222 A.D.)26 viewsAr Denarius
O: IVLIA SOAEMIAS AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing right, holding scepter & palladium.
Rome Mint
19mm
2.64g
RIC 237, RSC 3, BMC 41
2 commentsMat
FaustinaIIDenJuno.jpg
Juno7 viewsFaustina Junior
Denarius

Diademed, draped bust right, FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Juno seated left, holding patera & sceptre; at feet a peacock, IVNONI REGINAE

RIC 698
Blindado
Procilia1obre.JPG
Juno (Sospita)212 views* AR Denarius Procilia 1, moneyer L. Procili F.
* Rome 80 BC
* Obv: Laur. head of Jupiter. To l.: S•C.
* Rev: Cult statue of Juno Sospita, stg. r., wearring goatskin and holding shield in l.hand, and hurling spear with r.hand; before snake, behind: L•PROCILI / F downwards.
* 18,5 mm
* Crawford 379/1.
Gert
LUCILLA-2.jpg
Juno Lucina, the protectress of midwives and childbirth.276 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.
AR denarius (18mm, 3.24g), Rome mint, 166 CE.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing. l., holding baby in swaddling clothes in left arm.
RIC-771, Sear-5485, BMC-313, Cohen-38.

Lucina is the Roman name for the Greek goddess, Eileithyia, who was the protectress of midwives and who assisted during birth. She was later identified with Hera or Artemis. On Roman coins, Lucina is identified as an aspect of the goddess Juno associated with light and childbirth, during which she eased the pain and made sure all went well. Coins portraying Lucina may commemorate a birth in the Imperial family or that the help of the goddess had been invoked. She is usually portrayed with or holding children. A variety of objects may accompany her, sometimes a patera and scepter--attributes of Juno--or more commonly, a flower.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
SALONINA-7.JPG
Juno Regina, the Queen of the Gods.231 viewsSalonina, wife of Gallienus. Augusta, 254-268 CE.
Silvered Æ antoninianus (21.1 mm), Uncertain Eastern mint, 260-268 CE.
Obv: SALONINA AVG, diademed & draped bust right on crescent.
Rev: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at her feet.
RIC-92; Cohen-67.

Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown hoding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
EmpressCollector
AntoSe94.jpg
Juno Sospita130 viewsorichalcum sestertius (26.6g) Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
ANTONINVS AVG PI[-]VS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
IVNONI SISPITAE (around edge) S C (in field) Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608 (Scarce), Cohen 473, BMC 1248

Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
L_PAPIUS.jpg
L Papius AR Denarius, Gens Papia, SNG BMC 1190, Griffin24 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin, pump behind head
REVERSE: Griffin prancing right, pail with cup attached below, L. PAPI in exergue (Trade Guild: Farmers and shepherds)
3.23g, 19mm

Struck at Rome 79 BC
Legatus
Papia_1c_edge.JPG
L Papius Denarius Serratus28 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.

This image illustrates the uneven strike. You can see the thickness of the coin varying from left (where there was little or no pressure) to right (where the main pressure from the strike took place).
maridvnvm
Papia1.JPG
L Papius Denarius Serratus, 79 BC49 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind
Gryphon dancing right, symbol below, ex. L PAPI
Syd 773, Cr384/1, Papia 1
This coin has been identified as a cast fake that has emerged in the last year.
whitetd49
Papia 1a img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -39 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Barbed spear head.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Elephant head.
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon 149. BMCRR -
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia1b_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -114 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Dolphin wrapped around anchor.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Hippocamp
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.

A previously unknown symbol pair.
8 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1e_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -18 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Shoe.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.
3.78g. 19.71 mm. 180 degrees.

An unpublished symbol pair with five examples currently known. This is likely the best of the five examples. (Richard Schaefer)
maridvnvm
Papia_1e_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -40 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Shoe.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.
3.78g. 19.71 mm. 180 degrees.

An unpublished symbol pair with five examples currently known. This is likely the best of the five examples. (Richard Schaefer)
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1b_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC -63 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Dolphin wrapped around anchor.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Hippocamp
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC -. Babelon -. BMCRR -.

A previously unknown symbol pair and the only known example.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1p_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01328 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, cooking pot with hook.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, triple flesh-hook
Minted in Rome from B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 13. Babelon 13. BMCRR 35. CNR: 1/049.

A "Stannard" weight adjustment scoop on the reverse
maridvnvm
Papia_1g_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01921 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, hunter's net
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, two spears
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 19. Babelon 100. BMCRR 19.
maridvnvm
Papia_1g_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 01940 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, hunter's net
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, two spears
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 19. Babelon 100. BMCRR 19.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1k_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 05223 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, goblet.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, winsekin? shoe?
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 52. Babelon 96. BMCRR 52. CNR: 1/042.

Symbols listed as goblet/wine-skin by Sydenham. coppa/calzatura (cup/shoe) by CNR
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1t_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 064 27 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, forepart of lion.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, forepart of bull
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 64. Babelon 77. BMCRR 64. CNR unknown
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1n_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 06926 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, shepherd's crook.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, mask of Pan
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 69. Babelon 2. BMCRR 69. CNR: unknown.

Trade guild: farmers and shepherds
maridvnvm
Papia_1q_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07027 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, lock
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, key
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 70 Babelon 61. BMCRR 70. CNR: 1/027.

trade guild: metal workers
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1i_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07628 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, owl
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, crow with open wings or eagle
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 76. Babelon 76. BMCRR 12.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1i_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 07644 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, owl
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, crow with open wings or eagle
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 76. Babelon 76. BMCRR 12.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1w_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 08443 viewsDenarius Serratus
Obv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, sandal.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, sandal
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 84. Babelon 17. BMCRR 84. CNR 1/041
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1s_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 08820 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, whelk shell or conch.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, scallop shell
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 88. Babelon 14. BMCRR 88. CNR: -.
maridvnvm
Papia_1o_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 09241 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, crossbow bolt.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, front view of crossbow
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference:– RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 92. Babelon 75. BMCRR 92. CNR: unknown.

Some obverse corrosion
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1z_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 09418 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, spindle.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, distaff
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 94. Babelon 34. BMCRR 94. CNR 1/015
Weaver's guild

3.71g. 18.77 mm. 0 degrees.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1d_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 10919 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Lamp with spout
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Lamp feeder
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 109. Babelon -. BMCRR 109.
3.12g. 18.44 mm. 0 degrees

A modern cast fake.
Slightly uneven toning.
maridvnvm
Papia_1f_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 1117 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, tall cup
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, jug
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 11. Babelon -. BMCRR 11

This symbol pair is one of only two known to be produced from more than a single die pair with two die pairs known for this symbol pair.
maridvnvm
Papia_1f_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 1125 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, tall cup
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, jug
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 11. Babelon -. BMCRR 11

This symbol pair is one of only two known to be produced from more than a single die pair with two die pairs known for this symbol pair.
maridvnvm
Papia_1aa_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 12230 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, coiled serpent.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, dog
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 122 Babelon 9. BMCRR unknown. CNR unknown

ex SteveX6 collection

3.42g. 18.68 mm. 180 degrees.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1r_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 12831 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, chopper.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, scissors
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 128 Babelon 26. BMCRR -. CNR: -.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1v_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 13119 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, plumb line.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, mason's level
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 131. Babelon 31 BMCRR unlisted. CNR 1/032
maridvnvm
papia_1y_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 13419 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, aplustre.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, prow
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 134. Babelon -. BMCRR 47.

3.81g. 19.07 mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
Papia_1l_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 14728 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, altar
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, lighted altar
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 147. Babelon 69. BMCRR Unknown. CNR: Unknown
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1h_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 15018 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Harpa
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Winged Petasos
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 150. Babelon 149. BMCRR -.

Symbols of Mercury.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1h_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 15029 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Harpa
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Winged Petasos
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 150. Babelon 149. BMCRR -.

Symbols of Mercury.
maridvnvm
Papia_1c_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 20431 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 204. Babelon -. BMCRR -
3.85g. 20.41 mm. 180 degrees

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.
2 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1c_img~0.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 20433 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Compass
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Drill
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 204. Babelon -. BMCRR -
3.85g. 20.41 mm. 180 degrees

An uneven strike with an off-centre reverse spoils what would otherwise have been a very pleasing coin.
maridvnvm
papia_1x_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 2152 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, base of column.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, corinthian capital
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 21. Babelon 81. BMCRR 21. CNR 1/034

3.41 gms

Stannard weight correction scoop on reverse
5 commentsmaridvnvm
papia_1u_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 3123 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, crowbar.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, dolabrum (pickaxe)
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 31. Babelon 32 BMCRR 31. CNR 1/07
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Papia_1m_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 7522 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Modius.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, Modius
Minted in Rome from B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 75. Babelon 8. BMCRR 75. CNR: 1/009.
maridvnvm
Papia_1j_img.jpg
L Papius Denarius Serratus, Papia 1, Sym. var. RRC 9928 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin tied under chin. Behind head, Funnel strainer.
Rev:– Gryphon running right; in ex., L. PAPI.; in field, hydria (two-handled vase).
Minted in Rome from . B.C. 79.
Reference(s) – RSC Papia 1. RRC 384/1. RCTV 311.
Symbol variety – RRC 99. Babelon unlisted. BMCRR 99.
1 commentsmaridvnvm
Procilius1.JPG
L Procilia denarius, 80 BC51 viewsBust of Jupiter, right, S.C behind, bankers mark
L PROCILIA F, Juno Sospita advancing right with shield and spear, snake before
Procilia 1, Syd 771, Craw 379/1
1 commentswhitetd49
Procilius2.JPG
L Procilia Serrate denarius, 80 BC39 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, S.C behind
L PROCILIA F
Juno Sospita in biga right, holding shield and spear, snake below
Procilia 2, Syd 772, Craw 379/2
whitetd49
25691.jpg
L Procilius: AR Denarius, 80 B.C. 18 viewsObv: S C behind hea dof Juno Sospita r, wearing goat's skin / Juno Sospita in biga r, holding shield and hurling spear, serpent erect below horses.

Cr. 379/2



1 commentsSkySoldier
Desktop951.jpg
L ROSCIUS FABATUS; GENS ROSCIA AR Serrate Denarius 14 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, L ROSCI below, amphora or capis to left
REVERSE: Girl standing right feeding serpent before, sea shell(?) to left, FABATI in ex.
Rome 59 BC
3.7g, 18mm
Cr 412/1; Syd 915
1 commentsLegatus
Thorius1.JPG
L Thorius denarius, 105 BC58 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, I.S.M.R. behind
Bull charging right, control mark above, L. THORIVS below, Ex. BALBVS
Thoria 1, Syd 598, Craw 316/1
1 commentswhitetd49
L__Marcius_Philippus.jpg
L. Marcius Philippus - AR denarius11 viewsRome
¹113 BC
²113-112 BC
helmet, diademed bust of Philip V king of Macedon right with goat's horns
(ROMA)
Φ
equestrian statue right, holding laurel branch, flower below
L·PHILIPPVS
(XVI)
¹Crawford 293/1, SRCV I 170, Sydenham 551, RSC I Marcia 12
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex aurea

Reverse shows equestrian statue of L. Marcius Q. f. Philippus who had concluded a peace treaty with Philip V of Maced in 197 BC.
Moneyer was good speaker and important politician. He was tribune 104 BC, consul 91 BC. He was against granting of citizenship to Roman allies what led to Civil war.

"... A final intriguing element on the coinage of the Philippi which unites it across half a century and the shift in emphasis from Makedonian to Roman royalty, is the flower which appears in the same place on the reverses of RRC 293 and 425 (beneath the hooves of the horseman and the equestrian statue of Q. Marcius Rex). Crawford (RRC, 308) calls attention to the Roman tradition about the conception of Mars (legendary ancestor of clan Marcia) when Juno was fertilised by a flower. But to accomodate the distinctively Makedonian theme of RRC 293, it might be preferable to see it as a lily and already understood as a generic symbol of royal blood. This notion seems to originate with the shift of the Achaemenid seat of government from Persepolis to Susa (literally, the city or place of the lily), and this flower is found on both Hasmonaean and Seleukid royal coinage in Hellenistic times before eventually finding its way into the Merovingian and eventually the Capetian regalia. ..." Mark K.P. from McCabe's sites.
Johny SYSEL
L__Papius.png
L. Papius24 viewsRR L. Papius AR Serrate Denarius 79 BC Rome mint. Head of Juno Sospita right, half fish behind / Griffin right, fish below.
Ex. Calgary Coin
Ex Jay GT4
Ex ANE
1 commentsRob D
Papius.jpg
L. Papius - AR serratus denarius6 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
²78 BC
¹79 BC
head of Juno Sospita right waering goat skin; bucket behind
Gryphon springing right; jug below
L.PAPI
¹Crawford 384/1 (symbol 11); Sydenham 773; Papia 1; British museum 1902,0206.106
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
4,0g
ex Solidus

Gens Papia was Samnite origin and family came from Lanuvium.
Johny SYSEL
Papius_Denarius~0.jpg
L. Papius 79b.c. Denarius 12 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right wearing goat's skin, symbol behind. Reverse. Gryphon prancing right, symbol below, L. PAPI in exergue
Philoromaos
Papius_Celsus~0.jpg
L. Papius Celsus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
45 BC
head of Juno Sospita right. wearing goat skin
wolf right placing stick on fire, eagle left fanning flames with its wings
CELSVS·III·VIR
L.PAPIVS
Crawford 472/1, RSC I Papia 2
3,9g
ex Solidus

Reverse depicts a founder myth from Lanuvium.

"While Lavinium was building, the following omens are said to have appeared to the Trojans. When a fire broke out spontaneously in the forest, a wolf, they say, brought some dry wood in his mouth and threw it upon the fire, and an eagle, flying thither, fanned the flame with the motion of his wings. But working in opposition to these, a fox, after wetting his tail in the river, endeavoured to beat out the flames; and now those that were kindling it would prevail, and now the fox that was trying to put it out. But at last the two former got the upper hand, and the other went away, unable to do anything further. Aeneas, on observing this, said that the colony would become illustrious and an object of wonder and would gain the greatest renown, but that as it increased it would be envied by its neighbours and prove grievous to them; nevertheless, it would overcome its adversaries, the good fortune that it had received from Heaven being more powerful than the envy of men that would oppose it. These very clear indications are said to have been given of what was to happen to the city; of which there are monuments now standing in the forum of the Lavinians, in the form of bronze images of the animals, which have been preserved for a very long time.
...
This myth according to Dionysios occured not in Lanuvium but in Lavinium. And there too the group depicting the myth should have been found. This localisation seems to be an error of the author. On the obv. of this coin appears Juno Sospita. the main centre of her worshipping was Lanuvium, not Lavinium. The allusion to this myth at Horace (Hor. epod. 3, 27, 4) appears directly after the mention of Lanuvium. The confusion of these two sites is not astonishing. Lanuvium and Lavinium were swapped very often and in important documents too like the Fasti. The strong connection with Aeneas in this story of Dionysios can be explained as addition of the author who doesn't miss the chance to beautify the myth. Dionysios ascribes an old age to the myth but this can't be looked at as reliable. But rather a group of statues whose meaning has been lost may be the reason of this aetiological myth (Krumme)." - Jochen's Coins of mythological interest
Johny SYSEL
papius_Cr472_1.jpg
L. Papius Celsus, Crawford 472/162 viewsL. Papius Celsus, gens Papia
AR - denarius, 18mm, 3.66g
Rome, 45 BC
obv. Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat-skin, r.
rev. She-wolf r., with a wood stick in her mouth for throwing it in fire, which is burning r. before her, on its r. side an eagle stg. l., fanning the fire with his wings.
above CELSVS.III.VIR
in ex. L.PAPIVS
ref. Crawford 472/1; Sydenham 964; Papia 2
VF, attractive toning

The rev. depicts a scene from the founder myth of Lanuvium. For more information please look at the thread 'Coins of mythological interest'.
Jochen
pmdogeagle.jpg
L. PAPIUS CELSUS.21 viewsAR denarius. 45 BC. 3,74 grs. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / She-wolf standing right, dropping stick on incipient fire while eagle, standing left, fans flames with wings. CELSVS III VIR above. L.PAPIVS in exergue.
Craw 472/1. RSC Papia 2.

1 commentsbenito
195.jpg
L. Papius Denarius Serratus (2) - Juno Sospita with Griffin (Crawf. 384/1) 20 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 79 BC
3.84g

Obv: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; symbol (tall cup) behind

Rev: Griffin springing right; symbol (one handled jug) below; L• PAPI in exergue.

Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1, Grueber type 11

Roma Numismatics E-Sale 52, Lot 679
From the R.C. Vermeer Collection;
Naville Numismatics 34, 17 September 2017, lot 422.
ex. Elvira Clain Stefanelli (1914-2001) collection, curator of the National Numismatics Collection at the Smithsonian
3 commentsOptimo Principi
181.jpg
L. Papius Denarius Serratus - Juno Sospita with Griffin (Crawf. 384/1)39 viewsAR Denarius
Rome, 79 BC
3.93g

Obv: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin; symbol (stick with strap?) behind

Rev: Griffin springing right; symbol (bowling ninepin?) below; L• PAPI in exergue.

Crawford 384/1; RSC Papia 1 (symbols 44); Grueber type 96

Roma Numismatics Auction XV, 380
ex. Roma Numismatics Auction VI, 765.
3 commentsKained but Able
L__Papius.png
L. Papius – Papia-147 viewsRoman Republic, L. Papius 79 B.C., Silver Denarius Serratus, (3.43g., 24mm), Rome mint, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress, to left, control mark behind, rev., Griffin springing right, control mark below, RCV 311; Crawford 384/1; Sydenham 773; CNR 1/106; Papia 11 commentsBud Stewart
IMG_9496.jpg
L. Papius, 79 BCE19 viewsObverse: head of Juno Sospita right, control mark behind (column base?)

Reverse: griphon running right, control mark below (Corinthian style capitol?). L PAPI in ex.
1 commentsAquilaSPQR
procillius_jupiter.jpg
L. PROCILIUS20 views80 B.C.
AR Denarius 17.5 mm 3.23 g
O: laureate head of Jupiter right, S C behind
R: Juno Sospita standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI.F behind
ROME, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1
laney
Procilus_denarius.jpg
L. Procilius 80b.c. Denarius23 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin S.C. behind. Reverse. Juno Sospita as last but in a biga right, serpent below horses, L. PROCILI. F in exergue.Philoromaos
L_PROCILIUS.jpg
L. Procilius AR Denarius, Gens Procilia, Cr379, Juno Sospita 17 viewsOBV: Bust of Jupiter right, SC behind
REV: L PROCILI F, Juno Sospita advancing right with shield, spear aloft and serpent before
3.7g, 19mm

Struck at Rome, 80 BC
Legatus
0108.jpg
L. Procilius f., Denarius11 viewsL. Procilius f., Denarius

RRC 379/2
80 bc

Av: Head of Juno Sospita r.; behind, downwards, S C,
Rv: Juno Sospita in biga r., holding shield and spear; below, snake; in ex. L PROCILI F.

Ex Bertolami Fine arts, Auction 24, Numismatics, London, 23.06.2016, #465
Norbert
L_Procilius.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR denarius8 views²Minturnae?
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
laureate head of Jupiter right
S·C
Juno Sospita standing right, wearing goat skin, holding spear and shield; snake to the right
L.PROCILI / F
¹Crawford 379/1, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, RSC I Procilia 1
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea
Johny SYSEL
Procilius_Juno.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - AR serratus denarius9 views²Sardinia
¹Rome
¹²80 BC
head of Juno Sospita right wearing goat skin
S·C
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear, reins and shield; snake below
L.PROCILI.F
¹Crawford 379/2, SRCV I 307, Sydenham 772, RSC I Procilia 2
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,9g
ex Gitbud and Naumann

Juno Sospita offered protection to women, accompanying them throughout their lives from birth to death. She was often called upon by infertile women to aid in conception. Juno Sospita had a two temples at Rome, but her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. Her statue there, as described by Cicero and as depicted on coinage, wore a goatskin coat with a goat-horned headdress. Her attribute, the serpent, inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not, was destroyed.
Johny SYSEL
L__Procilius_L_f_.jpg
L. Procilius L.f. - Procilia-2224 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Procilius L.f. Silver denarius serratus, VF, Italian mint, (4.109gm, maximum diameter 19.4mm, die axis 180o) 80 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita clad in goat skin right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue. SRCV 307, Sydenham 772, Crawford 379/2, RSC I Procilia 25 commentsBud Stewart
L__Procilius_L_f_.png
L. Procilius L.f. – Procilia-142 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Procilius L.f. AR denarius (17mm, 3.98g). 80 B.C. Rome mint. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Juno Sospita walking right, hurling spear and holding shield; serpent before. SRCV 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1Bud Stewart
0010-063.jpg
L. Procilius L.F., Denarius79 viewsRome mint, 80 BC
Laureate head of Jupiter right, S . C behind
Juno Sospita right holding spear and shield. A snake at her feet. L . PROC[ILI/F] behind
3.77 gr
Ref : RCV # 306, RSC, Procilia # 1
3 commentsPotator II
0010-064-2000.jpg
L. Procilius L.F., Denarius13 viewsRome mint, 80 BC
Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat’s skin, S . C behind
Juno Sospita in biga right holding spear and shield. A snake below biga. [L. PROCILI. F] at exergue
19,5 mm - 3.89 gr
Ref : RCV # 307, RSC, Procilia # 2
1 commentsPotator II
procilius_Crawford379.1.jpg
L. Procilius, Crawford 379/165 viewsRoman Republic, L. Procilius, gens Procilia
AR - denarius
Rome, 80 BC
obv. Head of Juppiter r.
behind S.C
rev. Statue of Juno Sospita, advancing r., holding shield and spear, snake before
behind L.PROCILI / F
Crawford 379/1; Sydenham 771; Procilia 1
VF

Clearly you can see the beak-shoe-like bending of her shoes!
Jochen
procilius_Crawford379.2.jpg
L. Procilius, Crawford 379/263 viewsL. Procilius, gens Procilia
AR - Denarius Serratus, 21mm, 4.14g
Rome, 80 BC
obv. Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin, r.
S.C behind
rev. Juno Sospita, wearing shield and spear, in galloping biga r., beneath snake
in ex. L.PROCILI.F
Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; Procilia 2
about VF

L. Procilius generally is identified as the senator who was condemned because of its bad administration. Furthermore it is suggested that he is the historian Procilius. Else nothing is known about the gens Procilia. She seems to be from Lavinium as suggested by her motives.
Jochen
Procilia_1a_img.jpg
L. Procilius, denarius serratus17 viewsObv:– Head of Juno Sospita right, SC behind
Rev:– Juno Sospita in biga right, holding shield & hurling spear, snake below, L PROCILI F in exe.
Minted in Rome 80 B.C.
Reference:– Sydenham 772, Crawford 379/2, RSC I Procilia 5

Weight 4.14g. 19.43mm. 180 degrees.
maridvnvm
Fabati.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus102 viewsDenarius serratus 59 BC

Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin,
L ROSCI below, behind controlmark.

Girl standing right feeding serpent before,
controlmark to left, FABATI in ex.

Crawford 412/1; Syd 915.
2 commentsSergius Silus
3.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus (c.59BC) Serrated Denarius31 viewsL. Roscius Fabatus (c.59BC)
Denarius Serratus 3.89g 15mm
Obv: head of Juno Sospita (r) goat skin headdress
Control symbol behind.
Rev: Maiden feeding serpent, FABATI in exg.
Control symbol behind(club?)
Crawford 412/1; Sydenham 915; RSC Roscia 3.
RCV 363.
One of my favorites. Unsure of control symbols.
sean c2
Combined~4.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus Denarius22 viewsL. Roscius Fabatus, Denarius serratus,Rome, 64 BC, AR, (3,4 g, 18,4 mm).

Head of Juno Sospita r.; behind, control symbol; below, L ROSCI, Rv. Girl and snake facing each other; on l., control symbol; in ex. FABATI.

Ref: Crawford 412/1, (s. 34); Sydenham 915; Roscia 3; Catalli 588.
Flamur H
74061q00.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus – Roscia-337 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Roscius Fabatus Silver denarius serratus, (Italian provincial mint); Rome, 3.888g, 18.3mm, 135o, c. 64 B.C.; obverse head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, jug(?) and column or candelabrum (control symbols) behind, L ROSCI below; reverse Girl standing left feeding snake, low table or bench (control symbol) left, FABATI in exergue; RSC I Roscia 3; SRCV I 336; Crawford 412/1, symbols 16; BMCRR 3411; Sydenham 9151 commentsBud Stewart
roscius_fabatus_Crawford412.1.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus, Crawford 412/168 viewsRoman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus, gens Roscia
AR - denarius serratus, 18.10mm, 3.8g
Rome, 59 BC*
obv. bust of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin cap, r., behind modius
beneath L.ROSCI
bankers mark in r. field
rev. Virgin in long clothes stg. r., feeding snake, which erects before her in several
coils, behind cista
in ex. FABATI
Crawford 412/1 (symbols 23); Sydenham 915; Roscia 3; Albert 1329
scarce, toned VF, appealing silver
Pedigree:
ex Harlan J. Berk

* Dated 64 B.C. by Crawford and hence also by Roman Silver Coins , Volume I. The revised date is based on the outstanding analysis of the Messagne Horad by Alan Walker and Charles Hersh, ANS Museum Notes No. 29, New York, 1984, pp. 103-134

For more information look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'.
Jochen
Juno_Sospita.JPG
L. Roscius Fabatus. AR Denarius51 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right in goat skin headdress, L ROSCI below, wine decanter(?) below design behind

Maiden feeding serpent, FABATI in exergue, three legged stool behind.

Crawford 412/1. Sydenham 915.

Lucius R. Fabatus was a military officer and politician who began his political career as moneyer in 64BC. He served on Caesar's staff in Gaul and commanded LEG XIII. He later returned to the Senate and served as Procurator in 49BC. He died a Roman's death in combat against Marc Anthony's Legions at the Battle Of Forum Gallorum on 14/15th April 43BC.

ex- Areich, Photo Areich.

3 commentsWill Hooton
roscius_fabatus.jpg
L. Roscius Fabatus: snake feeding15 viewsDenarius serratus. L. Roscius Fabatus, 64 BC. Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, control-symbol behind, L ROSCI below. Rev: maiden standing right, feeding snake erect before her, control-symbol behind, FABATI in ex. RRC 412/1. CRR 915. Sear RCV I: 363, RSC Roscia 3.1-2, partly corroded.Podiceps
3430379.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus19 viewsL. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.98 g, 8h). Rome mint. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat-skin headdress / Bull charging right; K above. Crawford 316/1; Sydenham 598; Thoria 1. Good VF, toned, test cut on edge, banker’s mark on reverse. ecoli
Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus29 viewsHead of Juno Sospita right clad in goat skin
ISMR behind

Rev.
Bull charging right H above THORIVS below
BALBVS in ex

Rome 105 BC
3.76g

Sear 191; Craw., 316/1; Bab., 1; Syd., 598

ex-Calgary coins

C. Thorius Balbus was Born a native of Lanuvium. Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rate, that he did not enjoy. He is possibly the son of M. Aclius Balbus (168 B.C.) A coin was minted in honor of L. Thorius Balbus. On the front is the head of Juno Sospita, a god whose worship was of great antiquity in Lanuvium, and the letters I.S.M.R. On the reverse is L.THORIVS BALBVS with a bull rushing forward.
1 commentsJay GT4
L_Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - AR denarius9 viewsRome
²102 BC
¹105 BC
head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin headdress
I·S·M·R (Ivno Seispes Mater Regina)
bull charging right
B
L·THORIVS
BALBVS
¹Crawford 316/1, SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, RSC I Thoria 1 British Museum: R.7899
²Mark Passehl - Roman moneyer & coin type chronology, 150 – 50 BC
3,8g
ex Aurea auctions

Juno Sospita (=Savior) was goddes of fertility and protector of women. She was main deity in Lanuvium.
Bull - Taurus - is pun for moneyer's name Thorius.
Moneyer served as legate under Q. Caecilius Metellus in Spain 79 BC. Cicero wrote that he had lived as there was no pleasure in life.
Johny SYSEL
Thoria_Balbus Cr316.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - denarius49 viewsL. Thorius Balbus. 105 BC. AR Denarius, 3.91 g; obv. I(uno) S(ospita) M(agna) R(egina), Head of Juno wearing goat's skin; rev. Bull charging right; T above, L. THORIVS below, BALBVS in linear border in exergue; Crawford 316/1.1 commentsPriscian
L__Thorius_Balbus.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus - Thoria-1100 viewsROMAN REPUBLIC L. Thorius Balbus, C.105 BC, Denarius (3.96 gm) Rome mint, head of Juno Sospita right, wearing horned goat skin headdress, I•S•M•R downward behind; reverse bull charging right, H (control letter) above, L•THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue SRCV I 192, Sydenham 598, Crawford 316/1, RSC I Thoria-15 commentsBud Stewart
L__THORIUS_BALBUS.jpg
L. THORIUS BALBUS AR Denarius Cr 316/1; GENS THORIA18 views OBV: Head of Juno wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind
REV: Bull charging right, F. above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
3.92g, 19mm

Struck at Rome, 195 BC
Legatus
L__THORIUS_BALBUS_2.jpg
L. THORIUS BALBUS ROMAN REPUBLIC; GENS THORIA AR Denarius4 viewsOBVERSE: Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat-skin headdress, acronym I. S. M. R. behind.
REVERSE: Bull charging right, E above, L THORIVS below, BALBVS in exergue
Struck at Rome 105 BC
3.75g, 20mm
Cr 316/1, Sydenham 598, Thoria 1
Legatus
0010-057.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus, Denarius76 viewsRome mint, 105 BC
Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing a goat's skin, ISMR behind
Bull charging right, L above (control letter), L. THORIVS BALBVS in two lines at exergue
3.93 gr
Ref : RCV # 192, RSC, Thoria # 1
3 commentsPotator II
0085.jpg
L. Thorius Balbus. Denarius. 53 viewsL. Thorius Balbus AR Denarius.

RRC 316/1
105 BC. (?)

Av: Head of Juno Sospita in goat skin, ISMR (Juno Sispes Mater Regina) behind
Rv: Bull charging right, C above, THORIVS below, BALBUS in ex.

This moneyer was a native of Lanuvium and Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. Juno was worshipped at this city as the protectress of women, especially in pregnancy. The rushing bull is a type parlant of the moneyer's name.

ex Asta del Titano M3, lot#138
1 commentsNorbert
pmpapius.jpg
L.PAPIUS CELSUS42 viewsAR denarius. 45 BC. 3,74 grs. Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / She-wolf standing right, dropping stick on incipient fire while eagle, standing left, fans flames with wings. CELSVS III VIR above. L.PAPIVS in exergue.
Craw 472/1. RSC Papia 2.
benito
Screen_Shot_2014-06-22_at_10_08_09_PM.png
Licinus Bronze Follis22 views68338. Bronze follis, RIC VII 8, aVF, 2.742g, 20.2mm, 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, 313 - 315 A.D.;

obverse IMP LIC LICINIVS P F AVG, laureate head right;

reverse IOVI CON-SERVATORI, Jupiter standing left holding Victory on globe and scepter, eagle with wreath in beak left, "G" right, SIS in ex

Jupiter or Jove, Zeus to the Greeks, was the king of the gods and the god of sky and thunder, and of laws and social order. As the patron deity of ancient Rome, he was the chief god of the Capitoline Triad, with his sister and wife Juno. The father of Mars, he is therefore the grandfather of Romulus and Remus, the legendary founders of Rome.
Colby S
lucses2.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 169 A.D.)72 viewsÆ Sestertius
O: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE S-C, Juno seated left, holding a flower & infant.
18.94g
30mm
RIC 1747, Cohen 37.
3 commentsMat
lu1.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)49 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet.
Rome
19mm
3.4g
RIC 772, RSC 41, BMC 339
2 commentsMat
48327q00.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)51 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno Lucina standing facing, head left, extending right, infant in left.
Rome
3.07g
18.9mm
RIC III 771, RSC II 38

Originally the goddess of childbirth, Lucina later became an epithet for Juno as “the one who brings children into the light.” The line, “Juno Lucina, fer opem, serva me, obsecro,” (Juno Lucina, help me and give me strength, I beg of you) written by the Roman playwright Terence in Andria, exemplifies the custom for expectant mothers to address their prayers unto her.
2 commentsMat
luseated.jpg
Lucilla (164 - 182 A.D.)62 viewsAR Denarius
O: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: IVNONI LVCINAE Juno seated left, holding flower and infant.
3.2g
19mm
RIC M. Aurelius 770. C. 36. BMC M. Aurelius 342

Ex. Goldberg Auctions, Sept. 22, 2013, Sale 75 Lot 2706 (part of)
3 commentsMat
00475.jpg
Lucilla (RIC 1751, Coin #475)31 viewsRIC 1751, AE Sestertius, Rome, 166 - 169 AD.
Obv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO REGINA S C Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera and scepter; at her feet, a peacock.
Size: 33.0mm 26.86gm
1 commentsMaynardGee
lucilla-reshoot.jpg
Lucilla AE As - Juno19 viewsRoman Imperial, Lucilla AE As 11.2g, 24mm

Obverse: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right.

Reverse: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno veiled, standing left, raising right hand and holding an infant. SC in fields.

Reference: RIC III 1749

Ex: Rudi Smits

Not at Wildwinds.
Gil-galad
Lucilla_AE_SESTERTIUS.JPG
Lucilla AE Sestertius. 164-168/169 AD. 45 views23.27 grams.
30-32 mm.
Lucilla AE Sestertius. LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO REGINA S-C, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet. RIC 1751
sear5 #5502.
Lucilla, granddaughter of Antoninus Pius, daughter of Marcus Aurelius, wife of Lucius Verus and sister of Commodus. 164-168/169 AD. SOLD
Antonivs Protti
lucilla_ric1748.jpg
Lucilla RIC 174810 views AE sestertius,
struck by Marcus Aurelius, 164-169 AD.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right /
IVNONI LVCINAE, S-C, Juno, veiled, standing left,
extending right hand and holding an infant wrapped in swaddling clothes.
xokleng
lu1752.jpg
Lucilla RIC 175217 viewsAE As, Dupondius
Obverse: LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera & scepter, peacock at feet. S C across field.
26 mm., 10.0 g.
sold 3-2018
NORMAN K
ROMAN1.jpg
Lucilla Sestertius, 163-164 AD. AE31mm59 viewsLucilla Sestertius, 163-164 AD, Rome.

Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE / S C, Juno seated left, holding flower and infant
Ref. BMC-IV-1154.

UK Find.
Lee S
Lucilla_RIC_III_1750.jpg
Lucilla, AE Sestertius, RIC III 175063 viewsLucilla
Augusta, 164 - 169 A.D.

Coin: AE Sestertius

Obverse: LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust facing right.
Reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno, standing, facing left, holding a Patera with her right hand and a Sceptre with her left. A Peacock, to the left. S - C across the fields.

Weight: 23.87 g, Diameter: 30 x 29.3 x 4.7 mm, Die axis: 160°, Mint: Rome, struck between 164 - 169 A.D. Referencee: RIC III 1750, Note: A metal detecting find, near Marlborough in the County of Wiltshire, England in April 2013

Rated Scarce
Masis
0151-320np_noir.jpg
Lucilla, Sestertius 111 viewsRome mint, ca.166-169 AD.
LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Draped bust right
IVNONI REGINAE (sic !) Juno Lucina seated left holding flower and a baby
22.85 gr
12/10/13 - 0280

Potator II
LUCINA.JPG
Lucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.163 viewsÆ Sestertius (31mm), Rome mint, AD 166.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE SC, Juno Lucina seated left, holding flower and an infant in swaddling clothes.
RIC 1747, BMC 1154, Sear 5504, Cohen 37.
EmpressCollector
Roscia_3.JPG
Lucius Roscius Fabatus 29 viewsObv: L ROSCI below head of Juno Sospita facing right, wearing a goat's skin, currycomb behind.

Rev: Female standing right, feeding a serpent erect before her; horse's hoof behind; FABATI in exergue.

Note: The reverse scene depicts the events that occurred yearly at Lanuvium at the festival in honor of Juno Sospita, when a virgin was lowered into the grotto under the temple with food for the serpent who dwelt there. If the girl selected for the ceremony was chaste, then she returned safely to her home, where there was rejoicing. If she was not chaste she was killed by the serpent.

- Excerpt from Roman Silver Coins Volume 1, by H. A. Seaby

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, 64 BC

3.9 grams, 18.5 mm, 180°

RSC Roscia 3, S363
1 commentsSPQR Coins
FaustinaIIAsJuno~0.jpg
MAFJa1 Separation18 viewsFaustina II

As

Draped bust, left, FAVSTINA AVG PII AVG FIL
Juno seated left holding the three graces and scepter, peacock at feet, IVNO SC

The reverse is RIC 1400, for which only right-facing busts are listed.

Faustina was to spend years apart from her husband and probably traumatized as a mother shortly before his departure. The Historia Augusta records, "When about the set off for the German war. . . [Marcus] gave his daughter [Annia Aurelia Galeria Faustina] to [Gnaeus] Claudius [Severus, a Roman Senator from Pompeiopolis], a [man] of advanced age, son of a Roman knight and not of sufficiently noble family (subsequently [Marcus] made him Consul twice)--since his daughter was an Augusta and the daughter of an Augusta. But both Faustina and the girl who was being given in marriage regarded this wedding with reluctance. . . . Just before the day of his actual departure, [Marcus] lost his seven-year-old son, Verus Caesar by name, after an operation on a tumor under the ear. He mourned him for no more than five days, and after comforting the doctors returned to the affairs of state." How long, one wonders, did Faustina mourn?

According to the Historia Augusta, which at many points tends toward salacious gossip, "it is reasonably well known that Faustina chose both sailors and gladiators as paramours for herself at Caieta [where the couple spent several years after their marriage]. When Marcus was told about her, so that he might divorce her--if not execute her--he is reported to have said, "If we send our wife away, we must give back her dowry, too--and what dowry did he have but the empire. . . ?" During the German war, the text alleges, Faustina took pantomimists as lovers.

Whether or not the rumors had any basis in fact, Marcus thought highly of his wife and family situation. In his first meditation, he thanks the gods that "I have such a wife, so obedient, and so affectionate, and so simple; that I had abundance of good masters for my children." Perhaps the word from the horse's mouth is a better source than a history written more than a century later.

At some point, Marcus apparently saw the light, and Faustina joined him at the frontier. The Historia Augusta relates, "He had her with him even in the campaigning season, and [after her death] for this reason he gave her the title 'Mother of the Camp.'"
Blindado
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-BjW4o5vFw4-Marcus_Aurelius_Caesar.jpg
Marcus Aurelius (Caesar) Coin: Brass Sestertius0 viewsAVRELIVS CAESAR AVG PII F - Head of Marcus Aurelius, bare, right
TR POT COS II S C - Minerva, helmeted, draped, standing, right, holding vertical spear in right hand and resting left hand on round shield set on ground.
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (145 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 23.60g / 30.9mm / 360
References:
RIC III 1248 (Antoninus Pius)
Banti 299
Acquisition/Sale: erie-antiques eBay $0.00 03/18
Notes: Jun 13, 18 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

The spot on the reverse looks like corrosion but once I received the coin, it is a hard piece of encrustation.
Minerva, equated with the Greek Athena, was the Roman virgin warrior goddess of poetry, medicine, wisdom, commerce, weaving, crafts, magic, and the inventor of music. She was worshiped on the Capitoline Hill as one of the Capitoline Triad along with Jupiter and Juno.
Gary W2
domitian_191.jpg
Minerva261 viewsDomitian 81 - 96
AR - Denar, 3.62g, 18mm
AD 95/96
obv. IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TRP XV
laureate head r.
rev. IMP XXII COS XVII CENS P PP
Minerva standing r. on columna rostrata(!), brandishing
javelin and and holding shield; owl at her feet; below two
figures (Jupiter and worshipping figure, ref. to Curtis Clay)
RIC II, 191; C.293
EF
MINERVA, a war-goddess and also patron of wisdom and handicraft.
One of the 'Capitoline Triad', with Jupiter and Juno a grouping certainly of
Etruscian origin. Her bird is the owl, head covered with a helmet.
Jochen
diocletian_ticinum_43a.jpg
Moneta208 viewsDiocletian 284 - 305
AE - AE 2, 10.5g, 25mm
Ticinum 2. officina, ca. 300- 303
obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SACRA MONET AVGG - CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing l., r. holding scales, r. cornucopiae
exergue: ST dot
RIC VI, Ticinum 43(a); C.436
VF

MONETA, appears first as a title of Juno. 344 BC a temple was dedicated to JUNO MONETA on the Capitoline hill. The origin of this name from lat. monere = warning is doubtful. Because the first Mint of Rome stands near this temple MONETA became the personification of the Mint itself. Her attributes are like those of Aequitas: Scales and a Cornucopiae.
SACRA MONETA means: Mint of the emperor(s).
1 commentsJochen
C178_Cldc_red.jpg
Moneta Antioch mint40 viewsAntioch Mint Obverse: IMPCMAVRSEVALEXANDAVG. Laureate bust right, draped and cuirassed. Reverse: MONETAAVG. Juno Moneta standing, head left, holding cornucopia with left, and scales with right hand. Weight 3.042g; die axis, 6 h.
mix_val
BILD1383.JPG
Morocco, Volubilis Capitol45 viewsTo the south of the basilica stands the capitol, a temple dedicated to the Roman Capitoline triad, Jupiter, Juno and Minerva. It is composed of a single cella reached by thirteen steps. Four other chapels complete the complex, of which one was dedicated to the goddess Venus. The temple was reconstructed in 218 C.E. by Macrinus, as is indicated by an inscription found in 1924. The temple’s porticos were restored in 1955. In 1962, restoration work started again; the stairs were restored (only three steps remained out of the original thirteen), and the walls of the cella as well as the architectural elements (column drums, bases and capitals) were restored. Franz-Josef M
RIC_127.jpg
Otacilia Severa10 viewsAv. M OTACIL SEVERA AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rv. IVNO CONSERVAT
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre
RIC 127 4,07g Viminacium
Priscus
RIC_128.jpg
Otacilia Severa 16 viewsAv. M OTACIL SEVERA AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rv. IVNO CONSERVATRIX
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre
RIC 128 4,55g Viminacium RR+
Priscus
AF_RIC_127V_MARCIA.jpg
Otacilia Severa 5 viewsAv. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rv. IVNO CONSERVAT
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre
RIC - (127v) 3,61g Imitation ( Collection PRISCUS AFRIC 127V(1) )
Priscus
AF_RIC_127V_MARCIA_(2).jpg
Otacilia Severa 6 viewsAv. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rv. IVNO CONSERVAT
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre
RIC - (127v) 2,85g Imitation ( Collection PRISCUS AFRIC 127V(2) )
Priscus
AF_OS_RIC_-_IVNO_REGINA.jpg
Otacilia Severa 8 viewsAv. MARCIA OTACIL SEVERA AVG
Diademed and draped bust right, crescent behind shoulders
Rv. IVNO REGINA
Juno left (?)
RIC - 2,53g Imitation and Hybrid ( Collection PRISCUS AFOSRIC IVNO REGINA )
Priscus
00006.jpg
Otacilia Severa (RIC 127, Coin #6)10 viewsRIC 127, AR Antoninianus, Rome, 246-248 AD.
Obv: M OTACIL SEVERA AVG Diademed draped bust on crescent.
Rev: IVNO CONSERVAT Juno standing left with patera and scepter.
Size: 22.3mm 4.56gm
MaynardGee
oct.jpg
Otacilia Severa, (244 - 249 A.D.)46 viewsAR Antoninianus
O: M OTACIL SEVERA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, resting on a crescent.
R: IVNO CONSERVAT, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
Rome, 246 - 248 A.D.
24mm
5.1g
RIC 127; RSC 20

Scarce
2 commentsMat
IMG_2112q.JPG
Peafowl135 viewsVatican museums

animal of Juno ~ Hera
Johny SYSEL
6562_6563.jpg
Probus, Antoninianus, CONCORDIA AVG, VII, XXI5 viewsAE Antoninianus
Probus
Augustus: 276 - 282AD
Issued: 280AD
21.0mm 3.18gr
O: IMP C PROBVS PF AVG; Radiate, cuirassed bust, right.
R: CONCORDIA AVG; Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia.
Exergue: VII, right field; XXI, below line.
Aorta: 1651: B72, O63, R25, T7, M6.
Sear 11966; RIC 661, F2.; RSC 150.
juno_moneta79 121937675460
4/3/16 1/21/17
Nicholas Z
a08.jpg
Renia 1 - Biga of goats37 views138 B.C.
Silver Denarius
3.74 gm, 17.5 mm
Obv: X - Roma head right, helmeted.
Rev: C. RENI - Juno riding in biga of goats right.
Exe: ROMA
Rome mint: 138 BC
SEAR RCV I (2000), #108, page 94 - RRC 231/1
1 commentsJaimelai
Republican_Renius_Roma_BigaOfGoats_denar_AR16_3.36g_Cr-23-1_Syd432_Renia1.jpg
Renius, Roma, biga of goats, denar35 viewsDenarius, 138 BC, 3.36g. Cr-231/1, Syd-432, Renia 1. Obv: Head of Roma r., X behind head; Rx: Juno Caprotina in biga of goats r., C.RENI below goats, ROMA in exergue. . Areas of wear on obverse. Small chip out of coin on right edge, but does not detract from coins overall beauty. Good silver. Almost complete images in both sides. Nicely centered. Fine/aVF

ex HJB
1 commentsareich
denarius.jpg
Republic L Papius Denarius Serratus.63 viewsL Papius Denarius Serratus. 79 BC, Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goatskin, symbol behind / Gryphon dancing right, symbol below, L PAPI in ex.

Sear5 311, Syd 773, Cr384/1.

2 commentsTanit
RIC_817_Vespasianus.jpg
RIC 0817 Vespasianus126 viewsObv: IMP CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M T P P P COS VI, Laureate head right
Rev: S C (in exergue), The temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus: Hexastyle temple within which, statue of Jupiter seated facing flanked by statues of Juno and Minerva standing facing; on either side of the temple, a statue. The pediment is decorated with statues of the Capitoline Triad and other figures; roof surmounted by quadriga on top, and eagles on either side.
AE/Sestertius (33.19 mm 24.39 gr 6h) Struck in Rome 75 A.D.
RIC 817 (R3, same obverse die), BMCRE-BNF unisted
ex N.A.C. Auction 100 part 2 lot 1810
8 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_841_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0841 Domitianus44 viewsObv : IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII, Laureate head right
Rev : CAPIT (across field) RESTIT (in exergue), Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minerva
AR/Cistophorus (25.02 mm 10.596 g 6h) Struck in Rome for circulation in Asia Minor 82 A.D.
RIC 841 (C), RSC 23, BMCRE 251, BNF 221, RPC II 864
ex CNG Electronic Auction 125 lot 227
4 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
RIC_842_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 0842 Domitianus84 viewsObv: IMP CAESAR DOMITIANVS AVG, Laureate head of Domitian, right
Rev : CA-PIT (across field) RESTIT (in exergue), Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minerva
AR/Cistophorus (27.56 mm 11.122 g 7h) Struck in Rome for circulation in Asia Minor 82 A.D.
RIC 842 (R), RSC-BMCRE-BNF unlisted, RPC II 867
ex Numismatik Naumann GmbH Auction 70 Lot 462
8 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
Titus001.jpg
RIC 108 Titus denarius152 viewsIMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M
Laureate head right

TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P
Wreath on curule chair.

3.27g

Rome 79 AD

RIC 108 (C2), RSC 318


In the Roman Republic, and later the Empire, the curule seat (sella curulis, supposedly from currus, "chariot") was the chair upon which senior magistrates or promagistrates owning imperium were entitled to sit, including dictators, masters of the horse, consuls, praetors, censors, and the curule aediles. According to Livy the curule seat, like the Roman toga, originated in Etruria and it has been used on surviving Etruscan monuments to identify magistrates. The curule chair is used on Roman medals as well as funerary monuments to express a curule magistracy; when traversed by a hasta (spear), it is the symbol of Juno.

The curule chair was traditionally made of or veneered with ivory, with curved legs forming a wide X; it had no back, and low arms. Although often of luxurious construction, the Roman curule was meant to be uncomfortable to sit on for long periods of time, the double symbolism being that the official was expected to carry out his public function in an efficient and timely manner, and that his office, being an office of the republic, was temporary, not perennial.
6 commentsJay GT4
RIC_V_1293_Domitianus.jpg
RIC 1293 Domitianus37 viewsObv: CAESAR AVG F DOMITIANVS COS V, Laureate head right.
Rev: S C (in field), Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with six columns, enclosing statues of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva.
AE/As (27.78 mm 9.97 g 6h) Struck in Lugdunum 77-78 AD
RIC 1293 (R2, Vespasian), BMCRE 877 (Vespasian) apparently same dies
2 commentsFlaviusDomitianus
Sabina_R634_fac.jpg
RIC 2, p.386, 395a - Sabina, Juno standing24 viewsSabina
AR Denarius, AD 128-136
Obv: SABINA AVGVSTA, bust of Sabina, diademed, draped, right; hair is knotted in back and falls in waves down neck
Rev: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno, draped, standing left, holding patera in right hand and vertical sceptre in left
Ag, 3.01g, 16mm
Ref.: RIC 395a [C], CRE 54 [C]
2 commentsshanxi
Sabina_R636_fac.jpg
RIC 2, p.387, 401b - Sabina, Juno standing11 viewsSabina
AR Denarius, AD 128-136
Obv: SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, Diademed and draped bust left.
Rev: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
Ag, 3.5g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 401b [S], CRE 56 [R]
shanxi
Faustina_I_01.jpg
RIC 3, p.073, 391 - Faustina I, Juno 35 viewsFaustina Senior
Denarius after 141
Obv.: DIVA FAVSTINA Draped bust right.
Rev.: IVNO Juno veiled standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
Ag, 3.1g, 18.4mm
Ref.: RIC 391, CRE 99 [S]
Ex CNG
1 commentsshanxi
R654_Lucilla_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.275, 772 - Lucilla, Ivno Regina6 viewsLucilla
Denar, Rome
Obv.: LVCILLA AVGVSTA Draped bust right
Rev.: IVNO REGINA, Juno, veiled and standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at her feet, peacock.
Ag, 18mm, 3.23g
Ref.: RIC III, p.275, 772, CRE 255 [S]
shanxi
Crispina_01~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 283 - Crispina, Juno5 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust
Rev.: I- V-N-O, Juno standing with patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
Ag, 3.12g, 17.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 283, CRE 289 [S]
Ex Dionysos Numismatik
shanxi
domnasestertiusjuno.JPG
RIC 585. Julia Domna Sestertius Juno74 viewsAE Sestertius. Rome mint

Obv. Draped and diademed bust right IVLIA PIA FELIX AVG

Rev. Juno standing peacock at feet IVNONEM SC.

RIC 585.
LordBest
Salonina_03.jpg
RIC 5a, p.200, 92 - Salonina, Juno12 viewsSalonina
Augusta, 254-268
Antoninianus, Antiochia
Obv.: SALONINA AVG, Draped bust right, set on crescent.
Rev.: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left with patera and sceptre
Billon, 3.48g, 22.2mm
Ref.: RIC 92
shanxi
DomitianCistophorus.jpg
RIC 841 Domitian Cistophorus130 viewsIMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG P M COS VIII
laureate head of Domitian to right

CA PIT across field, RESTIT in exergue
tetrastyle temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus Capitolinus, containing statues of the Capitoline Triad, Jupiter seated left between standing figures of Juno and Minerva

Ephesus or more likely Rome for circulation in the East
A.D. 82

Rare
10.83g

RIC 841 (C), S.2715, BMC 251, RSC 23, RPC 864

From the MS collection
Ex-G&M auction 147 lot 1813 March 2006
Ex-Calgary Coin
4 commentsJay GT4
SALONINA.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - SALONINA19 viewsSalonina AD 253-268 AE Antoninianus "Juno" "O' Juno, save us" Obv: SALONINA AVG - Diademed bust right, draped and on a crescent Rev: IVNO REGINA - Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter. Rome mint AD 260-268 RIC Vi, p. 193, 13; Cohen 60, 3.10 g. dpaul7
treb gall 2.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - TREBONIANUS GALLUS20 viewsRIC 69 - Sear '88 #2783 Trebonianus Gallus AR Antoninianus. IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, radiate, draped& cuirassed bust right / IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left with corn ears & scepter. RIC 69, RSC 46.
Milan mint
dpaul7
09_treb_gallus_ivno_martialis.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - Trebonianus Gallus14 viewsROMAN EMPIRE - Trebonianus Gallus (251-253 AD) AR Antoninianus. Obv.: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P P AVG, radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right, IV below. Rev.: IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left, holding corn-ears and transverse spear, IV in exergue. References: RIC 83; RSC 47b.dpaul7
Roman_Empire_Julia_Mamaea.jpg
Roman Empire / Julia Mamaea AD (222-235) 41 viewsJulia Mamaea AR Denarius
Obverse : Julia portrait right.
Rverse : Juno with Peacock
(2.71 g) Rome Mint
RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, SRCV II 8212,

From the Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
10394ab~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE PROVINCIAL, Severus Alexander and Julia Maesa, Markianopolis in Moesia Inferior, governor Tereventinus, 5 assaria, 222-235 AD., unpublished.222 viewsMarkianopolis in Moesia Inferior, Severus Alexander and Julia Maesa, governor Tereventinus,
Æ28 / 5 assaria (27-29 mm / 13.76 g), 222-235 AD.,
Obv.: AVT K M AVP CEVH AΛEZANΔPOC IOVΛIA MAIC {AVΓ} , ({AVΓ} ligate ), confronted busts of Severus Alexander (l.) and Julia Maesa (r.).
Rev.: {HΓ} {OV}M TEPEBENTIN{OV} M{AP}KIANOΠOΛITΩN / E , ({HΓ}, {OV}, {AR} ligate) , Hera/Juno standing l., holding patera? and torch/spear?.
unpublished, cf. AMNG I page 296, 1063*.

Curtis Clay: For some reason coins of Alex. and Maesa under Tereventinus are rare. Pick knew only two types, three specimens, since 1064 shows Mamaea not Maesa. Hristova/Jekov pp. 189 and 191 try to add two new types, but the readings of empress and/or governor seem doubtful.
1 commentsArminius
Antose96~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Antoninus Pius Sestertius, RIC 60864 viewsÆ Sestertius (28.89g, Ø31mm, 12h). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
Obv.: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
Rev.: IVNONI SISPITAE around, S C across field, Juno Sospita wearing goat skin advancing right preceded by a snake, brandishing javelin and holding shield which is pinched in the middle.
RIC 608; Cohen 473; BMCRE 1248; Strack 837; Banti (I Grandi Bronzi Imperiali II-3) 201 (7 spec.); Sear (Roman Coins and their Values II) 4186
ex iNumis, Paris, March 2009

This issue is part of a series of coins struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome, figuring scenes from Ancient Roman legends. Juno Sospita was the goddess of Lanuvium, the birthplace of Pius, and one of the most ancient figures in the Roman pantheon.
Charles S
7MG_0994_Claudius_Avers_320_320.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus33 viewsClaudius II Gothicus ニ Antoninianus. Antioch Mint. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet, B in ex. RIC 212, Cohen 133.

dupondius
6MG_1008_Claudius_left_black_Avers_640_320.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II Gothicus31 viewsClaudius II AE Antoninianus. Antioch, AD 268-270. IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate head left / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, peacock at her feet. Cohen 133. RIC 212L

*AAH* Claudius II AE Ant "Juno" *FTN Claudius II "Gothicus" AD 268-270 AE Antoninianus "Claudius is a strong and valiant leader." Obv: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG - Radiate head left Rev: IVNO REGINA- Juno standing left, peacock at her feet. Antioch mint: AD 268-270 = RIC Vi, 212L, page 229 - Cohen 133 *FTN = First time notice of the listing of this RIC type by AAH (02July04)2.80g.
dupondius
Z5260LG.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Claudius II, AE Antoninianus49 viewsAttribution: RIC 212 (RIC V, Part I)

Mint: Antioch, B
Date: 269-270 AD

Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
Reverse: IVNO R_E_GINA, Juno standing facing, head left, patera in right hand, long scepter in left, peacock at feet to left looking right, B in exergue

Size: 21mm x 22mm
Weight: 3.96 grams

AnemicOak
bpAnto1R3Crispina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, AE Dupondius59 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Laureate and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
Dupondius, 15.4 gm, 25.2 mm, RIC 680
Comment: Juno Lucina is especially associated with childbirth and newborns in the Imperial family.
Massanutten
Faustina_I_RIC1143~0.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina I (Senior), Sestertius - RIC 114337 viewsObv: DIVA FAVSTINA. Draped bust right
Rev: IVNO S - C. Juno standing left holding patera and scepter
Size: 30 mm
Weight: 23,7 gr
Date: 141-161 AD
Ref: RIC III 1143 (Antoninus Pius), Cohen 210
Provenance: Collection of Karl Pollak, note: "Acquired from Rich. Ramisch on 24.09.1946 for 30 schillings"
vs1969
Faustina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina II8 viewsFaustina junior, the reverse is Juno -Jupiters wife, she holds a patera(a small dish used for drinking or pouring of libations) and a scepter. A peacock at her feet.jessvc1
bpAnto1E3FausJr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, AR Denarius38 viewsObv: FAVSTINA AVGVSTA
Bare headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO
Juno standing front, head left, holding sceptre and patera. Peacock at feet.
Denarius, 3.4 gm, 17.9 mm, RIC 688
Massanutten
Faustina sestertius IVNONI LVCINAE.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Junior, Sestertius44 viewsRIC 1650? (listed as a dupondius on Wildwinds, but at 30mm this is definitely a sestertius)
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing left between two infants, holding a third infant.
E Pinniger
bpAnto1B5FausSr.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Senior, AR denarius34 viewsObverse: DIVA FAVSTINA
Draped bust, right.
Rev: AVGVSTA
Juno enthroned right, holding transverse sceptre.
Denarius, 3.3 gm, 17.3 mm, RIC 363.
Comment: Issued by her husband, Antoninus Pius, to commemorate her funeral and deification in early 141.
Massanutten
moneta 672.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Faustina Sr., Rome - RIC III 115553 viewsFaustina Sr. As
obv: DIVA FAVSTINA. Draped bust right
rev: AETERNITAS S C. Juno standing left, raisinig hand and holding sceptre
Struck by Antoninus Pius 141-145 A.D. at Rome
RIC III 1155
Jericho
Unidentified_Geta_Limes_Denarius_or_Mule_Reverse.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Geta Silver/Billon Limes Denarius. IVNO Mule Reverse? 3.4 grams, 20mm max diameter109 viewsAt first glance this looks like an ordinary Gert AR/Silver Denarius or a Billon Limes. 3.4 grams, 20mm maximum diameter
However, the reverse is of the IVNO Juno with peacock image. In the sources I've examined such an issue was not officially struck.
Curtis
0235-210.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, JULIA MAESA Denarius, RIC 254292 viewsRome mint AD 218-220
IVLIA MAESA AVG, Bust of Maesa right
IVNO, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre
3.48 gr
Ref : RIC # 254, RCV #7750, Cohen #16
3 commentsPotator II
Photo_2006_8_11_14_39_41_edited.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Julia Mamaea IVNO CONSERVATRIX33 viewsJulia Mamaea, c. early 222 A.D., Rome.
OBV: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right.
REV: INVO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet left.
ancientcoins
pjimage_(14)_copy~0.jpg
Roman Empire, Julia Mamaea, Mother of Severus Alexander Ruling 222-235 AD18 viewsAR Denarius, Struck Early 222 AD, Eastern Mint
Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG (unbroken), draped bust right
Reverse: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno diademed standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
References: RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMC 43, Sear 2310
Size: 20.5mm, 2.9g
Justin L
Julia Mamaea sestertius IVNO AVGVSTAE.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Julia Mamaea, Sestertius14 viewsRIC 683
Rev: IVNO AVGVSTAE, Juno seated left holding flower in outstretched hand.

Appears to have a large die crack on the reverse.
E Pinniger
bpAnto1K3Lucilla.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Lucilla, AE Sestertius48 viewsObv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA
Bare headed and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO REGINA S C
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre with peacock at feet.
Sestertius, 22.8 gm, 29.9 mm, RIC 1751
Massanutten
0441-310.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, SALONINA, sestertius, RIC # 4659 viewsRome mint, AD 256-260
CORNELIA SALONINA AVG, Diademed and draped bust of Salonina right
IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, with patera and sceptre, SC in field
20.05 gr
Ref : RIC # 46, RCV #10679, Cohen #62
Potator II
as02.JPG
Roman Empire, Severina, AE As or reduced sestertius, Rome mint, struck 275 AD61 viewsSEVERINA AVG diademed-headed draped bust right
IVNO REGINA Juno standing left, peacock before, officina mark in exergue
RIC 7; Cohen 9
dupondius
as01.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, Severina, Rome mint, struck 275 AD, AE As or reduced sestertius31 viewsSEVERINA AVG diademed-headed draped bust right
IVNO REGINA Juno standing left, peacock before, officina mark in exergue
RIC 7; Cohen 9
dupondius
045B.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Volusian Sestertius45 viewsRIC 253a, Cohen 46, Sear '88 2800
19.35 g, 29 mm
IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
IVNONI MARTIALI SC, Juno seated facing in domed distyle temple.
Rare
Mark Z
39182381_283704872417870_5460970029744914432_n.jpg
Roman Imperial, Julia Domna AR Denarius.9 viewsRoman Imperial, Julia Domna Denarius.

IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.

IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left with patera and sceptre, Peacock at foot to left.

RIC 560, RSC 97, Sear RCV 1841
Gil-galad
Julia Mamaea~0.jpg
Roman Julia Mamaea Sestertius71 viewsJulia Mamaea AE Sestertius. 231 AD. IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, diademed & draped bust right / IVNO AVGVSTAE, SC below, Juno seated left, holding a flower & a baby in swaddling clothes.

RIC 683 , Cohen 33.
2 commentsTanit
6gSZmCd4qY2WMHt3B9TpHz7Ew8RqkjjjjFj.jpg
Roman Republic - L Rubrius Dossenus - Denarius - 87BC9 viewsObv: Veiled head of Juno right, scepter and "DOS" behind
Rev: Triumphal chariot right, small victory at top, "L RVBRI" below
Rubria 2
Antonivs Protti
L__PAPIUS.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC - L. PAPIUS - DENARIUS SERRATUS - HEAD OF JUNO SOSPITA - GRIFFIN 39 viewsObv: Head of Juno Sospita r.; symbol behind. Rev: L PAPI; Griffin leaping r.; below, symbol. Condition: very fine Weight: 3.5 gm. Diameter: 19 mm. _9801
Antonivs Protti
Roman_Republic.jpg
Roman Republic Denarius C. Renius21 views138 B.C C. Renius, 3.49g, 17mm
Rome Mint
Obverse: Helmeted head of Roma right (X= 10 asses) behind
Reverse: Juno in a biga of goats right, C.RENI below, ROMA in ex
Dk0311USMC
rrepde18-2.jpg
Roman Republic, 105 BC, Thoria9 viewsAR Denarius (3,9g, 19x22mm, 8h). Rome mint. Struck 105 BC.
Monneyer: L.Thorius Balbus.
Obv.: I·S·M·R [behind], head of Juno Juno Sospita of Lanuvium facing right with goat skin
Rev.: L·THORIVS [below,] BALBVS [in exergue], Bull charging right.
Seaby (Roman Silver Coins I.): Thoria 1

Additional info. from Seaby: I.S.M.R. stands for Juno Sispes Mater Regina. Thorius Balbus was a native of Lanuvium and Cicero describes him as a man who lived in such a manner that there was not a single pleasure, however refined or rare, that he did not enjoy. Juno was worshipped at this city as the protectress of women, especially in pregnancy. The rushing bull is a type parlant of the moneyer's name. This is one of the commonest Roman Republican coins.
Charles S
roscia.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, GENS ROSCIA21 viewsL. Roscius Fabatus. 59 BC.
AR Serrate Denarius (19mm, 3.73 g, 7h). Rome mint.
Head of Juno Sospita right; lyre behind / Female standing right before erect serpent; lyre key to left.
Crawford 412/1 (symbols 57); Sydenham 915; Roscia 3.
elmele
coin010.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L Thorius Balbus : 105BC - AR Denarius18 viewsObv: Head of Juno of Lanuvium r., wearing goat-skin; on left I.S.M.R
Rev: Bull charging r.; below, L. THORIVS / BALBUS; above, control mark V.
3.89g - 20mm - s.192

I.S.M.R "Juno. Sispes. Mater. Regina." meaning, Juno, Savior, Mother and Queen. Her statue, clad in a goat-skin, stood in Lanuvium, a Latin town 35km to the south of Rome, and from whence came the family of L Thorius Balbus.
jerseyjohnjames
Papia_combined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Papius, AR Serrate Denarius9 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Papius, 79 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.82g; 20mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin headdress tied at neck, facing right; control symbol (aplustre) behind.

Reverse: Griffon leaping right; control symbol (prow stem), below; L•PAPI in exergue.

References: Crawford 384/1 (symbol pair 134); Sydenham 773; BMCRR 2981 (symbol pair 5); Papia 1 (symbol pair 47).

Provenance: Ex Herbert & Aphrodite Rubin Collection [Goldberg 96 (14 Feb 2017) Lot 1963]; bought from Ariadne Galleries in 1980’s; The Numismatic Auction Ltd. (Tradart) 1 (13 Dec 1982) Lot 203.

Papius is only known through his coins. Juno Sospita was a deity who’s temple was in Lanuvium, a Latin town 32 kilometers southeast of Rome, and it’s likely that Papius came from that town.

These denarii have paired obverse and reverse control symbols, with almost all symbol pairs appearing on only one set of dies (N.B.: I'm aware of at least one pair that appears on multiple dies). Crawford counts 211 die pairs. The paired control symbols have some loose relationship to one another, i.e. the bow and stern of a galley on this coin. Sydenham argued that the symbols were propaganda for popularist trade guilds. However, because of the breadth and variety of symbol material, Crawford rules-out any intended meaning. This same control system of paired symbols would be re-used 20 years later by another Lanuvian, L. Roscius Fabatus.
1 commentsCarausius
13729q00.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Papius. Denarius, 79 B.C.873 viewsObv: Head of Juno Sospita right, clad in goat's skin, control-symbol behind head.
Rev: Gryphon leaping right, control-symbol below, L PAPI in exergue.
RSC Papia 1 | CRR 733 | RCV I : 311.
11 commentsthe_Apostate
m36659.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Procilius, AR Denarius11 viewsL. Procilius. 80 BC. AR Denarius (18mm, 3.98 g, 2h). Rome mint. Laureate head of Jupiter right / Juno Sospita advancing right, hurling spear and holding shield; serpent to right. Crawford 379/1; Sydenham 771; Procilia 1. Superb EF, fine old cabinet toning.FabiusMaximus
1710181.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Procilius, AR Denarius13 viewsL. Procilius. 80 BC. AR Serrate Denarius (19mm, 3.77 g). Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat's skin headdress / Juno Sospita, holding spear and shield, in biga right; serpent below. Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; Procilia 2. VF, toned, reverse banker’s mark.
FabiusMaximus
1680715l.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Procilius, AR Serrate Denarius - Crawford 379/213 viewsRome, The Republic.
L. Procilius, 80 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.77g; 20mm).
Rome mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goatskin, facing right; S.C. behind.

Rev: Juno Sospita, holding shield and spear, in biga galloping right; snake below horses; L. PROCILI F in exergue.

References: Crawford 379/2; Sydenham 772; BMCRR 3150; Procilia 2.

Provenance: Ex Student and Mentor Collection [NAC 83 (20 May 2015) Lot 339]; privately purchased in 1968.

The letters S.C. on the obverse indicate that this coinage was a special issue, by decree of the Roman Senate, for an unknown purpose. Like the coins of Papius and Roscius Fabatus, the images of Juno Sospita on this coin suggests that Procilius was native of Lanuvium which was home of a cult to Juno Sospita. The snake on the reverse, alludes to the snake in the grotto of Juno Sospita’s Lanuvium temple. Each year, a girl was sent to the grotto to feed the sacred snake, and only a virtuous girl would survive the ordeal.

The reason for serrating the edge of certain Roman Republic denarius issues remains uncertain. Some moneyers issued both serrate and plain edged coins. The practice ended with the serrate issue by Roscius Fabatus in 59 BCE. Possible reasons for the serrations include:
• Proof that the coins were not plated.
• Confounding forgers.
• Making the coins look painful to swallow (reducing theft by mint workers).
• Artistic preference.

1 commentsCarausius
Republican_denarius.jpg
Roman Republic, L. Procilius, L.f., 80 B.C.54 viewsSilver denarius, SRCV I 306, Sydenham 771, Crawford 379/1, RSC I Procilia 1, VF, Italian mint, weight 3.781g, maximum diameter 17.6mm, die axis 90o, 80 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Jupiter right, S C (senatus consulto - authorized by special decree of the Senate) behind; reverse Juno Sospita standing right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake before her, L.PROCILI.F behind

This coin has been stolen en route from Forum to me in the UK if canyone sees it could they let Joe know. Thanks

Ex Forum


Sospita was a surname of Juno in Latium. Her most famous temple was at Lanuvium. She also had two temples at Rome. Her statue, as described by Cicero, was covered with a goat skin. This statue may be the one now at the Vatican. Her attribute is the serpent, which inhabited a grotto near her temple, and was fed annually by a young girl, who, if a virgin, escaped unharmed, but if not was destroyed
3 commentsPhiloromaos
Fabatus_k.jpg
Roman Republic, L. Roscius Fabatus18 viewsAR Serrate Denarius. 19mm. 3.6g, 6h; Rome, c. 59 BC
Obv.: Head of Juno Sospita right, wearing goat skin; uncertain symbol behind.
Rev.: Female standing right feeding serpent to right; uncertain symbol behind.
Reference: Crawford 412/1 (symbols 215) / 16-373-215
2 commentsJohn Anthony
RosciaCombined.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, L. Roscius Fabatus, AR Serrate Denarius17 viewsRome. The Republic.
L. Roscius Fabatus, 59 BCE.
AR Serrate Denarius (3.95g; 19mm).
Rome Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno Sospita, wearing goat skin headdress tied at neck, facing right; L•ROSCI, below; control symbol (two-handled cup or bowl) behind.

Reverse: Female figure feeding serpent from fold of cloak; control symbol (pileus/cap?) behind; FABATI in exergue.

References: Crawford 412/1 (Symbols 199?); Sydenham 915; BMCRR 3394 -3510; Roscia 2.

Provenance: Ex John Barton Collection; Aes Rude Chiasso 4 (6 Apr 1979), Lot 240.

Crawford dated the issue to 64 BCE, but Hersh and Walker brought that date down to 59 BCE based on their analysis of the Mesagne hoard. Harlan picks a median date of 62 BCE based on some prosopographic assumptions.

The moneyer would go on to serve as lieutenant for Caesar in Gaul in 54 BCE. In 49 BCE, he was elected praetor and intermediated between Pompey and Caesar. He was killed at Mutina in 43 BCE.

Juno Sospita was a deity who’s temple was in Lanuvium, a Latin town 32 kilometers southeast of Rome, and it’s likely that both Roscius and L. Papius, whose 79 BCE coinage is a model for Roscius’ issue, came from that town. The reverse depicts an annual rite of the Juno Sospita cult in which a girl is sent into the grotto beneath the temple to feed the sacred snake. Only chaste girls could survive the ordeal.

Like Papius’s coins, these denarii are struck on serrated flans – the last of the Roman Republic to be produced with this fabric. Like Papius’s coins, Roscius’ denarii have obverse and reverse control symbols that are paired, with no pair of symbols appearing on more than one pair of dies. On both Roscius’ and Papius’s coins, the paired control symbols have some loose relationship to one another. Roscius re-used many of Papius’s symbol pairs, but reversed their locations on the coins.

The symbol pair on my coin is very rare. As of 10/1/18, there are no matching examples on Acsearch, Coinarchives or CNG’s website database. The pair is unlisted in Babelon, Sydenham, BMCRR and Banti. It resembles symbol pair 199 in Crawford, although some differences are evident. In his manuscript on Roman Republican series marks, Charles Hersh includes a hand drawn entry AI within the section of previously unpublished Roscia symbol pairs that is a precise match for the symbols on this coin. He cites the Vienna Museum (38465) and Vatican Museum (5158) for that entry.
2 commentsCarausius
00278q00.jpg
ROMAN REPUBLIC, Semilibral Struck AE Triens (Crawford 39)30 viewsRome. The Republic.
Semilibral Reduction, 217-215 BCE
Æ Triens (54 grams; 37 mm).
Uncertain Italian Mint.

Obverse: Head of Juno (?) right, wearing double-crested diadem, her hair tied in three ringlets down neck; scepter or sword over left shoulder (?); ●●●● (mark of value) behind.

Reverse: Hercules, naked but for lion skin, grasping centaur by hair and preparing to strike him with club; ●●●● (mark of value) before; ROMA in exergue.

References: Crawford 39/1; Sydenham 93 (R6); BMCRR (Romano-Campanian) 113-115.

Provenance: Ex Munzen und Medaillen 47 (1972), Lot 74.

Crawford dates his 39 series of collateral, semilibral struck bronzes to the early years of the Second Punic War, 217-215 BC. The economic hardship on Rome imposed by Hannibal’s invasion led to a rapid decline in the weight of Roman bronze coins, resulting in the adoption of a semi-libral bronze standard (AE As of ½ Roman pound) and eventual elimination of cast coins. Crawford deduces that Hannibal’s defeat of Rome at Trasimene in 217 B.C. likely tipped the financial scales to the semilibral reduction. He notes that Capua overstruck Roman coinage of the late semi-libral period when Capua joined with Hannibal in 216-215. Further, in Roman Republican Coin Hoards, Crawford reports that hoard #56, found at Capua in 1909, contained three trientes and four sextantes of the “collateral” series; thus the series must have circulated in Capua for a time before the town switched sides to Hannibal in 216-215. It appears that the standard, prow-type semilibral coins (Crawford 38) came first, because hoards containing the Crawford 39 coins almost always contain semilibral prow types as well.

The obverse of this Triens is particularly enigmatic. Both before, during and after production of this series, the goddess depicted on trientes was typically Minerva. In Roman iconography, Minerva’s attributes are the Corinthian helmet, aegis and spear. The goddess on this triens lacks the Corinthian helmet that was used to depict Minerva in previous Aes Grave series of libral and semilibral weight standard (See Crawford 35 and 38 Aes Grave) and on the subsequent, prow-type, struck trientes (Crawford 41 and 56). Some authors are non-committal as to the goddess’ identity (Crawford, for one, in his catalogue; though elsewhere in his text he refers to “Juno”); others attribute the goddess as Juno who, as Jupiter’s consort, is typically rendered with a diadem crown and scepter; and others believe the goddess is Bellona, a war goddess who is typically rendered with helmet and weapon. Firm identification depends, in part, on proper understanding of the headgear. I think attempts to call the headgear a “helmet” or “partial helmet” are misguided efforts to explain the crest. In my opinion, the headgear is a crested diadem. The odd crest attached to the end of the diadem is possibly a misinterpreted element borrowed from portraits of Tanit on Punic coinage, which always show Tanit with a stylized wheat leaf in this location (Tanit’s depiction was likely borrowed by the Carthaginians from Syracusan tetradrachms). There is also some confusion as to what the goddess holds over her left shoulder. Condition issues and poor strikes on some examples often eliminate this aspect of the design. Fortunately, my example is quite clear and one can see the shadowy image on the left shoulder which extends in straight-line behind the left side of the goddess’ head ending in a visible, rounded point above her head. Crawford may have thought the lower part of this element represented the goddess’ far-side curls (“hair falls in tight rolls onto BOTH shoulders” emphasis added), but this interpretation does not explain the point above her head. The point is not likely to represent the opposite crest, as the crest on the visible side does not extend above head-top level. A more plausible theory, proposed by both Grueber and Sydenham, is that the goddess is holding a scepter over her left shoulder, which is consistent with Juno’s attributes. Other possibilities are that she bears a spear, which is an attribute of Minerva, or a sword, which is an attribute of Bellona.

The Series 39 types and their relationship to contemporaneous Second Punic War events are interesting to ponder. Hercules is an important figure, appearing on two of the 10 available sides of the series. Likely this is a paradigm of Roman heroism during the War. In the myth depicted on this Triens, Hercules kills a centaur for assaulting his wife – is this an allegorical reference to Hannibal’s assault on Italy (and the likely response from Rome)?

Despite its beauty, this type would never again be repeated on a Roman coin. However, related imagery can be found on quincunxes of Capua and quadrantes of Larinum, Apulia, immediately following the defection of those towns to Hannibal’s side of the Second Punic War.
3 commentsCarausius
Silver_Denarius_of_Julia_Mamaea-2-.JPG
Roman, Julia Mamaea166 viewsRoman Empire
Julia Mamaea 222-235 AD
AR Denarius (2.71 g)
RV Juno with Peacock
Rome Mint
Certified by NGC / Ch Au Strike 5/5 Surface 5/5
Sam Mansourati Collection
Sam
sabina~0.jpg
Roman, SABINA (Boyd collection)241 viewsSabina, denarius (Boyd collection)
Sabina, moglie di Adriano (117-138 d.C.), denario d'argento, zecca di Roma (131 d.C.) AR, 2.93 gr., SPL (EF)
D/ SABINA AVGVSTA, busto diademato e drappeggiato a dx.
R/ IVNONI REGINAE, Juno stante a sin., regge patera e scettro
RCV 3921; RIC 395a
William C. Boyd Collection. Acquistata dallo stesso Boyd dal numismatico londinese W.S.Lincoln nel dicembre 1898. Collezione dispersa da Baldwin's Auctions (42), il 26 Settembre 2005, lotto 374
paolo
0088.jpg
Rubrius Dossenus, Denarius9 viewsRubrius Dossenus. AR Denarius

RRC 348/1
87 bc

Av: Veiled head of Juno right; behind, [sceptre and DOS].
Rv:Triumphal chariot right; in exergue, L. RVBRI. [above: victory with wreath]

Unfortunately the coin shows not all of the design - but what is shown looks good....

Ex ArtemideAste, Antiquities 4, 19/20.03.2016, # 88
Norbert
sabina-denarius-reshoot.jpg
Sabina denarius. 117-238 AD14 viewsRoman Imperial, Sabina denarius, (117-238 AD), 2.0g, 16mm

Obverse: SABINA AVGVSTA, Diademed and draped bust right, hair in queue down neck.

Reverse: IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre.

Reference: RIC 395a, RSC 43, Sear (RCV 2000) 3921, BMC 940

Ex: Octavian Coins
Gil-galad
sb2DNmZ6NQ8zqFF3Cw9758cApPB47g.jpg
Sabina, 117 - 138 AD, As or Dupondius, Juno26 viewsSabina, 117 - 138 AD. AE As or Dupondius
Rome Mint, 28mm, 10.8 grams
Obverse: SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P, Diademed and draped bust of Sabina right.
Reverse: IVNO REGINAE S C, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre.
Sear3945 // RIC1038
Antonivs Protti
21699p00.jpg
Sabina, Augusta c. 128 - 136 A.D., Wife of Hadrian33 viewsSilver denarius, RIC II 395a, Cohen 43, VF, 3.252g, 17.4mm, 180o, Rome mint, 128 - 137 A.D.; obverse SABINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair waived into crest on top of diadem, knotted falling down neck; reverse IVNONI REGINAE, Juno standing left holding patera and scepterMarjan E
sabina.jpg
Sabina, denarius (Boyd collection)107 viewsSabina, moglie di Adriano (117-138 d.C.), denario d'argento, zecca di Roma (131 d.C.) AR, 2.93 gr., SPL (EF)
D/ SABINA AVGVSTA, busto diademato e drappeggiato a dx.
R/ IVNONI REGINAE, Juno stante a sin., regge patera e scettro
RCV 3921; RIC 395a
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (5 agosto 2008, numero catalogo 17), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins), New York Usa (2007), ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 2005 (parte del lotto 374), ex William C. Boyd collection, London Uk, (dicembre 1898), ex W.S.Lincoln collection, London Uk (prima del 1897).
paolo
2-2014-11-14_coinsnov20141.JPG
Sabina, Juno22 viewsAr denarius; 18.3mm; 2.98g

SABINA AVGVSTA HADRIANI AVG P P
diademed and draped bust left

IVNONI REGINAE
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter

RIC 401b (Hadrian); RSC 37a (Rome mint, Rare)
Robin Ayers
coins352.JPG
Salonina7 viewsSalonina AE Antoninianus. SALONINA AVG, diademed bust right, draped & on a crescent / IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left with patera & scepter; peacock at feet. RSC 67. RIC 92
ecoli
Salonina-moeda1.jpg
Salonina - wife of Gallienus - Reined between 257 and 268 AD.63 viewsAR Antoninian of Salonina - wife of Gallienus - Reined between 257 and 268 AD.

Weight: 2.2g
Ø: 21mm

Obv: SALONINA AVG - Salonina right.

Rev: IVNO REGINA - JUNO standing left, holding a patera and a scepter.

EF/EF

RIC 13 - VM 22 - Cohen 58
1 commentsJorge C
Salonina.png
Salonina Antoninianus14 viewsSalonina Antoninianus

Obverse:
SALONINA AVG
Diademed, draped bust right on crescent

Reverse:
IVNO REGINA
Providentia standing left, holding globe and sceptre. * in left field
1 commentsHarry G
Salonina_Juno.JPG
Salonina Juno16 viewsSalonina, AE Antoninianus (wife of Gallienus) 20mm, 3.0gm
Struck 260-268 AD, RSC 60, RIC 29[j]
OBV: SALONINA AVG, Draped bust right on crescent
REV: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing holding scepter, peacock at feet left.
Romanorvm
Clipboard~53.jpg
SALONINA Juno standing left, peacock left at feet14 viewsSALONINA, wife of Gallienus. Antoninianus
Antioch mint. Struck 257-258 AD.
SALONINA AVG, diademed and draped bust right on
crescent
IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left,
holding patera and sceptre; peacock left at feet.
Weight - 3.3g
Diameter - 21mm
lorry66
SALONINA-1~0.jpg
Salonina RIC V-1, 6429 viewsObv: SALONINA AVG
Diademed, draped bust right on
crescent.
Rev: IVNO REGINA
Juno standing left holding patera & scepter
18mm 1.7gm
OWL365
salonina sest.jpg
SALONINA sestertius - c.255-256 AD65 viewsobv: CORNELIA.SA[L]O[NINA.AVG] (diademed & draped bust right)
rev: IVNO.REGINA / S.C. (Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter)
ref: RIC Vi-46, C.62
mint: Rome
21.11gms, 26-29mm
Rare
Wife of Gallienus, and mother of Valerianus II, Saloninus, and Egnatius Marinianus. She was married to Gallienus before 242. Salonina saw the murder of her husband in 268, in front of the walls of sieged Milan.
berserker
IMG_1075.JPG
Salonina Sestertius Ivno 32 viewsAE Sestertius
Salonina, 253-268 CE
Diameter: 26~29mm, Weight: 15.69 grams, Die axis: 6h

Obverse: CORNELIA SALONINA AVG
Draped and diademed bust to right.

Reverse: IVNO REGINA SC
Juno, draped, standing facing left, holding patera in outstretched right hand, and sceptre in left hand.

Mint: Rome

Notes:
- The wife of Emperor Gallienus, her fate following the assassination of her husband is not certain.
-Salonina was said to be an intellectual woman, and her and her husband were patrons of the influential Greek philosopher Plotinus.
-The Historia Avgvsta records an incident where Salonina was sold gems that turned out to be glass. The seller was apprehended, and was told he would be fed to a lion. When at last the gate was opened, a chicken emerged. The emperor Gallienus was supposed to have said "He deceived, and then was himself deceived".
- Bronze fractional coinage during this period of Roman history is scarce. The silver antoninianus became so debased and inflation so rampant, metal was used to mint this more valuable denomination, rather than fractions such as sestertii. This sestertius dates to 255-256 CE.

Ex Downies Melbourne Ancient Exclusives July 2016, number 134, Ex Dix Noonan Web 15 March 2012, lot 1262 (part of), from the John Quinn collection
Pharsalos
ARI-Salonina-3.jpg
Salonina, AD 254-268 11 viewsBi Double-Denarius, Sear #10640, RIC 29.

Grade: AU: Strike 4/5: Surface 5/5

Obv.:SALONINA AVG, draped bust right on crescent

Rev.: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre.

Julia Cornelia Salonina (died 268, Mediolanum) was an Augusta, wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus.
Richard M10
salonina_92.jpg
Salonina, Göbl 161924 viewsCornelia Salonina, killed AD 268, wife of Gallienus
Billon Antoninianus, 3.37g, 23.12mm, 0°
struck in Antiochia, time of Gallienus' sole-reign
obv. [SAL]ONINA AVG
Bust, draped and with stephane, on crescent, r.
rev. IVNO REGINA
Juno, in long clothes, wearing polos, stg. half left, holding patera in outstretched r. hand
and resting with l. hand on her sceptre; at her feet peacock stg. l.
ex. star (for Antiochia)
RIC V/1, 92; C.67; Göbl 1619
scarce, VF

Here Juno wears a real polos belonging rightly to her as queen of heaven.
Jochen
salonina.jpg
Salonina, IVNO REGINA (with peacock & star)11 viewsSalonina Antoninianus, ca. 243-268 AD 22 mm, 3.2 g. Antioch 264 A.D.
Obverse: SALONINA AVG; draped bust on crescent right
Reverse: IVNO REGINA; Juno standing with scepter and patera, peacock before, star in left field. RIC 92, RSC 67, Göbl 1619f, Sear 10641. Ex areich

Podiceps
Salonina8.jpg
Salonina, Juno32 viewsAnt.; 18-22mm; 2.58g

SALONINA AVG
Diademed draped bust right on crescent

IVNO REGINA
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet; Star in left field

RIC 92; RSC 67; Sear 10641; Göbl 1619f
arizonarobin
salonina090608a.jpg
Salonina, Juno41 viewsAr Antoninianus 21-22mm;2.82g

SALONINA AVG
Diademed bust right, draped and on a crescent

IVNO REGINA
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter

RIC 29; RSC 60; Sear 10640
arizonarobin
D3A60341-FED8-433B-ADA3-B9C97B78A0A0.jpeg
Salonina, Juno 8 viewsSalonina
AE Antoninianus; 3.57g; 20-21mm

SALONINA AVG,
diademed and draped bust right, on a crescent

IVNO REGINA,
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; peacock at feet, star in left field.

RIC 92; RSC 67; Goebl 1619f; Sear 10641.
Robin Ayers
SALONINA-2-ROMAN.jpg
Salonina, RIC V(1)-29 Rome14 viewsBillon Antoninianus
Rome mint, 257-258 A.D.
21mm, 3.19g
RIC V(1)-29, RSCv.4-60, RCVv.3-10640

Obverse:
SALONINA AVG
Diademed, draped bust right, on crescent.

Reverse:
IVNO REGINA
Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre.
rubadub
0441-310np_noir.jpg
Salonina, Sestertius - *95 viewsRome mint, AD 256-260
CORNELIA SALONINA AVG, Diademed and draped bust of Salonina right
IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left, with patera and sceptre, SC in field
20.05 gr
Ref : RIC # 46, RCV #10679, Cohen #62
2 commentsPotator II
D_elk_Salonina.jpg
Salonina, wife of Gallienus: Junos stag101 viewsSalonina, wife of Gallienus (253–268)
Rome mint, workshop A.
Obeverse: [COR]SALONINAAVG, Salonina head right.
Reverse: IVNONICONSAVG, stag standing left. [A] below.

W=2.83g; D=21x23mm.
KjetilK
jldose02-2.jpg
Septimius Severus for Julia Domna, sestertius of 193-19630 viewsÆ Sestertius (29.5g, Ø 32mm, 12h), Rome mint, struck under Septimius Severus in AD 193-196.
Obv.: IVLIA·DOMNA·AVG, Draped bust of Julia Domna facing right, hair waved and coiled at back..
Rev.: IVNO REGINA S C, Juno standing left, holding patera and long sceptre; at her feet a peacock.
RIC (Severus) 840 (R); Cohen 99
Charles S
Sest_Ivno_conservatrix.jpg
Sestertius IVNO CONSERVATRIX65 viewsObverse: "IVLI"AMAMAEAAVG
Bust right, drape, wearing stephane
Reverse: "IVNO"CONSERVATRIX, S and C, left and right, low in field.
Juno veiled draped standing front, head left, holding patera in extended right hand and vertical sceptre in left; to the left, peakcock standing front, body inclined left, head turned to catch drops from patera
BMC 51 (Plate 2), RIC 686
Weight, 20.32g; die axis, 12h
mix_val
FAVSTINA_II.JPG
Sestertius, IVNONI REGINAE S-C, Juno & peacock; RIC 165121 viewsFaustina Jr Æ Sestertius, Rome. Sear RCV 5278, RIC 1651, Cohen 142. FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right wearing circlet of pearls / IVNONI REGINAE S-C, Juno, veiled, standing left, holding patera & scepter; peacock standing left at feet, head reverted. Podiceps
severina.jpg
SEVERINA14 viewsAE reduced sestertius. Rome 11th emission, 275 AD. 7.37 g, 12h. Draped bust right, wearing stephane. SEVERINA AVG. / Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet, peacock standing left, head right; S in exergue. IVNO REGINA. RIC V 7. MIR 47.
Stack (24-28 August 1976), lot 1755.

benito
00sevesest.jpg
SEVERINA18 viewsAE reduced sestertius. Rome 11th emission, 275 AD. 7.37 g, 12h. Draped bust right, wearing stephane. SEVERINA AVG. / Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre; at feet, peacock standing left, head right; S in exergue. IVNO REGINA. RIC V 7. MIR 47.
benito
Severinabarb.JPG
Severina Antoninianus/As, Barbarous 3rd Century54 viewsObv: Severina draped bust rt. on a crescent, Rev: Juno stndng left holding patera and sceptre (RIC 7 Ref: Wildwinds)

A crude coin and an example of the barbarous habit of mixing an obverse antoninian type with a Juno reverse only known for the As.
daverino
volusianas.jpg
SHRINE, Volusian, AE As.84 viewsÆ As 252 AD. 9.59 gr. 12h . Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAE C VIB VOLUSIANO AVG. / Juno seated front within garlanded round shrine; peacock at her side. IVNONI MARTIALI. SC in fields. RIC IV 252b. benito
0400-220~0.jpg
SHRINE, Volusian, Antoninianus634 viewsMinted in Rome in AD 252
IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate and draped bust of Volusian right
IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated within a distyle shrine, * in right field
3,60 gr
Ref : RCV # 9750, Cohen #45

The precise location of this shrine could be in the Campus Martius, or in the Campus Martialis (see RCV III, p 241, note under # 9730)
4 commentsPotator II
045A~0.jpg
SHRINE, Volusian, Sestertius312 viewsRIC 253a, Cohen 46, Sear '88 2800
19.35 g, 29 mm
IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
IVNONI MARTIALI SC, Juno seated facing in domed distyle temple or shrine.
Rare
Mark Z
MameaDenarius.jpg
Silver Denarius of Julia Mamea14 viewsRoman silver denarius of Julia Mamaea, minted in Rome in 222 AD. 20.5 mm, 3.516 g.

Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG, draped bust right

Reverse: IVNO CONSERVATRIX, Juno standing half left, veiled, patera in right, long scepter vertical behind in left, peacock right at feet on left

Attribution: RIC IV 343, RSC III 35, BMCRE VI 43, SRCV II 8212
chuy1530
sol-gorsium.jpg
SOL statue from Gorsium (Pannonia Inferior) - 3rd century AD137 viewsGorsium is the greatest open-air archeological park in the Carpathian basin. The city was established in place of a military settlement by the Emperor Trajan. Gorsium lay at one of the most important road intersections in the province, and it was the center of emperor worship in Pannonia and the seat of the provincial assembly. Delegates from all over the province gathered here once every year to offer sacrifices to their gods for the glory of the reigning emperor, and to attend the assembly meetings. Septimius Severus visited the city in AD 202, and rebuilt the Temple of Augustus, what was destroyed by Markomanns in AD 178.
The city was full of pagan shrines, reliefs and monuments. According to the artifacts, the inhabitants of the city worshipped Aeneas, Amor, Icarus, Achilles, Jupiter, Silvanus, Minerva, Liber, Attis, Hercules, Venus, Luna, Juno, Mars, Victoria, Diana, Mithra and others.
This SOL statue was found in the central free-well together with broken coins and other things. 42mm high.
3 commentsberserker
Spain- Taragona- The Forum and Basilica Square with statue .jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum and Basilica Square with statue 22 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica25 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica and Cistern.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica and Cistern20 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica and house.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Basilica and house20 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court27 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court Inscriptions.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court Inscriptions25 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court Inscriptions 1.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Court Inscriptions 120 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Houses.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Houses41 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Industrial house and Cistern.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Industrial house and Cistern276 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Tomb.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Tomb271 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Via Roma.jpg
Spain- Taragona- The Forum- Via Roma302 viewsThe colonial Forum

All Roman towns had a large square (forum) that was the political, social and business centre of town.
Architecturally, it was a large space surrounded by arcades and varius public buildings, separated into different areas- the religious and the civil. The sacred area was presided over by a temple dedicated to the Capatoline Triad (Jupiter, Juno and Minerva) or the deified emperor. This temple may have been accompanied by others of less importance. The civil area contained various buildings, the most important of which was probably the basilica, which served as a courthouse, a social meeting place, and the curia, or seat of the council composed of the city´s dignitaries.
Today only the basilica is preserved. This building is divided into three sections, separated by Corinthian columns, and was built in the period of Augustus (in the years before the birth of Christ). It housed the court, or aedes augusti. In front of the basilica there was a square, with various statues, on which several of the city´s streets converged. These streets delimited insulae, or “islands” of houses. The ground floors of the houses contained shops, warehouses and workshops, while the upper floors were where the people lived, crowded together in small rooms. Only the wealthiest of families could afford to live in a domus, a house with one or two storeys, several rooms distributed around an atrium, and other recreational areas.
John Schou
T_Carisius.jpg
T Carisius AR Denarius Cr464/225 viewsOBV: Head of Juno Moneta right, slight drapery
REV: Implements for coining money: anvil die with garlanded punch die above; tongs and hammer on either side; all within wreath
19mm, 3.49 g

Struck at Rome, 46 BC
Legatus
4360481.jpg
T. Carisius7 viewsMoneyer issues of Imperatorial Rome. T. Carisius. 46 BC. AR Denarius (19mm, 3.71 g, 6h). Rome mint. Head of Juno Moneta right / Implements for coining money: anvil die with garlanded punch die above, tongs and hammer on either side; all within laurel wreath. Crawford 464/2; CRI 70; Sydenham 982a; Carisia 1a; Type as RBW 1614. VF, toned, small pin hole on obverse below Moneta’s bust.

From the Andrew McCabe Collection, purchased from Peus Nachf., with old German collection ticket.

The apparent punch die on this type may be a cap of Liberty, and the lower die a generic anvil. The cap-shaped object is wreathed like a Dioscurus cap, which is the same cap worn by Vulcan, the god of metal-working. An analogue can be seen in the Scribonius Wellhead issue, RRC 416, which displays four different symbols, not three. Even rarer than the sought-after anvil is the Scribonius with a cap of Liberty, a variety not listed by Crawford. The scene on this coin may thus represent Vulcan’s generic metal-making workshop, but with the placement of the cap above the anvil, it may also be intended to allude to minting even if a punch die is not directly shown.

RRC p. 475 notes one reverse die of this issue with legend T. CARISIV (Amsterdam) as per this coin. Richard Schaefer obtained a photograph of the Amsterdam example and compared it to other examples in his Republican Die Project. In fact, reverse die matched examples to the Amsterdam coin prove the final S of CARISIVS did exist, but the die was filled at a later state. This CARISIV variety from a different die pair seems to have been caused by the same phenomenon. There is a trace of a final letter S. [Andrew McCabe]

Ex-CNG
ecoli
Tibese10-2~0.jpg
TEMPLE, Tiberius, sestertius - temple of Concordia108 viewsÆ Sestertius (26,50g, Ø 35mm, 12h). Rome, AD 36-37.
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST PM TR POT XXXIIX around large S C.
Rev.: Hexastyle temple on podium of five steps with flanking walls to r. and l.; Concordia seated within, holding patera and cornucopiae, flanked by the statues of Hercules and Mercurius; Jupiter, Juno, Minerva, Victories and other figures above empty pediment.
RIC 67 (R); BMC 133; Cohen 70; RCV 1766
Ex Varesi Numismatica Auction 65, 10 Feb. 2015; ex Ex Astarte XII, 12 Sep. 2003, lot 485.

The temple of Concordia in the Roman Forum was restored and embellished under Tiberius. It housed so many antique statues that Pliny the Elder called it a museum of art and Greek sculpture.
1 commentsCharles S
VESPSE10-2~0.jpg
TEMPLE, Vespasian, Æ Sestertius - temple of Jupiter Capitolinus110 viewsÆ Sestertius (27,72g, Ø 33mm, 6h). Rome, AD 76.
Obv.: [IMP CAES] VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII, laureate head right.
Rev.: S·C in ex., Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus with six columns on podium of three steps; between the columns in the center on a pedestal, the statue of Jupiter seated on a throne, holding a scepter in l. hand; right and left statues of Juno and Minerva standing; outside the columns two statues standing. The pediment is decorated with Jupiter seated between two figures and groups in the corners; on the roof are statues and eagles at the corners left and right.
RIC 886; BMC 721; Cohen 488
Ex Calgary Coin (Robert Kokotailo), Sept. 2015; from an old time Calgary collection (MS), CNG Sale 58 (September 19, 2001), lot 1139.
1 commentsCharles S
l_005.JPG
Thorius Balbus 27 viewsRoman Republic L. Thorius Balbus 105 B.C
AR denarius

Obverse:Head of Juno Sospita wearing goat skin
Reverse: Bull charging right;THORIUS BALBUS;N above

18.73 mm 3.78gm

Syd 598

Similar with obverse of Alexander "Herakles"
maik
Tiberius__AD_14-37__Æ_Sestertius_(35_5mm,_27_11_g,_7h)__Rome_mint__Struck_AD_36-37__Hexastyle_temple_with_flanking_wings;_Concordia_seated_within_216.jpg
Tiberius (Augustus) Coin: Brass Sestertius3 views(no legend) - Hexastyle temple with flanking wings; Concordia seated inside, holding patera and cornucopiae; Hercules and Mercury stand on podia; Jupiter, Juno, Minerva, Victories and other figures above pediment.
TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXIIX - Legend surrounding large S C
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (36-37 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 27.11g / 35.5mm / 6
Rarity: Scarce
References:
RIC I 61
BMCRE 116
Cohen 69
Provenances:
Classical Numismatic Group, Inc.
Acquisition/Sale: CNG Internet 424 #414

From Wikipedia:
The Temple of Concord (Latin: Aedes Concordiae) in the ancient city of Rome refers to a series of shrines or temples dedicated to the Roman goddess Concordia, and erected at the western end of the Roman Forum. The earliest may have vowed by Marcus Furius Camillus in 367 BC, but history also records such a temple erected in the Vulcanal in 304, and another immediately west of the Vulcanal, on the spot the temple later occupied, commissioned in 217. The temple was rebuilt in 121 BC, and again by the future emperor Tiberius between 7 BC and AD 10.

Backed up against the Tabularium at the foot of the Capitoline Hill, the architecture had to accommodate the limitations of the site. The cella of the temple, for instance, is almost twice as wide (45m) as it is deep (24m), as is the pronaos. In the cella a row of Corinthian columns rose from a continuous plinth projecting from the wall, which divided the cella into bays, each containing a niche. The capitals of these columns had pairs of leaping rams in place of the corner volutes. Only the platform now remains, partially covered by a road up to the Capitol.

One tradition ascribes the first Temple of Concord to a vow made by Camillus in 367 BC, on the occasion of the Lex Licinia Sextia, the law passed by the tribunes Gaius Licinius Stolo and Lucius Sextius Lateranus, opening the consulship to the plebeians. The two had prevented the election of any magistrates for a period of several years, as part of the conflict of the orders. Nominated dictator to face an invasion of the Gauls, Camillus, encouraged by his fellow patrician Marcus Fabius Ambustus, Stolo's father-in-law, determined to resolve the crisis by declaring his support for the law, and vowing a temple to Concordia, symbolizing reconciliation between the patricians and plebeians.

Camillus' vow is not mentioned by Livy, who instead describes the dedication of the Temple of Concord in the Vulcanal, a precinct sacred to Vulcan on the western end of the forum, by the aedile Gnaeus Flavius in 304 BC. Flavius' actions were an affront to the senate, partly because he had undertaken the matter without first consulting them, and partly because of his low social standing: not only was Flavius a plebeian, but he was the son of a freedman, and had previously served as a scribe to Appius Claudius Caecus. The Pontifex Maximus, Rome's chief priest, was compelled to instruct Flavius on the proper formulae for dedicating a temple. Cicero and Pliny report that Flavius was a scribe, rather than aedile, at the time of the dedication, and a law was passed immediately afterward forbidding anyone from dedicating a temple without the authorization of the senate or a majority of the plebeian tribunes.

Yet a third Temple of Concord was begun in 217 BC, early in the Second Punic War, by the duumviri Marcus Pupius and Caeso Quinctius Flamininus, in fulfillment of a vow made by the praetor Lucius Manlius Vulso on the occasion of his deliverance from the Gauls in 218. The reason why Manlius vowed a temple to Concordia is not immediately apparent, but Livy alludes to a mutiny that had apparently occurred among the praetor's men. The temple was completed and dedicated the following year by the duumviri Marcus and Gaius Atilius.

The murder of Gaius Gracchus in 121 BC marked a low point in the relationship between the emerging Roman aristocracy and the popular party, and was immediately followed by the reconstruction of the Temple of Concord by Lucius Opimius at the senate's behest, which was regarded as an utterly insincere attempt to clothe its actions in a symbolic act of reconciliation.

From this period, the temple was frequently used as a meeting place for both the senate and the Arval Brethren, and in later times it came to house a number of works of art, many of which are described by Pliny.

A statue of Victoria placed on the roof of the temple was struck by lightning in 211 BC, and prodigies were reported in the Concordiae, the neighborhood of the temple, in 183 and 181. Little else is heard of the temple until 7 BC, when the future emperor Tiberius undertook another restoration, which lasted until AD 10, when the structure was rededicated on the 16th of January as the Aedes Concordiae Augustae, the Temple of Concordia of Augustus.

The temple is occasionally mentioned in imperial times, and may have been restored again following a fire in AD 284. By the eighth century, the temple was reportedly in poor condition, and in danger of collapsing.

The temple was razed circa 1450, and the stone turned into a lime kiln to recover the marble for building.

From CNG:
The Temple of Concordia at the northern end of the Forum in Rome was unusual in that its width was greater than its length. We do not know precisely when the temple was originally built, but its unorthodox design was likely due to space limitations. The temple was restored after the revolt of the Gracchi in 121 BC, and again under Tiberius in AD 10.
Gary W2
tiberius-sestertius.jpg
Tiberius AE Sestertius, Temple of Concordia53 viewsTiberius AE Sestertius. Rome , 36-37 A.D. Facade of the Temple of Concordia: hexstyle temple, Concordia enthroned left at center above an altar; statues of Hercules to left & Mercury to right; statues of Jupiter, Juno, Minerva & Victories on pediment above / CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST P M TR POT XXXII, Legend around large SC. Cohen 69. RIC I 67 2 commentsHolding_History
Tibese10-2.jpg
Tiberius, RIC 67, Sestertius of AD 36-37 (temple of Concordia)16 viewsÆ Sestertius (26,50g, Ø 35mm, 12h). Rome, AD 36-37.
Obv.: TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVST PM TR POT XXXIIX around large S C.
Rev.: No legend, Hexastyle temple on podium of five steps with flanking walls to r. and l.; Concordia seated within, holding patera and cornucopiae, flanked by the statues of Hercules and Mercurius; Jupiter, Juno, Minerva, Victories and other figures above empty pediment.
RIC 67 (R); BMC 133; Cohen 70; RCV 1766
Ex Varesi Numismatica Auction 65, 10 Feb. 2015; ex Ex Astarte XII, 12 Sep. 2003, lot 485.

The temple of Concordia in the Roman Forum was restored and embellished under Tiberius. It housed so many antique statues that Pliny the Elder called it a museum of art and Greek sculpture.
Charles S
00titusrayo.jpg
TITUS79 viewsAR denarius. 80 AD. 3,61 grs. Laureate head right. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M. / Pulvinar (throne) of Jupiter and Juno: square seat, draped and surmounted by horizontal winged thunderbolt. TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P.
RIC 119. RSC 316.
1 commentsbenito
Titus_Left_Throne.jpg
Titus Pulvinar Series108 viewsTitus. AD 79-81. Denarius 18mm 3.12g. Rome mint. Struck January-June AD 80.
O: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate, bearded. Head right
R: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, pulvinar (throne) of Jupiter and Juno: square seat, draped, surmounted by horizontal winged thunderbolt.

Rare with portrait left: Only three specimens in Reka Devnia hoard.
4 commentsNemonater
titus_23.jpg
Titus RIC II, 23110 viewsTitus 79 - 81
AR - Denar, 3.51g, 17mm
Rome 80
obv. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
laureate head r.
rev. TRP IV IMP XV COS VIII PP
winged thunderbolt on nice draped table ('pulvinar' of Jupiter and Juno?)
RIC II, 23(b); C.314; BMCR.51
EF nice portrait

PULVINAR, seat, on which goods were offered to the gods at a lectisternium, a banquet.
These coins shows pulvinaria (pl.) prepared for the solemn lectisternium followed the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 which destroyed Pompeji.
LECTISTERNIUM, a 'laying out of couches', the name for a sacrifice conducted by the Romans at times of great public distress. Couches were set out and tables placed before them, and then images of the gods were laid upon the couches and a banquet set before them, including a wreath (= struppus)
Thunderbolt, one of the regular attributes of Jupiter as god of the sky







1 commentsJochen
titus_23~0.jpg
Titus RIC II, 23775 viewsJochen's Titus RIC II, 23
Titus 79 - 81
AR - Denar, 3.51g, 17mm
Rome 80
obv. IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG PM
laureate head r.
rev. TRP IV IMP XV COS VIII PP
winged thunderbolt on nice draped table ('pulvinar' of Jupiter and Juno?)
RIC II, 23(b); C.314; BMCR.51
EF nice portrait

These issues show pulvinaria (pl.) prepared for the solemn lectisternium followed the eruption of Vesuvius in AD 79 which destroyed Pompeji and Herculaneum.
PULVINAR, seat, on which goods were offered to the gods at a lectisternium, a banquet.
LECTISTERNIUM, a 'laying out of couches', the name for a sacrifice conducted by the Romans at times of great public distress. Couches were set out and tables placed before them, and then images of the gods were laid upon the couches and a banquet set before them.
The thunderbolt, like the eagle, one of the main attributes of Jupiter.
Jochen
titus_tablel___thunderbolt.jpg
Titus RIC-119157 viewsAR Denarius, 3.37g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
RIC 119 (C2). BMC 51. RSC, 316.
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, winged thunderbolt
Acquired from York Coins, February 2005.

Another in the pulvinaria (supplication to the Gods) series, this one devoted to Jupiter or perhaps Juno too.

A nice example of a good VF denarius of Titus. Full legends and a pleasing portrait.
1 commentsVespasian70
T119A.png
Titus RIC-119A87 viewsAR Denarius, 3.31g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
RIC 119A. BMC 51 var. RSC, 316.
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M•; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P; Seat, draped; above, thunderbolt
Acquired from Yesterday's Change, March 2017.

In the new RIC II this type is described as having a 'winged thunderbolt' above the seat. However, it is sometimes seen with a 'wingless thunderbolt'. The upcoming RIC II Addenda takes note of this and has assigned the wingless type its own catalogue number - RIC 119A.

This denarius is part of a series that was struck for the lectisternium (religious ceremony) celebrating the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD. Each god had its own sacred couch, in Latin they are known as 'pulvinaria', brought out in pairs in the Forum or some such public space. The series commemorates these sacred couches which were set out with 'exuviae' (emblems) representing the gods. The above coin most likely shows the 'pulvinar' of Jupiter and Juno.

Struck slightly off-centre in average style with nice 'cabinet toning'.
2 commentsDavid Atherton
T515d.jpg
Titus RIC-515206 viewsAR Cistophorus, 10.64g
Rome mint (for Asia), 80-81 AD
RIC 515 (R). BMC spec. acquired 1948. RSC - . RPC 860 (3 spec.).
Obv: IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M•; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: CAPIT across field, RESTIT in exergue; Temple of Capitoline Jupiter with 4 columns enclosing figures of Juno, seated Jupiter and Minverva
Acquired from Calgary Coin, 30 November 2015. Ex MS collection. Ex Berk 124, 3 January 2002, lot 448.

In 80 AD while Titus was away in Campania surveying the damage Vesuvius had caused in the region the previous Fall, a devastating fire broke out in Rome, damaging much of the city center. One of the most important buildings affected by the fire was the Temple of Capitoline Jupiter, rebuilt recently by Vespasian. The temple being the most sacred and important building in Rome, Titus began rebuilding it immediately. Construction was still ongoing when Titus died of natural causes in September of 81. A cistophorus commemorating the rebuilding of the structure was struck for Domitian but it was not until 1948 with the discovery of this reverse type for Titus when the BM acquired a specimen was the type known to be minted for Titus. Needless to say it is extremely rare. Since 1948 seven other examples have surfaced, four of which are in public collections. A.M. Woodward speculates the type for Domitian is actually a hybrid struck from carry-over dies intended for Titus. This cistophorus was minted in Rome for export to Asia Minor. The style and die axis are similar to the denarii from Rome during the same period, firmly placing it to that mint. This coin is an obverse die match with Gemini IX, lot 458.

A wonderful 'chunky' coin in hand in good style.
12 commentsDavid Atherton
CD-12-1.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus (A.D. 251-253)18 viewsAR Antoninianus, A.D. 251, Antioch, 22.0mm, 3.32g, 0°, RIC IV 83; scarce.
Obv: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P F AVG. Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
Rev: IVNO MARTIALIS. Juno seated left, stalks of grain in right and scepter in left; VI in ex.
Joseph D5
Trebonianus_Gallus.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus . AD 251-253. Æ Sestertius40 viewsLaureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Statue of Juno seated facing, holding sceptre within round-domed, distyle temple. Rome mint, 5th officina. 2nd emission, AD 251-252 RIC IV 110a C 50 ; Banti 14. VF, green patina. 25 mm, 10.90 gr . Very rare.


From The Sam Mansourati Collection.
Sam
den4.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus Antoninianus87 viewsOb. IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, radiate, draped& cuirassed bust right
Rev. IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left with corn ears & scepter.

Ref. RIC 69, RSC 46
Milan Mint
Weight 3.8 g

-:Bacchus:-
Bacchus
trebgallus ant-~0.jpg
TREBONIANUS GALLUS antoninianus AD251-25330 viewsobv: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS P P AVG (radiate, draped & cuirassed bust right)
rev: IVNO MARTIALIS (Juno seated left, holding corn-ears and transverse spear, ○○○○ in ex )
ref:RIC83, C.47
mint: Antioch, 3.81g, 20x24mm
Scarce
berserker
Trebonianus Gallus antoninianus, 251-253 AD, Mediolanum.JPG
Trebonianus Gallus antoninianus, 251-253 AD, Mediolanum25 viewsTrebonianus Gallus
antoninianus – 21mm
Mediolanum, 251-253 AD
radiate, draped, cuirassed bust r.
IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG
Juno std. l., holding ears of corn & scepter, two dots in ex.
IVNO MARTIALIS
RIC 69
Ardatirion
trebaniano-ant2.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus RIC 699 viewsTrebonianus Gallus AR Antoninianus.
IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, radiate, draped& cuirassed bust right /
IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left with corn ears & sceptre.
xokleng
trebgallus sest.jpg
TREBONIANUS GALLUS sestertius - 251-253 AD24 viewsobv: IMP.CAES.C.VIBIVS.TREBONIANVS. GALLVS.AVG
rev: IVNONI.MARTIALI / S.C. (Juno seated left)
ref: RIC109, C.52
mint: Rome
13.10gms, 29mm
Rare
berserker
1111111Treboniano_Gallo.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus, antoninianus. (Simpson & Boyd collection) 76 viewsTrebonianus Gallus (A.D. 251-253), antoniniano, zecca di Roma o Antiochia
AE, 2.60 gr, 23,0 mm, aVF (qBB)
D/ IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, busto radiato e drappeggiato di Treboniano a dx
R/ IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seduta a sx, con cereali e uno scettro di traverso
RIC 69; RCV 9631
NOTA: l'attribuzione alla zecca di Roma (o in alternativa Antiochia) viene dalla titolatura. Se fosse Milano, infatti, secondo Mattingly e Carson si dovrebbe avere IMP CAE C VIB TREB
Provenienza: collezione Berardengo, Roma Italia (20 gennaio 2009, numero catalogo 32), ex Antony Wilson collection (Yorkcoins, London-New York, 2005), ex Baldwin's Auctions 42 (London, 26 Settembre 2005), ex W.C. Boyd collection (London, 16 dicembre 1889), ex dr. Simpson collection (London, fino al 1889).
paolo
treb_gallus_(mediolanum)69_#1_1.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus, RIC V, (Mediolanum) 69 (#1)26 viewsTrebonianus Gallus, AD 251-253
AR - Antoninianus, 3.19g, 23.24mm
Mediolanum, AD 251-253
obv. IMP CC VIB TREB GALLVS AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. IVNO MARTIALIS
Iuno Martialis, in long garment, std. l. on throne, holding in l. arm transverse sceptre and in r. hand pair
of grain-ears(?)
ref. RIC V/1, (Mediolanum) 69, pl. 13, 15; C.46
about VF/F+, slightly toned, flan crack at 2 o'clock

Here the object in Juno's r. hand doesn't look like grain-ears! For more information please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
treb_gallus_(mediolanum)69_#2.jpg
Trebonianus Gallus, RIC V, (Mediolanum) 69 (#2)23 viewsTrebonianus Gallus, AD 251-253
AR - Antoninianus, 2.95g, 22.53mm
Mediolanum, AD 251-253
obv. IMP CC VIB TREB GALLVS AVG
Bust, draped and cuirassed, radiate, r.
rev. IVNO MARTIALIS
Iuno Martialis, in long garment, std. l. on throne, holding in l. arm transverse sceptre and in r. hand pair
of grain-ears(?)
ref. RIC V/1, (Mediolanum) 69, pl. 13, 15; C.46
about VF/F+, slightly toned, flan damage on rev. at 6 o'clock

Here the object in Juno's r. hand doesn't look like grain-ears! For more information please look at the thread 'Mythological interesting coins'
Jochen
Trebonius_Gallus_Juno_RIC_69.jpg
Trebonius Gallus Juno RIC 696 viewsTREBONIANUS GALLUS, 252-253 AD, Rome, 22mm, 2.47g, RIC 69,
OBV: IMP C C VIB TREB GALLVS AVG, Radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right.
REV: IVNO MARTIALIS, Juno seated left with corn ears and scepter
SRukke
coins125.JPG
Valerian I14 viewsDiana

In Roman mythology, Diana was the virgin goddess of the hunt, the equivalent of the Greek goddess Artemis. Born with her twin brother Apollo on the island of Delos, Diana was the daughter of Jupiter and Latona.

Diana was the perpetually virginal huntress goddess, associated with wild animals and woodlands. She also later became a moon goddess, supplanting Luna, and was an emblem of chastity. Oak groves were especially sacred to her. She was praised for her strength, athletic grace, beauty and hunting skill. She made up a trinity with two other Roman deities: Egeria the water nymph, her servant and assistant midwife; and Virbius, the woodland god.

Diana was worshipped in a temple on the Aventine Hill and at the city of Ephesus, where the Temple of Artemis stood. Being placed on the Aventine, and thus outside the pomerium, meant that Diana's cult essentially remained a 'foreign' one, like that of Bacchus; she was never officially 'transferred' to Rome as Juno was after the sack of Veii. It seems that her cult originated in Aricia, where her priest, the Rex Nemorensis remained. Diana was regarded with great reverence by lower-class citizens and slaves; slaves could receive asylum in her temples. She was worshipped at a festival on August 13, when King Servius Tullius, himself born a slave, dedicated her shrine on the Aventine.

Diana is usually depicted with a deer. This is because Diana was the patroness of hunting. It is also a reference to the myth of Acteon (or Actaeon), a prince who saw her bathing naked. Diana transformed Acteon into a deer and sent his own hunting dogs to kill him.

IMP C P LIC GALLIENVS AVG Radiate draped cuirassed bust right
FELICITAS SAECVLI Diana, with crescent on head, walking right, drapery flying, carrying long traverse torch.

RIC 291 (Thanks!)
ecoli
VESPSE10-2.jpg
Vespasian, RIC 886, Sestertius of AD 76 (Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus)39 viewsÆ Sestertius (27,72g, Ø 33mm, 6h). Rome, AD 76.
Obv.: [IMP CAES] VESPASIAN AVG P M TR P P P COS VII, laureate head right.
Rev.: S·C in ex., Temple of Jupiter Capitolinus with six columns on podium of three steps; between the columns in the centre on a pedestal, the statue of Jupiter seated on a throne, holding a sceptre in l. hand; right and left statues of Juno and Minerva standing; outside the columns two statues standing. The pediment is decorated with Jupiter seated between two figures and groups in the corners; on the roof are statues and eagles at the corners left and right.
RIC 886 (rare); BMCRE 721; Cohen 488
Ex Calgary Coin (Robert Kokotailo), Sept. 2015; from an old time Calgary collection (MS), CNG Sale 58 (September 19, 2001), lot 1139.
3 commentsCharles S
salonina_ant_juno_o_04_ud_r_05_ud_flipped.JPG
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus 37 views*This photo is the two Upside Down photos of this coin, the one of the obverse one of the reverse shots, I took them and flipped then over and conjoined the two photos.... the detail looks quite nice especially on the reverse and on her hair in the portrait IMO. The peacock looks well detailed and in great shape as well, I do love this coin, it is my favorite one of the Empress Salonina that is in my collection.
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Ancient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
7 commentsrexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_o_02_r_02.JPG
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus27 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_o_01_r_01_70%.JPG
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus29 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
3 commentsrexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_o_04_upside-down.jpg
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus - Obv. Upside Down19 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_r_01.jpg
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus - Reverse 01.9 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_r_02.jpg
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus - Reverse 02.12 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_r_03.jpg
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus - Reverse 03.21 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
Copy_of_salonina_antoninianus_juno-regina_r_04.jpg
VI - Salonina, Wife of Gallienus - AR Antoninianus - Reverse.10 viewsAncient Roman Empire
Empress Julia Cornelia Salonina, Wife of Roman Emperor Gallienus (253 - 268 A.D.)
Silver Antoninianus -

obv: SALONINA AUG - Diademed and draped bust right, seated on a crescent.
rev: JUNO REGINA - Juno standing facing left holding a patera and sceptre. Peacock to left, star in left field.

Size: 23 mm
Weight: 4.1 Grams
rexesq
volusian.jpg
VOLUSIAN305 views Æ As 252 AD. 9.59 gr. 12h . Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAE C VIB VOLUSIANO AVG. / Juno seated front within garlanded round shrine; peacock at her side. IVNONI MARTIALI. SC in fields. RIC IV 252b.2 commentsbenito
volusian~0.jpg
VOLUSIAN99 viewsÆ As 252 AD. 9.59 gr. 12h . Laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAE C VIB VOLUSIANO AVG. / Juno seated front within garlanded round shrine; peacock at her side. IVNONI MARTIALI. SC in fields. RIC IV 252b.

benito
volusian452g.jpg
VOLUSIAN35 viewsAR antoninianus. 251-252 AD. 4,52 grs. Radiate,draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG / Juno seated slightly left within distyle temple. IVNONI MARTIALI.
RIC 172. RSC 43.
1 commentsbenito
volusian452g~0.jpg
VOLUSIAN25 viewsAR antoninianus. 251-252 AD. 4,52 grs. Radiate,draped and cuirassed bust right. IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG / Juno seated slightly left within distyle temple. IVNONI MARTIALI.
RIC 172. RSC 43.
1 commentsbenito
mB55FF8i2aYTyR9R4wqHKy3oXfQ76o.jpg
Volusian3 viewsVolusian. 251-253 AD. Æ Sestertius. Obv: IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind. Rev: IVNONI MARTIALI, S-C across fields. Juno seated facing, holding wheat-ears and scepter in r. hand; all within domed distyle temple, set on three-tiered base. RIC IV 253a; Hunter 30.Ancient Aussie
045A.jpg
Volusian Sestertius228 viewsRIC 253a, Cohen 46, Sear '88 2800
19.35 g, 29 mm
IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind
IVNONI MARTIALI SC, Juno seated facing in domed distyle temple.
Rare
6 commentsMark Z2
Volusian_Sestertius.jpg
Volusian Sestertius Ivnoni Martiali 253a34 viewsVolusian
Reigned AD 251-253
AE Sestertius
RIC 253a, Cohen 46, Sear (1988) 2839

O:IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate bust right

R: IVNONI MARTIALI SC, Juno seated facing in domed distyle temple


You probably can't see it in the picture, but in person, if you hold this thing at just the right angle, you can see the shape of the temple on the reverse, so I'm not just pulling this attribution out of my ass.
Gao
Volusian_RIC_174~0.JPG
Volusian, 251 - 253 AD30 viewsObv: IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust of Volusian facing right.

Rev: IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated, facing, inside a round distyle temple with a domed roof, two children one to her right and one to her left.

Billon Antoninianus, Rome mint, 253 AD

3.6 grams, 21.2 mm, 0°

RIC IViii 174, RSC 48, S9750, VM 13/3
2 commentsMatt Inglima
0400-220np_noir.jpg
Volusian, Antoninianus84 viewsMinted in Rome in AD 252
IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate and draped bust of Volusian right
IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated within a distyle shrine, * in right field
3,60 gr
Ref : RCV # 9750, Cohen #45
1 commentsPotator II
1000-15-200.jpg
Volusian. 21 viewsVolusian. A.D. 251-253. Æ sestertius (29.5 mm, 19.21 g, 1 h). Rome mint, A.D. 253. IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right / IVNONI MARTIALI, S-C, Juno seated facing, holding patera and sceptre; all within domed distyle temple, set on three-tiered base. RIC 253a. F/VF.ecoli
volusian.jpg
Volusianus, IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated 14 viewsVolusianus, Antoninianus. Obv: IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate draped bust right / Rev: IVNONI MARTIALI, Juno seated left holding corn-ears and globe. RIC 177, RSC 39, Sear RCV III: 97491 commentsPodiceps
JuliaDomnaRICIV560.jpg
[1003c] Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.24 viewsAR Denarius; RIC IV 560; 16.89 mm, 3.5 grams; AD 196-202; VF, Rome mint; Obverse: IVLIA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right; Reverse: IVNO REGINA, Juno standing left holding patera and sceptre, peacock at feet. A nice denarius on a smallish flan. Ex Ancient Imports.

De Imperatoribus Romanis, An On-Line Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Severan Julias (A.D. 193-235)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Julia Domna was born about 170 A.D., in Emesa of Syria. She was the youngest daughter of Julius Bassianus, priest of the sun god Elagabal. As such, she was part of the local aristocracy from a plebian family. Having come to the attention of Severus because of her promising horoscope, he married her, probably in 187 A.D. She gave birth to their first child, Bassianus, the future emperor M. Aurelius Antoninus, known as Caracalla, on 4 April 188. About thirteen months later, she gave birth to a second son, Geta.

When Septimius Severus claimed the empire after Didius Julianus had succeeded Pertinax in 193 A.D., two serious rivals challenged him, Pescennius Niger in the East and Clodius Albinus in the West. Julia Domna accompanied her husband in the campaign against Pescennius, having been honored with the title mater castrorum. After this successful campaign, there was another campaign in the East, against the Parthians, in 197 A.D. She was widely honored with inscriptions throughout this period, and numerous coin issues emphasized her imperial position. Julia Domna was, perhaps, more influential in the political life of the empire than any of her imperial predecessors.

She opposed Plautianus, the praetorian prefect and father-in-law of Caracalla, and was partially responsible for his downfall and his daughter Plautilla's disgrace. She was often accused of adultery; nonetheless, the emperor chose to ignore these charges, if true, and the marriage continued.

Among her passions were literature and philosophy; she gathered writers and philosophers in a kind of salon (among whom was Galen of Pergamum), and urged Philostratus to write the life of Apollonius of Tyana.

She once again accompanied her husband, with the two sons present as well, on campaign, against the Britons in 208 A.D. When Severus died at York in early 211 A.D., she returned to Rome with Caracalla and Geta, having gained the full title of mater castrorum et senatus et patriae, with the frequent addition of et Augustorum. She persuaded the two sons to share the rule, as the emperor had wished on his deathbed, but, since the brothers hated each other, this arrangement was doomed to failure. In 212 A.D., Caracalla murdered Geta while he sought succor in his mother's arms; covered with his blood, she was forbidden by Caracalla to grieve.

Her relationship with Caracalla during the six years of his reign was mixed. She had some public duties but largely devoted herself to philosophy. She accompanied Caracalla to the east on campaign against the Parthians in 217 A.D. When she learned, in Antioch, that he had been assassinated, she resolved upon death, which followed her refusal to take food. Her remains were ultimately placed in Hadrian's Mausoleum, at the insistence of Maesa, her sister. She was deified, and was known as Diva Iulia Domna or Diva Iulia Augusta. She was worshipped in various parts of the empire with local titles, such as Dea Caelestis in Carthage and Venus Caelestis in Puteoli.

By Herbert W. Benario, Emory University
Published: De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Rulers and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/startup.htm. Used by permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

If you are interested in Julia Domna, visit Ernie Thompson’s site: The Life, Family and Coinage of Julia Domna (http://juliadomna.ancients.info/).
1 commentsCleisthenes
JuliaMamaeaRIC343.jpg
[1008a] Julia Mamaea, Augusta 13 March 222 - February or March 235 A.D.54 viewsSeverus Alexander for Julia Mamaea. 222-235 AD. AR Denarius, RIC 343; Cohen 35; BMC 43. 2.68 gm, 19mm; VF, Rome mint, 222. Obverse: IVLIA MAMAEA AVG; Draped bust to right; Reverse: IVNO CONSERVATRIX; Juno standing to left, holding patera and sceptre, at her feet a peacock. Toned. Ex Tom Vossen.

De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Severan Julias (A.D. 193-235)

Herbert W. Benario
Emory University

Julia Mamaea
The younger daughter of Maesa, Mamaea had a happier, more successful, and lengthier life as imperial mother than her sister Soaemias. She married Gessius Marcianus, and in 208 bore him a son, Bassianus, later known as Alexander Severus. She was with her mother and sister in the East in 218 AD when her nephew, Elagabalus, was raised to the purple. Alexander was made Caesar in early 222 and soon thereafter became emperor, following the murder of his cousin and aunt. He was fourteen years old and much subject to the control of his grandmother and mother, who effectively governed the empire. After Maesa's death, Mamaea remained the dominant figure until her death.

She had seen to it that Alexander received a good education and, once emperor, chose a council of sixteen senators. Her imperial title was Iulia Augusta, mater Augusti nostri et castrorum et senatus et patriae, recalling the titulature of Julia Domna. Her position in the government was confirmed by the title consors imperii. She was charged with avaritia, but otherwise led a life free from scandal. She was recognized as religiosissima, having had conversation with Origen while in the East. She had accompanied Alexander thither on campaign against the Persians in 230/31. In 235, she was with him in Germany, at Mainz, when they were assassinated by the troops, with Maximinus Thrax chosen as successor. She suffered damnatio memoriae.


Copyright (C) 2001, Herbert W. Benario. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis, An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors;http://www.roman-emperors.org/sevjulia.htm. Used by permission.

Julia Mamaea was the highly intelligent and capable mother of Severus Alexander. After the death of her mother Julia Maesa, Julia Mamaea was the power behind the throne and largely responsible for the impressive recovery of the Roman state that took place during her son's rule. Though popular with the population of the empire, the military was deeply offended at being controlled by a woman. In 235 A.D., Julia Mamaea and Severus Alexander were both murdered by mutinous soldiers led by the thug Maximinus I (Joseph Sermarini).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
Valerian1RIC232.jpg
[1112a] Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.59 viewsSilver antoninianus, RIC 232, RSC 10, VF, worn die reverse, Mediolanum mint, 3.909g, 22.2mm, 180o, 257 A.D.; Obverse: IMP VALERIANVS P AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AETERNITATI AVGG, Sol standing left, raising right, globe in left; nice portrait, good silver for the reign. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.
Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright Richard D. Weigel, 2007. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian I was proclaimed emperor after the death of Trajan Decius. He successfully repulsed many barbarian incursions but the standard of living declined and would never recover. In 260 A.D., after four years of war during which Roman forces suffered great losses in battle and to plague, he arranged for peace talks. He set off with a small group to discuss terms with the Sassinian emperor Sapor and was never seen again. The date of his death is unknown, but in Rome it was rumored that he had been murdered and that Sapor was using his stuffed body as a footstool. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
GalllienusRIC163.jpg
[1113a] Gallienus, August 253 - 24 March 268 A.D.70 viewsBronze antoninianus, RIC 163, RSC 72, choice EF, Rome mint, 3.716g, 21.6mm, 180o, 268 A.D.; Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; Reverse: APOLLINI CONS AVG, centaur walking right drawing bow, Z in exergue; struck on a full and round flan, rare this nice. Commemorates vows to Apollo invoking his protection against the revolt of Aureolus. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families

Valerian (A.D. 253-260) and Gallienus (A.D. 253-268)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University


P. Licinius Valerianus, or Valerian, was unusual for his time period in that he was an emperor who came from an old Roman senatorial family. He was likely born shortly before 200 A.D., but little is known of his early life. Valerian married Egnatia Mariniana and had two sons, Gallienus and Valerian Junior. Gallienus was born around 218. Valerian makes his first appearance in the sources in 238 A.D. as an ex-consul and princeps senatus negotiating with (more likely than serving on) the embassy sent to Rome by Gordian I's African legions to secure senatorial approval of Gordian's rebellion against and replacement of Maximinus Thrax as emperor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae probably report accurately that Trajan Decius, on the recommendation of the Senate, offered Valerian the censorship in 251. Although the senatus consultum cited and the specific office are of doubtful authenticity, the high reputation Valerian possessed in the Senate and his association with the government under Decius probably are truthful aspects of the story. In 253 Valerian was apparently commanding in Raetia and Noricum when Trebonianus Gallus sent him to bring legions from Gaul and Germany to Italy for the struggle with the forces of Aemilianus. After Gallus' troops killed him and his son and joined Aemilianus, Valerian's men proclaimed their general emperor and their arrival in Italy caused Aemilianus' soldiers to desert and kill their commander and join Valerian's forces in acclaiming Valerian as emperor.

The Senate presumably was pleased to ratify the position of Valerian, one of their own, as emperor and they also accepted his son and colleague, P. Licinius Egnatius Gallienus, as Augustus, rather than just as Caesar. Valerian apparently realized the necessity of sharing power equally with his son and of dividing their efforts geographically, with Gallienus responsible for the West and Valerian himself concentrating on the East. The biographies of Valerian and Gallienus in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae, attributed to Trebellius Pollio, are not especially helpful in putting together an account of their joint reign. The life of Valerian is fragmentary and that of Gallienus projects an extremely biased negative interpretation of his career.

Gallienus in the early years of the joint reign concentrated, with some success, on protecting Gaul and the Rhine frontier by driving back Germanic tribes and fortifying cities such as Cologne and Trier. In a move which would characterize later diplomacy with Germans, Gallienus concluded an alliance with one of their chieftains, presumably to assist the Romans in protecting the empire from other Germanic tribes. The invasions increased in number around 257-258 as the Franks entered Gaul and Spain, destroying Tarraco (Tarragona), and the Alamanni invaded Italy. Gallienus defeated the Alamanni at Milan, but soon was faced with the revolts in Pannonia and Moesia led first by his general there, Ingenuus, and then by Regalianus, commander in Illyricum. Gallienus put down these rebellions by 260 and secured stability in the region by concluding an alliance with the Marcomannic king, whose daughter Pipa the emperor apparently accepted as his concubine although he was still married to Cornelia Salonina.

In the East, Valerian had succeeded by A.D. 257 in rescuing Antioch in Syria from Persian control, at least temporarily, but was soon faced with a major invasion of the Goths in Asia Minor. The Scriptores Historiae Augustae biography of Aurelian has Valerian appear to speak in the Baths at Byzantium to publicly commend Aurelian for his success in driving back the Goths and reward him with the consulship and even with adoption as imperial successor. However, it is not clear that Valerian even reached Byzantium because he sent Felix to that city while he remained to protect the eastern section of Asia Minor and then returned to Antioch to guard it against renewed Persian attacks. It was at this point, around 259, that Valerian moved to defend Edessa and his troops lost significant numbers to the plague. Valerian tried to negotiate a peace with the Persian king, Sapor, but was captured by treachery and taken into captivity. The ultimate humiliation of a Roman emperor by a foreign leader was enacted through Sapor's use of Valerian as a human stepping-stool to assist the Persian king in mounting his horse and Valerian's body was later skinned to produce a lasting trophy of Roman submission.

Eusebius discusses the policy of Valerian toward the Christians and says that, after initially treating them most positively, Valerian was persuaded by Macrianus to lead another persecution against them. Valerian in fact after his brutal imprisonment and death in Persia would serve as a negative moral exemplum for some Latin Christian writers who gleefully pointed out that those who oppose the true God receive their just desserts.

Eusebius also credits Gallienus with reversing his father's policy and establishing peace with the Church, citing imperial edicts which established freedom of worship and even restored some lost property. Paul Keresztes claims that Gallienus in fact established a peace with Christians that lasted for forty-three years, from A.D. 260 until 303, and gave the community a kind of legal status which they had previously lacked.

Andreas Alföldi details a growing separation between Gallienus and his father which goes well beyond the geographical one which had developed out of military necessity. In addition to the strikingly different policies, just described, which they pursued toward the Christians, Gallienus began to make his military independence clear through changes in coin inscriptions and by 258 he had created his central cavalry unit and stationed it at Milan. This independent force, which was under the command of a man of equestrian rank and soon stood on a level at least equal to that of the Praetorian Guard, would play a significant role in Gallienus' upcoming battles and, of course, was a foretoken of a new trend for military organization in the future. Alföldi cites as evidence of the increasing separation between the joint emperors the statement that Gallienus did not even seek his father's return from captivity, which Lactantius of course interpreted as part of Valerian's divine punishment, but one wonders what indeed Gallienus might have done and his "indifference" may have been instead his attempt to reassert confidence in his armies and not dwell on the depressing and humiliating servitude and ultimate death of Valerian. Another reform which Alföldi discusses as part of Gallienus' independent stand is his exclusion of the senatorial class from major military commands. H.M.D. Parker credits Gallienus with beginning to separate the civil and military functions of Rome's provincial governors, thus making senatorial governors purely civil administrators and starting to replace them even in this reduced role by equestrians. The disappearance in this period of the S.C. stamp of senatorial authority on bronze coins was probably also seen as an attack on the prestige of the order, although the debasement of the silver coinage had by this time practically reached the point where the "silver" coins were themselves essentially bronze and the change may have been more for economic than for political reasons. Gallienus' exclusion of senators from military command further broke down class distinctions because sons of centurions were by this time regularly given equestrian rank and the move further accelerated the alienation of Rome as center of the Empire. In addition, the bitterness of the senatorial class over Gallienus' policy most likely explains the hatred of Latin writers toward this particular emperor.

Although Gallienus' military innovations may have made his forces more effective, he still had to face numerous challenges to his authority.In addition to systemic invasions and revolts, the plague wreaked havoc in Rome and Italy and probably in several provinces as well. It must have seemed that every commander he entrusted to solve a problem later used that authority to create another threat. When Gallienus was involved in putting down the revolt of Ingenuus in Pannonia, he put Postumus in charge of the armies guarding the Rhine and Gaul. There is some doubt about which of Gallienus' sons, Cornelius Valerianus or P. Cornelius Licinius Saloninus, was left in Cologne under the care of the Praetorian Prefect Silvanus and perhaps also Postumus. In any case, when Postumus revolted and proclaimed his independent Gallic Empire, Silvanus and one of the emperor's sons were killed. Gallienus probably restricted Postumus' expansion, but he never gained the personal revenge that, according to one source, drove him to challenge Postumus to single combat. While Gallienus was thus engaged, and after Valerian's capture by the Persians, Macrianus had his soldiers proclaim his sons, Macrianus and Quietus, emperors in Syria, Asia Minor, and Egypt. Gallienus sent Aureolus to defeat Macrianus and one son in the area of Illyria and Thrace; Odenathus of Palmyra defeated the other son and restored stability in Syria and, with Gallienus' approval, followed that up with a victory over the Persians. After Odenathus' assassination ca. 267, his wife Zenobia continued to rule the independent Palmyrene section of the Empire.

In A.D. 262 Gallienus concluded his tenth year in office by celebrating in Rome his Decennalia with a spectacular procession involving senators, equestrians, gladiators, soldiers, representatives of foreign peoples, and many other groups. This festival included feasts, games, entertainment, and spectacle which probably reminded Romans of the millennial Secular Games celebrations of Philip I and likely were intended to secure popular support at home for Gallienus. Over the next five years little is known about specific activities of the emperor and he presumably spent more time in Rome and less along the frontiers.

Gallienus and Salonina as rulers patronized a cultural movement which collectively is known as the Gallienic Renaissance. The imperial patrons are most directly connected with the philosophical aspects of this movement because Porphyry testifies to their friendship for the Neoplatonic philosopher Plotinus. Porphyry goes on to say that Plotinus asked Gallienus to rebuild an abandoned former city of philosophers in Campania, rename it Platonopolis, and govern it as a kind of Platonic Republic, but that the jealousy and spite of others at court scuttled the plan. In addition to Neoplatonic philosophy, according to Gervase Matthew, the Gallienic Renaissance included the "upward glance" and other stylistic changes in imperial sculpture and religious beliefs that were characterized by "an overwhelming sense of the transcendent and immutable." Matthew points out both the return to artistic models of Augustus, Hadrian, and even Severus Alexander and also "a new Romantic tension" which breaks with the past and points toward a new and very different world. The Hellenic character of much of the Gallienic Renaissance is also stressed in the emperor's trip to Athens where he, likely in imitation of Hadrian, became eponymous archon and received initiation into the Eleusinian cult of Demeter.

Late in his reign, Gallienus issued a series of coins in Rome which honored nine deities as Conservator Augusti or protector of the emperor by pairing his portrait with reverses picturing an animal or animals symbolic of each deity. Included in this group of celestial guardians are Apollo, Diana, Hercules, Jupiter, Juno, Liber Pater, Mercury, Neptune, and Sol. For example, Apollo's coin-types portray a centaur, a gryphon, or Pegasus; Hercules is represented by either the lion or the boar. It appears that Gallienus was issuing the "animal series" coins both to secure, through some religious festival, the aid of Rome's protective gods against continuing invasions, revolts, and plague and to entertain the Roman populace with pageantry and circus games, thus to divert their attention away from the same problems and maintain the security of the regime in power.

In A.D. 268, Gallienus saw his third son, Marinianus, become consul, but in the spring another Gothic invasion brought the emperor back to Greece. He defeated the invaders at Naissus in Moesia , but was deterred from pursuing them further by a revolt of the commander of his elite cavalry, Aureolus. He besieged this last rebel emperor in Milan, but a plot involving his Praetorian Prefect and two future emperors, Claudius and Aurelian, all three men Illyrians popular with many of the soldiers, lured Gallienus away from the city on a false pretext and assassinated him.The emperor's brother Valerian and young son Marinianus were also murdered. In spite of the bitter resentment which many of the senators must have felt toward the dead emperor and his reform policies, Claudius II, perhaps only to legitimize his own reign, persuaded the Senate to deify Gallienus.

Copyright (C) 1998, Richard D. Weigel. Published on De Imperatoribus Romanis,
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors and their Families http://www.roman-emperors.org/gallval.htm. Used by permission.


Publius Licinius Egnatius Gallienus was born in about AD 213. This means that he was about 40 years old when his father Valerian, in AD 253, was hailed emperor by his troops in Raetia. Gallienus was made Caesar immediately by his father. But within a month, when Valerian got to Rome, Gallienus received the rank of Augustus.

Compared to other Roman emperors of the age, Gallienus was an exception, as far as he was not a soldier-emperor. He was rather a thoughtful, intellectual ruler, possessing sophisticated Greek tastes. However, this made him deeply unpopular with the gritty Danubian generals, who very much understood it as their right to choose a leader among their own ranks to rule the empire.

If the Danubian military elite didn't like Gallienus, then he certainly soon proved that he was a capable military leader. Between AD 254 to AD 256 he campaigned along the Danube, securing this troubled frontier against the barbarians. In AD 256 he then moved west to fight the Germans along the Rhine.

Then by autumn AD 260 the message of Valerian's capture by the Persians reached Gallienus. If Gallienus had always been unpopular among the military leaders, then now with his father gone and Roman authority crumbling, rebellion was in the air.

On a night in September, AD 268, at the siege of Mediolanum (Milan), an alarm was suddenly raised in the camp of the emperor. In the brief moment of confusion, Gallienus was struck down in the dark as he emerged from his tent.

During his reign, Gallienus began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. In doing so, he perhaps saved the empire from oblivion. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers.

As a last gesture of disrespect to this, most unfortunate of emperors, the Romans should lay Gallienus to rest not in one of the great mausoleums in Rome, but in a tomb nine miles south of the capital, along the Via Appia.

Ironically, he was deified by the senate at the request of Claudius II Gothicus, one of the men who must be held accountable for the assassination of Gallienus.
See: http://www.roman-empire.net/decline/gallienus.html


Gallienus was the son of Valerian I and was named Caesar at his father's accession to the throne in 253 A.D. Upon his father's capture by the Parthians he assumed the rank of Augustus and began numerous reforms and military campaigns to defend the empire, as much from usurpers as from barbarians. At the same time he presided over perhaps the last flowering of classical Roman culture, patronizing poets, artists and philosophers. Gallienus was assassinated while besieging Milan. Joseph Sermarini, FORVM.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
CIIGRICV197unlistedvar.jpg
[1114a] Claudius II Gothicus, September 268 - August or September 270 A.D.57 viewsSilvered antoninianus, RIC V 197 var (pellet in exergue), aEF, 3.880g, 21.1mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 268 - 270 A.D.; Obverse: IMP C CLAVDIVS AVG, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right; Reverse: AEQVITAS AVG, Aequitas standing left, scales in right, cornucopia in left, • in exergue; full silvering, bold strike, excellent centering and eastern style, rare this nice; rare variety. Ex FORVM.


De Imperatoribus Romanis
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Claudius II Gothicus (268-270)

Richard D. Weigel
Western Kentucky University

M. Aurelius Claudius, known to history as Claudius Gothicus or Claudius II, was born in either Dalmatia or Illyria on May 10, probably in A.D. 213 or 214. Although the most substantive source on Claudius is the biography in the Scriptores Historiae Augustae (SHA), this account is riddled with fabrications and slanted with fawning praise for this particular emperor, who in the fourth century was viewed as an ancestor of Constantine's father and thus of the ruling imperial family. This biography, attributed to one Trebellius Pollio, must be read with extreme caution and supplemented with information from other sources, including Aurelius Victor, the Epitome de Caesaribus, Eutropius, Orosius, Zonaras, and Zosimus, as well as coins and inscriptions.

The SHA account describes Claudius as being tall, with fiery eyes, and so strong that he could knock out the teeth of man or beast with one punch. It also says that Trajan Decius rewarded him after Claudius demonstrated his strength while wrestling another soldier in the Campus Martius. The SHA author suggests that Claudius may have been descended from the Trojan King Ilus and even from Dardanus, son of Zeus and ancestor of the Trojan royal family, but these suggestions are very likely fabricated to further ennoble Claudius and his putative descendants, the family of Constantine. The SHA biography also includes false letters attributed to the emperors Trajan Decius, Valerian, and Gallienus, all attesting to their high opinions of Claudius. Reference is made in these letters to Claudius' service as tribune in an otherwise unattested legion V Martialis and also as general in command of Illyria, but these positions may also be fictitious. One can assume that Claudius had served for some time in the army, at least under Gallienus and perhaps also under several earlier emperors.

There is some evidence that Claudius was wounded in Gallienus' campaign to put down the revolt of Ingenuus and that he later served with Aureolus under Gallienus in the war with Postumus. By 268, when Gallienus took his troops into Italy to put down Aureolus' revolt, Claudius had emerged as heir-apparent to Gallienus and may also have been involved in the plot to assassinate the emperor. Aurelius Victor says that when Gallienus was killed by his own troops besieging Aureolus in Milan, Claudius as tribune was commanding the soldiers stationed at Ticinum, some twenty miles to the south, and that prior to dying Gallienus designated Claudius as his heir. Victor goes on to claim that after succeeding to the purple Claudius forced the Senate to deify Gallienus. The SHA account states that the soldiers mutinied after Gallienus' death and had to be quieted with a donative of twenty aurei each before settling down and accepting their new emperor. Once in power, Claudius quickly dealt with Aureolus, who surrendered and was killed almost immediately. The new emperor also demanded clemency for the supporters of Gallienus.

The story of Gallienus' deathbed selection of his successor is doubtful at best and is very likely an attempt to deflect blame for the assassination plot from Claudius. The suggestion that the new emperor pressured the Senate to deify Gallienus is more difficult to assess. It is true that securing divine status for one's predecessor is generally seen as a pious act (e.g. Antoninus Pius requesting deification of Hadrian) that reflects positively on the initiator and the story, recorded only in Aurelius Victor, could just be a fabrication used to build up Claudius' moral reputation. What is difficult to penetrate is the biased condemnation of Gallienus that particularly dominates the Latin sources. They make it hard to see why anyone would want to deify Gallienus and so the story seems out of place. However, deification of a predecessor could also be interpreted as the expected thing to do and the act could have fostered legitimacy of the new emperor and gained support from those who were still loyal to Gallienus so it may well have taken place.

The first major challenge facing the new emperor was that of the Alemanni, who had invaded Raetia and Italy. After an early defeat, Claudius replaced some irresponsible officers and soldiers, designated Aurelian as cavalry commander, and led the army to a decisive victory over the Alemanni. This victory earned Claudius the title of Germanicus Maximus and several of his coin-types appear to refer to victory over the Germans.

In 269 Claudius served as consul with Paternus. This year would also feature his major campaign against the Goths. There are indications that Spain separated itself from the Gallo-Roman Empire of Postumus and Tetricus and recognized Claudius, at least nominally, as emperor. In addition, rebellion within Gaul itself demonstrated the weakening of this independent state, although Claudius avoided engagement at Augustodunum and chose only to send a small force to protect Narbonese Gaul. While Claudius concentrated on protecting Roman territory against the Alemanni and Goths, Zenobia extended her Palmyrene Empire by taking Antioch, parts of Asia Minor, and most of Egypt. Although Eusebius and Sulpicius Severus portray the period between the reign of Valerian and that of Diocletian as a peaceful pause in the persecution of Christians, the Acts of the Martyrs does list some individuals allegedly martyred during Claudius II's reign.

The coins issued by Claudius II provide some limited insight into his reign. In addition to the standard "personified virtues" coins that are common with most emperors of the second and third centuries, Claudius struck coin-types proclaiming the security of the Empire (SECVRITAS PERPETVA and PAX AETERNA), the fidelity of the army (FIDES MILITVM), and military victories over the Germans and Goths (VICTORIA GERMAN and VICTORIAE GOTHIC). In addition, Claudius Gothicus' mints struck some other interesting and unusual coin-types. For example, Claudius is one of very few emperors who issued coins portraying the god Vulcan. These must have been limited issues because they are struck only by the Antioch mint and are very rare. The type shows Vulcan standing, with his special tools, the hammer and tongs, and features the unique inscription REGI ARTIS. A variant type with a similar image has been described as carrying another unique coin inscription, DEO CABIRO, and interpreted as depicting one of Vulcan's sons, the Cabiri, with the same tools. However, the existence of this variant type is doubtful. Although the reason for honoring Vulcan (and his sons?) with these coins is unclear, there may be a connection to the fact that the Cabiri were patron gods of Thessalonica who had protected that city against an attack by the Goths. Although a connection between Claudius Gothicus and the Cabiri as defenders against Gothic attacks is relatively attractive, it is weakened somewhat by the fact that Valerian and Gallienus had also issued coins with Vulcan in a temple so there may be some other reason for his reappearance on coins in this period.

Claudius II issued an unusual and scarce series of coins that features a pair of deities, who are presumably conservatores Augusti, on each reverse. The AETER AVG type depicts Apollo and Diana, who, as gods of the sun and moon, are associated with the concept of aeternitas. A type featuring Serapis and Isis is combined with a CONSER AVG inscription and one of Hercules and Minerva with one of CONSERVATORES AVG. Apollo and Diana are depicted with a SALVS AVG inscription, Aesculapius and Salus with one of SPES PVBLIC, and Vulcan and Minerva with VIRT AVG. The general message is that these deities will protect the future of the empire and the emperor.

Other unusual coin-types include MARS VLTOR, the god Augustus had honored with a temple for securing revenge for Caesar's assassination. This deity had appeared on Roman coins in the reigns of Galba and Severus Alexander. Claudius II also minted coins with rarely-seen NEPTVN AVG [see this reverse type in my collection] and SOL AVG types. The latter coin indicates some early interest in the god who would become so dominant a few years later on the coins of Aurelian, yet Claudius also used the INVICTVS AVG inscription that Gallienus had paired with an image of Sol with one of Hercules. ROMAE AETERNAE coin-types were fairly common in the mid-third century, but Claudius II issued an unusual variant type on an aureus that showed the goddess in her temple and echoed the SAECVLVM NOVVM images associated with Philip I. In addition, Claudius introduced a IOVI VICTORI reverse combined with the image normally paired with a IOVI STATORI inscription and a IOVI FVLGERAT reverse inscription, both of which had not been used by any of his predecessors. Andreas Alföldi suggested that Claudius' GENIVS SENATVS type signified improvement of the relationship between emperor and Senate following the senatorial hostility toward Gallienus.

Claudius Gothicus also produced coin-types with reverses of goddesses customarily found paired on coins with images of the Roman empresses. The deities portrayed include Ceres, Diana, Diana Lucifera, and Diana Victrix, Minerva, Venus, and the goddess naturally associated with the image of an empress, Juno Regina. One might suggest that Claudius issued these images because he had no empress with which to pair them, but an examination of other emperors' reigns during this period reveals that those emperors who did not issue coins bearing the empress' image also did not strike these particular goddess types. Although Ceres and Venus images are sometimes paired with an emperor's portrait, Diana Lucifera is rarely found on emperors' coins and Claudius II is the only emperor paired on coins with Juno Regina. In addition, Claudius was the first emperor to issue imperial coins that featured an isolated image of the exotic Egyptian goddess, Isis Faria.

Claudius II's short reign was vulnerable to internal as well as external attack. There may have been a revolt in 269-270 led by a Censorinus, although the date and even the existence of this usurper remain in doubt. The SHA includes him as the last of the "thirty tyrants" and lists a whole series of offices for him, including two consulships, but no other record exists to confirm such service. The SHA account states that he was proclaimed emperor by his soldiers, but soon afterwards killed by them because of his enforcement of strict discipline. His tomb is listed as being in Bologna, which may provide some idea of the location for the revolt. Henry Cohen dates the revolt to the beginning of the year 270, perhaps on the basis of a reference in the Epitome de Caesaribus, but suggests that coins attributed to Censorinus in earlier works may not exist.

The Gothic challenge in 269 proved to be the greatest that Claudius II would face. The Goths assembled a large invading force, reportedly amounting to 320,000 men transported on a fleet of at least 2,000 ships, and first attacked coastal cities along the Black Sea in Moesia. After passing into the Aegean the Goths besieged Thessalonica. At this point, in 269, Claudius left Rome to stop the invasion. The Goths then sent the larger segment of their troops on land toward the Danube, while the fleet took the remaining group to continue the naval attack on Aegean coastal cities. Claudius sent Aurelian's cavalry to Macedonia to protect Illyria from attack, while he commanded the forces blocking the route to the Danube. In the area of Doberus and Pelagonia, the Goths lost 3,000 men to Aurelian's cavalry. At Naissus in Moesia, Claudius' force succeeded in killing some 50,000 Goths. There were follow-up operations on both land and sea, but the Gothic War had essentially been won. Staving off the attacks of the Goths was a major contribution to the survival of the Roman Empire. It was a significant step leading to the subsequent success of Aurelian and the resurrection of the Empire under Diocletian and Constantine. When the Goths eventually succeeded in taking parts of the western Empire in the fifth century, their disruption to the course of civilization was likely much less violent than it would have been had they succeeded in the third century.

In addition to bad weather, a lack of supplies, and hunger, plague was a major factor in the defeat of the Goths. Many of the Gothic prisoners were either impressed into Roman military service or settled on farms as coloni. Claudius received the title Gothicus in recognition of his triumph over the Goths. At some point he had also been given the title Parthicus, but the unlikelihood of any conflict with the Parthians in his short reign makes this difficult to explain. Perhaps Damerau was correct in his suggestion that a Parthian unit may have been involved in one of the battles with the Palmyrenes, although on this front there were few achievements to claim. In any case, Claudius' victory over the Goths was short-lived. The emperor himself caught the plague and died at Sirmium early in 270. He was 56 years old. Claudius' brother, Quintillus, became emperor briefly before losing out to Aurelian. Claudius also had another brother, Crispus, and the SHA traces the link to Constantius through Crispus' daughter Claudia.

The Roman Senate showed its respect for Claudius Gothicus by setting up a gold portrait-shield in the Curia and by approving his deification. He was also honored with a golden statue in front of the great temple of Jupiter Optimus Maximus and a silver statue set on a column on the Rostra.

In many ways, Claudius II received more adulation and honor in his Nachleben than he had during his lifetime. In the fourth century, attempts to link Constantine's family to Claudius resulted in the phrases of adoration and outright fabrication that dominate the SHA life and most of our other sources. Constantine even issued commemorative coins honoring Claudius. These carried inscriptions such as: DIVO CLAVDIO OPT[IMO] IMP[ERATORI], MEMORIAE AETERNAE, and REQVIES OPT[IMORVM] ME[RITORVM]. A tradition grew that changed the story of Claudius' death in some sources. In this version, Claudius, instead of dying from the plague, had actually performed a devotion, in response to an oracle found in the Sibylline Books, and sacrificed his life so that Rome could win the Gothic War. One of the most surprising things about the SHA account is that it ignores this more dramatic tradition and has Claudius simply dying from the plague.

One must, of course, reject the excessive claims of the SHA to the effect that Claudius II was "destined to rule for the good of the human race" and would, had he lived longer, "…by his strength, his counsel, and his foresight have restored to us the Scipios, the Camilli, and all those men of old." However, Claudius Gothicus was clearly a good emperor who made a significant contribution to protecting and restoring the Empire. In the third century there aren't too many emperors who merit such an assessment.

Copyright (C) 2001, Richard D. Weigel. Used by permission.
http://www.roman-emperors.org/claudgot.htm


Claudius II Gothicus was born in Illyricum around 215 A.D. Under Valerian and Gallienus he was recognized as a superb general. After the murder of Gallienus, Claudius Gothicus was proclaimed emperor and preceded to crush the Alemani tribe who had invaded Roman territory. Soon after an enormous horde of Goths poured into the empire. Against all advice, Claudius confronted the barbarians at Naissus in Upper Moesia. He fought a brilliant battle and annihilated them. Unfortunately for the empire, he died of plague after a reign of only two years (Joseph Sermarini, FORVM;
http://www.forumancientcoins.com/catalog/roman-and-greek-coins.asp?vpar=741&pos=0#Recovery%20of%20the%20Empire%20Coins).

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
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