Classical Numismatics Discussion Members' Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register.

Members' Gallery Home | Member Collections | Last Added | Last Comments | Most Viewed | Top Rated | My Favorities | Search Galleries
Search results - "Crispina"
CRISPINA-1.jpg
31 viewsCRISPINA (Wife of Commodus) - As - 180/182 AD _ Rome mint
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev: IVNO S C, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre. At her feet, a peacock.
Gms 10,4 mm 26,1
RIC 679 Cohen 23
Maxentius
Crispina_RIC_276.jpg
20.5 Crispina20 viewsCRISPINA
AR Denarius. 3.18g
CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / CERES, Ceres holding grain-ears and sceptre.
RIC 276, RSC 1, BM 33
Ex Coin Galleries 2/17/99
Ex Harlan J. Berk
RI0085
Sosius
Crispina_Sest_RIC_665.jpg
20.5 Crispina17 viewsCrispina
AE Sestertius
CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / CONCORDIA S-C, Concord seated left with patera and cornucopiae.
RIC 665, Cohen 6, BMC 406,409
Ex Glendinings
RI0086
Sosius
cr27.jpg
CRISPINA AE SESTERTIUS, WIFE OF COMMODUS, AUGUSTAS 178-182 C.E19 viewsObverse - CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Reverse - LAETITIA SC, Laetitia standing facing left, holding wreath in right hand and rudder set on globe in left hand. Cohen 27
31mm diam., 25.7 g
NORMAN K
cr1a.jpg
Crispina, RIC 276 Denarius14 viewsCrispina. Wife of Commodus AR Denarius.
Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, bust, draped, right, hair rolled in roundcoil at back.
Reverse: CERES, Ceres standing left, holding corn-ears and torch.
RIC 276. Cohen 1. 16 mm diam., 2.5 g
sold 4-2018
NORMAN K
commod_perseph_elaea.jpg
(0177) COMMODUS15 views177 - 192 AD
AE 19 mm; 3.77 g
O: ΑV ΚΑΙ ΚοΜΜοΔοС laureate-headed bust of Commodus wearing cuirass and paludamentum, right; countermark of head lower right
R: ƐΛΑΙΤΩΝ draped bust of Demeter or Persephone (with features of Crispina), r., holding poppy and two ears of corn
Aiolis, Elaea; ref. BMC 48, Cop 199
laney
crispina_2.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA24 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE 25 mm 11.20 g
O: BUST R
R: JUNO STANDING L HOLDING SCEPTER AND PATERA, PEACOCK AT FEET S.C
laney
crispina_1.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA23 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE 24 mm 9.4 g
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
BUST R
R: HILARITAS S-C
HILARITAS STANDING L HOLDING LONG PALM AND CORNUCOPIA
laney
crispina.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA34 views(wife of Commodus)
CRISPINA
d. 184
AE DUPONDIUS 14.04 g
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
BUST OF CRISPINA RIGHT
R: IVNO L[V]CINA SC
JUNO STANDING LEFT HOLDING A PATERA AND SCEPTER
laney
CRISPINA_JUNO.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA28 views(wife of Commodus)
AE 23 mm max. 8.07 g
177 - 182 AD (d. 182)
O: CRISIPINA, HEAD R
R: [IVNO REGINA] S C, Juno standing l. holding patera and scepter.
laney
CRISPINA_05_27.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA19 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE 25 mm max., 9.37 g
O: BUST R
R: JUNO STANDING L HOLDING SCEPTER AND PATERA
laney
crispina~0.jpg
(0177) CRISPINA10 views(wife of Commodus)
177 - 182 AD
AE As 24 mm 9.4 g
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
R: HILARTAS S-C, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm and cornucopiae. RIC 678; Cohen 20; BMC 428
Rome
laney
0184.jpg
0184 - Denarius Crispina 180-2 AC16 viewsObv/ CRISPINA AVGVSTA, togate bust of Crispina r.
Rev/ VENVS, Venus standing l., holding apple with r.h. and raising toga above shoulder with l.h.

Ag, 19 mm, 2.33 g
Mint: Roma.
RIC III/286a [S]
ex-Jesús Vico, auction 137, lot 413
dafnis
Personajes_Imperiales_4.jpg
04 - Personalities of the Empire54 viewsCommodus, Crispina, Pertinax, Didius Julianus, Manlia Scantilla, Didia Clara, Pescennius Níger, Clodius Albinus, Septimius Severus, Julia Domna, Caracalla, Plautilla, Geta and Macrinusmdelvalle
41.jpg
041 Crispina. AR Denarius25 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVG drp. bust r.
rev: CORNCORDIA clasped hands of her married life with Commodus
"wife of Commodus"
hill132
042_Crispina_(__-183_A_D_),_AE-As,_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_680_C-24_BMC_433_(Comm_),_Rome,_Q-001_h_mm_ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #167 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #1
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-LVCINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: -/-//--, diameter: 22,5-23,5mm, weight: 8,60g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-680 (Commodus), p-443, C-24, BMC-433, Scarce !,
Q-001
quadrans
042_Crispina_(_-183_A_D_)_AE-As_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_680-p-443_C-24_BMC_433_(Comm_)_Rome_Q-002_11h_24,5mm_9,86ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #271 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0680 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO LVCINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #2
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-LVCINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter:24,5mm, weight: 9,86g, axis: 11h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-680 (Commodus), p-443, C-24, BMC-433, Scarce !,
Q-002
1 commentsquadrans
042_Crispina_(__-183_A_D_),_AE-As,_CRISPINA_AVGVSTA__IVNO-LVCINA_S-C_RIC_III_682_C-_BMC__(Comm),_Rome,_Q-001_4h_25mm_12,29ga-s.jpg
042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0682 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #166 views042 Crispina ( ?-183 A.D.), RIC III 0682 (Comm.), Rome, AE-As, IVNO REGINA, Iuno standing left, Scarce !, #1
Wife of Commodus.
avers:- CRISPINA-AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in a bun.
revers:- IVNO-REGINA, Iuno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, S-C across the field.
exerg: S/C//--, diameter: 25mm, weight: 12,29g, axis: 4 h,
mint: Rome, date: A.D., ref: RIC-III-682 (Commodus), p-443, C- Not in, BMC-Not in
Q-001
quadrans
RI 056a img.jpg
056 - Crispina AE Sestertius - RIC 669118 viewsObv:– CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev:– LAETITIA, Laetitia standing facing, head left, holding wreath in right hand and rudder set on globe in left hand, S C
Minted in Rome A.D. 180 - 183
Reference RIC 669
maridvnvm
IMG_4636.JPG
065. Crispina (Wife of Commodus)22 viewsAv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Rv.: CONCORDIA / S-C

AE Sestertius Ø29 / 20.1g
RIC III 665 Rome, Cohen 6
Juancho
Crispina-RIC-281.jpg
071. Crispina.12 viewsDenarius, 180 -182 AD, Rome mint.
Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA / Bust of Crispina.
Reverse: DIS GENITALIBVS / Lighted altar.
3.49 gm., 18 mm.
RIC #281; Sear #5999.

This coin of Crispina has an unusual reverse type: an altar dedicated to the gods of childbirth. We know of no children born to Crispina and Commodus. Stevenson says of this reverse (p. 332): "It would seem that the empress had dedicated an altar to the dii genitales, either for having had children, or that she might obtain fertility from them, or that she might commend the child with which she was pregnant to their care and protection.
Callimachus
coin194.JPG
106a. Crispina47 viewsCrispina married the sixteen year-old, Commodus in the summer of 178 and brought him, as a dowry, a large number of estates. These, when added to the Imperial holdings, gave him control of a substantial part of Lucanian territory. The actual ceremony was modest but was commemorated on coinage and largesse was distributed to the people. An epithalamium for the occasion was composed by the sophist Julius Pollux.

Upon her marriage, Crispina received the title of Augusta, and thus, became Empress of the Roman Empire as her husband was co-emperor with her father-in-law at the time. The previous empress and her mother-in-law, Faustina the Younger, having died three years prior to her arrival.

Like most marriages of young members of the nobiles, it was arranged by paters: in Crispina's case by her father and her father-in-law, Emperor Marcus Aurelius. Crispina probably meant little to her egocentric husband though she was a beautiful woman. The other possible reason being that Commodus was known to prefer the company of men. Crispina is described as being a graceful person with a susceptible heart, but there is no medal extant of her.

As Augusta, Crispina was extensively honoured with public images, during the last two years of her father-in-law's reign and the initial years of her husband's reign. She did not seem to have any significant political influence over her husband during his bizarre reign. However, she was not exempted from court politics either as her sister-in-law, Lucilla, was an ambitious woman and was reportedly jealous of Crispina, the reigning empress, due to her position and power.

Crispina's marriage failed to produce an heir due to her husband's inability, which led to a dynastic succession crisis. In fact, both Anistius Burrus (with whom Commodus had share his first consulate as sole ruler) and Gaius Arrius Antoninus, who were probably related to the imperial family, were allegedly put to death 'on the suspicion of pretending to the throne'.

After ten years of marriage, Crispina was falsely charged with adultery by her husband and was banished to the island of Capri in 188, where she was later executed. After her banishment, Commodus did not marry again but took on a mistress, a woman named Marcia, who was later said to have conspired in his murder.

Crispina, wife of Commodus, 177-192, AE Dupondius or As (24x25mm), aVF. Sear RCV 6018. Obv. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right. Rev. IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing left holding patera and scepter. The coin is brown and green, on a squarish flan.
ecoli
lucilla sestertius.jpg
161-169 AD - LUCILLA AE sestertius48 viewsobv: LVCILLA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: FECVNDITAS / S.C. (Fecunditas - or Lucilla seated right, nursing child in arms, two children at feet)
ref: RIC III 1736 (M.Aurelius), Cohen 21, BMC 1197
22.42g, 26-28mm
Scarce

Annia Lucilla, daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, wife of Lucius Verus. She conspired against Commodus, by whom she was exiled to Capreae, where she was put to death (perhaps together Crispina in 183 AD).
berserker
151-crispina dup.jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA AE dupondius - struck 177 AD29 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: IVNO LVCINA / S.C. (Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter)
ref: RIC III 680(Commodus), C.24 (3frcs)
11.53gms, 25mm
Scarce
berserker
crispina RIC672a(commodus).jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA AE sestertius - struck 180-183 AD45 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: SALVS (Salus seated left, feeding serpent coiled around altar from patera held in right hand), S-C in field
ref: RIC 672a(Commodus), Cohen 33 (6frcs), BMC 420
24.04gms, 29mm
Scarce
berserker
crispina sest.jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA AE sestertius - struck 180-183 AD34 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (bust draped right, hair waved, rolled in front and knotted in bun on back of head)
rev: LAETITIA / S.C. (Laetitia standing facing, head left, holding wreath in right hand & rudder set on globe in left hand)
ref: RIC III 669(Commodus), C.27(6fr)
24.68gms, 29mm
Scarce
The beautiful Bruttia Crispina was married to the Emperor Commodus in 177 AD. A few years later Commodus divorced Crispina on account of her adultery and having being exiled to Capreae, she was put to death by strangulation on his orders (183 AD).
berserker
crispina fourre denar.jpg
177-183 AD - CRISPINA fouree denarius - struck 180-183 AD35 viewsobv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA (draped bust right)
rev: VENVS (Venus standing left, holding an apple)
ref: RIC III 286a (Commodus), C.35 (3frcs)
Scarce
berserker
rjb_crispina_02_06.jpg
177a31 viewsCrispina
AR denarius
Obv "CRISPINA AVGVSTA"
Draped bust right
Rev "DIS GENITALIBVS"
Altar
Rome mint
RIC 281
mauseus
2025-02.jpg
177a20 viewsCrispina
Ilion in Troas
AE 27 mm
mauseus
LucillaSestVenus.jpg
1bm Lucilla164 viewsWife of Lucius Verus, executed 182 AD

Sestertius
Draped bust, right, LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F
Venus standing facing left holding apple, drawing out robe, VENUS

RIC 1767

Daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina Junior, she married Lucius Verus in 164.

According to Herodian: For the present, however, the memory of his father and his respect for his advisers held Commodus in check. But then a disastrous stroke of ill fortune completely altered his previously mild, moderate disposition. It happened this way. The oldest of the emperor's sisters was Lucilla. She had formerly been married to Lucius Verus Caesar. . . . But after Lucius died, Lucilla, who retained all the privileges of her imperial position, was married by her father to Pompeianus.

Commodus, too, allowed his sister to retain the imperial honors; she continued to occupy the imperial seat at the theaters, and the sacred fire was carried before her. But when Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure, and felt that any honor paid to the empress was an insult to her; but since she was well aware that her husband Pompeianus was devoted to Commodus, she told him nothing about her plans to seize control of the empire. Instead, she tested the sentiments of a wealthy young nobleman, Quadratus, with whom she was rumored to be sleeping in secret. Complaining constantly about this matter of imperial precedence, she soon persuaded the young man to set in motion a plot which brought destruction upon himself and the entire senate.

Quadratus, in selecting confederates among the prominent senators, prevailed upon Quintianus, a bold and reckless young senator, to conceal a dagger beneath his robe and, watching for a suitable time and place, to stab Commodus; as for the rest, he assured Quintianus that he would set matters straight by bribes.

But the assassin, standing in the entrance to the amphitheater (it was dark there and he hoped to escape detection), drew his dagger and shouted at Commodus that he had been sent by the Senate to kill him. Quintianus wasted time making his little speech and waving his dagger; as a result, he was seized by the emperor's bodyguards before he could strike, and died for his stupidity in revealing the plot prematurely.

This was the initial reason for the young emperor's hatred of the Senate. He took Quintianus' words to heart and, ever mindful of what his attacker had said, now considered the entire Senate his collective enemy.

This incident also gave Perennis sufficient excuse for taking action, for he was always advising the emperor to eliminate and destroy the prominent men. By confiscating their property, Perennis easily made himself the richest man of his time. After the attempt at assassination had been thoroughly investigated by the prefect, Commodus without mercy put to death his sister, all those actually involved in the plot, and any who were under the slightest suspicion as well.
3 commentsBlindado
CrispinaAsJuno.jpg
1bo Crispina25 viewsWife of Commodus

As

Draped bust, right, CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Juno, IVNO LVCINA

RIC 680

We know little about Crispina. The Historia Augusta notes, "[W]hen Commodus married Crispina, custom demanded that the front seat at the theater be assigned to the empress. Lucilla found this difficult to endure. . . . His wife, whom he caught in adultery, he drove from his house, then banished her, and later put her to death."
1 commentsBlindado
Denario_Lucilla_RIC_786.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)87 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_786_Denario_Lucila.jpg
36-02 - LUCILA (164 - 180 D.C.)12 viewsAR Denario 19 x 17 mm 2.7 gr.

Annia Aurelia Galeria Lucila (7 de marzo de 150 - 182) fue la hija mayor del emperador romano Marco Aurelio y Faustina la Menor y hermana de Cómodo. En el año 164 d. C., el emperador Marco Aurelio casó a su hija Annia Lucilla, con su socio en el poder y hermano de adopción Lucio Aurelio Vero. Después de la muerte del emperador Lucio Vero en 169, Lucila se volvió a casar, esta vez con Claudius Pompeianus y se entregó al desenfreno y depravación, viviendo incluso una incestuosa relación con su hermano Cómodo. El emperador Cómodo sufrió numerosos complots y después de descubrir algunos de ellos, empezó un periodo de terror en el que numerosas personalidades influyentes fueron acusadas y condenadas a muerte. Incluso sus más allegados, como su esposa Crispina y su hermana Lucila fueron acusadas de traición, deportadas a Caprea (isla de Capri) y más tarde asesinadas. Lucila había realmente conspirado junto con un grupo de senadores, pero durante el año 182 fue descubierta y murió en Capri, por orden de emperador. Los senadores líderes también fueron ejecutados. [Fuente WIKIPEDIA]

Anv: "LVCILLA AVGVSTA"- Busto con rodete y vestido viendo a derecha.
Rev: "VENVS VICTRIX" - Venus estante a izquierda portando Victoriola en la mano derecha extendida y apoyando la izquierda en un escudo.

Acuñada 166 - 169 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III (Marco Aurelio) #786 Pag.276 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5492 – BMCRE IV #353 Pag.432 (Plate 59 #10) - Cohen Vol.III #89 Pag.222 - DVM #15 Pag.158 – RSC II #89 Pag.234 - MIR.18/45 -4
mdelvalle
RIC_279A_Denarius_CRISPINA_Foro.jpg
38-02 - CRISPINA (177 - 182 D.C.)18 viewsAR Denario
18 mm - 3.10 gr. - 6 hs.
Esposa de Cómodo.

Anv: "CRISPINA AVG" - Busto vestido y con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "CONCORDIA" - Apretón de manos .

Acuñada 178 - 180 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #279A (S) Pag.399 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #5997 Pag.421 - BMCRE IV #29 Pag.693, Pl.91 #16 - Cohen Vol.III #9 Pag.383 - DVM #4/2 Pag.169 - MIR Vol.18 #4-5 - Seaby RSC Vol.II #9 Pag.255
mdelvalle
Sestercio CRISPINA RIC 657j_1.jpg
38-20 - CRISPINA (177 - 182 D.C.)68 viewsAE Sestercio 31 mm 19.2 gr.
Esposa de Cómodo.

Anv: "CRISPINA AVG IMP COMMODI AVG" - Busto vestido y con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SA]LVS - [S C]" - Salus (La salud) sentada a izquierda dando de comer a una serpiente,enrollada en un altar, con una patera en mano derecha, su brazo izquierdo apoyado sobre el respaldo de la silla/trono .

Acuñada 178 - 180 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #672 Pag.442 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6009 Pag.423 - BMCRE #423 - Cohen Vol.III #32 Pag.384/5 - DVM #14 Pag.169 - MIR Vol.18 #18
mdelvalle
RIC_672b_Sestercio_Crispina.jpg
38-20 - CRISPINA (177 - 182 D.C.)14 viewsAE Sestercio 31 mm 19.2 gr.
Esposa de Cómodo.

Anv: "CRISPINA AVG IMP COMMODI AVG" - Busto vestido y con rodete viendo a derecha.
Rev: "[SA]LVS - [S C]" - Salus (La salud) sentada a izquierda dando de comer a una serpiente,enrollada en un altar, con una patera en mano derecha, su brazo izquierdo apoyado sobre el respaldo de la silla/trono .

Acuñada 178 - 180 D.C.
Ceca: Roma

Referencias: RIC Vol.III #672b Pag.442 - Sear RCTV Vol.II #6009 Pag.423 - BMCRE IV #423 - Cohen Vol.III #32 Pag.384/5 - DVM #14 Pag.169 - MIR Vol.18 #18
mdelvalle
R652_Crispina_portrait.jpg
AD 178-191? - CRISPINA9 viewsCrispina

Roman Empress from 178 to 191? as the consort of Roman Emperor Commodus.

for obverse, reverse and coin details click here
shanxi
commodusCrispina.jpg
Aeolis, Elaea. Commodus AE18. Crispina as Demeter58 viewsObv: AVT K L AVR KOMODOC, Laureate and draped bust right, from behind.
Rev: ELAITWN, Crispina as Demeter, bust right, holding corn-ears and poppy.
BMC 47
ancientone
elaia_commodus_SNGcop199.jpg
Aiolis, Elaia, Commodus, SNG Copenhagen 19919 viewsCommodus, AD 177-192
AE 21, 2.46g
obv. AV KAI - KOMMODO
Bust, draped and cuirassed, seen from behind, laureate, r.
rev. ELAIT - WN
Bust of Crispina as Demeter or Persephone, drsped and diademed, r., holding in l. hand poppy and 2
grain-ears
ref. SNG Copenhagen 199; SNG von Aulock 1641; SNG München 431; SNG Leypold 515; BMC Aiolis p.131, 47
about VF, nice green patina, elegant depiction
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

Elaia was the harbour of Pergamon.
Jochen
crispina.jpg
As, IVNO S - C, Juno & peacock6 viewsCrispina. As, Rome, Rome 180-2 AD. 11.32g. Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA Bust draped r. Rx: IVNO S - C Juno, veiled, standing l. holding patera and scepter, peacock at feet. BM-431, C-23, RIC-679, Sear RCV II 6017. Ex Thomas D. Walker, Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
pjimage_(20).jpg
Bruttia Crispina16 viewsAE As, Struck 180-182 AD, Rome Mint
Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair knotted in a bun in back.
Reverse: LAETITIA S-C, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath & rudder on globe.
References: RIC 683; BMC 435; Cohen 28
Size: 25mm, 11.80g
1 commentsJustin L
crispina~0.jpg
CRISPINA26 viewsAR denarius. 180-182 AD. 3,33 grs. Draped bust right. CRISPINA AVGVSTA / Venus standing left, holding apple and gathering drapery at her shoulder. VENVS.
RIC III 286a (Commodus); MIR 18, 19-4a; RSC 35
benito
crispina.jpg
CRISPINA31 viewsAR denarius. 180-182 AD. 3,33 grs. Draped bust right. CRISPINA AVGVSTA / Venus standing left, holding apple and gathering drapery at her shoulder. VENVS.
RIC III 286a (Commodus); MIR 18, 19-4a; RSC 35
benito
crisses4.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)41 viewsÆ Sestertius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, S C across lower field, Concordia seated left, holding patera in outstretched right hand and cradling cornucopia in left arm.
Rome Mint
18.35g
32mm
RIC 665, Cohen 6, BMC 406,409
1 commentsMat
C1338LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)131 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair weaved in rows and tucked in round coil at back.
R: VENVS, Venus standing facing, head left, apple in right hand, gathering up drapery on her left shoulder with left hand.
Rome
18mm
2.97g
RIC III, 286a (Commodus) RSC 035
7 commentsMat
16132LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)99 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right, hair in round coil at back.
R: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding Victory and sceptre.
Rome
19mm
2.55g
RIC 288
1 commentsMat
00478LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)68 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
R: HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left, holding palm and cornucopiae.
Rome
16mm
2.95g
RIC III 282 (Commodus); RSC 18
4 commentsMat
20984LG.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)80 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
R: CERES, Ceres standing left, holding grain ears and torch.
Rome
18mm
2.71g
RIC III 276 (Commodus); BMCRE 33 (Commodus); RSC 1
3 commentsMat
cri55.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)83 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: DIS GENITABILIS, lighted altar.
Rome
17.5mm
3.15g
RSC 16

Apparently commemorating an altar dedicated by the empress in hope of or thanks for a blessing of fecundity from the dii genitales.
6 commentsMat
cricon.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)65 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, Concordia standing left, patera in right, cornucopia in left.
Rome 180 -182
2.9g
17.5mm
RIC III 278, RSC II 5, BMCRE IV 36, SRCV II 5996
4 commentsMat
crisphan.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)78 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right.
R: CONCORDIA, clasped hands.
2.7g
18mm
RIC 279 (Commodus); BMCRE 29 (Commodus); RSC 9
3 commentsMat
crispinacollection.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)182 viewsVirtual Tray of completed set!

Thanks Jay GT4
14 commentsMat
crisses1.jpg
Crispina (178 - 182 A.D.)56 viewsÆ Sestertius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
R: HILARTAS S-C, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm and cornucopiae.
Rome
18.8g
33mm
RIC III 668 (Commodus)

Uneven Patina, what looks like a pit on reverse is extremely shallow.

Published on Wildwinds!
1 commentsMat
criju.jpg
Crispina (178-182 A.D.)82 viewsAR Denarius
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA,Draped bust right.
R: IVNO, Juno standing facing, head left, holding scepter and patera; to left, peacock standing left.
2.7g
19mm
Rome
RIC 283 (Commodus),RSC 021
2 commentsMat
crispina.jpg
Crispina (Augusta)48 viewsCrispina (Augusta)
AE As/Dupondius 14.28g
Ob: CRISPINA AVGVSTA - Draped bust right, hair tied in bun on back of head
Rv: IVNO LVCINA - S-C across field, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter
Mint: Rome (177 AD)
Ref: RIC II 680 (Commodus); Cohen 24, Sear #5 6018; BMC 433 (Commodus)
Scotvs Capitis
00384.jpg
Crispina (RIC 680, Coin #384)13 viewsRIC 680, AE AS, Rome, 180-182 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA Draped bust right. Hair waved, rolled in front and knotted in bun on back of head.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C Juno standing left with patera and scepter.
Size: 24.6mm 8.46gm
MaynardGee
424_Crispina.JPG
Crispina - AE as or dupondius6 viewsRome
180-182 AD
draped bust right
CRISPINA__AVGVSTA
Juno standing left holding scepter and patera
IVNO LV_CINA
S C
RIC III 680, Cohen 24, BMCRE IV 433, SRCV II 6018
12,92g
Johny SYSEL
1272_Crispina_Philippopolis~0.jpg
Crispina - Philippopolis5 views178-182 AD
draped bust right
KPICΠEINA__CEBACTH
Nike standing left, holding wreath and palm frond
ΦIΛIΠΠ_OΠO_ΛEITΩN
RPC IV online -; Varbanov 1153; Mouchmov 5233
ex Aureo & Calicó
ex Naumann
Johny SYSEL
00-crispina.jpg
Crispina - RIC 67010 viewsCrispina AE Sestertius.
CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right /
PVDICITA S-C, Pudicitia seated left.
xokleng
Crispina-RIC666.jpg
Crispina - Sestertius - RIC 66612 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA. Bust, draped, r., hair waved, rolled in front and knotted in bun on back of head
Rev: DIANA LVCIFERA S C. Diana standing r., holding torch in both hands.
Size: 30 mm
Weight: 23 g
Date: 180-183 AD
Ref: RIC III 666 (Commodus), BMC 411
Rarity: S
vs1969
Crispina_opt.jpg
CRISPINA Ae As RIC 675, Concordia16 viewsOBV: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
REV: CONCORDIA S-C, Concordia seated holding patera and cornucopiae
24mm, 5.2g

Struck at Rome, 177-191 AD
Legatus
now!!!_069.JPG
Crispina AE Sestertius Laetitia51 views21.48 grams.
31 mm.
Ref Crispina AE Sestertius, RIC 669, Cohen 27, BMC 416
Crispina Æ Sestertius. Struck 180-183 AD. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / LAETITIA S-C, Laetitia standing facing, head left, holding wreath in right hand & rudder set on globe in left hand. Cohen 27.

*CRISPINA (Bruttia), daughter of Bruttius Praesens, a man of consular rank. Considered a woman of great beauty, she was married to the Emperor Commodus in A.D.177. A few years after his accession to the throne, Commodus divorced Crispina on account of her adultery and, having being exiled to Capreae, she was put to death by strangulation on his orders (A.D.183).


Antonio Protti
crispina-sestertius.jpg
Crispina AE Sestertius, 178-191 AD16 viewsRoman Imperial, Crispina AE Sestertius, (178-191 AD), 24.4g, 31mm

Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.

Reverse: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left holding Victory & sceptre.

Reference: RIC 673, Cohen 40, BMC 424

Ex: John Anthony
Gil-galad
crispina1.jpg
CRISPINA AE SESTERTIUS, WIFE OF COMMODUS, AGUSTA 178-182 A.D.129 viewsObverse - CRISPINA AVGVSTS, draped bust right
Reverse - LAETITIA S-C, Laetitia facing left, wreath in right hand and rudder set on globe in left hand. Cohen 27
30mm max. dia.
NORMAN K
Crispina_AR_Denarius.jpg
Crispina AR Denarius (peacock)39 viewsCRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet. RSC 21, RIC 283, BMC 41 _110451 commentsAntonivs Protti
Crispina2.jpg
Crispina Denarius21 viewsCrispina AD 180-182 Silver Denarius
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA - Bare head bust right, draped.
Rev: CONCORDIA - Concordia standing left holding patera and cornucopia.
Rome mint: 180-182
RIC III, 278 (s) - BMCRE 36 - SEAR RCV II (2002), #5996, page 421

Scarce
Tanit
Crispina_b.jpg
Crispina denarius84 viewsVENVS
wife of Commodus
3 commentsTibsi
Crispina 10 D.jpg
Crispina Dupondius22 viewsAE Dupondius. Obv.: CRISPINA AVGGVSTA ; dr. bust r. ; Rev.: LAETITIA S C; Laeticia stg. l., holding a wreath and a rudder which rests open a globe . Tanit
Crispina_Salus.JPG
Crispina Salus22 viewsCrispina, wife of Commodus 178 - 182 AD. Sestertius, Rome 180 - 182 AD.
29.5mm 17g
Obverse: CRISPINA AVGVSTA draped bust right.
Reverse: SALVS S C across field, Salus seated left, feedinbg snake arising from altar, left arm on chair.

SCARCE
Romanorvm
crispina_concordia.JPG
Crispina Silver Concordia14 viewsDenarius Obv: CRISPINAAVGVSTA - Draped bust right.
Rev: CONCORDIA - Concordia standing left, holding patera and cornucopia. 180-182
James b4
Crispina.jpg
CRISPINA wife of COMMODUS ---- RIC675 ---- dupondius 26 viewsComing soonMarjan E
Crispina.png
Crispina – RIC-15 (Commodus)39 viewsCrispina. Augusta, A.D. 178-182. AR Denarius (19 mm, 2.94 g, 6 h). Rome, under Commodus, before ca. A.D. 183. CRISPINA AVG, draped bust of Crispina right / DIS GENI-TAL-IBVS, lighted altar. RIC 281; BMC 31; RSC 15; RCV 59991 commentsBud Stewart
crispina.jpg
Crispina, Concordia124 viewsSilver denarius, RIC III 279, RSC II 9, BMCRE IV 29, Choice gVF, Rome mint, 3.403g, 19.3mm, 0o, 180-182 A.D.; obverse CRISPINA AVG, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA, clasped hands; scarce;
Purchased from FORVM in Feb. 09
3 commentsarizonarobin
fastina45.jpg
Crispina, Philippopolis57 viewsThrace, Philippopolis

KRICPEINA CEBACTH
Draped bust right

FILIPPOPOLEITWN
Nike walking left, holding wreath and palm.

Augusta, AD 178-182
19-20mm;3.61g
Mouchmov 5233
Wildwinds example (this coin)
arizonarobin
Crispina_RIC_680.JPG
Crispina, RIC 68032 viewsCRISPINA AVGVSTA
Draped bust right
IVNO LVCINA
Juno standing left, holding a patera and scepter, SC in fields to sides
AE as, 25mm, 9.73g
novacystis
1 commentsnovacystis
crriciii288.jpg
Crispina, RIC III 288 (Commodus)11 viewsRome mint, Crispina Denarius, 178-182 A.D. AR, 18mm 2.59g, RIC III 288 (Commodus), RSC 39a
O: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
R: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left, holding Victory and sceptre
casata137ec
0161-310np_noir.jpg
Crispina, Sestertius76 viewsRome mint, circa AD 180-182
CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
LAETITIA, Laetitia standing left, holding wreath and rudder, SC in field
19.86 gr
Ref : Cohen # 27, RCV # 6007
Potator II
crispina092108a.jpg
Crispina, Venus65 viewsCRISPINA-AVGVSTA
draped bust right

VE-NVS
Venus standing facing, head left, holding apple and lifting drapery from shoulder

Ar denarius;3.06g;17-19mm
RIC 286a;Cohen 35
4 commentsarizonarobin
Crispina_RIC_C286a.JPG
Crispina, wife of Commodus39 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust of Crispina facing right.

Rev: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding an apple in her right hand; gathering up folds of her gown with her left.

Silver Denarius, Rome mint, c. 180 - 182 AD

3.4 grams, 19.14 mm, 180°

RIC III Commodus 286a, RSC 35, S6002, VM 8
1 commentsSPQR Coins
CRISPINA-2.jpg
Crispina, wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.262 viewsAR Denarius (19.5mm, 3.15g), Rome mint, 180-181 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: DIS GENITALIBVS, large rectangular altar.
RIC-281A, Sear 5999 var., BMC 31, RSC 15, Cohen 15.

Crispina's earliest obverse legend (CRISPINA AVGVSTA, RIC-281B; C-16; BMC-39, is usual for this issue).
2 commentsEmpressCollector
CRISPINA-3.JPG
Crispina, wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.218 viewsÆ As or Dupondius (25mm), Rome mint, 180-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C, Juno standing l., holding patera and scepter.
RIC-680, Sear-6018, BMC-433, Cohen-24.
EmpressCollector
Crispa IVNO.jpg
Crispina- IVNO LVCINA61 viewsCrispina, wife of Commodus, Augusta 178 -182 A.D.

Obverse:

CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair knotted in a bun in back

CRISPINA AVGVSTA

CRISPINA: Crispina
AVGVSTA: Augusta

Reverse:

IVNO LVCINA S C,

IVNO: Juno, goddess
LVCINA: Light
S C: Senatus Consulto


IVNO LVCINA (Goddess of light) S C, Juno standing left, holding patera (a bowl used to pour libations) and scepter

Domination:Middlle Bronze, Orichalcum Sstertius/ Dupondius, 25 mm

Mint: Rom
John Schou
ad1.jpg
Crispina. Augusta, AD 178-182. Æ Dupondius or As16 viewsRome mint. Struck under Commodus.
Obv: Draped bust right.
Rev: Venus seated left, holding Victory and scepter.
ancientone
EB0472_scaled.JPG
EB0472 Crispina / Juno10 viewsCrispina, AR Denarius, 178-182 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: IVNO, Juno standing left, holding patera and sceptre, peacock at her feet.
References: RIC III Commodus 283, RSC 21, BMC 41.
Diameter: 19.5mm, Weight: 2.244 grams.
EB
EB0473_scaled.JPG
EB0473 Crispina / Salus12 viewsCrispina (wife of Commodus), AE Sestertius, 180-183 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: SALVS S-C, Salus seated left, feeding serpent coiled around altar from patera held in right hand.
References: RIC III Commodus 672A, Cohen 33, BMC 420.
Diameter: 32mm, Weight: 24.72 grams.
EB
EB0474_scaled.JPG
EB0474 Crispina / Juno Lucina11 viewsCrispina, AE As, 178-191 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: IVNO LVCINA, S-C across field, Juno standing left, holding patera & scepter.
References: RIC III Commodus 680; Cohen 24; BMC 433.
Diameter: 24mm, Weight: 12.931 grams.
EB
coins_011.JPG
Faustina Jr. AE Sestertius UNLISTED?48 views22.63 grams.
30 mm.

Faustina Jr. AE Sestertius. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / HILARTAS S-C, Hilaritas standing left, holding long palm and cornucopiae.

*UNLISTED? I only found this Reverse on a Crispina AE dupondius. RIC 678, Cohen 20, BMC 428
. But not on a Fausatina Jr.

Antonio Protti
faustina_pautalia_wo_shield.jpg
Pautalia Thrace; AE 21.7; Athena with spear and owl, without shield10 viewsFaustina II. Pautalia, Thrace; AE 21.7mm, 8.19g. ΦΑΥΣΤΕΙΝΑ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗHead of Faustina II. r. / ΟΥΛΠΙΑΣ ΠΑΥΤΑΛΙΑΣAthena seated l., holding owl, resting on spear, no shield! Not in Ruzicka. This coin is part of a large hoard consisting of 673 pieces Faustina II. plus 4 coins of Crispina. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
faustina_pautalia_w_shield.jpg
Pautalia Thrace; AE 21.8; Athena with spear, owl and shield12 viewsFaustina II. Pautalia, Thrace; AE 21.8mm, 6.48g. ΦΑΥΣΤΕΙΝΑ ΣΕΒΑΣΤΗ Head of Faustina II. r. / ΟΥΛΠΙΑΣ ΠΑΥΤΑΛΙΑΣAthena seated l., holding owl, resting on spear; at her side, shield. Ruzicka 63, 106. This coin is part of a large hoard consisting of 673 pieces Faustina II. plus 4 coins of Crispina. Ex Gerhard RohdePodiceps
coin83.jpg
Ref Crispina AE Sestertius, RIC 672a, Cohen 334 viewsRef Crispina AE Sestertius, RIC 672a, Cohen 33,
BMC 420 Crispina Æ Sestertius. Struck 180-183 AD
CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / SALVS
S-C, Salus seated left, feeding serpent coiled around
altar from patera held in right hand. Cohen 33.
Coin #83
cars100
Crispina_RIC_281B.jpg
RIC 281B13 viewsDenarius, 178-193
Obv: CRIPINA AVGVSTA
Bust r., dr.; hair in round coil at back.
Rev: DIS GENITALIBVS
Garlanded and lighted altar, square in shape.
18mm, 3.29g

Possibly struck around 182, while Crispina might have been pregnant.
klausklage
crispina_02~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.398, 276 - Crispina, Ceres15 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: CERES Ceres standing left, holding corn ears and torch
Ag, 2.84g, 16.8x18mm
Ref.: RIC 276, BMC Commodus 33, Kamp. 42.5, CRE 280 [S]
1 commentsshanxi
R655_Crispina_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 278 - Crispina, Concordia13 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev.: CONCORDIA, Concordia standing left holding patera and cornucopiae.
Ag, 2.86g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 278 [S], CRE 284 [S]
shanxi
Crispina_R686_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 278 - Crispina, Concordia10 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev.: CONCORDIA, Concordia standing left holding patera and cornucopiae.
Ag, 2.73g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC III 278 [S], CRE 285 [C]
shanxi
R652_Crispina_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 279B - Crispina, Clasped hands17 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVG, Draped bust
Rev.: CONCORDIA, Clasped hands.
Ag, 3.24g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 279B, CRE 282 [S]
1 commentsshanxi
R647_Crispina_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 281A - Crispina, altar14 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVG, Draped bust right
Rev.: DIS - GENITALIBVS. Garlanded and lighted altar
Ag, 3.83g, 18mm
Ref.: RIC 281A [R], CRE 277 [R]
shanxi
Crispina_R673_fac~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 281B - Crispina, altar3 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right
Rev.: DIS - GENITALIBVS. Garlanded and lighted altar
Ag, 3.01g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC 281B, CRE 278 [S]
shanxi
Crispina_01~0.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 283 - Crispina, Juno7 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust
Rev.: I- V-N-O, Juno standing with patera and sceptre, peacock at feet
Ag, 3.12g, 17.8mm
Ref.: RIC III 283, CRE 289 [S]
Ex Dionysos Numismatik
shanxi
Crispina_R616_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 283 - Crispina, VENVS FELIX16 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 180-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair in round coil low at back
Rev.: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left on throne without back, Victory in right hand, long grounded scepter vertical in left hand
Ag, 2.716g, 19.3mm
Ref.: RIC III Commodus 288 [S], RSC II 39a, BMCRE IV 50, MIR 21, Hunter II 15, SRCV II 6003, CRE 293 [R]
Ex Ancient Coin Art
Ex Jyrki Muona Collection
Ex Forum Ancient Coins Shop
shanxi
R653_Crispina_fac.jpg
RIC 3, p.399, 286 - Crispina, Venus8 viewsCrispina
Augusta AD 178-182
AR Denarius
Obv.: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Draped bust right.
Rev.: VENVS, Venus standing left, holding apple and lifting drapery.
Ag, 3.50g, 17mm
Ref.: RIC III 286 [S], CRE 291 [C]
shanxi
Crispina1.jpg
Roman Crispina Denarius45 viewsCrispina Denarius. 180-182 AD.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right
Rev: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left holding statuette of Minerva and scepter.

RIC 289

Scarce
Tanit
crispina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE - CRISPINA30 viewsAs, 178-182 A.D. CRISPINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right / VENVS S-C, Venus standing left, holding apple & drawing drapery from back of neck. RIC 684
dpaul7
bpAnto1R3Crispina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, AE Dupondius59 viewsObv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA
Laureate and draped bust, right.
Rev: IVNO LVCINA S C
Juno standing left, holding patera and scepter.
Dupondius, 15.4 gm, 25.2 mm, RIC 680
Comment: Juno Lucina is especially associated with childbirth and newborns in the Imperial family.
Massanutten
Crispina.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, AR denarius117 viewsOptimus
Crispina as VENVS FELIX.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, As or Dupondius82 viewsRIC 686
Rev: VENVS FELIX, Venus seated left holding Victory & sceptre.
E Pinniger
P1140020_JPGzusammen.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Crispina, Sestertius24 viewsNumis-Student
CRISPINA-4.jpg
Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.345 viewsCrispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
4 commentsEmpressCollector
PhilipopolisCrispina.JPG
Thrace, Philippopolis. Crispina AE1838 viewsObv: Draped bust of Crispina, r.
Rev: Homonoia standing left holding patera and cornucopia.
1 commentsancientone
pautalia_faustinaII_Ruzicka101.jpg
Thracia, Pautalia, Faustina jun., Ruzicka 10119 viewsFaustina jun., AD 146-175
AE 23, 6.94g
obv. FAVCTEINA - CEBAC[TH]
Bust, draped, r.
rev. OVLPIAC PAVT - ALIAC
Athena, std. r. with crested helmet, holding patera in extended r. hand and spear in raised l.
hand; leaning at throne r. her shield with central knob.
Ruzicka 101 (1 ex., Sofia); cf. Varbanov (engl.) 4464 (cites Ruzicka 100 with foot on footstool)
F+, glossy brown patina

This coin comes from a hoard found15-20 years before at an unknown location. This hoard originally
has consisted of 673 coins of Faustina jr. and 4 of Crispina. From Pautalia alone were found 76 different
obv. dies of Faustina. This hoard was recorded by the Berliner Münzkabinett.
Jochen
pautalia_faustinaII_Ruzicka129var.jpg
Thracia, Pautalia, Faustina jun., Ruzicka 129 var.18 viewsFaustina jun., AD 146-175
AE 22 6.62g
obv. FAVCTEINA - [CEBACTH]
Bust, draped, r.
rev. [OVLP]IAC P - AVTALIAC
Hygieia stg. r., holding rod in lowered r. hand and l. hand with patera to snake which is entwined
around a stele (column), head to l.
Ruzicka 129 var. (without legend break on rev., doesn't mention the rod); Varbanov (engl.) 4488 (different
legend break, but mentions the rod)
very rare, F+, glossy brown patina

This coin comes from a hoard found15-20 years before at an unknown location. This hoard originally
has consisted of 673 coins of Faustina jr. and 4 of Crispina. From Pautalia alone were found 76 different
obv. dies of Faustina. This hoard was recorded by the Berliner Münzkabinett.
Jochen
pautalia_faustinaII_Ruzicka85.jpg
Thracia, Pautalia, Faustina jun., Ruzicka 8518 viewsFaustina jun., wife of Marcus Aurelius, AD 161-180
AE 23, 6.72g, 22.8mm
obv. FAVCTEI - NA CEBACTH
Bust draped, r., hair in chignon
rev. OVLPIAC P - A - VTALIAC
Demeter, veiled, in girdled double chiton, stg. frontal, head l., holding in l. arm burning long torch and in extended r. hand patera over garlanded burning altar.
ref. Ruzicka 85; Varbanov (engl.) 4470
about VF, brown patina

This coin comes from a hoard found15-20 years before at an unknown location. This hoard originally
has consisted of 673 coins of Faustina jr. and 4 of Crispina. From Pautalia alone were found 76 different
obv. dies of Faustina. This hoard was recorded by the Berliner Münzkabinett.
Jochen
Commodus-Provprg-CommodusCrispina-Helm-.jpg
VII-COMMODUS -b- 001 AE30 THRACIA // BYZANTHIUM100 viewsAv) ΒP KPICΠINA CEB AYT KΛ AYPH KOMOΔΟC
Bust of Crispina in drapea right, facing bare headed bust of young Commodus, with drapea and cuirass left

Rv) BYZANTIΩN EΠI AI ΠONTIKOY H
Crested helm with cheek-piece

Weight: 16,0g Ø:30mm ;References: Varbanov Vol. II/page 152/Nr.:1721; SEAR/2069
2 commentssulcipius
Crispina-Denar-DISGENITALIBUS-RIC281a.jpg
VII/a - CRISPINA - Denar RIC III[COMM]/281a30 viewsA) CRISPINA AVG
Draped bust right

R) DIS GENITALIBVS
Square, garlanded and lighted altar

Weight: 3,3g; Ø: 18mm; Reference: RIC III[COMM]/281a
2 commentssulcipius
CommodusRSC190.jpg
[906a]Commodus, March or April 177 - 31 Dec 192 A.D.167 viewsCOMMODUS AR silver denarius. RSC 190. RCV 5644. 16.5mm, 2.3g. F. Obverse: L AEL AVREL COMM AVG P FEL, bust of Commodus wearing lion skin in imitation of Hercules and Alexander the Great, facing right; Reverse: HER-CVL RO-MAN AV-GV either side of club of Hercules, all in wreath. RARE. Ex Incitatus.

This coin refers to Commodus' belief that he was Hercules reincarnated. According to the historian Herodian, "he issued orders that he was to be called not Commodus, son of Marcus, but Hercules, son of Jupiter. Abandoning the Roman and imperial mode of dress, he donned the lion-skin, and carried the club of Hercules..." (Joseph Sermarini).

De Imperatoribus Romanis:
An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

Commodus (A.D. 180-192)

Dennis Quinn

Marcus Aurelius Commodus Antoninus, the son of the Emperor Marcus Aurelius and his wife-cousin Faustina, was born in Lanuvium in 161 AD. Commodus was named Caesar at the age of 5, and co-Augustus at the age of 17, spending most of his early life accompanying his father on his campaigns against the Quadi and the Marcomanni along the Danubian frontier. His father died, possibly of the plague, at a military encampment at Bononia on the Danube on 17 March 180, leaving the Roman Empire to his nineteen-year-old son.[[1]] Upon hearing of his father's death, Commodus made preparations for Marcus' funeral, made concessions to the northern tribes, and made haste to return back to Rome in order to enjoy peace after nearly two decades of war. Commodus, and much of the Roman army behind him, entered the capital on 22 October, 180 in a triumphal procession, receiving a hero's welcome. Indeed, the youthful Commodus must have appeared in the parade as an icon of new, happier days to come; his arrival sparked the highest hopes in the Roman people, who believed he would rule as his father had ruled.[[2]]

The coins issued in his first year all display the triumphant general, a warrior in action who brought the spoils of victory to the citizens of Rome.[[3]] There is a great deal of evidence to support the fact that Commodus was popular among many of the people, at least for a majority of his reign. He seems to have been quite generous.[[4]]. Coin types from around 183 onward often contain the legend, Munificentia Augusta[[5]], indicating that generosity was indeed a part of his imperial program. Coins show nine occasions on which Commodus gave largesses, seven when he was sole emperor.[[6]] According to Dio, the emperor obtained some of this funding by taxing members of the senatorial class.[[7]] This policy of munificence certainly caused tensions between Commodus and the Senate. In 191 it was noted in the official Actus Urbis that the gods had given Commodus to Populus Senatusque Romanus. Normally the phrase Senatus Populusque Romanus was used. [[8]] While the Senate hated Commodus, the army and the lower classes loved him.[[9]] Because of the bad relationship between the Senate and Commodus as well as a senatorial conspiracy,[[10]] Rome "...was virtually governed by the praetorian prefects Perennis (182-185) and Cleander (186-9)."[[11]]

Commodus began to dress like the god Hercules, wearing lion skins and carrying a club.[[12]] Thus he appropriated the Antonines' traditional identification with Hercules, but even more aggressively. Commodus' complete identification with Hercules can be seen as an attempt to solidify his claim as new founder of Rome, which he now called the Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana. This was legitimized by his direct link to Hercules, son of Father Jupiter.[[13]] He probably took the title of Hercules officially some time before mid-September 192.[[14]]

While the literary sources, especially Dio, Herodian, and the Historia Augusta, all ridicule the antics of his later career, they also give important insight into Commodus' relationship to the people.[[15]] His most important maneuver to solidify his claims as Hercules Romanus was to show himself as the god to the Roman people by taking part in spectacles in the amphitheater. Not only would Commodus fight and defeat the most skilled gladiators, he would also test his talents by encountering the most ferocious of the beasts.[[16]]

Commodus won all of his bouts against the gladiators.[[17]] The slayer of wild beasts, Hercules, was the mythical symbol of Commodus' rule, as protector of the Empire.[[18]]

During his final years he declared that his age should be called the "Golden Age."[[19]] He wanted all to revel in peace and happiness in his age of glory, praise the felicitas Commodi, the glorious libertas, his pietas, providential, his victoria and virtus aeterna.[[20]] Commodus wanted there to be no doubt that this "Golden Age" had been achieved through his munificence as Nobilissimus Princeps. He had declared a brand new day in Rome, founding it anew in 190, declaring himself the new Romulus.[[21]] Rome was now to be called Colonia Lucia Annia Commodiana, as noted above, and deemed "the Immortal," "the Fortunate," "the Universal Colony of the Earth."[[22]] Coins represent the archaic rituals of city-[re]foundation, identifying Commodus as a new founder and his age as new days.[[23]]

Also in 190 he renamed all the months to correspond exactly with his titles. From January, they run as follows: Lucius, Aelius, Aurelius, Commodus, Augustus, Herculeus, Romanus, Exsuperatorius, Amazonius, Invictus, Felix, Pius.[[24]] According to Dio Cassius, the changing of the names of the months was all part of Commodus' megalomania.[[25]] Commodus was the first and last in the Antonine dynasty to change the names of the months.


The legions were renamed Commodianae, the fleet which imported grain from Africa was called Alexandria Commodiana Togata, the Senate was deemed the Commodian Fortunate Senate, his palace and the Roman people were all given the name Commodianus.[[26]] The day that these new names were announced was also given a new title: Dies Commodianus.[[27]] Indeed, the emperor presented himself with growing vigor as the center of Roman life and the fountainhead of religion. New expressions of old religious thought and new cults previously restricted to private worship invade the highest level of imperial power.[[28]]

If Eusebius of Caesarea [[29]] is to be believed, the reign of Commodus inaugurated a period of numerous conversions to Christianity. Commodus did not pursue his father's prohibitions against the Christians, although he did not actually change their legal position. Rather, he relaxed persecutions, after minor efforts early in his reign.[[30]] Tradition credits Commodus's policy to the influence of his concubine Marcia; she was probably his favorite,[[31]] but it is not clear that she was a Christian.[[32]] More likely, Commodus preferred to neglect the sect, so that persecutions would not detract from his claims to be leading the Empire through a "Golden Age."[[33]]

During his reign several attempts were made on Commodus' life.[[34]] After a few botched efforts, an orchestrated plot was carried out early in December 192, apparently including his mistress Marcia. On 31 December an athlete named Narcissus strangled him in his bath,[[35]] and the emperor's memory was cursed. This brought an end to the Antonine Dynasty.


SELECT BIBLIOGRAPHY
Alföldy, G. "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.

Aymard, J. "Commode-Hercule foundateur de Rome," Revue des études latines 14 (1936): 340-64.

Birley, A. R. The African Emperor: Septimius Severus. -- rev. ed.-- London, 1988.
________. Marcus Aurelius: A Biography. London, 1987.

Breckenridge, J. D. "Roman Imperial Portraiture from Augustus to Gallienus," ANRW 2.17. 1 (1981): 477-512.

Chantraine, H. "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quartalschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975): 1-31.

Ferguson, J. The Religions of the Roman Empire. Ithaca, 1970.

Fishwick, D. The Imperial Cult in the Latin West. Leiden, 1987.

Gagé, J. "La mystique imperiale et l'épreuve des jeux. Commode-Hercule et l'anthropologie hercaléenne," ANRW 2.17.2 (1981), 663-83.

Garzetti, A. From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192. London, 1974.

Grosso F. La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo. Turin, 1964.

Hammond, M. The Antonine Monarchy. Rome, 1956.

Helgeland, J. "Roman Army Religion," ANRW II.16.2 (1978): 1470-1505.

Howe, L. L. The Praetorian Prefect from Commodus to Diocletian (A. D. 180-305). Chicago, 1942.

Keresztes, P. "A Favorable Aspect of Commodus' Rule," in Hommages à Marcel Renard 2. Bruxelles, 1969.

Mattingly, R. The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. London, 1930.

Nock, A. D. "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947): 102-116.

Parker, H. M. D. A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337. London, 1935.
________. and B.H. Warmington. "Commodus." OCD2, col. 276.

Raubitschek, A. E. "Commodus and Athens." Studies in Honor of Theodore Leslie Shear. Hesperia, Supp. 8, 1948.

Rostovtzeff, M. I. "Commodus-Hercules in Britain," Journal of Roman Studies 13 (1923): 91-105.

Sordi, M. "Un senatore cristano dell'éta di Commodo." Epigraphica 17 (1959): 104-112.

Speidel, M. P. "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993): 109-114.

Stanton, G. R. "Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus, and Commodus: 1962-1972." ANRW II.2 (1975): 478-549.

Notes
[[1]] For a discussion of the circumstances surrounding the death of Marcus Aurelius, see A. R. Birley, Marcus Aurelius: A Biography -- rev. ed. -- (London, 1987), 210.
Aurelius Victor, De Caes. 16.4, writing around the year 360, claimed Aurelius died at Vindobona, modern Vienna. However, Tertullian, Apol. 25, who wrote some seventeen years after Marcus' death, fixed his place of death at Sirmium, twenty miles south of Bononia. A. R. Birley (Marcus Aurelius, 209-10) cogently argues Tertullian is much more accurate in his general description of where Marcus was campaigning during his last days.
For the dating of Marcus Aurelius' death and the accession of Commodus, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy (Rome, 1956), 179-80.

[[2]] For the army's attitude toward peace, the attitude of the city toward the peace, and the reception of the emperor and his forces into Rome, see Herodian, 1.7.1-4; for Commodus' subsequent political policies concerning the northern tribes, see G. Alföldy, "Der Friedesschluss des Kaisers Commodus mit den Germanen," Historia 20 (1971): 84-109.
For a commentary on the early years of Commodus in the public perception as days of optimism, see A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines. A History of the Roman Empire A. D. 14-192 (London, 1974), 530. For a more critical, and much more negative portrayal, see the first chapter of F. Grosso, La lotta politica al tempo di Commodo (Turin, 1964).

[[3]]The gods Minerva and Jupiter Victor are invoked on the currency as harbingers of victory; Jupiter Conservator on his coins watches over Commodus and his Empire, and thanks is given to divine Providence (H. Mattingly, The Roman Imperial Coinage. Volume III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [London, 1930] 356-7, 366-7). In 181, new coin types appear defining the new reign of Commodus. Victory and peace are stressed. Coins extol Securitas Publica, Felicitas, Libertas, Annona, and Aequitas (ibid., 357).
By 186 Commodus is depicted as the victorious princes, the most noble of all born to the purple. Herodian (1.5.5) describes how Commodus boasted to his soldiers that he was born to be emperor. See also H. Chantraine, "Zur Religionspolitik des Commodus im Spiegel seiner Münzen," Römische Quatralschrift für christliche Altertumskunde und für Kirchengeschichte 70 (1975), 26. He is called Triumphator and Rector Orbis, and associated with the Nobilitas of Trojan descent (Mattingly, RIC III.359; idem, Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum. Volume IV: Antoninus Pius to Commodus, [Oxford, 1940], clxii).

[[4]] Dio tells us that Commodus liked giving gifts and often gave members of the populace 140 denarii apiece (Cass. Dio, 73.16), whereas the Historia Augusta reports that he gave each man 725 denarii (SHA, Comm., 16.3).

[[5]]Mattingly, RIC, III.358.

[[6]] Idem., CBM, IV.clxxiv.

[[7]]Cass. Dio, 73.16.

[[8]]M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 113.

[[9]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.xii. Commodus was also popular amongst the northern divisions of the army because he allowed them to wield axes in battle, a practice banned by all preceding emperors. See, Speidel, JRS 83 (1993), 114.

[[10]]Infra, n. 34.

[[11]] H. Parker and B.H. Warmington, OCD2, s.v. "Commodus," col. 276; after 189, he was influenced by his mistress Marcia, Eclectus his chamberlain, and Laetus (who became praetorian prefect in 191 (Idem.).

[[12]]Herodian, 1.14.8. Hadrian appears on medallions in lion skins; but as far as the sources tell us, he never appeared in public in them. See J. Toynbee, Roman Medallions,(New York, 1986), 208.
He would often appear at public festivals and shows dressed in purple robes embroidered with gold. He would wear a crown made of gold, inlaid with the finest gems of India. He often carried a herald's staff as if imitating the god Mercury. According to Dio Cassius, Commodus' lion's skin and club were carried before him in the procession, and at the theaters these vestiges of Hercules were placed on a gilded chair for all to see (Cass. Dio, 73.17). For the implications of the golden chair carried in procession in relation to the imperial cult, see D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West, (Leiden, 1987-91 ), 555.

[[13]] H. M. D. Parker, A History of the Roman World from A. D. 138 to 337, (London, 1935), 34; For medallions that express the relationship between Antoninus Pius, Marcus Aurelius, and Lucius Verus extolling Hercules as a symbol of civic virtue, see Toynbee, Roman Medallions, 208. For a general statement on the symbolism of Hercules in the Antonine age, see M. Hammond, The Antonine Monarchy, 238.
For a discussion of Commodus' association with Hercules, see
Rostovtzeff, "Commodus-Hercules," 104-6.
Herodian spells out the emperor's metamorphosis in detail (1.14.8).

[[14]]See Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor," 114. He argues this general date because a papyrus from Egypt's Fayum records Hercules in Commodus' title on 11 October 192.

[[15]]For a preliminary example, Herodian writes (1.13.8), "people in general responded well to him."

[[16]]As Dio reports, Commodus, with his own hands, gave the finishing stroke to five hippopotami at one time. Commodus also killed two elephants, several rhinoceroses, and a giraffe with the greatest of ease. (Cass. Dio, 73.10), and with his left hand (ibid., 73.19). Herodian maintains that from his specially constructed terrace which encircled the arena (enabling Commodus to avoid risking his life by fighting these animals at close quarters), the emperor also killed deer, roebuck, various horned animals, lions, and leopards, always killing them painlessly with a single blow. He purportedly killed one hundred leopards with one hundred javelins, and he cleanly shot the heads off countless ostriches with crescent-headed arrows. The crowd cheered as these headless birds continued to run around the amphitheater (1.15-4-6; for Commodus' popularity at these brutal spectacles, see Birley, The African Emperor, 86) (and Dio tells his readers that in public Commodus was less brutal than he was in private [73.17ff]).

[[17]] According to Herodian (1.15-17), "In his gladiatorial combats, he defeated his opponents with ease, and he did no more than wound them, since they all submitted to him, but only because they knew he was the emperor, not because he was truly a gladiator."

[[18]]Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.360.

[[19]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[20]] Mattingly, RIC, III.361. For Commodus' propaganda of peace, see W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392.

[[21]] W. Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.392-3. In 189 a coin type was issued with the legend Romulus Conditor, perhaps indicating he began the official renaming process during that year. For a discussion on Commodus as Romulus, see A. D. Nock, "The Emperor's Divine Comes," Journal of Roman Studies 37 (1947), 103.

[[22]] HA, Comm. 7.1; Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[23]]Mattingly, RIC, III.361. See also, Webber, "The Antonines," CAH, XI.386.

[[24]]The title Felix is first used by the emperor Commodus, and is used in the titles of almost all successive emperors to the fifth century. See, D. Fishwick, The Imperial Cult in the Latin West (Leiden, 1987-91), 473.
HA, Comm., 12.315; Cass. Dio, 73.15; Herodian, I.14.9. These new names for the months seem to have actually been used, at least by the army, as confirmed by Tittianus' Altar. See M. P. Speidel, "Commodus the God-Emperor and the Army," Journal of Roman Studies 83 (1993), 112.

[[25]] Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[26]]Legions:Idem.; the Grain fleet: SHA, Comm., 12.7. For a further discussion of Commodus' newly named fleet, see, A. Garzetti, From Tiberius to the Antonines, 547. For coins issued extolling the fleet, see Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxix; RIC, III.359; the Senate: Cass. Dio, 73.15; the Imperial Palace: SHA, Comm., 12.7; the Roman People: Ibid., 15.5.

[[27]]Cass. Dio, 73.15.

[[28]]Mattingly, CBM, IV.clxxxiv.

[[29]]Eusebius, Hist.Ecc., 5.21.1.

[[30]]For a discussion of the treatment of Christianity during the reigns of Marcus Aurelius and Commodus as well as persecutions during the reign of Commodus, see Keresztes, "A Favorable Aspect," 374, 376-377.

[[31]]Herodian, 1.16.4; Dio, 73.4. A Medallion from early 192 shows Commodus juxtaposed with the goddess Roma, which some scholars have argued incorporates the features of Marcia. See, Roman Medallions, "Introduction." Commodus was married, however, to a woman named Crispina. He commissioned several coins early in his rule to honor her.

[[32]]The Christian apologist Hippolytus tells that she was a Christian (Philos. 9.2.12), Dio tells that she simply favored the Christians (73.4). Herodian does not take a stand on the matter either way (1.16.4).

[[33]]Cass. Dio, 73.15. He pronounces Commodus' edict that his rule should be henceforth called the "Golden Age."

[[34]]H. Parker and B.H. Warmington note that Commodus..."resorted to government by means of favorites...which was exacerbated by an abortive conspiracy promoted by Lucilla and Ummidius Quadratus (182)." (OCD2, col. 276).

[[35]]Herodian, 1.17.2-11; Dio Cass., 73.22; SHA, Comm.,17.1-2.

Copyright (C) 1998, Dennis Quinn. This file may be copied on the condition that the entire contents, including the header and this copyright notice, remain intact. Used by Permission.

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.


Cleisthenes
   
114 files on 1 page(s)