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Augustus_REX_PTOL.jpg
2 Augustus and Ptolemy, King of Mauretania 26 viewsÆ Semis, Carthago Nova, Spain
C. Laetilius Apalus and Ptolemy, duoviri.

Bare head of Augustus right / Name and titles of the duoviri around diadem, REX PTOL inside

RPC 172; SNG Copenhagen 494

Ptolemy of Mauretania (Greek: Πτολεμαῖος, Latin: Ptolemaeus, 1 BC-40) was the son of Juba II and Cleopatra Selene and the grandson of Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony. He was the last Roman client King of Mauretania, and the last of the Ptolemy line.
1 commentsSosius
AUGUDU03-2.jpg
28 BC Colony established at Nemausus by Augustus' army387 viewsmedium bronze (dupondius or as?) (12.6g, 25mm, 2h) Nemausus mint. Struck 10 BC - 10 AD.
IMP DIVI F Agrippa laureate head left and Augustus laureate head right, back to back
COL NEM crocodile chained to palm tree top bent to right, wreath at top.
RIC (Augustus) 158

Denomination uncertain. COL NEM stands for COLONIA AVGVSTA NEMAVSVS (present Nîmes, France), built by Augustus' army after their conquest and return from Egypt. The crocodile chained to the palm tree symbolizes the defeat of the Cleopatra and Marc Antony at Actium.
2 commentsCharles S
coinC_copy.jpg
Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra31 viewsAE 19, 5.78g, Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra, 123 BC, Obv: Radiate head of Antiochus right.. Rev: Owl standing right, head facing on prostrate amphora / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΞΟΥ, IE in ex. , Seleukid date 190 (123 BC), aXF. S 7139, B.M.C.4.87,10, SC 2263, Hoover HGC 9, 1189 (S).Molinari
Antiochus_IX.jpg
Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.20 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C. Ae 18. Weight 5.2g. Obv: Diademed head rt. Rev: Pallas Athena rt. holding shield and spear ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ. BMC 93.23
Antiochus IX Eusebes, ruler of the Greek Seleucid kingdom, was the son of Antiochus VII Sidetes and Cleopatra Thea. Upon the death of his father in Parthia and his uncle Demetrius II Nicator's return to power (129 BC), his mother sent him to Cyzicus on the Bosporus, thus giving him his nickname. He returned to Syria in 116 BC to claim the Seleucid throne from half-brother/cousin Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes in 96 BC.
ddwau
AUGUSTUS_Cistophorus_Pergamum.JPG
AUGUSTUS. AR Cistophorus (3 denarii) of Pergamum. Struck c.19 - 18 B.C.560 viewsObverse: IMP IX TR PO V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298.

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who was defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.) Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests may actually have incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.

This is the rarest cistophorus struck during the reign of Augustus with the exception of the exceedingly rare issues featuring a sphinx.
6 commentsdivvsavgvstvs
ptolemyxiiTD.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes AR Tetradrachm, 72 BC69 viewsOBV: Diademed head right in aegis
REV: Eagle standing left on Thunderbolt; PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS, [Pi A] in right field; Dated L.Theta (Year 9)

This coin was minted in the ninth year of Ptolemy XII Auletes. Svoronos originally ascribed this coin type to year 9 of Cleopatra VII (43 BC) but was reattributed by Regling to her father. This re-attribution is generally accepted. The coin is of relatively low-grade silver (ca 30%) and flat-struck on the obverse.
Svoronos 1856, Ref. Svoronos on-line
wt 13.8 gm
1 commentsdaverino
lg004_quad_sm.jpg
"As de Nîmes" or "crocodile" Ӕ dupondius of Nemausus (9 - 3 BC), honoring Augustus and Agrippa24 viewsIMP DIVI F , Heads of Agrippa (left) and Augustus (right) back to back, Agrippa wearing rostral crown and Augustus the oak-wreath / COL NEM, crocodile right chained to palm-shoot with short dense fronds and tip right; two short palm offshoots left and right below, above on left a wreath with two long ties streaming right.

Ӕ, 24.5 x 3+ mm, 13.23g, die axis 3h; on both sides there are remains of what appears to be gold plating, perhaps it was a votive offering? Rough edges and slight scrapes on flan typical for this kind of coin, due to primitive technology (filing) of flan preparation.

IMPerator DIVI Filius. Mint of COLonia NEMausus (currently Nîmes, France). Known as "As de Nîmes", it is actually a dupontius (lit. "two-pounder") = 2 ases (sometimes cut in halves to get change). Dupondii were often made out of a golden-colored copper alloy (type of brass) "orichalcum" and this appears to be such case.

Key ID points: oak-wreath (microphotography shows that at least one leaf has a complicated shape, although distinguishing oak from laurel is very difficult) – earlier versions have Augustus bareheaded, no PP on obverse as in later versions, no NE ligature, palm with short fronds with tip right (later versions have tip left and sometimes long fronds). Not typical: no clear laurel wreath together with the rostral crown, gold plating (!), both features really buffling.

But still clearly a "middle" kind of the croc dupondius, known as "type III": RIC I 158, RPC I 524, Sear 1730. It is often conservatively dated to 10 BC - 10 AD, but these days it is usually narrowed to 9/8 - 3 BC.

It is a commemorative issue, honoring the victory over Mark Antony and conquest of Egypt in 30 BC. The heads of Augustus and Agrippa were probably positioned to remind familiar obverses of Roman republican coins with two-faced Janus. Palm branch was a common symbol of victory, in this case grown into a tree, like the victories of Augustus and Agrippa grown into the empire. The two offshoots at the bottom may mean two sons of Agrippa, Gaius and Lucius, who were supposed to be Augustus' heirs and were patrons of the colony. Palm may also be a symbol of the local Nemausian deity, which was probably worshiped in a sacred grove. When these coins were minted, the colony was mostly populated by the settled veterans of Augustus' campaigns, hence the reminiscence of the most famous victory, but some of the original Celtic culture probably survived and was assimilated by Romans. The crocodile is not only the symbol of Egypt, like in the famous Octavian's coins AEGYPTO CAPTA. It is also a representation of Mark Antony, powerful and scary both in water and on land, but a bit slow and stupid. The shape of the crocodile with tail up was specifically chosen to remind of the shape of ship on very common "legionary" denarius series, which Mark Antony minted to pay his armies just before Actium. It is probably also related to the popular contemporary caricature of Cleopatra, riding on and simultaneously copulating with a crocodile, holding a palm branch in her hand as if in triumph. There the crocodile also symbolized Mark Antony.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was born c. 64-62 BC somewhere in rural Italy. His family was of humble and plebeian origins, but rich, of equestrian rank. Agrippa was about the same age as Octavian, and the two were educated together and became close friends. He probably first served in Caesar's Spanish campaign of 46–45 BC. Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to train in Illyria. When Octavian returned to Rome after Caesar's assassination, Agrippa became his close lieutenant, performing many tasks. He probably started his political career in 43 BC as a tribune of the people and then a member of the Senate. Then he was one of the leading Octavian's generals, finally becoming THE leading general and admiral in the civil wars of the subsequent years.

In 38 as a governor of Transalpine Gaul Agrippa undertook an expedition to Germania, thus becoming the first Roman general since Julius Caesar to cross the Rhine. During this foray he helped the Germanic tribe of Ubii (who previously allied themselves with Caesar in 55 BC) to resettle on the west bank of the Rhine. A shrine was dedicated there, possibly to Divus Caesar whom Ubii fondly remembered, and the village became known as Ara Ubiorum, "Altar of Ubians". This quickly would become an important Roman settlement. Agrippina the Younger, Agrippa's granddaughter, wife of Emperor Claudius and mother of Emperor Nero, would be born there in 15 AD. In 50 AD she would sponsor this village to be upgraded to a colonia, and it would be renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium (colony of Claudius [at] the Altar of Agrippinians – Ubii renamed themselves as Agrippinians to honor the augusta!), abbreviated as CCAA, later to become the capital of new Roman province, Germania Inferior.

In 37 BC Octavian recalled Agrippa back to Rome and arranged for him to win the consular elections, he desperately needed help in naval warfare with Sextus Pompey, the youngest son of Pompey the Great, who styled himself as the last supporter of the republican cause, but in reality became a pirate king, an irony since his father was the one who virtually exterminated piracy in all the Roman waters. He forced humiliating armistice on the triumvirs in 39 BC and when Octavian renewed the hostilities a year later, defeated him in a decisive naval battle of Messina. New fleet had to be built and trained, and Agrippa was the man for the job. Agrippa's solution was creating a huge secret naval base he called Portus Iulius by connecting together lakes Avernus, Avernus and the natural inner and outer harbors behind Cape Misenum at the northern end of the Gulf of Naples. He also created a larger type of ship and developed a new naval weapon: harpax – a ballista-launched grapnel shot with mechanisms that allowed pulling enemy ships close for easy boarding. It replaced the previous boarding device that Romans used since the First Punic War, corvus – effective, but extremely cumbersome. A later defence against it were scythe blades on long poles for cutting ropes, but since this invention was developed in secret, the enemy had no chance to prepare anything like it. It all has proved extremely effective: in a series of naval engagements Agrippa annihilated the fleet of Sextus, forced him to abandon his bases and run away. For this Agrippa was awarded an unprecedented honour that no Roman before or after him received: a rostral crown, "corona rostrata", a wreath decorated in front by a prow and beak of a ship.

That's why Virgil (Aeneid VIII, 683-684), describing Agrippa at Actium, says: "…belli insigne superbum, tempora navali fulgent rostrata corona." "…the proud military decoration, gleams on his brow the naval rostral crown". Actium, the decisive battle between forces of Octavian and Mark Antony, may appear boring compared to the war with Sextus, but it probably turned out this way due to Agrippa's victories in preliminary naval engagements and taking over all the strategy from Octavian.

In between the wars Agrippa has shown an unusual talent in city planning, not only constructing many new public buildings etc., but also greatly improving Rome's sanitation by doing a complete overhaul of all the aqueducts and sewers. Typically, it was Augustus who later would boast that "he had found the city of brick but left it of marble", forgetting that, just like in his naval successes, it was Agrippa who did most of the work. Agrippa had building programs in other Roman cities as well, a magnificent temple (currently known as Maison Carrée) survives in Nîmes itself, which was probably built by Agrippa.

Later relationship between Augustus and Agrippa seemed colder for a while, Agrippa seemed to even go into "exile", but modern historians agree that it was just a ploy: Augustus wanted others to think that Agrippa was his "rival" while in truth he was keeping a significant army far away from Rome, ready to come to the rescue in case Augustus' political machinations fail. It is confirmed by the fact that later Agrippa was recalled and given authority almost equal to Augustus himself, not to mention that he married Augustus' only biological child. The last years of Agrippa's life were spent governing the eastern provinces, were he won respect even of the Jews. He also restored Crimea to Roman Empire. His last service was starting the conquest of the upper Danube, were later the province of Pannonia would be. He suddenly died of illness in 12 BC, aged ~51.

Agrippa had several children through his three marriages. Through some of his children, Agrippa would become ancestor to many subsequent members of the Julio-Claudian dynasty. He has numerous other legacies.
Yurii P
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001a. Cleopatra VII and Mark Antony48 viewsSYRIA, Coele-Syria. Chalcis ad Libanum. Mark Antony, with Cleopatra VII. 36-31 BC. Æ 19mm (5.45 g, 12h). Dated RY 21 (Egyptian) and 6 (Phoenician) of Cleopatra (32/1 BC). Draped bust of Cleopatra right, wearing stephane / Bare head of Mark Antony right; dates in legend. RPC I 4771; Rouvier 440 (Berytus); SNG München 1006; SNG Copenhagen 383 (Phoenicia). Near Fine, green patina.

Chalcis was given by Antony to Cleopatra in 36 BC. At the culmination of his spectacular triumph at Alexandria two years later, further eastern territories - some belonging to Rome - were bestowed on the children of the newly hailed “Queen of Kings” (referred to as the “Donations of Alexandria”). Shortly after, Antony formally divorced Octavia, the sister of Octavian. These actions fueled Octavian’s propagandistic efforts to win the support of Rome’s political elite and ultimately led to the Senate’s declaration of war on Cleopatra in 32 BC.

Ex-CNG
ecoli
Denarius_Augusto_RIC_180.jpg
01- 04 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 97 viewsAR denario 3,27 gr.

Esta acuñación conmemora la famosa Victoria de Augusto sobre Marco Antonio y Cleopatra en la batalla de Actium, que indirectamente termina con la trágica muerte de estos dos últimos.

Anv: AVGVSTVS DIVI F - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: IMP / XII - ACT en exergo - Apolo Citharoedus de Actium, de pié de frente viendo a izq., vistiendo larga vestimenta y portando Plectrum/Plectro (Pequeña púa hecha de diferentes materiales que se usa para tocar instrumentos de cuerda, como un reemplazo o ayuda de los dedos) en mano der. y Lira en izq.

Acuñada: Entre el 11 y 10 A.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Lyon
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC I 180; Lyon 37; RSC 165; BMCRE 478-9 = BMCRR Gaul 194-5; BN 1418-9.
3 commentsmdelvalle
RIC_180_Denario_Octavio_Augusto.jpg
01- 04 - AUGUSTO (27 A.C. - 14 D.C.) 20 viewsAR denario 18 mm 3,27 gr.

Esta acuñación conmemora la famosa Victoria de Augusto sobre Marco Antonio y Cleopatra en la batalla de Actium, que indirectamente termina con la trágica muerte de estos dos últimos.

Anv: AVGVSTVS DIVI F - Cabeza laureada viendo a derecha.
Rev: IMP / XII - ACT en exergo - Apolo Citharoedus de Actium, de pié de frente viendo a izq., vistiendo larga vestimenta y portando Plectrum/Plectro (Pequeña púa hecha de diferentes materiales que se usa para tocar instrumentos de cuerda, como un reemplazo o ayuda de los dedos) en mano der. y Lira en izq.

Acuñada: Entre el 11 y 10 A.C.
Ceca: Lugdunum - Lyon
Rareza: R2

Referencias: RIC I 180 Pag.53; Lyon #37; RSC I #165 Pag.142; BMCRE #478-9 = BMCRR Gaul #194-5; BN #1418-9; SRCTV I #1611var Pag.319
mdelvalle
Demetrio II, Nicator.jpg
12-02 - Demetrio II, Nicator (1er.Reino 145 - 139 A.C.)55 viewsDemetrio II Nicátor de la dinastía Seléucida, fue rey de Siria en dos períodos: 146 - 139 A.C. y 129 - 126 A.C. Huyó a Creta tras la derrota y muerte de su padre, Demetrio I Sóter, pero regresó después, proclamándose rey. Fue puesto en fuga casi inmediatamente por el general Diodoto, que primero proclamó rey a un hijo de Alejandro Balas, Antíoco VI Dioniso, y luego a sí mismo con el nombre de Trifón. Demetrio marchó en guerra contra el rey de Partia, Mitrídates I, siendo derrotado y capturado en 139 A.C.
En 129 fue puesto en libertad, con la esperanza de provocar una guerra entre él y su hermano Antíoco VII Evergetes. Sin embargo, Antíoco murió antes de que estallara el conflicto, con lo que Demetrio II se proclamó rey de nuevo. Poco después fue derrotado y muerto por el rey de Egipto Ptolomeo VIII, que sostenía al usupador Alejandro Zabinas. Le sucedió su hijo Seleuco V Filométor, bajo la regencia de su viuda Cleopatra Tea. (Wikipedia)

AE 18 x 19 mm 4.9 gr.

Anv: Busto con diadema de Demetrio II viendo a derecha. Grafila de puntos.
Rev: "BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΔHMHTPIOY – TYPIΩN (por Tiro)" - Popa de Galera (Simboliza el poderío naval de Tiro Fenicia bajo los Seléucidas).

Acuñación: 145/4 A.C.
Ceca: Seleucia en Tiro - Fenicia

Referencias: Houghton #753 – SNG Spaer #1722 - B.M.C. Vol.4 (Seleucid Kings of Syria) #20-22 Pag.60 - Sear GCTV Vol.2 #7070 Pag.661 - SNG Israel #1708.
mdelvalle
Cleopatra Thea y Antioco VIII.jpg
16-02 - Anti­oco VIII, Grifo (125 - 96 A.C.)40 viewsAntiochus VIII Epiphanes/Callinicus/Philometor, Hijo de Demetrio II Nicátor y Cleopatra Thea, su apodo Grypus significa nariz de gancho.
Antíoco VIII Grifo de la dinastía Seléucida, fue rey de Siria entre 125 A.C. - 96 A.C. Sucedió a su hermano Seleuco V Filométor, tras ser éste asesinado por la madre de ambos, Cleopatra Tea. Esta intentó envenenarle, pero Antíoco la obligó a beberse su propio veneno. Hubo de combatir contra Antíoco IX Eusebio, con el que finalmente compartió el reino. Fue asesinado en 96 A.C., quedando Antíoco IX como único rey. Sin embargo, varios de sus hijos llegaron a reinar posteriormente.

AE 12 mm 1.4 gr.

Anv: Bustos apareados y laureados de Dioskouri. ” * “ arriba.
Rev: "ANTIOXEΩN / EN ΠTOΛEMAI" a derecha de una cornucopia, "IEPAΣ AΣYΛOY"? a izquierda y "LΠI" fecha seleuciana en exergo.

Acuñada: 125 - 96 A.C.
Ceca: Ake Ptolomais - Fenicia (Ubicado al norte de Haifa - en esta época formaba parte de los reinos Seléucidas)

Referencias: Sear GCTV Vol.2 #6047 var / 6046 Pag.555 - B.M.C. Vol.26 (Phoenicia) #10 Pag.129 - Houghton 810 - Hen #414
mdelvalle
Cleopatra80DrachEagle.jpg
1ad Cleopatra VII55 views51-29 BC

Alexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871

Plutarch wrote: [Cleopatra] was to meet Antony in the time of life when women's beauty is most splendid, and their intellects are in full maturity. . . . She received several letters, both from Antony and from his friends, to summon her, but she took no account of these orders; and at last, as if in mockery of them, she came sailing up the river Cydnus, in a barge with gilded stern and outspread sails of purple, while oars of silver beat time to the music of flutes and fifes and harps. She herself lay all along under a canopy of cloth of gold, dressed as Venus in a picture, and beautiful young boys, like painted Cupids, stood on each side to fan her. Her maids were dressed like sea nymphs and graces, some steering at the rudder, some working at the ropes. The perfumes diffused themselves from the vessel to the shore, which was covered with multitudes, part following the galley up the river on either bank, part running out of the city to see the sight. The market-place was quite emptied, and Antony at last was left alone sitting upon the tribunal; while the word went through all the multitude, that Venus was come to feast with Bacchus, for the common good of Asia. On her arrival, Antony sent to invite her to supper. She thought it fitter he should come to her; so, willing to show his good-humour and courtesy, he complied, and went. . . . For her actual beauty, it is said, was not in itself so remarkable that none could be compared with her, or that no one could see her without being struck by it, but the contact of her presence, if you lived with her, was irresistible; the attraction of her person, joining with the charm of her conversation, and the character that attended all she said or did, was something bewitching. It was a pleasure merely to hear the sound of her voice, with which, like an instrument of many strings, she could pass from one language to another; so that there were few of the barbarian nations that she answered by an interpreter. . . .
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FulviaQuinariusLion.jpg
1ae2 Fulvia43 viewsFirst wife of Marc Antony

ca 83-40 BC

AR Quinarius
Bust of Victory right with the likeness of Fulvia, III VIR R P C
Lion right between A and XLI; ANTONI above, IMP in ex

RSC 3, Syd 1163, Cr489/6

Fulvia was the first Roman non-mythological woman to appear on Roman coins. She gained access to power through her marriage to three of the most promising men of her generation, Publius Clodius Pulcher, Gaius Scribonius Curio, and Marcus Antonius. All three husbands were politically active populares, tribunes, and supporters of Julius Caesar. Fulvia married Mark Antony in 47 or 46 BC, a few years after Curio's death, although Cicero suggested that Fulvia and Antony had had a relationship since 58 BC. According to him, while Fulvia and Antony were married, Antony once left a military post to sneak back into Rome during the night and personally deliver a love letter to Fulvia describing his love for her and how he had stopped seeing the famous actress Cytheris. Cicero also suggested that Antony married Fulvia for her money. At the time of their marriage, Antony was an established politician. He had already been tribune in 49 BC, commanded armies under Caesar and was Master of the Horse in 47 BC. As a couple, they were a formidable political force in Rome, and had two sons together, Marcus Antonius Antyllus and Iullus Antonius.

Suetonius wrote, "[Antony] took a wife, Fulvia, the widow of Clodius the demagogue, a woman not born for spinning or housewifery, nor one that could be content with ruling a private husband, but prepared to govern a first magistrate, or give orders to a commander-in-chief. So that Cleopatra had great obligations to her for having taught Antony to be so good a servant, he coming to her hands tame and broken into entire obedience to the commands of a mistress. He used to play all sorts of sportive, boyish tricks, to keep Fulvia in good-humour. As, for example, when Caesar, after his victory in Spain, was on his return, Antony, among the rest, went out to meet him; and, a rumour being spread that Caesar was killed and the enemy marching into Italy, he returned to Rome, and, disguising himself, came to her by night muffled up as a servant that brought letters from Antony. She, with great impatience, before received the letter, asks if Antony were well, and instead of an answer he gives her the letter; and, as she was opening it, took her about the neck and kissed her."

After Julius Caesar was assassinated, Antony became the most powerful man in Rome. Fulvia was heavily involved in the political aftermath. After Caesar's death, the senate realized his popularity and declared that they would pass all of Caesar's planned laws. Antony had attained possession of Caesar's papers, and with the ability to produce papers in support of any law, Fulvia and Antony made a fortune and gained immense power. She allegedly accompanied Antony to his military camp at Brundisium in 44 BC. Appian wrote that in December 44 and again in 41 BC, while Antony was abroad and Cicero campaigned for Antony to be declared an enemy of the state, Fulvia attempted to block such declarations by soliciting support on Antony's behalf.

Antony formed the second triumvirate with Octavian (the future emperor Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus on 43 BC and began to conduct proscriptions. To solidify the political alliance, Fulvia's daughter Clodia was married to the young Octavian. Appian and Cassius Dio describe Fulvia as being involved in the violent proscriptions, which were used to destroy enemies and gain badly needed funds to secure control of Rome. Antony pursued his political enemies, chief among them being Cicero, who had openly criticized him for abusing his powers as consul after Caesar's assassination. Though many ancient sources wrote that Fulvia was happy to take revenge against Cicero for Antony's and Clodius' sake, Cassius Dio is the only ancient source that describes the joy with which she pierced the tongue of the dead Cicero with her golden hairpins, as a final revenge against Cicero's power of speech.

In 42 BC, Antony and Octavian left Rome to pursue Julius Caesar's assassins, Marcus Junius Brutus and Gaius Cassius Longinus. Fulvia was left behind as the most powerful woman in Rome. According to Cassius Dio, Fulvia controlled the politics of Rome. Dio wrote that "the following year Publius Servilius and Lucius Antonius nominally became consuls, but in reality it was Antonius and Fulvia. She, the mother-in‑law of Octavian and wife of Antony, had no respect for Lepidus because of his slothfulness, and managed affairs herself, so that neither the senate nor the people transacted any business contrary to her pleasure."

Shortly afterwards, the triumvirs then distributed the provinces among them. Lepidus took the west and Antony went to Egypt, where he met Cleopatra VII. When Octavian returned to Rome in 41 BC to disperse land to Caesar's veterans, he divorced Fulvia's daughter and accused Fulvia of aiming at supreme power. Fulvia allied with her brother-in-law Lucius Antonius and publicly endorsed Mark Antony in opposition to Octavian.

In 41 BC, tensions between Octavian and Fulvia escalated to war in Italy. Together with Lucius Antonius, she raised eight legions in Italy to fight for Antony's rights against Octavian, an event known as the Perusine War. Fulvia fled to Greece with her children. Appian writes that she met Antony in Athens, and he was upset with her involvement in the war. Antony then sailed back to Rome to deal with Octavian, and Fulvia died of an unknown illness in exile in Sicyon, near Corinth, Achaea.
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AgrippaAsNeptune.jpg
1ah Marcus Agrippa35 viewsDied 12 BC
As, minted by Caligula.

Head left wearing rostral crownt, M AGRIPPA L F COS III
Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left, SC

RIC 58

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (c 63 BC–12 BC) was a close friend, and defence minister of the future emperor Augustus. He was responsible for many of his military victories, most notably Actium against the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII of Egypt. He was son-in-law to Augustus, maternal grandfather of the Emperor Caligula, father-in-law of the Emperors Tiberius and Claudius, and maternal great-grandfather of the Emperor Nero. He probably served in Caesar’s campaign of 46/45 BC against Pompey and Caesar regarded him highly enough to send him with Octavius in 45 BC to study at Apollonia. From then on Agrippa played a major part in Augustus’ career, as military commander and admiral, also undertaking major public works, and writing works on geography (following his survey of the Empire) and other subjects. He erected many fine buildings in Rome, including the original Pantheon on the Campus Martius (during his third consulship 27 BC). He married Claudia Marcella the Elder, daughter of Octavia the Younger in 28 BC, and Julia the Elder in 21 BC, with whom he had five children. His daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Younger the married Tiberius, and his daughter Agrippina Vipsania the Elder married Germanicus. His last campaign initiated the conquest of the upper Danube region, which would become the Roman province of Pannonia in 13 BC. Augustus had Agrippa’s remains placed in his own mausoleum. Ronald Syme offers a compelling case that Agrippa was much more co-ruler of the empire with Augustus than he was a subordinate.
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160-agrippa as.jpg
37-41 AD - AGRIPPA memorial AE dupondius - struck under Caligula (by RIC)47 viewsobv: M AGRIPPA LF COS III (head left wearing rostral crown)
rev: Neptune standing facing, head left, naked except for cloak draped behind him & over both arms, holding small dolphin in right hand & vertical trident in left. / S.C.
ref: RIC58(Gaius), BMC(Tib)161
mint: Rome
11.10gms, 28mm

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C.
berserker
60661q00.jpg
4) Cleopatra Tetradrachm of Alexandria59 viewsThis coin was issued in the first year of Cleopatra's reign, which would place it around 50 B.C. while she was was still in a relationship with Julius Caesar. Twenty years later, she and Antony would commit suicide after their defeat at Actium, ending the reign of the Pharaohs of Egypt.

Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1817 (Ptolemaios XIII); SNG Cop 398; Cohen DCA 70; BMC Ptolemies p. 1817, 2 (Ptolemaios XIII); Noeske 363; Hosking 129; SNG Milan -, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, weight 9.476g, maximum diameter 25.6mm, die axis 0o, 51 - 50; obverse diademed bust right (feminized bust of Ptolemy I or Cleopatra?), wearing aegis; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, palm behind over right wing, LB (year 2) over crown of Isis left, PA right

Purchased from FORVM
RM0010
1 commentsSosius
Cleopatra_RPC_4772.jpg
4) Cleopatra - Chalcis, Syria16 viewsCLEOPATRA VII
AE 19 of Chalcis, Syria, 32-31 BC

Diademed and draped bust of Cleopatra right / Nike advancing right, holding palm, within laurel wreath.

RPC I 4772; SNG Copenhagen -; HGC 9, 1452. aVF, flan crack

Ex-Amphora Coins, with Hendin COA
RM0021
Sosius
25385q00.jpg
4) Cleopatra VII17 viewsCleopatra VII (maybe)
Bronze dichalkon, 1.491g, 11.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint

Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure / PTOLEMAIOU - BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons

Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); SNG Cop 649; Weiser -, Fine.

Caption per FORVM catalog:
Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.

Purchased from FORVM
RM0004
Sosius
Cleo_VII_Paphos_5.jpg
4) Cleopatra VII Thea Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C.29 viewsCLEOPATRA VII
Bronze dichalkon, Paphos mint

Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis r., hair in melon-coiffure / ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ−ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons

Kreuzer p. 44, 1st illustr; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649. VF
RM0022
Sosius
2550147.jpg
4) Juba II and Cleopatra Selene27 viewsKINGS of MAURETANIA
Juba II, with Cleopatra Selene. 25 BC-24 AD.
AR Denarius (18mm, 2.95g)
Caesarea mint. Struck circa 20 BC-AD 24.

Diademed head right / Star in crescent. MAA 97; SNG Copenhagen 567. VF, weak strike.

For almost fifty years Juba II maintained order in North Africa as one of Rome's most loyal client kings. In AD 11, he had been given Cleopatra Selene, daughter of Cleopatra VII of Egypt, as a wife by a grateful Augustus, and their son, Ptolemy, succeeded him in AD 24.

Ex CNG
RM0005
2 commentsSosius
Marc_Antony_Cr496.jpg
496/1 Marc Antony45 viewsMarc Antony AR Denarius. 42 BC, Greek Mint. (3.62g, 17.8m, 2.3h). Obv: M ANTONI IMP, bare head right. Rev: III VIR R P C, facing head of Sol in a temple of two columns. RSC 12, Sear5 1467, Syd 1168, Cr496/1.

After Caesar’s death, Antony, Octavian, and Lepidus formed the Second Triumvirate. Ultimately, Lepidus was pushed to the side and Antony was defeated by Octavian at the battle of Actium. Fleeing back to Egypt, Antony and Cleopatra committed suicide in the face of their defeat by Octavian.
2 commentsLucas H
coin599.JPG
501. Constantine I Alexandria Posthumous22 viewsAlexandria

The city passed formally under Roman jurisdiction in 80 BC, according to the will of Ptolemy Alexander but after it had been previously under Roman influence for more than a hundred years. Julius Caesar dallied with Cleopatra in Alexandria in 47 BC, saw Alexander's body (quipping 'I came to see a king, not a collection of corpses' when he was offered a view of the other royal burials) and was mobbed by the rabble. His example was followed by Marc Antony, for whose favor the city paid dearly to Octavian, who placed over it a prefect from the imperial household.

From the time of annexation onwards, Alexandria seems to have regained its old prosperity, commanding, as it did, an important granary of Rome. This fact, doubtless, was one of the chief reasons which induced Augustus to place it directly under imperial power. In AD 215 the emperor Caracalla visited the city and for some insulting satires that the inhabitants had directed at him, abruptly commanded his troops to put to death all youths capable of bearing arms. This brutal order seems to have been carried out even beyond the letter, for a general massacre ensued.

Even as its main historical importance had formerly sprung from pagan learning, now Alexandria acquired fresh importance as a centre of Christian theology and church government. There Arianism was formulated and where also Athanasius, the great opponent of both Arianism and pagan reaction, triumphed over both, establishing the Patriarch of Alexandria as a major influence in Christianity for the next two centuries.

As native influences began to reassert themselves in the Nile valley, Alexandria gradually became an alien city, more and more detached from Egypt and losing much of its commerce as the peace of the empire broke up during the 3rd century AD, followed by a fast decline in population and splendour.

In the late 4th century, persecution of pagans by Christians had reached new levels of intensity. Temples and statues were destroyed throughout the Roman empire: pagan rituals became forbidden under punishment of death, and libraries were closed. In 391, Emperor Theodosius I ordered the destruction of all pagan temples, and the Patriarch Theophilus, complied with his request. It is possible that the great Library of Alexandria and the Serapeum was destroyed about this time. The pagan mathematician and philosopher Hypathia was a prominent victim of the persecutions.

The Brucheum and Jewish quarters were desolate in the 5th century, and the central monuments, the Soma and Museum, fell into ruin. On the mainland, life seemed to have centred in the vicinity of the Serapeum and Caesareum, both which became Christian churches. The Pharos and Heptastadium quarters, however, remained populous and left intact.

veiled head only
DV CONSTANTI-NVS PT AVGG
RIC VIII Alexandria 32 C3

From uncleaned lot; one of the nicer finds.
ecoli
AnthonyLegPanoramaBlack~0.jpg
544/21 Mark Anthony 32 viewsMarc Antony Legionary Denarius- Legion VIII. Patrae(?) Mint 32-31 BC. (3.42 g, 16.73 mm) Obv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley. Rev: LEG VIII, legionary eagle between two standards.
Sydenham 1225, RSC 35, Crawford 544/21

Ex: Private Collection

Description from Forvm Ancient Coins:

"The legionary denarii were struck by Antony for the use of his fleet and legions, most likely at his winter headquarters at Patrae just before the Actian campaign. They may have been struck with silver from Cleopatra's treasury. The legionary denarii provide an interesting record of the 23 legions, praetorian cohorts and the chort of speculatores of which Antony's army was composed. Some of them give the name as well as the number of the legion honored. They have a lower silver content than the standard of the time. As a result they were rarely hoarded, heavily circulated and are most often found in very worn condition."

Unfortunately from what I understand VIII Leg has no equivelant among the imperial legions.

This specific coin was fun to photograph, it seemed like no matter how you turned and twisted it still turned out great. A photogenic coin, in other words!
Paddy
EpirusAugustus3.jpg
Achaea, Epirus, Nikopolis, AE18. Augustus (under Hadrian) (Divus)/ Head of boar92 viewsObv: AVGOVCTO CKTICTHC, Head of Augustus r., bare.
Rev: NΕIΚΟΠΟ(Λ) ΕW(C), Head of boar r.
Oikonomidou Augustus 56-57

Nikopolis, Epirus was founded in 28 BC by Octavian in memory of his victory over Antony and Cleopatra at Actium.
1 commentsancientone
Agrippa.jpg
Agrippa55 viewsAgrippa, as (struck under Caligula).
Son-in-law of Augustus.
RIC 58.
11,37 g, 28-29 mm.
Rome, 37-41 A.D.
Obv. M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left wearing rostral crown.
Rev. S C either side of Neptune standing left holding dolphin and trident.

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a renowned Roman general and close friend of Octavian (Augustus). As general, Agrippa defeated the forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. In 21 B.C., Augustus married his own daughter Julia to Agrippa. By Julia, Agrippa had two daughters, Vipsania Julia Agrippina and Vipsania Agrippina maior, and three sons, Gaius, Lucius and Agrippa Postumus.
1 commentsMarsman
Agrippa S C.jpg
Agrippa- Anepigraphic78 viewsAgrippa – 63- 12 BC, Military commander and friend of Augustus

Obverse:

Head left wearing a rostral crown.

M.(Marcus) AGRIPPA L.F. (Lucius Filius = son of Lucius) COS. III (Consul for the third time.)

M:Marcus
L.F: Lucius Filius = son of Lucius
COS. III: Consul for the third time

Agrippa he wears a crown on his head which is decorated by prows of (war)ships, a so-called 'rostral crown' probably given to him to honour him as a fleetcommander during the battle of Actium, the decisiove battle in which Octavian defeated Marc Antony and Cleopatra.

Reverse:

S—C, Senatus Consulto

The reverse is 'anepigraphic' without text, apart from S.C. (Senatus Consulto = by approval of the Senate) Neptune holds a trident and has a dolphin on his outstretched hand. Neptune too is a reference to the sea and Agrippa's nautical carreer.

Domination: AS, Copper, 29 mm

Mint: Rome. This AS of Agrippa is struck under Caligula.

AGRIPPA
63 - 12 BC
Roman General
Agrippa was the companion of Octavian by the time Caesar was murdered in 44 BC. Agrippa was Octavian's most brilliant military commander. He defeated Pompeius in two naval battles and was responsible for for Octavian's victory over Mark Antony. When Octavian became emperor under the name Augustus Agrippa was second only to the emperor in authority. He suppressed rebellions, founded colonies and built an extensive road-network throughout the Roman empire.
John Schou
ATG_bust_Pergamon.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C.143 viewsAlexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC), better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

"Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.
Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr Joann Fletcher (http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml)
Cleisthenes
ATGlifetimeDrachmLydiaSardes.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue104 viewsSilver drachm, Price 2553, VF, 4.297g, 16.4mm, 0o, Lydia, Sardes mint, c. 334 - 323 B.C. Lifetime Issue; Obverse: Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; Reverse: BASILEWS ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, eagle in right, scepter in left, EYE monogram left, rose under throne. Ex FORVM.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the 13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
AlexTheGreatMemphisTet.jpg
Alexander III The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C., Possible Lifetime Issue103 viewsThis is the same coin in my collection, different picture, as the Alexander tetradrachm listed as [300mem].

Silver tetradrachm, Price 3971, VF, 16.081g, 26.1mm, 0o, Egypt, Memphis mint, c. 332 - 323 or 323 - 305 B.C.; obverse Herakles' head right, clad in Nemean lion scalp headdress tied at neck; reverse ALEXANDROU, Zeus enthroned left, legs crossed, eagle in right, scepter in left, rose left, DI-O under throne. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini).

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
1 commentsJames Fitzgerald
cleo.jpg
Antioch ad Orontes, Semi-Autonomous21 viewsAE23, 10.77g, 12h, Denomination A; Antioch: after 47 BC
Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus right; countermark of Cleopatra VII.
Rev.: ‭[‬A]NTIOΣEΩN‭ [‬ME]TPOΠOΛ[EΩΣ‭]; Zeus seated left, holding Nike and scepter, thunderbolt above.
Reference: Butcher 20, SNG Cop 80
Notes: The attribution of the countermark to Cleopatra is conjectural, but seems to jibe with the historical and numismatic evidence.
John Anthony
6Dsqo4PxjTZ3fo8FN7QceNQ95Bbmzw.jpg
Antioch c. 47 - 41 B.C. Cleopatra Countermark. AE 6 viewsAntioch c. 47 - 41 B.C., Roman Provincial Syria, Cleopatra Countermark. AE , SGCV 5855 - 5856; RPC 4218 ff., Coin and countermark F, Antioch mint, , c. 47 - 41 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, countermarked; reverse “ANTIOCEWN THS MHTROPOLEWS”, Zeus enthroned left holding Nike and scepter. jimbomar
antioch_cleo.jpg
Antioch c. 47 - 41 B.C., Apollo or Cleopatra Countermark. AE 2437 viewsAntioch c. 47 - 41 B.C., Roman Provincial Syria, Apollo or Cleopatra Countermark. Bronze AE 24, SGCV 5855 - 5856; RPC 4218 ff., Coin and countermark F, Antioch mint, 11.012g, 23.7mm, 180o, c. 47 - 41 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, countermarked; reverse “ANTIOCEWN THS MHTROPOLEWS”, Zeus enthroned left holding Nike and scepter, uncertain date in ex; brown patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
antioch_cm.jpg
Antioch c. 47 - 41 B.C., Roman Provincial Syria, Apollo or Cleopatra Countermark. AE 2410 viewsAntioch c. 47 - 41 B.C., Roman Provincial Syria, Apollo or Cleopatra Countermark. Bronze AE 24, SGCV 5855 - 5856; RPC 4218 ff., coin and countermark VG, Antioch mint, 11.797g, 24.4mm, 0o, c. 47 - 41 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right, countermarked; reverse “ΑΝΤΙΟΧΕΩΝ ΤΗΣ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΕΩΣ”, Zeus enthroned left holding Nike and scepter, uncertain date in ex; brown patina. RPC notes this countermark as "Head of Apollo" but it may be Cleopatra. The bun behind the head and the piece of hair dangling behind the neck are similar to portraits of Cleopatra on bronze coins from Chalkis and Cyprus and tetradrachms from Syria. Perhaps it was countermarked by the mint that struck the Cleopatra / Antony tetradrachms. Ex FORVMPodiceps
ppsectetORweb.jpg
Antioch, Revised Posthumous Philip, RPC 413653 viewsAntioch Mint, revised posthumous Philip, year = 19 (31/30 B.C.) AR, 26mm 14.39g, RPC 4136, Newell, no. 23
O: Diademed head of Philip Philadelphus, r.
R: BAEILEWE FILIPPOY EPIFANOYE FILADELFOY, Zeus, seated l., holding Nike and scepter
EX: THI
* "In the early fifties, the Romans revived the coinage of King Philip Philadelphus to be their coinage of Syria, copying his types (portrait of Philip/Zeus seated l.), though in a debased style. The coinage lasted from then until the reign of Augustus, and was discussed most recently by H.R. Baldus (in CRWLR, pp. 127-30, with earlier references for H. Scying, E. T. Newell, A. R. Bellinger and C. M. Kraay). The first issues were made with the monogram of Gabinius (57-55 BC), Crassus (54/53 BC) and Cassius (52/51 BC). There after the establishment of a Caesarian era at Antioch in 44/48 BC, their monogram was replaced by one standing for Antioch )or ‘autonomous’: see Wr. 21) and the coins were dated in the exergue by the years of this era. Year 3-12 and, then with a new style (see E. T. Newell, NC, 1919, pp. 69ff.; Baldus, p. 150, n. 14) 19-33 are known.
It may seem odd that the Romans chose the Tetradrachm of Philip (92-83 BC) to revive, rather than those of the last king, Antiochus XII; it is true that the last substantial issue of Seleucid tetradrachms was made by Philip, so that his would have comprised a most important proportion of the currency (so Newell, pp 80-4; M. J. Price ap. Baldus, op. cit., p. 127), but it is hard to see that this provides a sufficient reason, and it is possible that some other consideration might be relevant. While Antiochus (c. 69-65 BC) was away campaigning against the Arabs, the people of Antioch revolted and put forward, as king, Philip, the son of Philip Philadelphus. As the claims of Antiochus were rejected by Pompey when he formed the province, the Roman view may have been that Philip was the last legitimate Seleucid king, and, if so, his coins would naturally have been chosen as the prototype of the Roman coinage in Syria.
The Philips were interrupted from year 12 until year 19, and it seems that in this gap the tetradrachms of Cleopatra and Antony were produced. The evidence for their production at Antioch, however, does not seem sufficient, and they have been catalogued elsewhere, under ‘Uncertain of Syria’ (4094-6). It is certain, however, that a unique drachm portraying Antony was produced at Antioch during this period, as it bears the ethnic ANTIOXEWN MHTPOPOLEWS. See also addenda 4131A.
After the defeat of Antony, the coinage of posthumous Philip was revived in 31/30 BC, though it is not clear whether this represents a conscious decision to avoid putting Octavian’s portrait on the coinage, as happened in Asia and Egypt (similarly, the portrait does not appear on city bronzes of Syria before the last decade BC) or whether it is just the simple reinstatement of the previous type, after the new type of Antony and Cleopatra became unacceptable. At any rate the coinage continued until at least year 33 (= 17/16 BC). Current evidence does not permit us to be sure that it continued any later, to the year 36 (= 14/13 BC), as Newell thought, though this is not impossible."

RPC I, pp. 606-607
casata137ec
Antioches_VII_Euergetes_BM_52.jpg
Antioches VII Euergetes BMC 5225 viewsAntiochos VII Euergetes, Antioch on the Orontes, 138-129 BC, 17.77mm, 5.1g, BMC 52, SNG UK 1301.617-620, SC 2067.15; SGC 7098
OBV: Winged bust of Eros, right
REV: BASILEWS ANTIOXOY EUERGETOU, Headdress of Isis, Seleucid date ΠΡ = 180 SE = 133/2 BC
Son of Demetrius I. Reign 138 - 129 BC. Married Cleopatra Thea (may as well; everyone else had).
Hunted down Tryphon and made him commit suicide.
Romanorvm
coinD_copy.jpg
Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra22 viewsAE 19, Antiochos VIII & Cleopatra, 123 BC, Obv: Radiate head of Antiochus right. Rev: Owl standing right, head facing on prostrate amphora / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΞΟΥ, IE in ex. , Seleukid date 190 (123 BC), XF. S 7139, B.M.C.4.87,10, SC 2263, Hoover HGC 9, 1189 (S).Molinari
Antiochos_VIII_GCV_7139.JPG
Antiochos VIII, Grypos (with Cleopatra Thea), 125 - 121 BC37 viewsObv: No legend, diademed, radiate head of Antiochos facing right.

Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATRAΣ on right, KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY on left, owl facing, perched on an overturned amphora, qp (Seleucid date 190 = 124 - 123 BC) below.

Æ 19, Antioch mint, 124 - 123 BC

6.2 grams, 17 x 19 mm, 0°

GCV II 7139, SNG Spear 2443
1 commentsSPQR Coins
antiochus_VIII_owl.jpg
Antiochus VIII & Cleopatra Thea; owl, AE1814 viewsSeleucid Empire Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII 125-121 B.C. 18mm, 5.3 g. Obverse: Radiate bust of Antiochus VIII right. Reverse: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚAΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, owl, wings closed, facing standing on sideways amphora. SNGCop 376, Sear GCV II: 7139. Podiceps
Antiochus_VIII.jpg
Antiochus VIII and Cleopatra Thea - AE2 viewsAntioch
123-122 BC
radiate head of Antiochus VIII right
facing owl standing on amphora
BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ / KΛEOΠATPAΣ // KAI / BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY
ϘP
Houghton-Lorber II 2263
ex Lanz
Johny SYSEL
cleopatra.jpg
Antiochus VIII and Cleopatra Thea 125-121 B.C.21 viewsObv. Radiate head of Antiochos right
Rev. BASILISSHS KLEOPATRAS KAI BASILEWS ANTIOXOY, owl standing facing on amphora
Skyler
AUGUSTUS_ARCH_Cistophorus.JPG
ARCH, AUGUSTUS, RIC I : 510.139 viewsAR Cistophorus (Cistophoric Tetradrachm = 3 denarii) of Pergamum. Struck 19 - 18 B.C.
Obverse: IMP•IX•TR•PO•V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
Diameter: 24 - 25mm | Weight: 11.7gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who was defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.). Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests may actually have incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.
2 comments*Alex
ArgosWolf200.JPG
Argos, Argolis142 viewscirca 3rd century BC
AR Triobol (15mm, 2.25g)
O: Forepart of wolf left.
R: Large A, eagle standing right on thunderbolt beneath; IP-EΩ-NO-Σ (Hieronos, magistrate) in corners, all within shallow incuse square.
SNG Cop 42; BCD Peloponnesos 1177; SNG Delepierre 2273; Sear 2795v
ex Empire Coins

The origins of Argos are pre-Mycenaean, making it one of the most ancient cities in Greece.
Argos played a prominent role in The Iliad, being claimed by Hera as "one of the three cities dearest to Me". While they did supply ships and soldiers (including the hero Diomedes) for Agamemnon's war with Troy, Argos later remained neutral during the Graeco-Persian wars. And though ostensibly allied with Athens during her war with Sparta at the end of the 5th century BC, Argos was basically a non-participant.

Recent speculation dates this coin to the time of Cleopatra VII and may in fact have been issued by her. I remain skeptical, however it is an interesting theory.
5 commentsEnodia
Augustus_Actium.jpg
Augustus145 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head right

IMP X ACT
Apollo standing left, plectrum in right, lyre in left hand

15 - 13 B.C. Lugdunum (Lyon) mint
3.457g, 17.8mm, die axis 255o

RIC I 171a, BMCRE I 461, RSC I 144

Ex- Forum, ex-Ancient Imports, ex-McSorley Westchester Stamp Coin Show 4 April 1976

Commemorates the battle of Actium over Antony and Cleopatra
1 commentsJay GT4
63761q00.jpg
Augustus87 viewsRoman Imperatorial
Octavian Caesar
(Reign as ‘Augustus’ 1st Emperor of the Roman Empire 27 BC-14 AD)
(b. 63 BC, d. 14 AD)


Obverse: Bare head of Octavian facing right

Reverse: IMP CAESAR, Facing head of Octavian on ithyphallic boundary stone of Jupiter Terminus, winged thunderbolt below

Reverse refers to Octavian's reestablishment of boundaries in the east after the battle of Actium and review of the client kingdoms established by Mark Antony (in particular return of Roman territory from Cleopatra and her children)

Silver Denarius
Minted in Italy 30-29 BC




Translations:

Imperatorial=The Imperatorial period extends from the outbreak of civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey in January 49 BC and ends early 27 BC when Caesar's adopted heir Octavian was given the title "Augustus" by the Senate, effectively making him the sole ruler of the entire Roman territory. 

IMP CAESAR=Imperator(Commander-in-Chief) Caesar(Octavian took Julius Caesar’s name after he was posthumously adopted by him in 44 BC)


Reference
RIC I 269a
2 commentsSphinx357
PtolemyREX.jpg
AUGUSTUS & PTOLEMY OF NUMIDIA AE semis172 viewsAVGVSTVS DIVI F
bare head of Augustus right

C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q, REX PTOL (Ptolemy, King) within diadem

Carthago Nova, Spain, under sole 'duovir quinqunennales' C Laetilius Apalus.

18.5mm, 5.3g.
RPC 172.

Ex-Incitatus

Ptolemy of Numidia was the son of King Juba II of Numidia and Cleopatra Selene II. He was also the grandson of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII on his mohter's side. He was named in honor of the memory of Cleopatra VII, the birthplace of his mother and the birthplace of her relatives. In choosing her son's name, Cleopatra Selene II created a distinct Greek-Egyptian tone and emphasized her role as the monarch who would continue the Ptolemaic dynasty. She by-passed the ancestral names of her husband. By naming her son Ptolemy instead of a Berber ancestral name, she offers an example rare in ancient history, especially in the case of a son who is the primary male heir, of reaching into the mother's family instead of the father's for a name. This emphasized the idea that his mother was the heiress of the Ptolemies and the leader of a Ptolemaic government in exile.

Through his parents he received Roman citizenship and was actually educated in Rome. Amazingly he grew up in the house of his maternal aunt, and Antony's daughter Antonia Minor, the youngest daughter of Mark Antony and the youngest niece of Augustus. Antonia was also a half-sister of Ptolemy's late mother, also a daughter of Mark Antony. Antonia Minor's mother was Octavia Minor, Mark Antony's fourth wife and the second sister of Octavian (later Augustus). Ptolemy lived in Rome until the age of 21, when he returned to the court of his aging father in Mauretania.

Ptolemy was a co-ruler with his father Juba II until Juba's death and was the last semi-autonomous ruler of Africa. On a visit to Rome in 40 AD he was seen by the Emperor Caligula in an amphitheather wearing a spectacular purpal cloak. A jealous Caligula had him murdered for his fashionable purple cloak.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
2 commentsJay GT4
normal_AUGUDU03-2~0.jpg
Augustus, RIC 158, medium bronze of 10 BC to AD 1065 viewsmedium bronze (dupondius ?) (12.6g, 25mm, 2h) Nemausus mint. Struck 10 BC - 10 AD.
Obv.: IMP DIVI F Agrippa laureate head left and Augustus laureate head right, back to back
Rev.: COL NEM crocodile chained to palm tree top bent to right, wreath at top.
RIC (Augustus) 158

COL NEM stands for COLONIA AVGVSTA NEMAVSVS (now the city of Nîmes, France), built by Augustus' army after their conquest and return from Egypt. The crocodile chained to the palm tree symbolizes the defeat of the Cleopatra and Marc Antony at Actium. This symbol is still used as the city's emblem in Nîmes today.
3 commentsCharles S
RICI-171a-Lugdinum-Augustus-denarius-blk.jpg
Augustus/Actium - Denarius, RIC I, 171a15 viewsDenomination: Denarius
Era: c. 15-13 BC
Metal: AR
Obverse: AVGUSTUS DIVI F; Bare head r.

Reverse: Apollo Citharoedus in long drapery, stg. l., r. holding plectrum, l. lyre; IMP to l., X to r.; ACT in exergue.

Mint: Lugdunum
Weight: 3.88 gm.
Reference: RIC 171a (Lugdunum), BMC 461, RCV 1611, RSC 144
Provenance: Jonathan Kern, February 23, 1987.

This issue commemorates the victory over Antony and Cleopatra at the battle of Actium on 2 September, 31 BC.
Lovely toning, well centered and GVF.
3 commentsSteve B5
RIAugustusAsCounterM~0.JPG
AVG and TICAE on AUGUSTUS AS (25 BC)296 views(26mm - 10.8g). Obv: Bust right (CAESAR), countermarked "AVG" (AVGUSTUS) & "TICAE" (TIBERIUS CAESAR). Rev: Legend within wreath (AVGVSTVS). Minted in Ephesus. Reference for this coin is RIC 486. Augustus was adopted by Julius Caesar as heir. After the assassination of Caesar, Octavian and Mark Antony fought together and won the resulting Civil War. They shared the rule of the Roman Empire. Antony's alliance with Cleopatra provoked a split with Octavian that led to a new Civil War. At the Battle of Actium (31 BC) Antony was defeated and Octavian became the sole ruler of the Empire. He was declared "Augustus" and became the proto-type emperor of Rome.1 commentskerux
imgonline-com-ua-twotoone-jL32v9k6T0fUkE3l-Agrippa.jpg
Caligula (Agrippa) (Augustus) Coin: Bronze AS2 viewsM AGRIPPA. L. F. COS. III - Head left, wearing rostral crown
S-C across field - Neptune standing left, holding small dolphin and trident.
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-41 AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 11.70g / 28.45mm / 6h
Rarity: Common
References:
RIC I 58 (Gaius)
BMCRE 161 (Tiberius)
Cohen 3
Acquisition/Sale: 22noelnoel22 Ebay $0.00 08/18
Notes: Aug 24, 18 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Agrippa, Military Commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.
Gary W2
Agrippa-Brass_As_of_Roman_Co.jpg
Caligula (Agrippa) (Augustus) Coin: Bronze As 1 viewsM AGRIPPA L F COS III - Head of Agrippa, left, wearing rostral crown
S C - Neptune stg. l. holding dolphin and trident
Exergue:



Mint: Rome (37-41AD)
Wt./Size/Axis: 10.00g / 27mm / 180
Rarity: Common
References:
BMC 161
RIC 1 58
Acquisition/Sale: servuscoins Ebay $0.00 8/17
Notes: Jun 13, 18 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

Agrippa, Military Commander, Friend of Augustus, Grandfather of Caligula, Great-grandfather of Nero
Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.
Gary W2
carisia2_denar.jpg
CARISIA 2 denarius - moneyer Titus Carisius - 46 BC33 viewsobv: Diademed and winged bust of Victory right, wearing earring and necklace; jewelled hair pulled into knot, [S. C. behind], banker's mark on face
rev: Victory driving galloping biga right, holding reins and wreath., T CARISI in ex., banker's mark on the top of horses
ref: Cr464/1, Syd986, Sear1324, Albert1437(125eur)
2.86gms, 17mm

A very pleasant type struck during the time Cleopatra was in Rome with Caesar.
berserker
carthago nova.jpg
Carthago Nova. Augustus80 viewsObverse: AVGVSTVS DIVI F, Augustus Bare head right
Reverse: C LAETILIVS APALVS II V Q
Exe: REX/PTOL in two lines across field within diadem
Mint : Carthago Nova
Date : 27 BC-AD 14
Reference : RPC I 172; SNG Copenhagen 494
Grade : Good VF
Weight : 5.26 g
Denom : Semis
Metal : AE
Dealer : CNG.

Comments : 20mm, 12h . Red and black-olive patina. The bronze coin honors the young Mauretanian prince Ptolemaios (Juba II and Cleopatra Selene's son) with the highest official title of the city.
Bolayi
cleo_diobol_3_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (1) Obv8 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_3_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (1) Rev6 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_2_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (2) Obv8 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_2_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (2) Rev7 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_1_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (3) Obv5 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_diobol_1_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (3) Rev6 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_4_obv.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (4) Obv4 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
cleo_4_rev.JPG
Cleopatra 80 Drachmai (4) Rev4 viewsAlexandria, 80 Drachmai

Diademed, draped bust, right, KLEOPATRAS BASILIS[SHS]
Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopia in left field, mark of value P (= 80) in right field

Svoronos 1871
jimbomar
CLEO I.jpg
Cleopatra I, wife of Ptolemy V (Epiphanes).294 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Æ (28.4 mm, 18.84 g), before 176 BCE.
Obv: Diademed head of Cleopatra I as Isis, r.
Rev: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing l. on thunderbolt, wings open.
Svoronos 1235; Sear Greek 7880; BMC 6.94,72; SNG VIII 1175; Forrer 80.
EmpressCollector
Cleo_III.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Alexandria, 19.8 mm, obol20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426, F, Alexandria mint, 6.557 g, 19.8 mm, 315o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM

Podiceps
cleoIII.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, Paphos, 30,7 mm, diobol13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX or X, c. 116 - 104 B.C. Bronze diobol, Paphos II #315, Svoronos -, Poor/Fair, Paphos mint, 17.088g, 30.7mm, 0o; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “BASILEWS PTOLEMAIOU”?, two eagles standing left, star and “S” before; weak strike, rough; very rare. The flan is typical for the Paphos Mint. The two eagles indicates two rulers on the throne. The weight is double the more common c. 8.5 grams obol of this period. ex FORVM

Podiceps
ptolemy_X_01.jpg
Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X AR Tetradrachm39 viewsObv: Diademed head right, wearing aegis.
Rev: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; LIΓ/I (date) before; ΠA behind.
Date: 105 - 104 BC
Mint: Alexandria mint.
Weight: 13.40g
Ref: Svoronos 1729, SNG Copenhagen 360
oa
2_kotkaa.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, AE 21.652 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1426 var (Alexandria), gVF, Paphos mint, 8.369g, 21.6mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left side by side on thunderbolt, cornucopia left. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
cleo_III_ja_pojat.jpg
Cleopatra III with sons, Zeus Ammon, 30.1 mm20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra III with sons Ptolemy IX Soter and Ptolemy X Alexander, c. 116 - 80 B.C. 32188. Bronze triobol, Svoronos 1424, SNG Cop 305 ff., SGCV II 7900 (all Ptolemy VI), VF, dark brown patina, 22.037g, 30.1mm, 0o, obverse diademed head of Zeus Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolts, side by side, double cornucopia left. Among the most common of Ptolemaic coins, struck during the joint reign of Cleopatra III and her sons, Ptolemy IX then Ptolemy X. Svoronos 1424 has two very distinct varieties. The earlier 29 gram variety was found in quantity in the c. 160 B.C. CoinEx Hoard. In that hoard, there were none of this later, common, c. 23-24 gram variety. The two types are separated by about 50 years. ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo_paphos.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, dichalkon; Paphos, Cyprus13 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, gF, Paphos mint, 1.570g, 11.8mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; nice green patina. Ex FORVMPodiceps
cleo.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus20 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, Paphos mint, 1.190 g, 10.9 mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons. Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVMPodiceps
25363_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_F.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, F, attractive patina, Paphos mint, 1.254g, 11.5mm, 270o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; crude, flan flaw. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
25389_Cleopatra_VII,_Philopator,_51_-_30_B_C_,_Paphos,_Cyprus_aF.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus12 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, aF, Paphos mint, 1.498g, 11.7mm, 0o, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; green patina. FORVM. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
Cleopatra_VII.jpg
Cleopatra portrait, Paphos, Cyprus (2)10 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus. Bronze dichalkon, Kreuzer p. 44, first illustration; Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV); Weiser -; SNG Cop 649, VF, obverse off center, 1.660g, 13.5mm, 0o, Paphos mint, obverse diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons; Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus, assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
collage7~2.jpg
Cleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII41 viewsCleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII
Antioch 125-121 BC

O: Head of Antiochus VIII, with ray diademed to right
R: Owl on recumbant amphora
2 commentsarizonarobin
Antiochus_VIII~1.jpg
Cleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII 125-121 BC14 viewsCleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII AE18. Weight 5.60g. Antioch mint, 125-121 BC. Radiate head of Antiochos right / ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ANTIOXOY, owl standing facing on amphora. SNGCop 376, SNGIs 2441ff.ddwau
Cleopatra_Thea_and_Antiochos_VIII~0.JPG
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII27 viewsCleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII, 125 - 121 BC, Hoover 1189, SC 2263, Antioch, year 191 (122 - 121 BC)
OBV: Diademed and radiate head right
REV: Owl standing facing on overturned amphora; date and aplustre in exergue
21mm, 8.1g
Romanorvm
AntiochosVIII.jpg
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII Epiphanes (Grypos)51 views125-121 BC
19 mm, 5.90 g
obv: radiate and diademed head of Antiochos right
rev: ΒΑΣΙΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATPA ΘEAΣ / KAI ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟY; owl standing right on amphora, head facing
Hoover p. 241, #1189
2 commentsareich
Antiochus_VIII_and_Cleopatra_Thea.jpg
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII 125 - 121 B.C.5 viewsCleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII 125 - 121 B.C. Ae 7.79g. 20.6~21.3mm. Obv: Jugate busts r. of Cleopatra Thea, diademed, veiled and wearing stephane, and Antiochus VIII diademed, dotted border. Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATΡAΣ ΘEAΣ in three lines on r., KAI BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOΥ in three lines on l., Nike standing l., holding wreath. Control: inner l. conjoined H P. SC 2265; SNG Spaer 2467 - 2469; Babelon 1364; BMC 82 commentsddwau
Cleopatra_Thea_and_Antiochos_VIII_Epiphanes.jpg
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Epiphanes. 125-121 B.C.12 viewsCleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Epiphanes. 125-121 B.C. Ae 18.5~19.7mm. 5.27g. Ake-Ptolemaïs mint, Dated (ΗΠΡ) S.E. 188 (125/4 B.C.). Obv: Diademed and radiate head of Antiochus VIII, right. Rev: ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΠΑΣ KAI ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ,
headdress of Isis; monogram high in inner right field. SC 2274.2a; HGC 9, 1191.
1 commentsddwau
Cleopatra_Thea_and_Antiochus_VIII_Epiphanes.jpg
Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Epiphanes. 125-121 B.C.8 viewsCleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Epiphanes. 125-121 B.C.. Ae 13.6~15.1mm. 3.21g. Antioch on the Orontes. Dated SE 191 (122/1 BC). Obv: Draped bust of Tyche r., wearing calathus, dotted border. Rev: BAΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ / ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ. Tiller on base; control mark to inner l. IE above AφP (date). SC 2264; HGC 9, 1192.ddwau
CLEOIII_ANTIOCHUSVIII.jpg
Cleopatra Thea, queen of Syria (with son, Antiochos VIII).214 viewsAR Tetradrachm (27 mm). Antioch mint, 125-121 BCE.
Obv: Conj. busts r.
Rev: BASILISSHS/ KLEOPATRAS/ KAI/ BASILEWS/ ANTIOXOU, Zeus Nikephoros seated l., holding lotus-tipped scepter; IE outer left, A under throne. SNG Spaer 2437. Cf. Sear 7135.
1 commentsEmpressCollector
Cleopatra_VII~0.JPG
Cleopatra VII41 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, 13mm, 1.7g, Cleopatra VII, Philopator, 51 - 30 B.C., Paphos, Cyprus
OBV: diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure
REV: Double cornucopiae, ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Kreuzer p. 44 first illustration, Svoronos 1160 (Ptolemy IV), SNG Cop 649,

Kreuzer, in his book The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus,
assembles evidence dating this type to Cleopatra VII instead of the reign of Ptolemy IV used in older references.
1 commentsRomanorvm
Cleopatra_VII.jpg
Cleopatra VII17 viewsCleopatra VII, Paphos mint, 11mm
Obverse: Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ − ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons
Dk0311USMC
13_Cleopatra.jpg
Cleopatra VII (51 – 30 B.C.)4 viewsAE Dichalkon, 51 – 30 B.C., Paphos, 11.4mm, 1.48g, 0°, Svornos 1160; SNG COP 649.
Obv: Diademed bust of Cleopatra VII as Isis right, hair in melon-coiffure.
Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY − BAΣIΛEΩΣ, double cornucopia flanked by ribbons.
Marti Vltori
00-cleop.jpg
Cleopatra VII - Cox 128.15 viewsCleopatra VII, 51-30BC,
AE17 of Neopaphos, Cyprus, Mint,
Laureate head of Zeus to right /
Zeus standing head to right,
holding ears of corn on single stalk & sceptre, star above.
xokleng
cleo___poika.jpg
Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, Paphos19 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII and Ptolemy XV, 44 - 30 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1842 (Ptolemy XII), F, Paphos mint, 5.575g, 24.4mm, 0o, 44 - 30 B.C.; obverse diademed and horned head of Zeus-Ammon right; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, headdress of Isis before; rough. The two eagles on the reverse symbolize harmony between the two rulers, in this case the mother and son, Cleopatra VII and Caesarion. ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
6__Drachme_de_Cléopâtre~0.jpg
Cleopatra VII drachm 131 viewsCleopatra VII drachm

Bronze 80 drachmes Cléopâtre VII
- Bronze 80 drachmes, Cléopâtre VII, Alexandrie, 51-29 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Buste de Cléopâtre
Revers : KLEOPATRAS BASILISAigle debout à gauche sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
bgaut
cleopatraVII.jpg
Cleopatra VII hemiobol20 viewsLaureate head of Zeus

Statue of Zeus Salaminos standing, holding stalks of grain, star above


Paphos mint c. 35 BC

3.15g

Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35

Notes from Forum:

While not noted in Svoronos, this type is fairly common on Cyprus and many have been found in the excavations at Neopaphos. The lack of a central depression indicates they were struck after 96 B.C. Recent Cypriot numismatic publications date them to the time when Cleopatra VII of Egypt was the ruler of the island


Sold Forum Auction March 2019
1 commentsJay GT4
AE_Tiny_Greek.JPG
Cleopatra VII Philopator AE Chalkous-Sixteenth Unit. Paphos on Cyprus mint, 51-30 BC24 viewsDiademed idealized head right / Eagle standing left on thunderbolt. Kreuzer P49 soldAntonivs Protti
coin215.jpg
Cleopatra VII Philopator Svoronos 1161 Æ VB-2 19 viewsCleopatra VII Philopator Svoronos 1161 Æ VB-2
Dichalkon-Eighth Unit. Paphos on Cyprus mint, 51-30 BC. Diademed & draped idealized bust right / Double cornucopiae. Coin #215
cars100
3Ze6NxF5Y9nBWN7oL4iFyCP846wC2L.jpg
Cleopatra VII, AR Tetradrachm. 18 viewsAntonivs Protti
9rSWA2YgA3d5j3zJTF8ms69G7DSiy4.jpg
Cleopatra VII, AR Tetradrachm. 16 viewsCleopatra VII Philopator. AR Tetradrachm. _soldAntonivs Protti
CLEOPATRA_VII_ZEUS_REV.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII16 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
cleopatra_vii_ZEUS_REV_2.jpg
CYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII15 viewsCYPRUS - Time of Cleopatra VII, 51-30BC, Æ17 Neopaphos Mint. Obv.: Laureate head of Zeus to right. Rev.: No legend. Zeus standing head to right, holding ears of corn on single stalk in right hand and a scepter in the
left hand; star above head. Reference: BMC-; Svor.-; SNG Cop.-; RPC-; RPC Supplement; Cox 128.

While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Nea- Paphos. This issue has also sbeen attributed to Ptolemy IX.
dpaul7
image~7.jpeg
Cyrenaica Antony and Cleopatra obverse9 viewsCYRENAICA. Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Summer 31 BC.

Æ 26mm. Cut for change

BACIL/QEA/NE in three lines / ANTW/YPA/G in three
lines.

RPC I 922; Svoronos 1899; Weiser 188. brown patina

Rare
1 commentsjimbomar
image~8.jpeg
Cyrenaica Antony and Cleopatra Reverse9 viewsCyrenaica. Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII. Summer 31 BC. Æ 26mm. Cut for change.
BACIL/QEA/NE in three lines / ANTW/YPA/G in three
lines. RPC I 922; Svoronos 1899; Weiser 188. brown patina
Rare.
jimbomar
rhino_domitien.jpg
Domitian - quadrans21 viewsThis African rhinoceros was the third rhino which had been brought alive to Rome (the first one was an Indian rhino seized by Octavius in Cleopatra's Alexandrian zoo, the second one was seen in Rome later during Augustus' principate. Pliny's mention of a rhino in the games given by Pompey is probably a mistake).
Domitian's rhino could have been the first African rhino in Rome. He has been opposed in the Colosseum to a bear and perhaps also a bull. The fight has been narrated by Martial.
Ginolerhino
EB0156b_scaled.JPG
EB0156 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle6 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LI (year 10) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1671.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 13.083g.
EB
EB0157b_scaled.JPG
EB0157 Ptolemy IX? / Eagle3 viewsCleopatra III and Ptolemy IX?, PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, AR Tetradrachm.
Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, with aegis at neck.
Reverse: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle with wings closed stands half left atop fulmen, LC (year 6) left, ΠΑ right.
References: Svoronos 1667.
Diameter: 25mm, Weight: 14.108g.
EB
EB0925_scaled.JPG
EB0925 Cleopatra VII / Eagle35 viewsCleopatra VII, Alexandreia mint, 51-30 BC.
Obverse: Diademed and draped bust right.
Reverse: BACIΛIC[CHC KΛEO]ΠATPAC, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to left, Π to right.
References: Svoronos 1871; Weiser 183; SNG Copenhagen 419–21; Noeske 380–2; BMC 4–5.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 20.64g.
Ex: Numismatic Art and Ancient Coins
3 commentsEB
EB0937_scaled.JPG
EB0937 Cleopatra VII / Eagle 13 viewsCleopatra VII, Alexandreia mint, 51-30 BC.
Obverse: Diademed & draped bust right.
Reverse: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, cornucopiae in left field, M (denomination=40) in right field.
References: Svoronos 1872, SNG Cop 422.
Diameter: 21mm, Weight: 8.2g.
Ex: Numismatic Art and Ancient Coins
1 commentsEB
EB0938_scaled.JPG
EB0938 Cleopatra I / Eagle3 viewsPtolemy V 204-180 BC, AE 26.
Obverse: Head of Cleopatra I as Isis right.
Reverse: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; monogram (Omega/Sigma ?) at left.
References: Svoronos 1233 sim.
Diameter: 26.5mm, Weight: 15.86g.
Ex: Malter Auction II, lot 184.
EB
EB0944_scaled.JPG
EB0944 Zeus / Two Eagles2 viewsPtolemy X with Cleopatra III, AE 30.
Obverse: Diademed head of Zeus-Ammon right.
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae before.
References:
Diameter: 30mm, Weight: 25.71g.
EB
cleo.jpg
EGYPT -- CLEOPATRA VII20 viewsEGYPT -- CLEOPATRA VII (51-30 BC) AE 25, Paphos Mint, Cyprus. Horned head of Zeus/Ammon right. Rev.: ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ - Palm Branch through eagle right with closed wings; KPR monogram right. Reference: Svoronos 1875dpaul7
Cleopatra_VII,__51-30_BC,_AE13.jpg
Egypt, Cleopatra VII 51-30 BC, AE13, 31 viewsDraped and diademmed bust of Cleópatra right.
Filleted cornucopiae "PTOLEMAIOY BASILEWS"
1.43gr. SNG Cop 649
Older refences attribute this issue to Ptolemy VI. More recent evidence points to Cleopatra VII
_3809
Antonivs Protti
Kleopatra.jpg
Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE 80 drachm34 viewsCleopatra VII
AE 80 drachm
Obv.: Diademed Bust right
Rev.: KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣIΣ Eagle standing left on thrunderbolt, double cornucopia left, Π=value=80.
Ae, 18.03g, 26.6mm
Ref.: Svoronos: 1871
shanxi
Egypt_Ptolemy_X_GCV_7939~0.JPG
Egypt: Ptolemy X (Joint reign) Tetradrachm29 viewsObv: No legend, diademed head of Ptolemy I facing right, wearing aegis.

Rev: ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, eagle standing left on a thunderbolt, wings closed, LIΓ (year 13) / I (year 10) in left field; ΠA in right field.

Silver Tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 105 - 104 BC (Joint reign with Cleopatra III)

13.5 grams, 24.8 mm, 0°

GCV 7939 (var.)

Ex: FORVM
SPQR Matt
Elis,_AE_2Assaria_30__s_BC_.jpg
Elis, Civic Issue, ca. 30’s BC, Æ 2 Assaria17 viewsHead of Hera wearing stephane right.
F-Eagle with wings closed standing right on thunderbolt, MY monogram to right.

BCD Peloponnesos 695 (this coin); HGC 5, 544 (this coin) (S); BCD Olympia 307-313; SNG Copenhagen (Phliasia) 429; Wroth p. 335, 6.

(24.5 mm, 13.32 g, 1h).
Edward J. Waddell, June 2011; ex- BCD Collection, LHS 96, 8-9 May 2006, 695; ex- B. Kritt collection - acquired from Kritt in 1987 for $1,800 per BCD note in LHS 96 catalogue.

One of the best examples of the type known - Alan Walker in the LHS 96 catalogue noted that this coin is ‘Very well struck and of unusually good style for this normally fairly dreadful issue.’

Warren connects this issue with the presence of Marc Antony in Elis and sees the eagle standing on a thunderbolt as being a reference to the standard Ptolemaic reverse type (the eagle at Olympia never seems to grasp the thunderbolt of Zeus) and thus an allusion to Cleopatra.
n.igma
FotorCreated~97.jpg
Greek, Cleopatra I, Ptolemaic Kings of Egypt, Ptolemy 6th circa 180-176 BC Ae 2892 viewsHead of Cleopatra 1st as Isis. Rev eagle standing on thunderbolt left.
EX NFA
Grant H
Ptolemy_XIII_-_XV_and_Cleopatra_VII,_c__51_-_39_B_C_.jpg
GREEK, Cyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. 82 viewsCyprus, Paphos mint. Cleopatra and Ptolemy XIII-XV. Mintet c. 51-39 B.C. Bronze diobol, 10.340g, 29.5mm. VF. Attributution by Matt Kreuzer, author of "The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus." The two eagles symbolize two rulers on the throne of Cyprus, in this case Cleopatra VII and one of her two successive brother-husbands, Ptolemy XIII or XIV, less likely her son Ptolemy XV. The round, thin flan and weight standard is correct for the very late Ptolemaic Kingdom. The palm branch appears on obols (c. 6 grams) across the eagles, RPC 3903. Obv: diademed head of Zeus right, of Cypriot style, star before? Ref: unstruck Greek legend, presumably PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, two eagles standing left, palm branch before. Unpublished in major references: SNG Cop -, BMC -, Svor -, Paphos II -, RPC -, Noeske -. Exstremely rareBard Gram O
6__Drachme_de_Cléopâtre.jpg
Greek, Egypt, Cleopatra VII drachm131 viewsBronze 80 drachmes Cléopâtre VII
- Bronze 80 drachmes, Cléopâtre VII, Alexandrie, 51-29 avant J.-C (Bronze)
Avers : Buste de Cléopâtre
Revers : KLEOPATRAS BASILISAigle debout à gauche sur un foudre, les ailes déployées.
bgaut
cleo_diobol.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE Diobol, 51-30 B.C.76 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Æ Diobol of Alexandria, Egypt. 51-30 BC.
Obv: Diademed and draped bust right
Rev: KΛEOΠATPAΣ BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopiae to left, Π to right.
Svoronos 1871; Weiser 183; SNG Copenhagen 419-21; Noeske 380-2. 20.60g, 27mm, 12h.
1 commentschance v
cleo_obol.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE Obol, 51-30 B.C.53 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Cleopatra VII Thea Neotera Æ Obol - 40 Drachmai. Alexandria, 51-30 BC.
Obv: Diademed and draped bust right
Rev: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATPAΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt; cornucopia to left, M to right.
Svoronos 1872; Weiser 184-5; SNG Copenhagen 422–4; Noeske 383. 16.26g, 25mm, 11h.
Very Fine. Very Rare.
chance v
cleo_1.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE1120 viewsCleopatra VII

ae 11mm
seaotter
cleo_2.jpg
GREEK, Ptolemaic Kingdom, Egypt, Cleopatra VII, AE1224 viewsCleopatra VII
AE 12mm
seaotter
25884q00.jpg
GREEK, Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C.215 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.
5 commentsJoe Sermarini
lg1_quart_sm.jpg
IMP•CAESAR•DIVI•F•AVGVSTVS•IMP•XX / •PONTIF•MAXIM•TRIBVN•POT•XXXIIII / Ӕ As (10-12 A.D.)10 viewsIMP • CAESAR • DIVI • F • AVGVSTVS • IMP • XX, bare head left / • PONTIF • MAXIM • TRIBVN • POT • XXXIIII, huge letters S•C, no field or mint marks.

Ӕ, 26-27mm, 5.77g, die axis 5h (slightly turned coin alignment), material: supposed to be pure red copper.

IMPerator (originally meant "supreme commander", Augustus started to use it as a title)
CAESAR (Augustus adopted the last name from Julius, this is not a title yet)
DIVI Filius (Son of the divine [Julius], Augustus was thus named, having been adopted by Caesar as his son) AVGVSTVS (following his defeat of Mark Antony and Cleopatra in 31 BC Senate granted Octavian this new name, meaning "majestic")
IMPerator XX (Vicesimum) (i. e. "invested with the twentieth imperial acclaim", second 'imperator' means his military title, a victorious general, the number refers to important victories when the title was renewed) PONTIFex MAXIMus (the high priest, starting with Augustus the emperor was always the head of state religion)
TRIBVNitia POTestas (Tribunal power, the function of the tribune of the people, originally an important republican official, was "hijacked" by Augustus when he was building the imperial structure of power and subsequently became another emperor's title, renewed every year and thus very useful for dating coins)
XXXIIII (Augustus got his tribunal power for life in 23 BC, during the Second Settlement with the Senate, so the 34th tribunal year of Augustus gives us 11 AD as the year of issue of the coin, ±1 since the coin could have been minted slightly before or after, and there is alos some uncertainty about when exactly the tribunal year number was increased by)
SC = [Ex] Senatus Consulto (Senatus is genitive, Consulto is ablative of Consultum) = by decree of the Senate, i. e. the authority of the Senate approved minting of this coin (necessary to justify issue of copper alloy coins for which the intrinsic value was not obvious)
As or assarius – the lowest-valued Roman coin (in times of Augustus minted of pure red copper).

The size and weight of the coin, large SC and the bare head of the emperor (who actually looks really like a typical official portrait of Augustus) all point towards an early imperial as. Unfortunately due to a very poor condition of the coin all that can be reliably gathered from the legends: IMP… left of the neck, …(DI)VI… top of the head on obverse and …XII… 10-11 o'clock on reverse, perhaps also …PONTI… at 2 o'clock and a few other letters, that get increasingly unreliable. Fortunately to my knowledge this excludes all of the coins except just one as of Augustus: RIC 471, Cohen 226, BMC 275, minted in Rome, with the legends as given above and very common. The closest other coin fitting the general outlook is Ӕ as of Tiberius (RIC 44, Cohen 25, BMC 91), but for it the obverse legend starts with TI and DIVI never gets close to 12 o'clock. And the face of Tiberius typically looks noticeably different.

Still, I will be very grateful if anybody looking at this coin points out any other possibilities for identification.

No biographical info here, since Augustus (reign 27 BC - 14 AD) is too well known.
Yurii P
fc15.jpg
Joe Geranio Collection -Cn. Domitius L.f. Ahenobarbus. 41-40 BC. AR Denarius20 viewshe Republicans. Cn. Domitius L.f. Ahenobarbus. 41-40 BC. AR Denarius (20mm, 3.61 g, 7h). Uncertain mint along the Adriatic or Ionian Sea. Head right / Prow right surmounted by a military trophy. Crawford 519/2; CRI 339; Sydenham 1177; Domitia 21. Fine, lightly toned, minor porosity and scratches, banker’s mark on each side.

Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus accompanied his father at Corfinium and Pharsalus on the side of Pompey. After his pardon by Julius Caesar, he retired to Rome in 46 BC. After Caesar's assassination, Ahenobarbus supported Brutus and Cassius, and in 43 BC was condemned under the terms of the Lex Pedia for complicity in the assassination. Ahenobarbus achieved considerable naval success against the Second Triumvirate in the Ionian theater, where this denarius was certainly minted, but finally, through the mediation of Gaius Asinius Pollio, he reconciled with Mark Antony, who thereupon made him governor of Bithynia. He participated in Antony's campaign against the Parthians, and was consul in 32 BC. When war broke out between Antony and Octavian, Ahenobarbus initially supported Antony, but, disgusted by Antony’s relationship with Cleopatra, sided with Octavian shortly before Actium. His only child, Lucius Domitius Ahenobarbus, was married to Antonia Maior, the daughter of Mark Antony and Octavia. Their son, Gnaeus Domitius Ahenobarbus, married Agrippina Minor, the sister of the emperor Caligula, and was the father of the emperor Nero. Anyone may use as long as credited to Joe Geranio Collection.
Joe Geranio
Juba_ptol1.jpg
Juba II72 viewsObverse: REX IVBA Bust right of Juba II with club behind
Reverse: RXXXX Bust right of Ptolemaios I or Cleopatra
Date : 25BC – 23 AD
Reference : Mazzard 376
Weight : 3.04g
Denom : Denarius
Metal : Silver
Comments : Ex Grün 27, 1999, 596
Bolayi
JubaII.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene88 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed and draped bust right, club over shoulder

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Headdress of Isis, with stalks of grain, crescent above

Caesarea mint, 25 B.C. - 24 A.D

12.62g

Bronze AE 27, Alexandropoulos 209, Mazard 351 (RRR), SNG Cop 605, De Luynes 4013

Very Rare! Excellent for the type!

From a very old collection


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.

Sold to Calgary Coin Feb 2017
1 commentsJay GT4
JubaCleo.jpg
Juba II & Cleopatra Selene daughter of Antony60 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-William McDonald Collection

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death
Jay GT4
Juba_II.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene213 viewsREX IVBA
Diademed head right

BACIΛICCA KΛEOΠATPA
Star and crescent.

25 B.C.-23 A.D
17 mm, 2.62 gm

MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300.
VF, toned
Scarce

Ex-ANE

Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today.
6 commentsJay GT4
Jubaselene.jpg
Juba II and Cleopatra Selene84 viewsJuba II of Mauretania and Cleopatra Selene

REX IVBA REGIS IVBA E F R A VI
Head of Juba II left.

BACIΛICCA KΛE - OΠATPA
Cleopatra Selene left

dated year 6 = 20-19 BC.

3.12g

Rare

Ex-William McDonald Collection

SNG Cop. 546 ; Mazard 357 ; Sear 6000 ; Müller III, 108, 87

Wildwinds example


Juba II was the only son and heir of his father King Juba I. King Juba I was the King of Numidia and ally to Pompey the Great. He fought against Julius Caesar at the battle of Thapsus and lost commiting suicide soon after. His son Juba II was taken away to Rome to be paraded in Caesar's Triumph's. He was then raised in Caesar's houshold and educated in both Latin and Greek excelling in his studies. He was praised as one of Rome's most educated citizens and at age 20 even published a work entitled Roman Archaeology. He became life long friends with Julius Caesar's heir Octavian. He accompanied Octavian on several campaigns during the turbulent times after Caesar's death even fighting at the battle of Actium against his future wifes parents...Antony and Cleopatra VII.

Augustus restored Juba II as the king of Numidia between 29 BC-27 BC and Numidia become one of the most loyal client kings that served Rome. Between 26 BC-20 BC, Augustus arranged for him to marry Cleopatra Selene II (Daughter of Antony and Cleopatra) giving her a large dowry and appointing her queen. She also had been paraded in a Triumph in Rome after the battle of Actium. It was probably due to his services with Augustus in a campaign in Spain that led Augustus to make him King of Mauretania.

Cleopatra is said to have exerted considerable influence on Juba II's policies. Juba II encouraged and supported the performing arts, research of the sciences and research of natural history. Juba II also supported Mauretanian trade. Mauretania traded all over the Mediterranean and exported fish grapes, pearls, figs, grain, wooden furniture and purple dye harvested from certain shellfish, which was used in the manufacture of purple stripes for senatorial robes. Juba II sent a contingent to Iles Purpuraires to re-establish the ancient Phoenician dye manufacturing process.

Cleopatra Selene seems to have inherited the same qualities of both Antony and Cleopatra VII. She was strong willed and maintained her Egyptian/Greek heritage. She seems intent on continuing the Ptolomaic line of strong women rulers using the same titles as her mother. She died sometime before Juba II. The Greek Historian Plutarch describes Juba II as 'one of the most gifted rulers of his time'. Between 2 BC-2, he travelled with Gaius Caesar as a member of his advisory staff to the troubled Eastern Mediterranean. In 21, Juba II made his son Ptolemy co-ruler. Juba II died in 23 AD. He had two children by Cleopatra Selene, Ptolomy of Mauretania (1 BC- 40 AD) and Drusilla of Mauretania (born in 5 AD). He was burried in the Mausolium he constructed for himself and his wife which is still visible today. A partial inscription attributed to her reads:

The moon herself grew dark, rising at sunset,
Covering her suffering in the night,
Because she saw her beautiful namesake, Selene,
Breathless, descending to Hades,
With her she had had the beauty of her light in common,
And mingled her own darkness with her death.
2 commentsJay GT4
ALEXANDER_III_AR_Drachm.JPG
Kingdom of Macedonia, Alexander the Great. AR Drachm. Struck 323 – 317 BC at Lampsakos, Mysia.21 viewsObverse: No legend. Head of Herakles, wearing lion-skin knotted at base of neck, facing right.
Reverse: AΛEΞANĐPOY. Zeus Aëtophoros seated facing left, right leg drawn back, feet on stool, eagle in right hand, sceptre in left; buckle in left field; Λ above Ω below throne.
Diameter: 18mm | Weight: 4.16gms | Die Axis: 7 | Cut mark above eyebrow on obverse.
Price: 1376

Alexander the Great reigned from 336 to 323 BC but this coin was struck shortly after his death, in around 323 to 317 BC under Leonnatos, Philip III Arrhidaios, or Antigonos I Monophthalmos.

Leonnatos was a Macedonian officer under Alexander the Great and one of the diadochi, rival generals, family and friends of Alexander the Great who fought for the control of Alexander's empire after his death in 323 BC.
Leonnatos was the same age as Alexander and was very close to him. After Alexander died, Leonnatos was made satrap of Phrygia and Alexander's sister, Cleopatra, offered him her hand in marriage. When the Athenians heard that Alexander had died, they revolted against Macedonia. Leonnatos led an army of 20,000 infantry and 1,500 cavalry to relieve the new regent, Antipater, probably with the ambition of usurping Antipater's power since a victory over the Athenians would have enhanced Leonnatos' own claim to the throne. However, in 322 BC, Leonnatus was killed in battle against the Athenians and his marriage to Cleopatra never took place.
Philip III Arrhidaeus was the king of Macedonia after the death of Alexander the Great, from 323 BC until his own death in 317 BC. He was a son of King Philip II of Macedonia and a half-brother of Alexander. Named Arrhidaeus at birth, he assumed the name Philip when he ascended the throne.
As Arrhidaeus grew older it became apparent that he had mild learning difficulties. Alexander was very fond of him, and took him on his campaigns, both to protect his life and to ensure he would not be used as a pawn in a challenge for the throne. After Alexander's death in Babylon, Arrhidaeus was proclaimed king by the Macedonian army in Asia, but he was a mere figurehead, and a pawn of the powerful generals, one after the other.
Antigonos I Monophthalmus (Antigonos the One-eyed) was a Macedonian nobleman, general, and satrap under Alexander the Great. As part of the division of the provinces after Alexander's death, Antigonos received Pamphylia and Lycia from Perdiccas, regent of the empire, but he incurred the enmity of Perdiccas by refusing to assist Eumenes to obtain possession of Paphlagonia and Cappadocia, the provinces which had been allotted to him. Leonnatos had left with his army for Greece, leaving Antigonos to deal with Cappadocia, a task he apparently couldn't complete alone and Perdiccas seems to have viewed this as a direct affront to his authority. Perdiccas then went with the royal army to conquer the area himself and from there he turned west towards Phrygia in order to confront Antigonos. Antigonos, however, escaped to Greece where, in 321 BC, he obtained the favour of Antipater, regent of Macedonia.
When Perdiccas died later that same year, a new attempt at division of the empire took place and Antigonos found himself entrusted with the command of the war against Eumenes, who had joined Perdiccas against the coalition of the other generals which included Antipater, Antigonos, Ptolemy and Craterus. Eumenes was defeated and forced to retire to the fortress of Nora in Cappadocia, and a new army that was marching to his relief was routed by Antigonos.
In 319 BC Antipater died, and Polyperchon was given the regentship, but Antigonos and the other dynasts refused to recognize him since it undermined their own ambitions. Antigonos' old adversary, Eumenes, who had been given authority over anyone within the empire by Polyperchon, raised an army and built a fleet in Cilicia and Phoenicia, and soon after formed a coalition with the satraps of the eastern provinces. Antigonos fought against him in two great battles and, though both were inconclusive, in the aftermath of the second battle Antigonos managed to capture the family and possessions of the Silvershields, an elite regiment within Eumenes' army. The Silvershields negotiated the release of their families by handing over Eumenes to Antigonos in return. Antigonos had Eumenes executed resulting in him now being in possession of the empire's Asian territories, stretching from the eastern satrapies to Syria and Asia Minor in the west.
2 comments*Alex
Sardes.jpg
Kings of Macedon. Philip III Arrhidaios, (Circa 322-318 BC)21 viewsAR Drachm

17 mm, 4.20 g

Sardes mint under Philip III Arrhidaios (323-317 BC) in the types of Alexander III

Obverse: Head of Herakles to right, wearing lion skin headdress.

Reverse: ΦIΛIΠΠΟΥ (FILIPPOU) Zeus seated left on throne, holding eagle in his right hand and scepter in his left; to left, bee; below throne, A.

Price P104

This coin is a die match for Nomos Web Auction 6, Lot 330, 11/20/2016 (https://www.acsearch.info/search.html?id=3481680)

Subsequent to his death in 323 BC, Alexander the Great's sister, Cleopatra, traveled to Sardes (Autumn 322 BC) to lure a husband from among her brother's former generals (who had already begun warring over Alexander's empire). Over the course of the next two years she was visited twice by Alexander's former secretary and now dashing outlaw general, Eumenes of Cardia. The first time Eumenes brought an offer of marriage from the general Perdiccas, who Cleopatra turned away (rightfully, it turned out, as he was killed by his own troops after failing in battle vs. Ptolemy in Egypt). The second time (320 BC) Eumenes offered to ally with Cleopatra to combine his military might and her royal legitimacy.(This was not an offer of marriage, as Eumenes was not Macedonian.) To impress the princess, Eumenes paraded his cavalry back and forth before Sardes. But Cleopatra, though she granted Eumenes an audience, was not willing to become his partisan. Throughout the wars that followed Cleopatra never married or even left Sardes, where she remained as a veritable damsel in the tower keep until her death by assassination in 308 BC.
Nathan P
juba_II_star1.JPG
KINGS of MAURETANIA. Juba II, with Cleopatra Selene96 viewsObverse: REX IVBA, Diademed head of Juba right
Reverse: BACCILICCA KLEOP[ATPA], Star and crescent
Mint : Caesarea
Date : Struck circa 16-17 AD
Reference : MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300
Grade : VF
Weight : 2.77 g
Denom : Denarius
Dealer : Ancient Imports
Comments : Juba was married to the only surviving child of Cleopatra VII, Selene (goddess of the moon). This may be a reference to Juba's wife depicted on the reverse.
2 commentsBolayi
juba_II_star.JPG
KINGS of MAURETANIA. Juba II, with Cleopatra Selene. 72 viewsObverse: REX IVBA, Diademed head of Juba right
Reverse: BACCILICCA KLEOP[ATPA], Star and crescent
Mint : Caesarea
Date : Struck circa 16-17 AD
Reference : MAA 85; SNG Copenhagen 590; Mazard 300
Grade : EF
Weight : 2.96 g
Denom : Denarius
Dealer : Baldwin's
Comments : Juba was married to the only surviving child of Cleopatra VII, Selene (goddess of the moon). This may be a reference to Juba's wife depicted on the reverse.
Bolayi
656_Marathos_Cleopatra_I.jpg
Marathos - AE1 views187-186 BC
veiled bust of Cleopatra I (wife of Ptolemy V) right
prow left
MRTS (aramaic script)
III¯NNN (73)
BMC Phoenicia p. 122, 15 -18 and SNG Cop 158
3,71 g
Johny SYSEL
Antony_Octavian_denarius.jpg
Marc Antony and Octavian denarius portraits39 viewsMARK ANTONY and OCTAVIAN. Silver denarius. Moneyer: M. Barbatius Pollio, quaestor pro praetore. Ephesus, Spring-Summer 41 BC. Obv: M ANT IMP AVG III VIR R P C M BARBAT Q P. Bare head of Mark Antony right. Rev: CAESAR IMP PONT III VIR R P C. Bare head of Octavian right. Crawford 517/2; CRI 243. Weight: 3.91 g. Diameter: 13 mm.
This coin was struck to pay Antony's troops shortly after he and the young Octavian completed their defeat of Caesar's assassins. Several months later would come his first meeting with Cleopatra.
3 commentsOctavianus
38348q00.jpg
Mark Antony101 viewsMark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., Silver denarius, cf. Crawford 544/14, Sydenham 1216, BMCRR 190, and RSC I 27 ff., Fair, Patrae?, 2.818g, 17.7mm, 180o, 32 - 31 B.C.; obverse ANT•AVG / III VIR•R•P•C, galley right with rowers, mast with banners at prow, border of dots; reverse LEG - [...], legionary eagle between two standards, border of dots Ex Forvm


The silver for this issue may have come from the Ptolemaic treasury, and this coin may have been present at the Battle of Actium.

"The Battle of Actium was the decisive confrontation of the Final War of the Roman Republic. It was fought between the forces of Octavian and the combined forces of Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII. The battle took place on 2 September 31 BC, on the Ionian Sea near the city of Actium, at the Roman province of Epirus vetus in Greece. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, while Antony's fleet was supported by the ships of Queen Cleopatra of Ptolemaic Egypt.
Octavian's victory enabled him to consolidate his power over Rome and its dominions. To that end, he adopted the title of Princeps ("first citizen") and some years after the victory was awarded the title of Augustus by the Roman Senate. This became the name by which he was known in later times. As Augustus, he would retain the trappings of a restored Republican leader; however, historians generally view this consolidation of power and the adoption of these honorifics as the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire."
3 commentsrandy h2
Mark_Antony_Denarius_91_90.jpg
Mark Antony (Triumvir) Gens: Antonia Moneyer: Military Mint Coin: Silver Denarius 1 viewsANTAVG III VIR. R.P.C. - Galley right under oars
Legion XII Antiqvae - Eagle between standards
Mint: Patras ? (32-31 BC)
Wt./Size/Axis: 2.72g / 1mm / 12h
References:
RSC 40
BMC 222
Cr544/9
Syd 1231
Sear5 #1480
Provenances:
Thierry DUMEZ NUMISMATIQUE
Acquisition/Sale: Thierry DUMEZ NUMISMATIQUE MA-Shops $0.00 10/18
Notes: Nov 23, 18 - The Gary R. Wilson Collection

"ANT AVG | III VIR R P C"
("Antonius Augur | Triumvir rei publicae constituendae")
trans. "Antony Augustus (military title), Triumvirate for the Restoration of the Republic"



From Wikipedia:
Marcus Antonius (Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N;[note 1] 14 January 83 BC – 1 August 30 BC), commonly known in English as Mark Antony or Marc Antony, was a Roman politician and general who played a critical role in the transformation of the Roman Republic from an oligarchy into the autocratic Roman Empire.

Antony was a supporter of Julius Caesar, and served as one of his generals during the conquest of Gaul and the Civil War. Antony was appointed administrator of Italy while Caesar eliminated political opponents in Greece, North Africa, and Spain. After Caesar's death in 44 BC, Antony joined forces with Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, another of Caesar's generals, and Octavian, Caesar's great-nephew and adopted son, forming a three-man dictatorship known to historians as the Second Triumvirate. The Triumvirs defeated Caesar's murderers, the Liberatores, at the Battle of Philippi in 42 BC, and divided the government of the Republic between themselves. Antony was assigned Rome's eastern provinces, including the client kingdom of Egypt, then ruled by Cleopatra VII Philopator, and was given the command in Rome's war against Parthia.

Relations among the triumvirs were strained as the various members sought greater political power. Civil war between Antony and Octavian was averted in 40 BC, when Antony married Octavian's sister, Octavia. Despite this marriage, Antony carried on a love affair with Cleopatra, who bore him three children, further straining Antony's relations with Octavian. Lepidus was expelled from the association in 36 BC, and in 33 BC disagreements between Antony and Octavian caused a split between the remaining Triumvirs. Their ongoing hostility erupted into civil war in 31 BC, as the Roman Senate, at Octavian's direction, declared war on Cleopatra and proclaimed Antony a traitor. Later that year, Antony was defeated by Octavian's forces at the Battle of Actium. Antony and Cleopatra fled to Egypt, where they committed suicide.

With Antony dead, Octavian became the undisputed master of the Roman world. In 27 BC, Octavian was granted the title of Augustus, marking the final stage in the transformation of the Roman Republic into an empire, with himself as the first Roman emperor.

LEG XII ANTIQVAE
This was Caesar's 12th legion, raised in 58 BC for the campaign against the Helvetii. It served throughout the wars in Gaul (58 to 49), Italy (49), and at Pharsalus (48). It was disbanded 46-45 BC and the colonists were settled at Parma. The legion was reformed in 44-43 BC most likely by Lepidus. The legion was then passed to Antony in 41-31 BC and was present at Actium. It appears on Antony's coinage as LEG XII ANTIQVAE. Colonists were settled at Patrae, Greece alongside men of Legio X Equestris, perhaps by Antony, more likely by Octavian soon after Actium.

The legion's whereabouts during most of Augustus' reign is unclear. The 12th was very possibly the unnamed third legion (with III Cyrenaica and XXII Deiotariana) stationed in Egypt. That unnamed legion disappears from Egypt at just about the same time that Legio XII Fulminata is first found in Syria. By early in the reign of Tiberius, the 12th legion was based at Raphanae.

Above the ship ANT AVG abbreviates the name Antonius along with one of his titles, Augur, a priest of the Roman state religion. Below the ship is his other title III VIR. R.P.C. (tresviri rei publicae constituendae), which loosely translates as “Triumvir for the Reorganization of the Republic”. A triumvir in this case was a member of the “Second Triumvirate” an informal power-sharing arrangement formed in 43 BCE between three men: Antony, Octavian (Julius Caesar’s great-nephew and designated heir,) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus (c. 88 – 12 BCE), last high priest of the Republic and Caesar’s political ally.

From Forvm:
The legionary denarii were struck by Antony for the use of his fleet and legions, most likely at his winter headquarters at Patrae just before the Actian campaign. They may have been struck with silver from Cleopatra's treasury. The legionary denarii provide an interesting record of the 23 legions, praetorian cohorts and the chort of speculatores of which Antony's army was composed. Some of them give the name as well as the number of the legion honored. They have a lower silver content than the standard of the time. As a result they were rarely hoarded, heavily circulated and are most often found in very worn condition. The Francis Jarman collection includes the very rare and scarce named legions and cohorts.
Gary W2
00906-MarcAntonyCleopatra.JPG
Mark Antony and Cleopatra VII61 viewsMark Antony and Cleopatra VII
22 mm 5.68 gm
O: Draped bust of Cleopatra right, wearing stephane
R: Bare head of Mark Antony right; dates in legend
Provincial of Chalcis ad Libanum
4 commentsKoffy
0023-070np_noir.jpg
Mark Antony and Lucius Antonius, Denarius232 viewsDenarius minted in Ephesus in 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : HCRI # 246, RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Marc Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Marc Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Marc Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
3 commentsPotator II
LEG_VI.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG VI 100 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
galley r. mast with banners at prow

Rev LEG VI legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

The photo appears to show this as LEG VII but in hand you can see that the second I is a scratch
Background History on the VI Legion

Raised in Cisalpine Gaul in 58 BC by Julius Caesar, the Sixth Legion served with him during his tenure as governor and was withdrawn to Spain in 49 BC where it earned the title “Hispaniensis”.

Later seeing action at Pharsalus in 48 BC, Julius Caesar took the 6th to Alexandria to settle the dispute in Egypt with Cleopatra. Alexandria was laid to siege and the 6th was almost wiped out losing almost two thirds of its entire manpower. Julius Caesar eventually triumphed when reinforcements arrived.

Julius Caesar took his “Veteran Sixth Legion” with him to Syria and Pontus. The Legion then served in Pontus under Caesar in 48 BC and 47 BC. This culminated in the battle of Zela where victory was won by Legio VI.

During Caesar’s African war against Scipio, the Sixth Legion deserted en masse from Scipio to reinforce Caesar and fought under him.

The legion was disbanded in 45 BC after Munda establishing a colony at Arelate (Arles), but was re-formed by Lepidus the following year (44 BC) and given over to Marcus Antonius the year after that. Following the defeat of the republican generals Cassius and Brutus in successive battles at Philippi in 42 BC and the subsequent division of control between Antony and Octavian, a colony was again formed from retired veterans at Beneventum in 41 BC (this is the colony which it is believed became Legio VI Victrix) and the remainder of Legio VI Ferrata was taken by Antony to the East where it garrisoned Judea.

Legio VI fought in the Parthian War in 36 BC.

Another Legio VI Victrix evidently saw action at Perusia in 41 BC, which presents us with a problem because the official Legio VI Ferrata was at that moment with Anthony in the East. This is explained in Lawrence Keppie's excellent book The Making of the Roman Army - from Republic to Empire (pp.134); “Octavian did not hesitate to duplicate legionary numerals already in use by Antony. The latter had serving with him legio V Alaudae, legio VI Ferrata and legio X Equestris. Soon we find Octavian's army boasting of a legio V (the later Macedonica), legio VI (the later Victrix) and legio X (soon to be Fretensis). Of these, legio V and legio X, and less certainly legio VI, bore under the empire a bull-emblem which would normally indicate a foundation by Caesar; but the true Caesarian legions with these numerals (Alaudae, Ferrata and Equestris) were with Antony.”

It would seem, therefore, that Octavian had again used the veterans of Caesars Sixth Legion, this time from those left at Beneventum, to form the core of his own Sixth Legion used at Perusia.

Both Legio VI’s (Ferrata and Victrix) fought at the Battle of Actium, after this event the legio VI Ferrata was dispatched back to Judea and the next time we hear of the legio VI Victrix was in Spain.

Legio VI Ferrata was severely mauled at the Battle of Actium in 31 BC by the forces loyal to Caesar's nephew and heir, Octavian. Following the Battle of Actium, another colony of veterans seems to have been created at Byllis, probably together with soldiers from other legions, and the remainder of VI Ferrata was moved to Syria/Judea where it was to remain.

From 9 BC to 73 AD the VI Ferrata was garrisoned the area of Judea. It was in this time frame that Jesus Christ was tried before Pontius Pilatus, the Roman Governor of Judea.

From 54 AD to 68 AD the Legion served under Corbulo at Artaxata and Tigranocerta against the Parthians. In 69 AD the Legion returned to Judea and fought in the Jewish Civil War. As the Jewish Civil War wound down, the sixth was placed under Mucianis and fought against Vitellius. Legion VI was largely responsible for Mucianis victory over the forces of Vitellius during the brief Roman Civil War .
Titus Pullo
ANTLEGX.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary Denarius LEG X99 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley r. mast with banners at prow

LEG X
Legionary eagle between two standards

Patrae mint 32-31BC

LEG X (later called Gemina) was levied in 59 BC or earlier by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion levied by him personally and was raised in Spain. It played a major role in the Gallic war featuring prominently in Caesar's "Gallic Wars." Legio X was his most trusted and loyal Legion. In 45 BC the Legion was disbanded and given land grants in Southern Gaul.

During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC making use of many retired legionaries who re-enlisted. It was eventually turned over to Antony and fought for him until the final Battle of Philippi. The veterans obtained lands near Cremona, and an inscription reports that the name of the legion at the time was Veneria, "devoted to Venus." This alluded to Julius Caesar's claimed descent from Venus.

The newly levied Tenth was then taken by Antony to Armenia for his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for him until his defeat at the Battle of Actium, after which the legion changed sides and moved into Octavian's army. They were then taken to Egypt to finish off Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian never fully trusted the 10th Legion as it had been fiercely loyal to both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After Antony's death Octavian left the legion in the East in Syria. In 29 BC the legion was due to be discharged. When the legionaries pressed for their release and land grants Octavian was slow in complying. Suetonius says that the entire legion rioted and Octavian dishonorably discharged the entire legion.

Octavian now recruited new legionaries to fill the 10th Legion in its traditional recruiting grounds of Spain. Some of the senior Centurions may have re-enlisted for a third term to serve with the 10th. These men would have been in their late 40's or early 50's. The new legionaries marched over land to Syria to take up their posting. The new 10th Legion's home base was on the Euphrates to keep an eye on the Parthians.

The next discharge date would be 14-13 BC. This time the 10th Legion was settled in Beirut and the city was given Colony status. Ten years later the 10th Legion under Publius Quintilius Varus was marched down to Jerusalem to garrison the city after Herod the Great died. The 10th Legion would remain in Jerusalem until 6 AD.
2 commentsJay GT4
ANTVESPcounter.jpg
Mark Antony Legionary denarius LEG X IMPVESP135 viewsANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley r. mast with banners at prow
IMPVESP counter mark above galley

LEG X?
Legionary eagle between two standards IMPVESP countermark


Patrae mint 32-31BC

3.01g

Ex-Incitatus

Obverse countermarked IMPVESP during Vespasian's reign showing this denarius was in circulation for well over 100 years! In hand I can make out X for the legion number but can't be sure if any other numerals appear after it. This countermark appears mostly on late Republican and Imperatorial denarii, although denarii of Augustus and denarii of the Flavians struck at Ephesus are also recorded. The MP VES countermarks circulated specifically within the province of Asia Minor. Martini noted that the output of silver coinage in relation to the civic bronze for this region was much smaller during the Julio-Claudian period. This suggests the denarii were countermarked to validate locally circulating silver coinage at an acceptable weight while the regional mints opened by Vespasian were gearing up production, a theory which the countermarking of cistophori with the contemporary MP VES AVG countermarks seems to support. The similarly countermarked Flavian denarii struck at Ephesus can be accounted for then as examples accidentally countermarked by unobservant mint workers during the transition.



LEG X (later called Gemina) was levied in 59 BC or earlier by Julius Caesar. It was the first legion levied by him personally and was raised in Spain. It played a major role in the Gallic war featuring prominently in Caesar's "Gallic Wars." Legio X was his most trusted and loyal Legion. In 45 BC the Legion was disbanded and given land grants in Southern Gaul.

During the civil war that followed Caesar's assassination, Legio X was reconstituted by Lepidus in the winter of 44/43 BC making use of many retired legionaries who re-enlisted. It was eventually turned over to Antony and fought for him until the final Battle of Philippi. The veterans obtained lands near Cremona, and an inscription reports that the name of the legion at the time was Veneria, "devoted to Venus." This alluded to Julius Caesar's claimed descent from Venus.

The newly levied Tenth was then taken by Antony to Armenia for his Parthian campaign. During Antony's civil war, the legion fought for him until his defeat at the Battle of Actium, after which the legion changed sides and moved into Octavian's army. They were then taken to Egypt to finish off Antony and Cleopatra. Octavian never fully trusted the 10th Legion as it had been fiercely loyal to both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. After Antony's death Octavian left the legion in the East in Syria. In 29 BC the legion was due to be discharged. When the legionaries pressed for their release and land grants Octavian was slow in complying. Suetonius says that the entire legion rioted and Octavian dishonorably discharged the entire legion.

Octavian now recruited new legionaries to fill the 10th Legion in its traditional recruiting grounds of Spain. Some of the senior Centurions may have re-enlisted for a third term to serve with the 10th. These men would have been in their late 40's or early 50's. The new legionaries marched over land to Syria to take up their posting. The new 10th Legion's home base was on the Euphrates to keep an eye on the Parthians.

The next discharge date would be 14-13 BC. This time the 10th Legion was settled in Beirut and the city was given Colony status. Ten years later the 10th Legion under Publius Quintilius Varus was marched down to Jerusalem to garrison the city after Herod the Great died. The 10th Legion would remain in Jerusalem until 6 AD.
5 commentsJay GT4
Scarpus~0.jpg
Mark Antony Scarpus denarius100 viewsM ANTO COS III IMP III
Head of Jupiter Ammon right

ANTONIO AVG SCARPVS IMP
Victory walking right holding wreath and palm

Cyrene summer of 31 BC
2.86g
Sear 1486

In the will of Caesar, Scarpus received one eighth of certain legacies after the legacies given to Octavian. He along with his cousins from the will became heirs to his great uncle.

Scarpus became an ally to Mark Antony and commanded for him against the war on Marcus Brutus and Cassius Longinus. In the years leading up to Actium 31 BC, Antony appointed Scarpus to the military command of Cyrenaica. Scarpus had with him four legions to command. During his time in Cyrenaica Scarpus had control of the currency mint in Cyrene, as he became a moneyer. Scarpus had issued various coins bearing Antony’s name and Scarpus’ name was inscripted as an issuer of these coins.

After Antony & Cleopatra were defeated by Octavian at Actium, Scarpus withdrew his support from Antony and gave his support (including his legions) to Octavian. Antony after the defeat sailed back to North Africa and sent messengers to Scarpus for help.
Scarpus refused to see Antony’s messengers and put them to death. He gave his legions to Gaius Cornelius Gallus, Octavian’s lieutenant to command.

Augustus then appointed his cousin as Governor of Cyrenaica. Scarpus as he did for Antony, became a moneyer and issued various coins bearing Augustus’ name. On these coins, Scarpus had his name inscripted as an issuer of the coins.
2 commentsJay GT4
0023-056.jpg
Mark Antony, Denarius91 viewsStruck in a travelling mint, moving with Mark Antony in 41 BC
ANT AVG IMP III VI R P C, Head of Mark Antony right
Fortuna standing left, holding rudder in right hand and cornucopiae in left; at feet, stork; below, PIETAS COS
3,82 gr - 20 mm
Ref : Crawford # 516/2, Sydenham # 1174, HCRI # 241, C # 77
Ex. Auctiones.GmbH

The following comment is copied from NAC auction # 52/294 about the very rare corresponding aureus :
The year 41 B.C., when this aureus was struck at a mint travelling in the East with Marc Antony, was a period of unusual calm for the triumvir, who took a welcomed, if unexpected, rest after the great victory he and Octavian had won late in 42 B.C. against Brutus and Cassius at the Battle of Philippi. Antony’s original plan of organising an invasion of Parthia was put on hold after he sailed to Tarsus, where he had summoned Cleopatra VII, the Greek queen of Egypt. She was to defend herself against accusations that she had aided Brutus and Cassius before Philippi, but it is generally agreed that the summons was merely a pretext for Antony’s plan to secure aid for his Parthian campaign. Their meeting was anything but a source of conflict; indeed, they found much common ground, including their agreement that it was in their mutual interests to execute Cleopatra’s sister and rival Arsinoe IV, who had been ruling Cyprus. In addition to sharing political interests, the two agreed that Antony would winter in Egypt to share a luxurious vacation with Cleopatra that caused a further postponement of Antony’s designs on Parthia. Thus began another of the queen’s liaisons with noble Romans, a prior having been Julius Caesar (and, according to Plutarch, Pompey Jr. before him). During the course of his stay in Egypt Cleopatra was impregnated, which resulted in twins born to her in 40 B.C. But this care-free period was only a momentary calm in the storm, for trouble was brewing in both the East and the West. Early in 40 B.C. Syria was overrun by the Parthians, seemingly while Antony travelled to Italy to meet Octavian following the Perusine War, in which Octavian defeated the armies of Antony’s wife and brother. The conflict with Octavian was resolved when they signed a pact at Brundisium in October, and Syria was eventually recovered through the efforts of Antony’s commanders from 40 to 38 B.C.{/i]

5 commentsPotator II
legioxxiiLG.jpg
Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C.60 viewsMARCUS ANTONIUS (Marc Antony) AR silver legionary denarius. Legion XXIII. 18mm, 3.5g. Struck at a military mint, likely Patrae, 32-31 BC. Obverse: ANT AVG III VIR R P C, Praetorian galley sailing. Reverse: LEG XXIII, eagle between standards. Ex Incitatus.

Legion XXII, the 22nd, is the second-last legion in the series and one of the scarcer types of the regular numbered legions.

Marcus Antonius (in Latin: M·ANTONIVS·M·F·M·N[1]) (January 14, 83 BC – August 1, 30 BC), known in English as Mark Antony, was a Roman politician and general. He was an important supporter and the loyal friend of Gaius Julius Caesar as a military commander and administrator, despite his blood ties, through his mother Iulia, to the branch of Caesars opposed to the Marians and murdered by them. After Caesar's assassination, Antony formed an official political alliance with Octavian (Augustus) and Marcus Aemilius Lepidus, known to historians today as the Second Triumvirate.

The triumvirate broke up in 33 BC. Disagreement between Octavian and Antony erupted into civil war, the Final War of the Roman Republic, in 31 BC. Antony was defeated by Octavian at the naval Battle of Actium, and in a brief land battle at Alexandria. He and his lover Cleopatra committed suicide shortly thereafter.

For anyone tempted to laud Marcus Antonius, to Antony's great shame read what Plutarch wrote about what Antony did to Cicero:

Plutarch: Cicero's Death

But in the meantime the assassins were come with a band of soldiers, Herennius, a centurion, and Popillius, a tribune, whom Cicero had formerly defended when prosecuted for the murder of his father. Finding the doors shut, they broke them open, and Cicero not appearing, and those within saying they knew not where he was, it is stated that a youth, who had been educated by Cicero in the liberal arts and sciences, an emancipated slave of his brother Quintus, Philologus by name, informed the tribune that the litter was on its way to the sea through the close and shady walks. The tribune, taking a few with him, ran to the place where he was to come out. And Cicero, perceiving Herennius running in the walks, commanded his servants to set down the litter; and stroking his chin, as he used to do, with his left hand, he looked steadfastly upon his murderers, his person covered with dust, his beard and hair untrimmed, and his face worn with his troubles. So that the greatest part of those that stood by covered their faces whilst Herennius slew him. And thus was he murdered, stretching forth his neck out of the litter, being now in his sixty-fourth year. Herennius cut off his head, and, by Antony's command, his hands also, by which his Philippics were written; for so Cicero styled those orations he wrote against Antony, and so they are called to this day.

When these members of Cicero were brought to Rome, Antony was holding an assembly for the choice of public officers; and when he heard it, and saw them, he cried out, "Now let there be an end of our proscriptions." He commanded his head and hands to be fastened up over the rostra, where the orators spoke; a sight which the Roman people shuddered to behold, and they believed they saw there, not the face of Cicero, but the image of Antony's own soul.

Translation by John Dryden: http://intranet.grundel.nl/thinkquest/moord_cicero_plu.html

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
juba_cleo.jpg
Mauretanian King Juba II and Cleopatra Selene79 viewsObverse: Diademed head right. 'REX IVBA'
Reverse: Head-dress of Isis, sistrum. 'BACILICC KLEOPATP'
Date : 25 BC - 23 AD
Reference : S6003, SNG Cop 570-573
Grade : VF
Weight : 2.54 g
Denom : Denarius
Metal : Silver
Comments : Nice toned, 19mm, From an old collection, acquired 1961

Thanks to Barry & Darling for the picture
Bolayi
xP3D4oPRX74k8yyCJf9DiQT2Hr6Hj5.jpg
Nabataea: Malichus II (40-70 CE) Æ Unit13 viewsNabataean Kingdom, Malichus II, 40 - 70 A.D., Petra mint, gVF; Bronze AE 16, BMC 4-5, S 5703, gVF, 2.88g, 16.5mm, Petra mint, obverse jugate laureate and draped bust of Malichus II and Shaquilath II right; reverse two cornucopias, crossed and filleted, Aramaic legend, "Malichus, Shaquilath" in two lines above and one below cornucopia.



http://www.answers.com/topic/nabataean During the King Malichus II reign, in 32 BC Herod the Great started a war against Nabatea, with the support of Cleopatra. The war started with Herod's army plundering Nabataea and with a large cavalry force, and the occupation of Dium. After this defeat the Nabatean forces amassed near Canatha in Syria, but were attacked and routed. Athenio (Cleopatra's General) sent Canathans to the aid of the Nabateans, and this force crushed Herod's army which then fled to Ormiza. One year later, Herod's army overran Nabataea. [6]
SpongeBob
neopaphos_cleoVII.jpg
Neopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII9 viewsNeopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII. Bronze hemiobol, Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35; Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, RPC -, F, Neopaphos mint, 2.291 g, 12.5 mm, 0o, c. 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse, statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right and scepter in left, star above. While not noted in the standard references for Ptolemaic coinage, the coin is fairly common on Cyprus and is noted in Cypriot numismatic publications, and dated there to the time of Cleopatra VII. This denomination was commonly found in the excavations at Neopaphos. ex FORVMPodiceps
neopaphos_cleo.jpg
Neopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII (2)14 viewsNeopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII. Bronze hemiobol, Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35; Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, RPC -, F, Neopaphos mint, 2.291g, 12.5mm, 0o, c. 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse, statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right and scepter in left, star above. ex FORVMPodiceps
neopaphos.jpg
Neopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII (3)7 viewsNeopaphos, Cyprus, c. 51 - 30 B.C., Time of Cleopatra VII. Bronze hemiobol, Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35; Svoronos -, SNG Cop -, RPC -, F, Neopaphos mint, 2.642g, 14.9mm, 0o, c. 51 - 30 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse, statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right and scepter in left, star above. Ex FORVMPodiceps
augustus_alex.jpg
Octavian, Alexandria eagle14 viewsOctavian, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt. Bronze diobol, Dattari 2, RPC I 5001, BMC Alexandria 2, Kampmann and Ganschow 2.5, Fair, porous, Alexandria mint, 12.547 g, 25.1 mm, 0o, first series, c. 30 - 28 B.C.; obverse “QEOU UIOU”, bare head right; reverse “KAISAROS AUTOKRATOROS”, eagle standing left, double cornucopia before, “P” behind. RPC notes, "Struck in two denominations, with the value marks P and M. The value marks and the reverse type (eagle and cornucopia) provide a direct link with the coinage of Cleopatra, indicating that these are the earliest coins of the reign. The absence of “SEBASTOS” in the otherwise very full legend suggests a date of 30 - 28 B.C."ex FORVMPodiceps
Paphoscyprusae14.jpg
Paphos, Cyprus. Ae1427 viewsObv: Zeus head facing right (common Ptolemaic design) on the obverse.
Rev: Zeus standing head to left, holding ears of grain in his left hand and a scepter in his right hand.

Generic small change coin type from 1st C. BC, time of Cleopatra VII and others.

BMC Ptolemies -; Svor. 1842; SNG Cop. -; RPC -; RPC Supplement mentions Paphos II; Cox, Excavations at Curium, 128
ancientone
Paphoscyprusae18.jpg
Paphos, Cyprus. AE1826 viewsObv: Zeus head facing right (common Ptolemaic design) on the obverse.
Rev: Zeus standing head to left, holding ears of grain in his left hand and a scepter in his right hand.

Generic small change coin type from 1st C. BC, time of Cleopatra VII and others.

BMC Ptolemies -; Svor. 1842; SNG Cop. -; RPC -; RPC Supplement mentions Paphos II; Cox, Excavations at Curium, 128
ancientone
eumenia_BMCphrygia21.jpg
Phrygia, Eumeneia (Fulviana), Fulvia BMC Phrygia 2132 viewsFulvia, wife of Marcus Antonius, c. 41-40 BC
AE 20, 7.43g
struck under magistrate Zmertorix, son of Philonidas
obv. Head of Fulvia as winged Nike, draped, with chignon, r.
rev. Athena, in chiton and peplos, helmeted, advancing l., holding spear and round
shield
FOVLOVIANWN / ZMERTORIGOC / FILWNIDOV
RPC I 3139; BMC Phrygia 21
rare, good F

Fulvia was the first real woman depicted on a coin!

Fulvia was first married to P. Clodius, the Roman firebrand. After his violent death in 52 BC she married C. Scribonius Curio, who likewise met an untimely end in Africa. She married Mark Antony in 44 BC, and became an outspoken defender of his interests in Rome while he campaigned in the east (and enjoyed the attentions of Cleopatra). The city of Eumenia was re-named Fulviana in her honor by Antony's partisans. By 40 BC Fulvia's strident attacks on Octavian had provoked a reaction, and she had to flee first to southern Italy and then to Greece. She met Antony at Athens, where he upbraided her for antagonizing Octavian when he was trying to maintain a semblance of cordial relations. Fulvia died at Sicyon shortly thereafter. Sometime afterward these coins struck at "Fulviana" had their ethnic scratched off.
Jochen
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27.3g.jpg
Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I33 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC
30 mm, 27.27 g
Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right
Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field
Sear 7900var
ex Bart Lewis
areich
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_Cleopatra_51-30_BC_AR_Tetradrachm_Yr__17_(36_to_35_BC_).jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). ISIS HEADDRESS SYMBOL102 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom Cleopatra 51-30 BC AR Tetradrachm Yr. 17 (36/5 BC). Diademed head of Ptolemy I
PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, Eagle standing, headdress of Isis before and palm branch at shoulder.
Size: 23 mm 13.24 grams SOLD
Antonivs Protti
740-3.png
Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Cleopatra VII with Ptolemy XV, AR tetradrachm, Year 11 (42/1 BC)36 views44-30 BC
12.6 Grams
Obv.: Diademed head of Ptolemy I right, wearing aegis
Rev.: Eagle standing left on thunderbolt, palm over shoulder; date LIA (Yr 11) to left, ΠA to right.
Purchased on eBay
Grade: XF; Strike 5/5; Surface 3/5
Ptolemy XV Philopator Philometor Caesar was the last king of the Ptolemaic dynasty of Egypt, who reigned jointly with his mother Cleopatra VII of Egypt, from September 2, 47 BC. Between the death of Cleopatra, on August 12, 30 BC, and his own death on August 23, 30 BC, he was nominally the sole pharaoh. He was killed on the orders of Octavian, who would soon become the Roman emperor Augustus. He was the eldest son of Cleopatra VII, and possibly the only son of Julius Caesar, for whom he was named.
2 commentsRichard M10
Egyp_0030_Ns.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra I - 011026 viewsBust of Isis right
PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, Eagle left
16.37 gr, 25 mm
Ref : Sear # 7880
1 commentsPotator II
Ptolemaic_1b_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm53 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
3 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemaic_1b_img~0.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy X Soter, 110 - 109 B.C. and 107 - 101 B.C., Tetradrachm36 viewsSilver tetradrachm
Obv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, L I (year 10 of Cleopatra's reign) left, PA right;
Minted in Paphos, B.C. 110
Reference:– Svoronos 1668, SNG Cop -, Noeske -,
ex Forvm

14.258g, 24,1mm, 0o

After the death of Ptolemy VIII in 116 B.C. Cleopatra III ruled jointly with her mother Cleopatra II and her son Ptolemy IX. Cleopatra III expelled Ptolemy IX 110 B.C. and replaced him as co-regent with her second son Ptolemy X. Ptolemy IX regained the throne in 109 but was again replaced in 107 B.C. In 101 B.C., after 6 years of joint rule Ptolemy X had his mother Cleopatra III murdered.
maridvnvm
cleopatra_vii.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII47 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
CLEOPATRA VII THEA NEOTERA
51 - 30 BC
AE 80 drachms 27mm 15.47g
O: DIADEMED HEAD OF CLEOPATRA VII RIGHT, HAIR IN BUN
R: EAGLE STANDING LEFT ON THUNDERBOLT, DOUBLE CORNUCOPIA IN LEFT FIELD
SVORONOS 1871, SNG COP. 419-21
ALEXANDRIA
(ex Sayles & Lavender)
laney
neopaphos.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII27 views51- 30 BC (Time of Cleopatra VII)
AE Hemiobol 17 mm max., 3.55 g
O: Laureate head of Zeus to right
R: Statue of Zeus Salaminios standing left, stalks of grain in right hand and scepter in left, star above.
Cyprus, Neopaphos;
Nicolaou, Paphos II, 469-509; Cox, Exc. at Curium 128; Museum of the History of Cypriot Coinage ch. 11, 35
laney
cleopatra_vii_bk_res.jpg
PTOLEMAIC KINGDOM, CLEOPATRA VII43 viewsPTOLEMAIC KINGDOM
CLEOPATRA VII THEA NEOTERA
b. 69 BC d. 30 BC
(Queen of Egypt 51-30 BC)
AE 80 drachms 27mm 15.47g
O: DIADEMED HEAD OF CLEOPATRA VII RIGHT, HAIR IN BUN
R: EAGLE STANDING LEFT ON THUNDERBOLT, DOUBLE CORNUCOPIA IN LEFT FIELD
SVORONOS 1871, SNG COP. 419-21
ALEXANDRIA
(ex Sayles & Lavender)
2 commentslaney
Ptolemaic_Kingdom_1d_img.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180-145 B.C., Tetradrachm, Svoronos 1489149 viewsObv:– Diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Rev:- PTOLEMAIOY BASILEOS, eagle standing left, head left, on thunderbolt, wings closed
Minted in Alexandria, B.C. 180-145
Reference:– Svoronos 1489, SNG Cop 262

Ex Forum

14.031g, 27.3m, 0o

Additional comments from Forum - "Ptolemy VI became king in 180 B.C. at the age of about 6 and ruled jointly with his mother, Cleopatra I, until her death in 176 BC. From 170 to 164 B.C., Egypt was ruled by Ptolemy, his sister-queen and his younger brother Ptolemy VIII Physcon. In 170 BC, the Seleukid King Antiochus IV invaded and was even crowned king in 168, but abandoned his claim on the orders from Rome. In 164 Ptolemy VI was driven out by his brother. He went to Rome and received support from Cato. He was restored the following year. In 152 BC, he briefly ruled jointly with his son, Ptolemy Eupator, but his son probably died that same year. In 145 B.C. he died of battle wounds received against Alexander Balas of Syria. Ptolemy VI ruled uneasily, cruelly suppressing frequent rebellions."
9 commentsmaridvnvm
Ptolemy_X_pan.jpg
Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.139 viewsAR Tetradrachm, (Sovornos 1868~Cleopatra VII), (SNG Cop 391), Weight 14.1g, Max. diameter 24.15mm, Paphos mint (Alexandria mint in some refs.) year 21 (60/61 B.C.), Obv. Diademed head of Ptolemy Soter right, wearing aegis, Rev. ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ, Eagle standing left on thunderbolt (off flan); L KA (date) before; ΠA behind, Background toning with some pitting on obv.


There is some disagreement between references as to which ruler it is assigned to. And the mint.

Background info courtesy Forvm Ancient Coins

In 80 B.C., Ptolemy XI was removed from the throne by the Egyptian people after he killed his coregent and step-mother Berenice III. Since he had no male heir, the oldest (illegitimate) son of Ptolemy IX was made King Ptolemy XII. Ptolemy XI had left the throne to Rome in his will, but Rome did not challenge Ptolemy XII's succession because the Senate did not want an Egyptian expansion.

Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

Ex. Aegean Numismatics
Ex. CNG auction 91 lot 75

Pictured on Wildwinds
2 commentsSteve E
Ptolémée V Epiphane Sear 7880.jpg
Ptolemy V Epiphanes - Ae 2730 viewsHead of Isis (Cleopatra I) right
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ , eagle standing left on thunderbolt
Ginolerhino
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE26, 205-180 BC.JPG
Ptolemy V Epiphanes, AE26, 205-180 BC25 viewsPtolemy V Epiphanes
AE 26mm, 205-180 BC
bust of Cleopatra I r.
eagle std. r.
ΠTOΛEMAIOY BAΣIΛEΩΣ
Svoronos 1234
Ardatirion
Comb29072018114216.jpg
Ptolemy V. 204 - 180 BC11 viewsObv: Head of Cleopatra I as Isis.
Rev: Eagle standing on thunderbolt with one open wing.
Svoronos 1237.
SNG Copenhagen 253.
15mm and 2.97 grams
Canaan
Ptolemaic_Isis_Eagle_AE27_15_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Cleopatra I as Isis, AE 2814 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 28. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var. ex areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
PtolemyVIAndCleopatra_ZeusAmmon_2Eagles_AE30_27_3g.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, Zeus, AE 3011 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. Ptolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I, struck 180-145 BC. 30 mm, 27.27 g. Obv: diademed head of Zeus Ammon right. Rev: Two eagles standing left on thunderbolt, side by side, a cornucopia in left field. Sear 7900var. ex Bart Lewis & areich, photo credit areichPodiceps
isis_cleo.jpg
Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27. Cleopatra I as Isis13 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy VI and Cleopatra I. AE 27, 17,37g. Cleopatra I as Isis, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings open. Sear 7903 var.Podiceps
41065_Ptolemaic_Kingdom,_Ptolemy_VI_Philometor,_180_-_145_B_C_,_Cleopatra_I_Thea_as_Regent_S1384.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Tetrobol, Svoronos 138412 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C., Cleopatra I Thea as Regent. Bronze tetrobol, Svoronos 1384, SNG Cop 286, Fair, Alexandria mint, 13.790g, 28.1mm, 0o, 180 - 177 B.C.; obverse head of (Cleopatra I as) Isis right, wearing grain wreath; reverse “ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ”, eagle standing half left, wings open, head left, monogram left. Ex FORVM, photo credit FORVMPodiceps
ptolemyVI.jpg
Ptolemy VI Philometor, Herakles/ Eagle, 25 mm, "K"18 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy VI Philometor, 180 - 145 B.C. Bronze obol, Svoronos 1376, SNG Cop 270, VF, obverse weak in places, 11.427g, 25.0mm, 315o, c. 180 - 168 B.C.; obverse Bearded head of Herakles right wearing lion's scalp; circle of dots around; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing half left, head turned back right, long transverse caduceus behind, K below; rare. The bearded Herakles obverse occurs on three different series of Ptolemaic bronzes identified by Svoronos. Our coin type has an average obol weight of 10.93 g. The style and weight connect it to the reign of Ptolemy VI. Similar issues with a transverse scepter have “EUL” between the legs of the eagle, for Eulaios an advisor to young Ptolemy VI. The K may refer to Cleopatra I, senior co-ruler between 180 and 178/7 BC, while Ptolemy VI was a young child. Alternatively, K may stand for either Komanos or Kineas, who took the advisor-roles of Eulaios and Lenaios. Diobols (Svoronos 1375) exhibit a different eagle but the same K between the legs. The relative scarcity of the K-issues suggests that they may be for Komanos or Kineas. ex FORVM

Podiceps
silphium.jpg
Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C. Zeus/ two eagles & silphium plant25 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II, as King of Cyrenaica, 163 - 145 B.C., Bronze AE 17, SNG Copenhagen 455; Svoronos 1158 (Ptolemy IV), 6.87g, Kyrene mint, head of Zeus Ammon right with ram's horn, wearing taenia and uraeus; reverse ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΩΣ, two eagles with closed wings standing left on two thunderbolts, silphium plant in left field; The date and reign of issue for this type are uncertain. Svoronos attributed it to Ptolemy IV but noted it may `belong to a later reign.` Recent attributions span from Ptolemy VIII to Ptolemy X. Kreuzer suggests it is similar to Svoronos 1426, Cleopatra III and Ptolemy IX. Ex H.J.BerkPodiceps
Ptolemy_XII_brockage.jpg
Ptolemy XII 348 viewsSilver tetradrachm, VF, partial brockage
Alexandria mint
13.384g, 25.1mm, 0o, 62 - 61 B.C.
Obverse: diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
Reverse: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, date LK left ( year 20, L appears as I) and PA right.

Svoronos 1867 (Cleopatra VII); BMC 113, 39-40 (Ptolemaeus XI), SNG Cop-.

Ex FORVM: "Rare partial brockage. A partial brockage occurs when: 1) one coin jams in the die, 2) a second coin is struck using the first coin as a die, 3) the first coin is removed, and 4) the second coin is re-struck with the die. This is an unusual circumstance of events. Clashed dies are more common. In clashed dies, the dies are struck against each other, creating a weak design of one or each die on the other. This coin is a partial brockage, not the product of clashed dies. The depth of the intaglio image, position in relation to the cameo image, and weakness of the higher points of the cameo image support the attribution to "partial brockage.""
mihali84
cleoptol.jpg
Ptolemy XII Auletes [53 BC] AR Tetradrachm23 views Svoronos 1837, SNG Cop 395. Paphos Mint, 11.9 grams

Obverse: Diademed head of Ptolemy I with feminine features.
Reverse:Eagle standing left with thunderbolt in claws and Isis crown to left, palm branch over its right shoulder. In the left field 'LKH' (=year 28); in right field 'PA' (=Paphos)/ BASILEWE PTOLEMAIOY (of King Ptolemy)


In 54 BC, Ptolemy XII returned to Egypt from a 3-year exile and issued new Tetradrachms for the last 27-30th years of his rule. They show the crown of Isis in the eagle's claw that recognized Cleopatra as his heir and likely co-regent. The Isis crown remained the symbol of Cleo VII on her coins following Ptolemy's death in 51 BC. This pattern remained unchanged for all of Cleopatra's tetradrachms though the quality of coins became very bad owing to the huge bribes that had to be paid for Roman "protection". For a great discussion of these attributions and coin history see the link: http://www.ptolemaic.net/cleopatra/4coin-isis.htm#p5bydelay.

This coin was issued by Ptolemy XII in his 28th regnal year (53 BC) when his daughter, Cleopatra was about 15.

1 commentsdaverino
PtolCleo.jpg
Ptolemy XII or Cleopatra VII Tetradrachm101 viewsPtolemy XII (80-58 BC) or Cleopatra VII
AR Tetradrachm
Diademed head of Ptolemy I right

ΠΤΟΛΕΜΑΙΟΥ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ
Eagle on thunderbolt left.
year (L) IH = 18 (=64-63 BC or 34-33 BC), PA to right

Listed as Alexandria mint, though the "PA" to the right suggests it was minted in Paphos, Cyprus.

SNG Cop-389

13.49g

Ex-ANE

IH is year 18 and in this context it is ambiguous - either 64BC (modern scholars like Morkholm, Noeske, etc.) or 34BC (Svoronos).

Hence this issue is either Ptolemy XII (modern interpretation) or Cleopatra VII ruling with Ptolemy XIV, Ptolemy XV or Ptolemy XVI (Svoronos interpretation).
1 commentsJay GT4
Ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII Silver Tetradrachm47 viewsPtolemy XII, Silver tetradrachm, Paphos mint, 14.577g, 24.3mm, die axis 0o, 58 - 57 BC, Noeske 356, Svoronos -, SNG Cop -,
OBV: diademed head of Ptolemy I right wearing aegis
REV: PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, LKD left (year 24), PA right; struck with a worn obverse die; scarce;

Ptolemaic Kingdom, Ptolemy XII Neos Dionysos, 80 - 58 B.C. and 55 - 51 B.C.
Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player.
Deposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance.
His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt.

EX: Forum Ancient Coins
1 commentsRomanorvm
ptolemy_XII.jpg
Ptolemy XII, tetradrachm71 viewsPtolemaic Kingdom of Egypt, Ptolemy XII, Neos Dionysos, 80 - 51 B.C. Silver tetradrachm, Svoronos 1839; BMC 117, 35; SNG Cop 396, gVF, toned, Paphos mint, 13.683 g, 25.9 mm, 0o, 52 - 51 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Ptolemy I or XII? right, wearing aegis; reverse “PTOLEMAIOU BASILEWS”, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, wings closed, date “IKQ” (year 29) and crown of Isis left, “PA ” right. Ptolemy XII was a weak and unpopular ruler. He was awarded the belittling title Auletes - the flute player. Disposed by his own subjects in 58 B.C., he regained his throne with Roman assistance. His daughter, the famous Cleopatra VII, was the last Ptolemaic ruler of Egypt. Minted under Roman supervision. About 33% silver. ex FORVM1 commentsPodiceps
contermarked.jpg
Roman Bronze Countermarked Coin22 viewsA Roman bronze countermarked coin minted between 47-41 AD, during the reign of either Julius Caesar or the second triumverate. It carries the countermark of Cleopatra. An awful lot of history on one coin. 24 mm, 9.5 g.chuy1530
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ROMAN EMPIRE, Agrippa, Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58423 viewsAgrippa, Military commander, friend of Augustus, grandfather of Caligula, great-grandfather of Nero

Copper as, RIC I Caligula 58, SRCV I 556, superb EF, weight 10.34 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 38 A.D.; obverse M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head left wearing a rostral crown; reverse Neptune standing half left, dolphin in right, trident in left, S - C across fields; bold high relief strike on a large flan with no wear, beautiful green patina, extraordinary portrait, spectacular!

Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa was a boyhood friend of Augustus and a renowned military commander on land and sea, winning the famous battle of Actium against the forces of Marcus Antonius and Cleopatra. Declared Augustus' successor, Agrippa's brilliant career ended when he predeceased Augustus in 12 B.C. He was married to Augustus' daughter Julia; father of Gaius and Lucius Caesars, Agrippa Postumus, Julia and Agrippina Senior; grandfather of Caligula, and great-grandfather of Nero.

7 commentsJoe Sermarini
AUGUSTUS_Cistophorus_Pergamum~0.JPG
ROMAN EMPIRE, AUGUSTUS AR Cistophorus (3 denarii) of Pergamum. Struck 19 - 18 B.C. 275 viewsObverse: IMP IX TR PO V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298
Very Rare.

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who had been defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.). Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests actually incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.

This is the rarest cistophorus struck during the reign of Augustus with the exception of the exceedingly rare issues featuring a sphinx.
9 comments*Alex
Hadrian_Cyprus_mint.jpg
ROMAN EMPIRE, Hadrian, 117-138 AD.18 viewsHadrian, 117-138 AD. Cyprus mint. Copper uncia (1/4 obol), 1.067 g, 8.8 mm, green patina, F. Obv: laureate and draped bust right. Rev: large S C in wreath. Ref: Vagi 1379, RIC 629b, S 3705 (Rome). Rare

There is disagreement about the mint site of this coin. The coin is attributed to both Rome and Syria traditionally. Author Matt Kreuzer, in his book "The Coinage System of Cleopatra VII and Augustus in Cyprus", reattributes the issue to Cyprus.
Bard Gram O
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ROMAN IMPERATORIAL, Marc Antony, 32 BCE50 viewsRome, The Imperators.
Marcus Antonius, 32 BCE.
AR Denarius (3.72g; 18mm).
Athens Mint.

Obv: ANTON AVG IMP III COS DES III III V R P C. Bare head of Antony facing right.

Rev: ANTONIVS AVG IMP III, in two lines.

References: Crawford 542/2; HCRI 347; Sydenham 1209.

Provenance: Ex Andrew McCabe Collection [CNG eSale 385 (26 Oct 2016) Lot 470]; CNG 49 (17 Mar 1999), Lot 1316; Reinhold Faelten Collection [Stack's (20 Jan 1938) Lot 1495].

On the obverse, behind Antony’s ear, a small letter P, likely an engraver’s signature, is hidden within the hair line. This coin was struck in Athens in 32 BCE, while Antony and Cleopatra lived extravagantly among the Greeks. The coin’s inscription refers to a designated third consulship that Antony was supposed to share with Octavian in 31 BCE. Around the time this coin was minted, Antony notified his wife, Octavia (Octavian’s sister), in Rome that he was divorcing her. Octavian was outraged. Cleopatra’s growing influence over Antony was soon used by Octavian as progaganda to unite Italy and the West against Antony. Thus, the designated third consulship referenced on this coin never occurred, as the designated consuls went to war instead, ending with Antony’s naval defeat at Actium in September 31 BCE.
5 commentsCarausius
0023-070.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, MARK ANTONY and LUCIUS ANTONIUS denarius129 viewsEphesus mint, 41 BC
M ANT IMP AVG III VIR RPCM NERVA PROQ P, Bare head of Mark Antony right
L ANTONIUS COS, Bare head of Lucius Antonius right
3.58 gr
Ref : RCV #1509, Cohen #2
Lucius Antonius was the youngest brother of Mark Antony, and Consul in 41 BC
His coinage is rare, one type of aureus, two types of denarius
Following description taken from NAC auction 40, #617, about an other example of the same coin :
"This denarius, depicting the bare heads of Mark Antony and his youngest brother Lucius Antony, is a rare dual-portrait issue of the Imperatorial period. The family resemblance is uncanny, and one wonders if they truly looked this much alike, or if it is another case of portrait fusion, much like we observe with the dual-portrait billon tetradrachms of Antioch on which the face of the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII takes on the square dimensions of Mark Antony. When Antony fled Rome to separate himself from Octavian and to take up his governorship in Gaul, Lucius went with him, and suffered equally from the siege of Mutina. This coin, however, was struck in a later period, when Lucius had for a second time taken up arms against Octavian in the west. Mark Antony was already in the east, and that is the region from which this coinage emanates. Since Lucius lost the ‘Perusine War’ he waged against Octavian, and was subsequently appointed to an office in Spain, where he died, it is likely that he never even saw one of his portrait coins."
5 commentsPotator II
bpPI1C1MarcAnt.jpg
ROMAN IMPERATORS, Mark Antony, Denarius, 32-31 BC62 viewsObv: ANT AVG III VIR R P C
Galley right, mast with banners at prow.
Rev: LEG XXI
Legionary eagle between two standards.
3.5 gm, 18 mm, Mint: Patria (?), S 1479, RSC 58.
Comment: One of the legionary series struck in vast quantities to pay for his impending war against Octavian. Minted from inferior silver supplied from Cleopatra and sometimes referred to as 'money of necessity'.
ex-Berk
Massanutten
sphinx.JPG
Roman Republic, T.Carisius 46 BC, AR Denarius47 views3.9 g, 21 mm


This denarius was minted in Rome by Titus Carisius in 46 BC.

The obverse portrays head of Aphrodisian Sibyl Herophile right.Sibyl, a goddess of prophecy, her hair decorated with jewels and tied with bands.

The reverse depicts the Sphinx, a monster with a human head and body of a lion, which originates in Egypt. Above the head is the legend 'T.CARISIVS' referring to the moneyer. The legend below, 'III.VIR', indicates his official position.

In the 1st century BC, Rome gradually gained control of Egypt, supporting members of the Ptolemy dynasty. In the winter of 48-47 BC Caesar was in Egypt, supporting the claims, and becoming the lover, of Cleopatra. She later lived in Rome as his mistress.

Caesar seized Rome at an early stage in the Civil War with Pompey, and with it the means to mint in Rome. The designs of coins from this time generally relate to Caesar, not, as was more common before, exploits and symbols of the individual moneyers.

XLi
Seleucia,_Cleopatra_Thea_and_Antiochus_VIII,_125-121_BC,_AE18,_Radiate_head_r,_headdress_of_Isis,_SC_2274,_Hoover_HGC_1191,_Q-001,_0h,_17,5-18mm,_5,07ga-s.jpg
Seleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 19 Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII., (125-121 B.C.), SC 2274, AE-18, Headdress of Isis, #1133 viewsSeleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 19 Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII., (125-121 B.C.), SC 2274, AE-18, Headdress of Isis, #1
avers: Radiate head of (Sol)Antiochos right.
reverse: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ /KΛEOΠATPAΣ /KAI/BAΣILEΩΣ /ANTIOXOY, To left and right of the headdress of Isis, OΠP, and thunderbolt below.
exergue: -/-//OΠP, diameter: 17,5-18,0mm, weight: 5,07 g, axes: 0h,
mint: Seleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII, date: 125-121 B.C., ref: SC 2274, Hoover HGC 1191,
Q-001
quadrans
Seleucia,_Cleopatra_Thea___Antiochus_VIII,_125-121_BC_,_AE18__Radiate_head_r_,_Owl_on_amphora,_SNGCop_376,_SNGIs_2441ff_,_Q-001,_0h,_16,5-18,5mm,_5,53g-s.jpg
Seleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 19 Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII., (125-121 B.C.), SNG Cop 376, AE-18, Owl standing facing on amphora,140 viewsSeleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, 19 Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII., (125-121 B.C.), SNG Cop 376, AE-18, Owl standing facing on amphora,
avers: Radiate head of (Sol)Antiochos right.
reverse: BAΣIΛIΣΣHΣ KΛEOΠATPAΣ KAI BAΣILEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Owl standing facing on amphora.
exergue: -/-//--, diameter: 16,5-18,5mm, weight: 5,53 g, axes: 0h,
mint: Seleucia, Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII, date: 125-121 B.C., ref: SNG Cop 376, SNG Israel 2441ff.,
Q-001
quadrans
Cleopatra_Thea___Antiochus_VIII.jpg
Seleucid - Cleopatra Thea & Antiochus VIII Grypos (125-121 BCE)7 viewsMetal/Size: AE19; Weight: 6.2 grams; Denomination: Unknown; Mint: Antioch; Date: 125-121 BCE; Obverse: Radiate head of Antiochus right. Reverse: Owl facing front and standing on amphora - BASILIEUS CLEOPATRAS KAI BASILEWS ANTIOXOY (Queen Cleopatra Thea King Antiochus). References: SNG Cop. #376; SNGIs #244 lff.museumguy
SC-2264b.jpg
Seleukid Empire: Cleopatra Thea & Antiochos VIII (126-121 BCE) Æ Unit, Antioch on the Orontes (SC 2264b; HGC 9, 1192; CSE 320; SNG Spaer 2463)1 viewsObv: Turreted and draped bust of Tyche to right
Rev: BAΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ - ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ; Tiller on basis; to inner left, IE above AЧP (date); aphlaston on below
Dim: 16 mm, 3.52 g, 7 h
Quant.Geek
25884q00.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus AR Drachm Circa 144 - 142 or 141 B.C. (Ex FORVM)80 viewsSeleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VI Epiphanes Dionysus, 144 - 142 or 141 B.C., SH25884. Silver drachm, SNG Cop 294, SNG Spaer 1760 var, Mint State, Antioch mint, weight 4.232g, maximum diameter 17.9mm, die axis 45o, 144 - 143 B.C.; obverse diademed radiate head of Antiochus VI right; reverse BASILEWS ANTIOCOU EPIFANOUS DIONUSOU, Apollo seated left on omphalos, nude, arrow in right, resting left on bow, monogram between legs, QXR (year 169) STA (magistrate) in ex.

Antiochus VI was the son of Alexander Balas and Cleopatra Thea and daughter of Ptolemy VI of Egypt. He was nominated in 145 BC by the general Diodotus Tryphon in opposition to Demetrius II. He did not actually rule and served only as the general's pawn. In 142 BC, Diodotus deposed and succeeded him.

Purchased from FORVM (March 04, 2012).
2 commentsJason T
58079p00.jpg
Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Grypus, 125 - 121 B.C.8 viewsBronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 2263, VF, 6.109g, 21.2mm, 0o, Antioch mint, 122 - 121 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochus VIII right; reverse BASILISSHS KLEOPATRAS KAI BASILEWS ANTIOCOU, owl, looking forward, standing right on amphora, uncertain date and control-marksMagisterRiggs
seleu_diosc_cornu_res.jpg
SELEUKID KINGDOM--PRE-COLONIAL16 views2nd Century BC
(Time of Cleopatra Thea and Antiochos VIII)
AE 15.5 mm; 2.81 g
O: Jugate heads of the Dioskouroi right;
R: ANTIOXEΩN TΩN / EN ΠTOΛEMAI∆I or similar, cornucopia, monogram outer left
GALILEE, AKE (ACCO) PTOLEMAIS
laney
AUGCIST_ARCH.JPG
Struck 19 - 18 B.C. AUGUSTUS. AR Cistophorus (Cistophoric Tetradrachm = 3 denarii) of Pergamum14 viewsObverse: IMP•IX•TR•PO•V. Bare head of Augustus facing right.
Reverse: Triumphal arch surmounted by Augustus in facing triumphal quadriga; IMP IX TR POT V on architrave; S P R SIGNIS RECEPTIS in three lines within arch opening, standards at either side.
Diameter: 24 - 25mm | Weight: 11.7gms | Die Axis: 12
RIC I : 510 | BMC : 703 | RSC : 298
Ex ROMA NUMISMATICS (London) | Ex Künker, 2006
RARE

This coin commemorates Augustus' triumphant agreement with the Parthians in 20 B.C. under which they returned the legionary standards captured from Crassus who was defeated and killed at Carrhae thirty-three years earlier (53 B.C.). Augustus installed these standards in the Temple of Mars Ultor.
The reverse of the coin shows the triumphal arch which was awarded to Augustus on the occasion of his recovery of the standards. This was the second triumphal arch awarded to Augustus and, like the earlier arch which had been constructed in 29 BC to honour his victory over Cleopatra, this second arch, which archaeological evidence suggests may actually have incorporated the first arch, stood in close proximity to the Temple of Divus Julius at the southern entrance to the Roman Forum.
This is the rarest cistophorus struck during the reign of Augustus with the exception of the exceedingly rare issues featuring a sphinx.
1 comments*Alex
chalkis_lysanias.jpg
SYRIA (COELE), CHALKIS SUB LIBANO24 viewsTetrarchy of Chalkis, Coele Syria, Lysanias
AE 21.5 mm; 5.17 g
O: Diademed female bust [(Artemis ?) with features of Cleopatra VII)?]
R: Double cornucopia.
Chalkis sub Libano mint
cf. RPC.4769; Lindgren III 1243; HCG 9 1444

laney
McAlee-43.jpg
Syria, Seleucis and Pieria: Pseudo-Autonomous (ca. 1st Century BCE) Æ Tetrachalkon, Antioch (McAlee 43; RPC I 4216)10 viewsObv: Laureate head of Zeus right; c/m: head of Cleopatra VII(?) right within oval incuse
Rev: ΑΝΤΙΟΧΕΩΝ ΤΗΣ ΜΗΤΡΟΠΟΛΩΣ; Zeus Nikephoros seated left; IΘ date in exergue; all within laurel wreath
Quant.Geek
antiocheia_RPC4216_countermark.jpg
Syria, Seleukis & Pieria, Antiocheia, RPC 4216 countermarked16 viewsAE 23, 9.65g, 23.3mm, 0°
struck 48/47 BC (year 19)
obv. laureate of Zeus r., c/m
rev. r. side ANTIOXEWN / MHTROPOLEWS
l. side AVTONOMOV
Zeus Nikephoros enthroned kl., resting with raised l. hand on sceptre and holding in
extended r. hand small Nike with wreath
in lower field crown of Isis
in ex. IQ (year 19 of Pompeian era)
ref. RPC I, 4216; BMC Syria p.155, 35; SNG Copenhagen -
From Forum Ancient Coins, thanks!

c/m: Portrait of Cleopatra r. in oval incus, McAllee p.74, note 25
Richard McAllee: "It now seems likely that the countermark portaits Cleopatra, and was used to mark coins circulating in the Syro-Phoenician territorries which were given to her by Marcus Antonius." Older references identified the head as Apollo.
Jochen
Battle_of_Actium.jpg
The Battle of Actium, by Lorenzo A. Castro, 1672.29 viewsThe Battle of Actium was a naval battle of the Roman Civil War between Mark Antony and Octavian (Caesar Augustus). It was fought on September 2, 31 BC, near the Roman colony of Actium in Greece (near the modern-day city of Preveza), on the Ionian Sea. Octavian's fleet was commanded by Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa, Antony's fleet was supported by the fleet of his lover, Cleopatra, queen of Ptolemaic Egypt. The battle was won by the forces of Octavian, whose victory led him to be titled the Princeps Augustus, and eventually to be considered the first Roman Emperor; for this reason the date of the battle is often used to mark the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire.

Cleisthenes
image~18.jpg
Trajan Decius; Tarsus, Cilicia23 viewsCILICIA, Tarsus. Trajan Decius. AD 249-251. Æ (33mm, 19.74 g, 6h). Radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right / Lion attacking bull right. SNG Levante 1161 (same dies); SNG France 1764 (same dies). VF, earthen black-green patina.

From the Kelly J. Krizan, M.D. Collection.

Pompey subjected Tarsus to Rome, and it became capital of the Roman province of Cilicia, the metropolis where the governor resided. In 66 BC, the inhabitants received Roman citizenship. To flatter Julius Caesar, for a time it took the name Juliopolis. It was also here that Cleopatra and Mark Antony met and was the scene of the celebrated feasts they gave during the construction of their fleet (41 BC). In William Shakespeare's 1606 play Antony and Cleopatra (Act 5, Scene 2), after Antony's death Cleopatra says she is going to Cydnus to meet Antony, i.e., she will commit suicide to meet him in the afterlife; "Go fetch / My best attires: I am again for Cydnus, / To meet Mark Antony"

When the province of Cilicia was divided, Tarsus remained the civil and religious metropolis of Cilicia Prima, and was a grand city with palaces, marketplaces, roads and bridges, baths, fountains and waterworks, a gymnasium on the banks of the Cydnus, and a stadium. Tarsus was later eclipsed by nearby Adana, but remained important as a port and shipyard. Several Roman emperors were interred here: Marcus Claudius Tacitus, Maximinus II, and Julian the Apostate, who planned to move his capital here from Antioch if he returned from his Persian expedition.

Tarsus was the city where, according to the Acts of the Apostles, "Saul of Tarsus"[Acts 9:11] was born, but he was "brought up" ([Acts 22:3]) in Jerusalem. Saul became Paul the apostle after his encounter with Christ (Acts 9:11; 21:39; 22:3), and he briefly returned here after his conversion (Acts 9:30). From here Barnabas retrieved him to help with the work in Syrian Antioch (Acts 11:25).

Already by this time a Christian community probably existed, although the first recorded bishop, Helenus, dates only from the third century; Helenus visited Antioch several times in connection with the dispute concerning Paul of Samosata. Later bishops of Tarsus included Lupus, present at the Council of Ancyra in 314; Theodorus, at the Council of Nicaea in 325; Helladius, who was condemned at the Council of Ephesus and who appealed to the bishop of Rome in 433; above all the celebrated exegete Diodorus, teacher of Theodore of Mopsuestia and consequently one of the fathers of Nestorianism. From the sixth century the metropolitan see of Tarsus had seven suffragan bishoprics; the Greek archdiocese is again mentioned in the tenth century , and existed until the twentieth century upheavals, part of the Patriarchate of Antioch.

Owing to the importance of Tarsus, many martyrs were put to death here, among them being Saint Pelagia, Saint Boniface, Saint Marinus, Saint Diomedes, Saint Quiricus and Saint Julitta.

At about the end of the tenth century, the Armenians established a diocese of their rite; Saint Nerses of Lambroun was its most distinguished representative in the twelfth century.

A cave in Tarsus is one of a number of places claiming to be the location of the legend of the Seven Sleepers, common to Christianity and Islam.
ecoli
zenodorus.jpg
Zenodorus, Tetrarch of Trachonitis, c. 30 - 20 B.C. Bronze AE 2037 viewsAugustus & Zenodorus, Tetrarch of Trachonitis, c. 30 - 20 B.C. Bronze AE 20, RPC I 4775, VF, Chalkis mint, 4.81g, 20.1mm, 0o, 27 - 26 B.C.; obverse “ΖΗΝΟΔΟΡΟΥ ΤΕΤΑΡΧΟΥ ΚΑΙ ΑΡΧΗΡΕΩΣ”, bare head of Zenodorus left; reverse L ZP NE KAI, bare head of Augustus right. Mark Antony gave the Tetrarchy of Trachonitis (in Syria) to Cleopatra in 36 B.C. After their defeat, Augustus made Zenodorus tetrarch restoring the previous dynasty. Because he was aggressive toward his neighbors, in about 24 B.C. Augustus took almost all his territory and gave it to Herod the Great. When he died in 20 B.C. the rest of his territory was also given to Herod. Ex FORVM2 commentsPodiceps
ATGlifetime TetMemphis.jpg
[300mem] Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm (Possible Lifetime Issue)79 viewsAlexander III, The Great; 336-323BC. AR tetradrachm; Price 3971, SNG Cop.7; 16.07g. Memphis mint, Egypt. Possible Lifetime issue. Obverse: Beardless bust of young Herakles right wearing lions scalp. Reverse: Zeus enthroned left; holding eagle in outstretched right hand and sceptre in left , rose in left field; between legs of throne and O next to right leg of throne; gVF/VF, light encrustation obverse, small chip reverse; together with several light scratches both sides. Ex Pavlos S. Pavlou. Ex FORVM, "The Memphis issues are among the finest style Alexander coins. Experts disagree on the date of this issue. Some identify it as a lifetime issue and others as a posthumous issue (Joseph Sermarini)..

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ATG_Susa_Price3827_incitatus.jpg
[300sus] Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Tetradrachm (Lifetime Issue)52 viewsAlexander III, AR silver tetradrachm; Price 3827; struck 336-323 BC. Susa mint; VF; Sturck during the lifetime of Alexander the Great. Obverse: Head of Herakles right in lion skin; Reverse - AΛEΞANΔPOY, Zeus seated left with eagle & scepter; monogram in left field, monogram below throne; BASILEOS below. Ex Incitatus.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."
--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
ATGlifetimeDrachm.jpg
[301aby] Alexander III, The Great, 336-323 BC, AR Drachm (Lifetime Issue)65 viewsAlexander III, 336-323 BC, Silver Drachm; Minted during lifetime of Alexander the Great. Price-1503, Müller-907, struck 328-323BC at Abydus, 4.27 grams, 17.3 mm. Nice VF. Obverse: Head of young Herakles facing right, clad in lion's skin; Reverse: Zeus enthoned facing left, holding eagle and sceptre, his legs are parallel and resting on a stool, Hermes standing facing left in left field, monogram beneath throne. A very nice specimen of a lifetime drachm of Alexander III 'the Great' with Hermes as the mint symbol in the left field of the reverse. Just a touch of wear on both surfaces, but still quite attractive. Ex Glenn W. Woods.

Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do
so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached
epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his
description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.

Cleisthenes
ATGBronzeAE19Price310.jpg
[302mac] Alexander III, The Great, 336-323, AE19 (Lifetime Issue)42 viewsAlexander III, The Great, Macedonian Kingdom, 336 - 323 B.C. Minted during lifetime of Alexander the Great. Bronze AE 19, Price 310, VF, Macedonian, 6.613g, 19.1mm, 90o, c. 336 - c. 323 B.C. Obverse: head of Herakles right, in lion skin headdress; Reverse: ALEXANDRS, club above, quiver and bow below, P upper right. Ex FORVM.


Alexandros III Philippou Makedonon (356-323 BC)

"Alexander III of Macedon, better known as Alexander the Great, single-handedly changed the entire nature of the ancient world in little more than ten years.

Born in the northern Greek kingdom of Macedonia in 356 BC, to Philip II and his formidable wife Olympias, Alexander was educated by the philosopher Aristotle. Following his father's assassination in 336 BC, he inherited a powerful yet volatile kingdom, which he had to secure - along with the rest of the Greek city states - before he could set out to conquer the massive Persian Empire, in revenge for Persia's earlier attempts to conquer Greece.

Against overwhelming odds, he led his army to victories across the Persian territories of Asia Minor, Syria and Egypt without incurring a single defeat. With his greatest victory at the Battle of Gaugamela, in what is now northern Iraq, in 331 BC, the young king of Macedonia, leader of the Greeks, Overlord of Asia Minor and Pharaoh of Egypt also became Great King of Persia at the age of 25.

Over the next eight years, in his capacity as king, commander, politician, scholar and explorer, Alexander led his army a further 11,000 miles, founding over 70 cities and creating an empire that stretched across three continents and covered some two million square miles.

The entire area from Greece in the west, north to the Danube, south into Egypt and as far east as the Indian Punjab, was linked together in a vast international network of trade and commerce. This was united by a common Greek language and culture, whilst the king himself adopted foreign customs in order to rule his millions of ethnically diverse subjects.

Primarily a soldier, Alexander was an acknowledged military genius who always led by example, although his belief in his own indestructibility meant he was often reckless with his own life and that of those he expected to follow him. The fact that his army only refused to do so once, in the13 years of a reign during which there was constant fighting, indicates the loyalty he inspired.

Following his death in 323 BC at the age of only 32, his empire was torn apart in the power struggles of his successors. Yet Alexander's mythical status rapidly reached epic proportions and inspired individuals as diverse as Julius Caesar, Cleopatra, Louis XIV and Napoleon.

He continues to be portrayed according to the bias of those interpreting his achievements. He is either Alexander the Great or Iskander the Accursed, chivalrous knight or bloody monster, benign multi-culturalist or racist imperialist - but above all he is fully deserving of his description as 'the most significant secular individual in history'."

By Dr. Joann Fletcher
http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/alexander_the_great.shtml

"When Alexander saw the breadth of his domain, he wept for there were no more worlds to conquer."--attributed to Plutarch, The Moralia.
http://www.pothos.org/alexander.asp?paraID=96

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
42576q00.jpg
[303a] Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 280 B.C.115 viewsSilver drachm, Houghton and Lorber 131(8), Newell ESM 91a-b (same obv die), gVF, Seleukeia mint, weight 4.239g, maximum diameter 17.1mm, die axis 270o, obverse laureate head of Zeus; reverse Athena driving quadriga of horned elephants right, anchor above, BASILEWS on left, SELEUKOU in ex; ex CNG auction 82, lot 713. Ex FORVM.

Seleukos (often spelled Seleucus) I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.

In the year 281 B.C., at the age of 77, Seleukos was assassinated by Ptolemy Ceraunus (the eldest son of Ptolemy I Soter). All of the "principal" Diadochi; Antigonas Monophthalmos, Antipater, Kassander, Ptolemy, Lysimichus and Seleukos; had now joined their great king, Alexander, in death.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
5 commentsCleisthenes
SeleukosISNGSpaer23.jpg
[303b] Seleucid Kingdom, Seleukos I, 312 - 281 B.C.81 viewsBronze AE 19, WSM 925, SNG Spaer 23, VF, Antioch mint, 7.994g, 19.2mm, 225o; Obverse: winged Gorgon head right; Reverse: BASILEWS SELEUKOU, bull butting right, X in exergue.


Seleukos I Nikator, Founder of a Hellenistic Dynasty in the Orient
Born into a well-placed family in Macedon, trained as a royal page to King Philip II, trusted companion and chief of the élite bodyguard of Alexander the Great, he spent half his life in the shadow of more ambitious soldiers. Yet he eventually rose above all of them, and the kingdom he founded rivalled Ptolemaic Egypt in brilliance and almost in longevity, for Cleopatra VII ended her life, surrendering Egypt to Octavian, only a generation after Rome reduced what remained of the Seleukid Empire to the Province of Syria.
http://www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Article/908680

Seleucus I (surnamed for later generations Nicator, Greek: Σέλευκος Νικάτωρ, i.e. Seleucus Victor) (ca. 358 BCE–281 BCE), was a Macedonian officer of Alexander the Great. In the wars of the Diadochi that took place after Alexander's death, Seleucus established the Seleucid dynasty and the Seleucid Empire.

Seleucus was the son of Antiochus from Orestis, one of Philip's generals, and of Laodice. In 333 BC, as a young man of about twenty-three, he accompanied Alexander into Asia and won distinction in the Indian campaign of 326 BC. In 324 BCE Seleucus took as wife Apama, with whom he had four children: two daughters, Apama and Laodice, and two sons, Antiochus & Achaeus.

When the Macedonian empire was divided in 323 BC (the "Partition of Babylon"), Seleucus was given the office of chiliarch, which attached him closely to the regent Perdiccas. Subsequently, Seleucus had a hand in the murder of Perdiccas during the latter's unsuccessful invasion of Egypt in 321 BC.

At the second partition, at Triparadisus (321 BC), Seleucus was given the government of the Babylonian satrapy. In 316 BC, when Antigonus had made himself master of the eastern provinces, Seleucus felt himself threatened and fled to Egypt. In the war which followed between Antigonus and the other Macedonian chiefs, Seleucus actively cooperated with Ptolemy and commanded Egyptian squadrons in the Aegean Sea.

The victory won by Ptolemy at the battle of Gaza in 312 BC opened the way for Seleucus to return to the east. His return to Babylon was afterwards officially regarded as the beginning of the Seleucid Empire and that year as the first of the Seleucid era. Master of Babylonia, Seleucus at once proceeded to wrest the neighbouring provinces of Persia, Susiana and Media from the nominees of Antigonus. A raid into Babylonia conducted in 311 BC by Demetrius, son of Antigonus, did not seriously check Seleucus' progress. Over the course of nine years (311-302 BC), while Antigonus was occupied in the west, Seleucus brought the whole eastern part of Alexander's empire as far as the Jaxartes and Indus Rivers under his authority.

In 305 BC, after the extinction of the old royal line of Macedonia, Seleucus, like the other four principal Macedonian chiefs, assumed the title and style of basileus (king). He established Seleucia on the Tigris as his capital.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seleucus_I_Nicator

Edited by J. P. Fitzgerald, Jr.
Cleisthenes
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