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Home > Coin Collecting Theme Galleries > The Pantheon - Gods, Goddesses and Personifications

Last comments - The Pantheon - Gods, Goddesses and Personifications
RI 077v img~0.jpg
Romulus260 viewsSeverus Alexander Denarius
Obv:– IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P VII COS II P P, Romulus advancing right with spear & trophy
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 85. RSC 351

Romulus, founder of the city, shares the attributes of Mars but not helmeted.
3 commentsmaridvnvm02/15/18 at 21:06Aleph: A nearly identical issue has the legend VIRTVS AVG...
rome_sestertius_ANACS-VF-20_rev_04_cut~0.JPG
MARS ULTOR136 viewsEmperor Severus Alexander. AD232. AE Sestertius. MARS ULTOR Reverse, cut.

obv: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, seen from front, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MARS VLTOR - Mars with spear and shield in the 'Ready-for-Action' position.
'S C' to either side of Mars.

22.3 grams
1 commentsrexesq04/24/15 at 15:26shanxi: a real piece of art
triobol.jpg
VIA TRAIANA, TRAJAN585 viewsAR denarius. 112-114 AD. 3,36 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P / Via Traiana reclining left, left elbow on rock, holding wheel and reed. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI. In exergue VIA TRAIANA.
Minted to commemorate the construction of the Via Traiana from Beneventum to Brindisium. On the left a pic of part of the road,and on the right a miliaria ( milia passuum, "one thousand paces", 4,841 feet ) or milestone.
The stone, besides the titles of the emperor, reports that it was constructed at the emperor's expense ( PECVN SVA FECIT ).

4 commentsbenito02/22/15 at 16:21Charles S: I fully agree: great coin and presentatio
Herennia_Etruscilla_Milne_3818.jpg
Athena, Herennia Etruscilla, Potin Tetradrachm, Alexandria, Milne 3818137 viewsHerennia Etruscilla
Augusta, 249-251 A.D.

Coin: Potin Tetradrachm

Obverse: ЄP KOVΠ AITPOVCKIΛΛA CЄ, draped bust facing right, wearing a Stephane.
Reverse: Athena, standing, facing to the left, holding a Spear with her left hand and looking at Nike, whom she holds in her right hand. A Shield to the left. L - B across the fields.

Weight: 13.43 g, Diameter: 21 x 22 x 4.4 mm, Die axis: 330°, Mint: Alexandria, Year: 2 (LB, 251 A.D.), Reference: Milne 3818

Rated Rare
1 commentsMasis08/18/14 at 11:50shanxi: a good addition with nice details
GAE289_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy III Euergetes - Alexandria - Diobol - 246/222BC207 viewsAE 30.8-31.5mm : 22.97gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, closed wings, head facing left, cornucopia in left field, CHI RHO monogram between legs
REF - Svoronos 966
NOTE - Denomination series of Svoronos 964, 965, 966, 967, 968, 969
1 commentsPtolemAE11/27/13 at 19:53TIF: beautiful!
6gn2v5v.jpg
Vesta on Caligula as230 viewsC CAESAR AVG GERMANICVS PON M TR POT
VESTA / S C
RIC 38 (C) ; COHEN 27
fredericweber.com
1 commentsfrederic W08/30/13 at 23:29Molinari: Love the photo work!
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T08/14/13 at 15:33Sam: Powerful portrait of Alex
mazaios~0.jpg
Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap Mazaios260 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
4 commentsJason T08/08/13 at 13:51*Alex:
Maroneia.jpg
Dionysos on Maroneian AR Tetradrachm171 viewsLate 2nd-mid 1st centuries B.C. AR Tetradrachm, 16.18g, 31mm, 12h. Schonert-Geiss-1150 (V51/R158); SNG Copenhagen-; Dewing-1296 (same as obverse die). Obverse wreathed head of young Dionysos right. Reverse Dionysos standing half left, holding grapes and narthex stalks; monogram to inner left & right. Near EF, toned, minor die wear on reverse.

Ex CNG 88 (14 Sept. 2011) lot 52. Ex CNG e-Auction 286 lot 22.

Maroneia, together with Thasos and other Thracian poleis, was famous for its excellent wine in the ancient world. Therefore, it is no wonder that that the god of wine Dionysos is so prominent on their coins.
2 commentsJason T08/06/13 at 08:31David Atherton: Stunning coin!
AcarnaniaLeukas.jpg
Athena and Pegasos on AR Stater of Leukas235 viewsCirca 320-280 B.C. AR Stater (22mm. 8.58g. 6h). BCD Akarnania 269 var. (no monogram). SNG Copenhagen 357 var. (same). Pegasi 134. Obverse Pegasus left, lambda below. Reverse helmeted head of Athena left, monogram below, lambda before stylis. EF, toned.

Ex Sukenik Collection (acquired from Brian Kritt). Ex CNG.

Leukas is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea; and according to ancient sources, a former Corinthian colony. Their coinage reflect their ties with the mother city and almost identical with the coinage of Corinth which could only be distinguished by a small Greek letter to signify where the coins were made, in case of our coin, the letter lambda for Leukas. The coin we have is a beautiful specimen with exquisite details. We could strongly confirm from this coin that the winged Pegasus is a male mythical beast. The reverse is also quite interesting since Athena’s helmet is realistically well proportioned in relation to her head. Other coins of the same type show a smaller helmet which she could impossibly use! The engraver of this coin followed the rules of proportion. Of particular importance is that Leukas is associated with Sappho and the myth of her suicide at Cape Lefkada (Lefkada being the modern name of Leukas). Recently, some scholars suggested that Leukas is the actual place of Homer’s Ithaca. Passages from the Odyssey described Ithaca as an island reachable on foot, which is the case for Leukas since it is not really an island, that it was connected to the mainland by a narrow causeway.
3 commentsJason T08/06/13 at 08:27David Atherton: Incredibly beautiful piece.
AcarnaniaLeukas.jpg
Athena and Pegasos on AR Stater of Leukas235 viewsCirca 320-280 B.C. AR Stater (22mm. 8.58g. 6h). BCD Akarnania 269 var. (no monogram). SNG Copenhagen 357 var. (same). Pegasi 134. Obverse Pegasus left, lambda below. Reverse helmeted head of Athena left, monogram below, lambda before stylis. EF, toned.

Ex Sukenik Collection (acquired from Brian Kritt). Ex CNG.

Leukas is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea; and according to ancient sources, a former Corinthian colony. Their coinage reflect their ties with the mother city and almost identical with the coinage of Corinth which could only be distinguished by a small Greek letter to signify where the coins were made, in case of our coin, the letter lambda for Leukas. The coin we have is a beautiful specimen with exquisite details. We could strongly confirm from this coin that the winged Pegasus is a male mythical beast. The reverse is also quite interesting since Athena’s helmet is realistically well proportioned in relation to her head. Other coins of the same type show a smaller helmet which she could impossibly use! The engraver of this coin followed the rules of proportion. Of particular importance is that Leukas is associated with Sappho and the myth of her suicide at Cape Lefkada (Lefkada being the modern name of Leukas). Recently, some scholars suggested that Leukas is the actual place of Homer’s Ithaca. Passages from the Odyssey described Ithaca as an island reachable on foot, which is the case for Leukas since it is not really an island, that it was connected to the mainland by a narrow causeway.
3 commentsJason T08/06/13 at 00:00paul1888: Beautiful!!!
Maroneia.jpg
Dionysos on Maroneian AR Tetradrachm171 viewsLate 2nd-mid 1st centuries B.C. AR Tetradrachm, 16.18g, 31mm, 12h. Schonert-Geiss-1150 (V51/R158); SNG Copenhagen-; Dewing-1296 (same as obverse die). Obverse wreathed head of young Dionysos right. Reverse Dionysos standing half left, holding grapes and narthex stalks; monogram to inner left & right. Near EF, toned, minor die wear on reverse.

Ex CNG 88 (14 Sept. 2011) lot 52. Ex CNG e-Auction 286 lot 22.

Maroneia, together with Thasos and other Thracian poleis, was famous for its excellent wine in the ancient world. Therefore, it is no wonder that that the god of wine Dionysos is so prominent on their coins.
2 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 06:03Pscipio: That's an unusually nice style for Maroneia!
prnbzw~0.jpg
Aphrodite and Ares on Cilician AR Stater of Satrap Pharnabazos168 views
Circa 380-374/3 B.C.(21mm, 10.39g, 11h). Struck circa 380-379 B.C. Casabonne series 3; Moysey Issue 3, 3-5 var. (dolphin on obv.); SNG France 246 var. (rev. legend). Obverse Head of nymph facing three-quarters left. Reverse Helmeted head of Ares left, Aramaic PRNBZW to left. Near EF, toned, struck from a slightly worn obverse die.

Ex CNG.

There is still an ongoing debate whether who represent the obverse and reverse of this coin type of Pharnabazos. The obverse obviously was inspired by the renowned Syracusan tetradrachm of Kimon, whose three-quarter facing head of the nymph Arethusa was widely copied throughout the ancient world. A handful of ancient poleis adopted this style to represent their local nymph or goddess on their coins. A perfect example is the numerous coins of Larissa in Thessaly representing the local nymph of the same name. It is possible to assume then that the obverse of our coin might be another female deity other than Arethusa. A current opinion holds that the obverse represents Aphrodite, the goddess of love; and the reverse depicts Ares, the god of war. The two were known in ancient mythology as lovers, and commonly paired together on ancient coins. Of special note on this coin is the reverse: while most coins of this type display static male heads with little originality, the reverse die is probably from a special issue marked by superior style and executed with extreme delicacy. It has been suggested (Leu Auction 81, lot 317) that the head of Ares may be a disguised portrait of Pharnabazos himself.

1 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 05:27Lloyd: Stunning portraiture!
AcarnaniaLeukas.jpg
Athena and Pegasos on AR Stater of Leukas235 viewsCirca 320-280 B.C. AR Stater (22mm. 8.58g. 6h). BCD Akarnania 269 var. (no monogram). SNG Copenhagen 357 var. (same). Pegasi 134. Obverse Pegasus left, lambda below. Reverse helmeted head of Athena left, monogram below, lambda before stylis. EF, toned.

Ex Sukenik Collection (acquired from Brian Kritt). Ex CNG.

Leukas is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea; and according to ancient sources, a former Corinthian colony. Their coinage reflect their ties with the mother city and almost identical with the coinage of Corinth which could only be distinguished by a small Greek letter to signify where the coins were made, in case of our coin, the letter lambda for Leukas. The coin we have is a beautiful specimen with exquisite details. We could strongly confirm from this coin that the winged Pegasus is a male mythical beast. The reverse is also quite interesting since Athena’s helmet is realistically well proportioned in relation to her head. Other coins of the same type show a smaller helmet which she could impossibly use! The engraver of this coin followed the rules of proportion. Of particular importance is that Leukas is associated with Sappho and the myth of her suicide at Cape Lefkada (Lefkada being the modern name of Leukas). Recently, some scholars suggested that Leukas is the actual place of Homer’s Ithaca. Passages from the Odyssey described Ithaca as an island reachable on foot, which is the case for Leukas since it is not really an island, that it was connected to the mainland by a narrow causeway.
3 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 05:21Lloyd: Wonderfully detailed!
mazaios~0.jpg
Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap Mazaios260 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
4 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 04:49Lloyd: Outstanding!
mazaios~0.jpg
Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap Mazaios260 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
4 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 04:24Randygeki(h2): Awesome one man!
mazaios~0.jpg
Baal or Zeus (Interpretatio Graecia) on Cilician Stater of Satrap Mazaios260 viewsCirca 361-334 B.C. AR Stater (10.88g, 24mm, 5h). cf. SNG Levant-106; SNG Paris-. Obverse Baal of Tarsos enthroned left, head facing, holding club, bunch of grapes, wheat ear, and eagle in right hand, lotus-headed scepter in left hand, B’LTRZ (Baaltarz) in Aramaic behind, M below throne, all within a circle of dots. Reverse lion bringing down bull, attacking with teeth and claws, MZDI (Mazdai) in Aramaic above, unlisted ankh symbol, wheat ear below, all within a circle of dots. Sharply struck on an excellent metal with areas of flat strikes on high points. Choice superb EF/EF. Toned, lustrous.

Ex Ponterio and Associates Sale No. 84, November 1996, lot 141. Ex Stacks Bowers and Ponterio Sale No. 172, November 2012, lot 11680. Ex Pars Coins.

The depiction of Phoenician-Canaanite god Baal on Cilician coinage suggests the preeminence of his cult in Tarsos. He is shown enthroned, most probably on Mount Zaphon. The symbols corn-ear/barley and grapes suggest Baal’s capacity as a god involved in the seasonal cycles of life and death, or a more specific reference to Cilicia’s fertile plains. The iconography of this late coinage is also a syncretic mixture of other cultures, including Greek. The treatment of the god’s body gives us a hint of the extent of influence of Hellenic culture exerted in Eastern Asia Minor long before Alexander’s conquest, and it is said that Baal could be equated with Zeus in the Greek context. After the conquest of Alexander III of the East, Mazaios was appointed governor of Babylon. The new coinage of Alexander was strongly influenced by Mazaios’ pre-Alexandrine coinage (the Zeus Aetophoros commonly found on the reverses of his tetradrachmai is a direct descendant of this). The reverse depicts the City’s Emblem and clearly has an underlying meaning now lost to us. Some say it symbolizes the victory of Day over Night, while others suggest military conquest and subjugation of the enemies by the Persian Empire. Marvin Tameanko has persuasively argued (see Celator, Jan. 1995, pp. 6-11) that the kneeling bull (without the lion) is symbolic of Zeus, as attested on scores of later Greek and Roman coins; and the lion is symbolic of the supreme god Baal of the Cilicians. This concludes the lion-over-bull motif on this coin delivers a message that is blatantly direct and simple, if the argument put forward is to be believed.
4 commentsJason T08/04/13 at 00:20Jay GT4: A work of art!
Kassander.jpg
Zeus on Kassander AR Tetradrachm134 viewsCirca 317-315 B.C. AR Tetradrachm in the name and types of Philip II, 14.31g. Pella Mint. Le Rider-531 (D281/R436), SNG ANS-450 (same dies). Obverse laureate head of Zeus right. Reverse ΦIΛIΠ-ΠOY nude youth, holding palm frond and reins, on horseback right; coiled serpent below, Boeotian shield below foreleg. EF, lightly toned, some die wear on obverse, die break and die shift on reverse. Attractive style.

Ex CNG
1 commentsJason T08/03/13 at 23:11Jay GT4: Exceptional coin!
triobol.jpg
VIA TRAIANA, TRAJAN585 viewsAR denarius. 112-114 AD. 3,36 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P / Via Traiana reclining left, left elbow on rock, holding wheel and reed. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI. In exergue VIA TRAIANA.
Minted to commemorate the construction of the Via Traiana from Beneventum to Brindisium. On the left a pic of part of the road,and on the right a miliaria ( milia passuum, "one thousand paces", 4,841 feet ) or milestone.
The stone, besides the titles of the emperor, reports that it was constructed at the emperor's expense ( PECVN SVA FECIT ).

4 commentsbenito06/13/13 at 10:08*Alex: Great coin and great presentation. ★★&...
GG-AugMerc33__10~0.jpg
Mercury127 viewsOctavian, AR Denarius of Eastern Mint (?), B.C.32-31

Obv: Bare head of Octavian right
Rev: Naked Mercury seated on a rock, petasus hanging down his back, playing a lyre. CAESAR DIVI F

RIC.257 Sear RCV I 1550 RSC I 61 BMCRE.596 BMCRR East 236

In addition to Mercury's position as messenger of the gods and patron of merchants there was another belief about him that on occasion he was a cunning thief, and was thus the patron of thieves. One story relates how he stole some oxen from Apollo. Whilst in hiding he found a tortoise in a cave. From the shell and some strings drawn across it he invented the lyre. As he was playing it Apollo heard the sound and was so charmed by it that he allowed Mercury to keep the oxen, and the lyre was from then on was also associated with Apollo. However, with this coin here the petasus denotes that the lyre is being played by Mercury.
1 commentsnemesis04/28/13 at 22:53Jay GT4: Nice bold strike!
GG-CMamilMerc74__4[2]~1.jpg
Mercury140 viewsAR Serrate Denarius, Rome mint, 82B.C. by C. Mamilius C.f.Limetanus

Obv: Draped bust of Mercury right, wearing winged petasus, caduceus over shoulder, control letter M behind.
Rev: Ulysses walking right, holding staff and extending his right hand to his dog, Argos. C MAMIL on left, LIMENTAN (TA in monogram) on right.

Crawford 362/1 Sear RCV I 282 RSC Mamilia 6

Mercury was alleged to be the son of Jupiter and daughter of Maia, daughter of Atlas. It is thought that he was originally an Etruscan deity who was borrowed by the Romans. They later transferred all the myths and legends of the Greek god Hermes to Mercury. One of his main characteristics was his faithful attendance to Jupiter, to whom he acted as messenger. Among other occupations he was regarded as the patron of merchants and thus denoted by the winged hat (petasus) he wore. It was said that all business negotiations should be kept hidden under the hat and that the wings signified that the bargaining should be swiftly completed, like a bird flying through the air.
1 commentsnemesis04/28/13 at 20:41Legatus: Beautiful RR
geta3.jpg
FORTUNA REDUX.229 viewsAE sestertius. Rome, 211 AD. 28.05 gr. Laureate head right. P SEPTIMIVS GETA PIVS AVG BRIT. / Fortuna seated left on throne, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae, wheel under seat. FORT RED TR P III COS II P P S C. BMCRE 40. RIC 168a.
Fortuna is the Roman Goddess of Luck, Fate, and Fortune. Usually depicted holding in one hand a cornucopia, or a horn of plenty, from which all good things flowed in abundance, representing her ability to bestow prosperity; in the other she generally has a ship's rudder, to indicate that She is the one who controls how lives and fates are steered. She could also be shown enthroned, with the same attributes of rudder and cornucopia, but with a small wheel built into the chair, representing the cycles of fate and the ups and downs of fortune.
Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars—redux means "coming back" or "returning". She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of Her is of an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 BCE for the safe return of the Emperor Augustus
3 commentsbenito11/02/12 at 14:08Michael K5: All around beautiful coin.
triobol.jpg
VIA TRAIANA, TRAJAN585 viewsAR denarius. 112-114 AD. 3,36 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P / Via Traiana reclining left, left elbow on rock, holding wheel and reed. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI. In exergue VIA TRAIANA.
Minted to commemorate the construction of the Via Traiana from Beneventum to Brindisium. On the left a pic of part of the road,and on the right a miliaria ( milia passuum, "one thousand paces", 4,841 feet ) or milestone.
The stone, besides the titles of the emperor, reports that it was constructed at the emperor's expense ( PECVN SVA FECIT ).

4 commentsbenito08/11/12 at 15:25Panatha: Nice! Studying a coin other archaeological materia...
crepereiaIIII.jpg
Neptune and Amphytrite150 viewsAR denarius. 72 BC. 3,78 grs. Bust of Amphytrite right,seen from behind letter C before, symbol (crab) behind / Neptune,brandishing trident, in sea chariot right,drawn by two hippocamps,above C.Q.CREPER.M.F. / ROCVS in two lines below.
Craw 399/1b. RSC Crepereia 2. CNR Crepereia 2/3.

Amphytrite daughter of Nereid and Doris was courted by Neptune. But she fled from his advances to Atlas, at the farthest ends of the sea. There the dolphin of Neptune sought her through the islands of the sea, and finding her, spoke persuasively on behalf of Poseidon. As Hyginus writes he was rewarded by being placed among the stars as the constellation Delphinus.












1 commentsbenito08/07/12 at 12:55Jochen: Beautiful motiv!
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T07/31/12 at 04:22kc: super!!!
triobol.jpg
VIA TRAIANA, TRAJAN585 viewsAR denarius. 112-114 AD. 3,36 grs. Laureate bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder. IMP TRAIANO AVG GER DAC P M TR P COS VI P P / Via Traiana reclining left, left elbow on rock, holding wheel and reed. S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI. In exergue VIA TRAIANA.
Minted to commemorate the construction of the Via Traiana from Beneventum to Brindisium. On the left a pic of part of the road,and on the right a miliaria ( milia passuum, "one thousand paces", 4,841 feet ) or milestone.
The stone, besides the titles of the emperor, reports that it was constructed at the emperor's expense ( PECVN SVA FECIT ).

4 commentsbenito07/24/12 at 16:28SPQR Coins: Very cool presentation!
00postumdog.jpg
DIANA and LELAPS.247 viewsAR denarius. 74 BC. 3.52 gr. Bust of Diana huntress right,bow and quiver on shoulder. / Hound running right,hunting spear below. C. POSTUMI/TA (in monogram) below. Toned. Craw 394/1a . RSC Postumia 9
Myth of Lelaps and the fox.
Procris was a mortal woman, a great favorite of the Goddess Diana, the goddess of hunting. Diana (also famous for her hunting hounds) made a gift of a dog to Procris. Lelaps was the swiftest of dogs and could outrun any rival. Diana also gave a JAVELIN that would never miss its target to Procris.
Procris fell in love and married a beautiful youth by the name of Cephalus. Cephalus was also a great hunter, and so Procris gave the presents of the hound and javelin to her husband.
It came to pass that some angry deity had sent a ravenous fox to plague the country, snatching his prey from under the farmers very noses. All the hunters turned out in great numbers and strength to kill the fox, but their efforts failed. None had a hound that could run this supernatural fox to ground.
At last the people came to Cephalus and begged him to set Lelaps, the famous gift hound from Diana, after the fox.
Lelaps was loosed and darted away faster than the eye could follow. It was said that if the men had not seen his footprints in the sand they would have thought he had taken flight. Cephalus and the hunters stood on a hill and watched the pursuit.
The fox tried every trick, every sly, cunning art he knew to evade the hound. He ran in a circle and turned on his track, he doubled back, he leapt over water and trotted across fallen logs, but no trick he knew would fool swift and clever Lelaps. The hound came on relentless, breathing on the foxes heels and snapping at his brushy tail, missing by only a hair!
Cephalus threw the magic javelin when suddenly both dog and fox stopped, frozen in mid-motion. The heavenly powers that had given both hound and fox their powers were not willing that either should conquer - or lose. In that very moment, they turned to Stone .ZEUS cast them into the stars as the constellations Canis Major (Lelaps) and Canis Minor (the Teumessian fox).[


1 commentsbenito06/04/12 at 03:28Ancientnoob: I have been looking for one of these, great catch ...
HADRSE24-2.JPG
Tellus, goddess of the earth146 viewsorichalcum sestertius (24.0g, 33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 137-138.
HADRIANVS [-] AVG COS III P P laureate head of Hadian facing right
TELLVS STABIL / S C [below] Woman reclining left leaning with her left elbow on a basket filled with fruits and vegetables, right hand resting on a globe.
RIC 971f (scarce); Cohen 1432; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 121/126

Issued on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the reign in AD 137, with the Earth Goddess Tellus symbolising the stability of the world (Tellus stabilita) under Roman rule.
2 commentsCharles S06/01/12 at 10:39David Atherton: A very serious looking portrait.
HADRSE24-2.JPG
Tellus, goddess of the earth146 viewsorichalcum sestertius (24.0g, 33mm, 6h). Rome mint. Struck AD 137-138.
HADRIANVS [-] AVG COS III P P laureate head of Hadian facing right
TELLVS STABIL / S C [below] Woman reclining left leaning with her left elbow on a basket filled with fruits and vegetables, right hand resting on a globe.
RIC 971f (scarce); Cohen 1432; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 121/126

Issued on the occasion of the twentieth anniversary of the reign in AD 137, with the Earth Goddess Tellus symbolising the stability of the world (Tellus stabilita) under Roman rule.
2 commentsCharles S05/27/12 at 09:32cicerokid: Another choice reverse
AntoSe08-2.jpg
Ops137 viewsorichalcum sestertius (24.0g, 33mm, 6h) Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144
ANTONINVS AVG PI[-]VS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
OPI AVG / S C [in ex.] Ops seated left, holding sceptre, left hand drawing back drapery.
RIC 612 (Scarce); Cohen 569 (fr.8); BMC 1258-62; Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 130:67

Ops stands for plenty, properity, power, fertility... Her cult goes back to the earliest times, supposedly founded by Romulus. She is the wife of Saturn, sometimes equated with Cybele. Appears on Roman coins only twice (also on issues of Pertinax). The issue under A. Pius is most probably associated with the 900th anniversary of Rome.
1 commentsCharles S05/27/12 at 02:15Randygeki(h2): nice!
ANTOSEb4.jpg
Tiber river god145 viewsorichalcum sestertius (22,9g). Rome mint. Struck AD 140-144.
ANTONINVS AVG [-] PIVS P P TR P COS III laureate head of Antoninus Pius facing right
TIBERIS S C River god the Tiber, draped about waist, reclining to left, leaning with elbow on urn which pours out water, resting right hand on ship's prow and holding reed in the left.
RIC 642a (rare), Cohen 819 (fr.20), BMC 1313-15, Foss (Roman Historical Coins) 129:60
ex Dr. Busso Peus Nachf. Auction 401; Ex NAC AG, Auction 54; ex Busso-Peus Nachf sale 351 (1997).

Struck in preparation of the 900th anniversary of Rome celebrated in AD 147.
The river god Tiber plays a very important role in ancient Roman legends such as Rhea Silvia, the mother of Romulus and Remus, who was thrown into the river to be drowned. She fell into the arms of the River god who married her; Romulus and Remus were saved by the river god Tiber who safely left the twins in a pool where they were rescued by a wolf.
1 commentsCharles S05/27/12 at 02:14Randygeki(h2): awesome coin!
Diana_of_Ephesus_-_Claudius_AR_Tetradrachm.jpg
Artemis, (Diana of Ephesus), in her Temple136 viewsTI. CLAVD CAES AVG. Claudius bare head, facing left. / DIAN-EPHE Cult statue of Diana (Artemis) of Ephesus inside a tetra style temple, set on three tiered base; pediment decorated by figures flanking three windows.
RIC I 118; RPC I 2222; BMCRE 229; RSC 30; Sear Millennium 1839. Ephesus ca. 41-42 AD.
(25 mm, 11.14 g, 6h)

The statue of Artemis (Diana) at Ephesus was one of the Seven Wonders of the ancient world. Depicted on this coin, which was minted shortly after Claudius’ accession to the throne, there remains no trace of the statue, or the temple that housed it, other than some recently stacked column remnants to mark the location. Pliny The Elder described the temple as 115 meters in length, 55 meters in width, made almost entirely of marble; consisting of 127 Ionic style columns 18 meters in height. The original temple, which stood on the site from about 550 BC, was destroyed by arson in 356 BC. It was rebuilt around 330 BC in the form depicted on the coin, only to be destroyed by the Goths in 262 AD. Again rebuilt it was destroyed for the final time by Christians in 401 AD. The columns and marble of the temple were used to construct other buildings. Some of the columns found their way into the church of Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (Istanbul).

The site of the temple was rediscovered in 1869 by an expedition sponsored by the British Museum, but little remains to be seen today. A Christian inscription found at Ephesus reads Destroying the delusive image of the demon Artemis, Demeas has erected this symbol of Truth, the God that drives away idols, and the Cross of priests, deathless and victorious sign of Christ. This Christian zeal explains why so little remains of the site despite its repute in the ancient pre-Christian world.

This coin is rare with a few dozen examples known. In contrast to most examples, which show a four tiered temple base, the reverse of this coin shows a three-tiered temple base. The rectangles on the pediment of the temple are frequently identified as tables, or altars. However, it is more likely that these are windows in the pediment to facilitate lighting of the statue in the interior of the temple. The Ionic style of the columns, as described by Pliny, is clearly visible in the reverse image.
1 commentsLloyd T05/26/12 at 17:27Charles S: splendid monumental reverse with excellent detail
gordianIII_SNGlev774~0.jpg
Aphrodite512 viewsAphrodite is the greek goddess of beauty and love. She is much older and more primordial than Venus. Venus was a more local goddess and came to Rome not before the 4th century. Aphrodite is melted together of indoeuropean-hellenistic, aegaean-anatolean and semitic-oriental elements. The origin of her name is unknown, perhaps it is related to the sem.*asthart. Her relation to Cyprus is referring to that origin. Possibly the name of the month April comes from etruscan *aprodita. So there could be an etruscan intermediation. She seems to be a conglomerate of old fertility goddesses. Her attributes dolphin and shell points to marine, dove, sparrow and and swane to caelestic and apple, rose and pomegranat to herbal sexual spheres. With Homer Aphrodíte replaces the dark weird deities as a light goddess of charm and gracefulness. She was called 'philommeides', the smiling, and she was the mistress of the Graces.
On the rev. of this coin we see Aphrodite as a later depiction as goddess of grace and seduction. She holds a mirror as the symbol of vanity. Her companions are two Erotes with torches to ignite love.
2 commentsJochen05/26/12 at 13:04Charles S: Superb reverse
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert05/26/12 at 07:22Charles S: I love this Pan figure. Would love to have one in...
gord2~1.jpg
Hercules292 viewsThis medallion of Gordian III represents the third labour of Hercules. This labour was to capture the Hind of Cerynaea, the hind was known as Cerynitis. Eurystheus bestowed this task upon Heracles knowing full well that the animal was the sacred property of Artemis, that meant he would be committing impiety against the goddess. Artemis found a small herd of five while out hunting, she captured four to harness to her chariot, but the fifth escaped to Mount Cerynaea which borders Arcadia and Achaea. The animal was larger than a bull, brazen-hoofed also with huge golden horns or antlers of a stag.
With the hind being swift of foot it took Heracles a whole year to get close to the creature. He tracked the hind through Greece and into Thrace, (in some versions it says the chase took Heracles as far as Istria and the northern lands of the Hyperboreans). Never daunted by the long chase, Heracles was waiting for the hind to tire, this was not to be, and the hind seemed to have plenty of stamina and agility left.
Heracles knew he must disable the creature in some way, then by chance the hind stopped to drink at a river. Taking an arrow and removing the blood of the Hydra from the tip, Heracles took aim and hit the hind in the leg, making it lame, this made catching the creature much easier. Heracles bound the wound and then set off on his long journey home. On the way to the palace of Eurystheus he was met by the goddess Artemis and her twin brother Apollo. On seeing the Ceryneian Hind, the huntress accused Heracles of sacrilege. Heracles pleaded with them, saying it was a necessity to return the sacred hind to the court of king Eurystheus, as he was bound by the labor imposed on him. Artemis granted Heracles forgiveness and he was allowed to carry the hind alive to the palace.
Upon bringing the hind to Eurystheus, he was told that it was to become part of the King's menagerie. Heracles knew that he had to return the hind as he had promised, so he agreed to hand it over on the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. The King came out, but the moment Heracles let the hind go, it sprinted back to its mistress, and Heracles left saying that Eurystheus had not been quick enough

5 commentsbenito05/26/12 at 06:58Charles S: wonderful medaillon, artistic reverse. Size of me...
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T05/07/12 at 14:43kokoshawnuff: very nice
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K04/29/12 at 05:30Steve E: Very interesting type!
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/04/12 at 07:29cicerokid: That is really great work
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/04/12 at 02:23Jay GT4: Wow!
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/03/12 at 11:19Kained but Able: Eye popping deep tone and exquisite detail on Zeus...
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/03/12 at 07:36quadrans: very nice
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/03/12 at 05:05Enodia: a very lifelike, although somewhat forlorn looking...
PtolemyIV.jpg
Zeus Ammon on Ptolemy IV Hemidrachm564 viewsZeus Ammon portrait by master die artist. In unusually high relief and expressive style. Uncommon for this type (~ 35mm, 35gm). Issued ca. 220BC at Alexandria mint. This is one Zeus that looks like he really might just get up and step right off the coin or turn around and have something to say of great mythological significance :) 6 commentsPtolemAE03/03/12 at 02:46Randygeki(h2): wonderful portrait!
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K11/17/11 at 16:36ancientone: Amazing coin!
Gallienus~1.JPG
SOL168 viewsSol - god of the sun

Gallienus AE Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 465a, Mediolanum
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate
head r.
Reverse: AETERN AVG, Sol stg. l.,
r. hand raised & l. holding globe,
MT in exergue
Size: 19.1 mm
3 commentsNoah10/05/11 at 05:52Randygeki(h2): Nice!
claude_ii_regi_artis.jpg
Vulcan, Claudius II antoninianus968 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
REGI ARTIS
RIC 215 ; Cohen 239 (30 fr.)
RIC rate it Common, but it's a very rare coin, Volkano is rarely seen on roman imperial coins.
fredericweber.com
2 commentsfrederic W10/02/11 at 13:13neander: Very very pleasant - silvered, very rare and etc!
Bactria,_Antimachos_I_AR_Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Poseidon - Ποσειδῶν441 viewsPoseidon is portrayed on the reverse of this Baktrian tetradrachm issued by Antimachos I (ca. 175-170 BC). A uniquely curious choice for a landlocked country, although the association of Poseidon with earthquakes (which regularly shake the region of Afghanistan) may have been a determining factor in Antimachos choice of a patron god.

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea and the earth-shaker (god of earthquakes) of Greek mythology. He was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. The contest revolved around a gift of each god to the city, with the preferred one of the Athenians determining the outcome. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident, whereupon a spring came into being, only its water proved salty. Athena on the other hand, offered an olive tree making the choice of the Athenians decisive. To placate Poseidon on their choice the Athenians erected a temple to him (Poseidon) at Cape Sounion to the south of Athens.


4 commentsLloyd T08/28/11 at 00:13Bruno V.: Fantastic!
0240-210.jpg
IOVI VLTORI228 viewsSeverus Alexander, Denarius minted in Rome in AD 225
IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head of Severus Alexander right
IOVI VLTORI, Jupiter seated left holding victory and spear
3.26 gr
Ref : RCV #7873, Cohen #97
4 commentsPotator II06/27/11 at 14:58rexesq: AMAZING example!!! This is a coin that has been on...
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K05/21/11 at 10:33Joe Sermarini: Love the obverse type! Nice coin!
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K05/19/11 at 22:23Lloyd T: Wonderfaul example of a rare type.
Apollo_Delphios.jpg
Apollo Delphios213 viewsApollo seated on the omphalos (Apollo Delphios) was the patron god of the Seleukids from the time of Antiochos I Soter who established this reverse coin image, which was to become emblematic of the early Seleukid dynasty.

This coin was issued by Antiochos II Theos 261-241 BC and is a previously undocumented emission of Antioch on the Orontes

Further background and attribution http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-62107
1 commentsLloyd T05/14/11 at 16:24Noah: masterful
Bactria,_Antimachos_I_AR_Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Poseidon - Ποσειδῶν441 viewsPoseidon is portrayed on the reverse of this Baktrian tetradrachm issued by Antimachos I (ca. 175-170 BC). A uniquely curious choice for a landlocked country, although the association of Poseidon with earthquakes (which regularly shake the region of Afghanistan) may have been a determining factor in Antimachos choice of a patron god.

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea and the earth-shaker (god of earthquakes) of Greek mythology. He was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. The contest revolved around a gift of each god to the city, with the preferred one of the Athenians determining the outcome. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident, whereupon a spring came into being, only its water proved salty. Athena on the other hand, offered an olive tree making the choice of the Athenians decisive. To placate Poseidon on their choice the Athenians erected a temple to him (Poseidon) at Cape Sounion to the south of Athens.


4 commentsLloyd T04/24/11 at 08:38David Atherton: This is a fantastic coin. Both the obverse and rev...
pixo.jpg
Apollo / Zeus Labraundos, Pixodaros Didrachm482 views340-334 BC. AR Didrachm (21mm, 6.98 g). Laureate head of Apollo, facing slightly right / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre.5 commentsember03/10/11 at 20:06pitbull: a coin i could spend all day staring at--Beautiful...
Herakles_plus_Zeus_Aetophoros_accompanied_by_Helios.jpg
Herakles plus Zeus Aetophoros accompanied by Helios316 viewsHerakles on the obverse with Zeus seated with his eagle (Zeus Aetophoros) on the reverse was the standard reverse typology of Alexander the Great and his immediate successors (the Diadochi). On this coin of Babylon the image of Zeus Aetophoros is accompanied by an image of Helios in the left field. Three gods for the price of one!

Further background http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60892
3 commentsLloyd T03/04/11 at 00:09Brian L: Great reverse detail!
Herakles_plus_Zeus_Aetophoros_accompanied_by_Helios.jpg
Herakles plus Zeus Aetophoros accompanied by Helios316 viewsHerakles on the obverse with Zeus seated with his eagle (Zeus Aetophoros) on the reverse was the standard reverse typology of Alexander the Great and his immediate successors (the Diadochi). On this coin of Babylon the image of Zeus Aetophoros is accompanied by an image of Helios in the left field. Three gods for the price of one!

Further background http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60892
3 commentsLloyd T03/03/11 at 23:08mant01: My favourite coin so far
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K02/17/11 at 11:15Noah: excellent Talos with that "just-right" touch of gr...
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K02/17/11 at 10:46Dino: Very nice example.
Faestos.jpg
Talos and never missing hound Laelaps326 viewsPhaestos, Crete. 300 - 250 BC
AE17, 4.4 g
GCV 3208, Plant 1078, Lindgren III A128b
7 commentsPekka K02/16/11 at 11:13rover1.3: lovely Cretan bronze i really like.
liberalitas_person.JPG
Liberalitas290 viewsPhilipp I Arabs 244 - 249
AR - Antoninian, 5.4g, 23mm
Rome AD 244-247
obv. IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG
bust draped and cuirassed, radiate head r.
rev. LIBERALITAS AVGG II
Liberalitas standing l., holding abacus and cornucopiae
RIC IV/3, 38(b); C.87
nice EF

LIBERALITAS, liberality, the personification of generosity.
The so-called ABACUS is a misattribution! Really it is a kind of shovel with depressions on its surface, designed to pick up from a bag the correct number of coins when a distribution of money was being made, the 'largitio', largesse; here the second largesse of the emperor.
1 commentsJochen01/30/11 at 22:46Noah: good strong portrait and lovely Liberalitas revers...
Bactria,_Antimachos_I_AR_Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Poseidon - Ποσειδῶν441 viewsPoseidon is portrayed on the reverse of this Baktrian tetradrachm issued by Antimachos I (ca. 175-170 BC). A uniquely curious choice for a landlocked country, although the association of Poseidon with earthquakes (which regularly shake the region of Afghanistan) may have been a determining factor in Antimachos choice of a patron god.

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea and the earth-shaker (god of earthquakes) of Greek mythology. He was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. The contest revolved around a gift of each god to the city, with the preferred one of the Athenians determining the outcome. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident, whereupon a spring came into being, only its water proved salty. Athena on the other hand, offered an olive tree making the choice of the Athenians decisive. To placate Poseidon on their choice the Athenians erected a temple to him (Poseidon) at Cape Sounion to the south of Athens.


4 commentsLloyd T01/21/11 at 12:24Tibsi: Great!
maximianus~0.jpg
Hercules. The Nemean lion.172 viewsAntoninianus. 287-289 AD. Lugdunum. 3 off. 5 ems. Radiate, helmeted, and cuirassed bust right . IMP MAXIMIANVS AVG. / Hercules standing right, strangling lion; club thrown behind him at feet. VIRTVTI AVGG. RIC V 456.Lyon 227.
First Labor of Hercules - Nemean Lion
From Apollodorus. " When Hercules heard that, he went to Tiryns and did as he was bid by Eurystheus. First, Eurystheus ordered him to bring the skin of the Nemean lion; now that was an invulnerable beast begotten by Typhon. On his way to attack the lion he came to Cleonae and lodged at the house of a day-laborer, Molorchus; and when his host would have offered a victim in sacrifice, Hercules told him to wait for thirty days, and then, if he had returned safe from the hunt, to sacrifice to Saviour Zeus, but if he were dead, to sacrifice to him as to a hero. And having come to Nemea and tracked the lion, he first shot an arrow at him, but when he perceived that the beast was invulnerable, he heaved up his club and made after him. And when the lion took refuge in a cave with two mouths, Hercules built up the one entrance and came in upon the beast through the other, and putting his arm round its neck held it tight till he had choked it; so laying it on his shoulders he carried it to Cleonae. And finding Molorchus on the last of the thirty days about to sacrifice the victim to him as to a dead man, he sacrificed to Saviour Zeus and brought the lion to Mycenae. Amazed at his manhood, Eurystheus forbade him thenceforth to enter the city, but ordered him to exhibit the fruits of his labours before the gates. They say, too, that in his fear he had a bronze jar made for himself to hide in under the earth, and that he sent his commands for the labours through a herald, Copreus, son of Pelops the Elean. This Copreus had killed Iphitus and fled to Mycenae, where he was purified by Eurystheus and took up his abode."

1 commentsbenito12/31/10 at 20:15Jay GT4: WOW!
Gallienus~1.JPG
SOL168 viewsSol - god of the sun

Gallienus AE Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 465a, Mediolanum
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate
head r.
Reverse: AETERN AVG, Sol stg. l.,
r. hand raised & l. holding globe,
MT in exergue
Size: 19.1 mm
3 commentsNoah12/29/10 at 10:00David Atherton: Indeed this is a great coin. The portrait is very ...
Antoninus_pius~0.JPG
Genius182 viewsGenius - male spirit of the Roman family

Antoninus Pius Denarius

Attribution: RIC 70, BMC 207,
RSC 405
Date: AD 140-144
Obverse: ANTONINVS AVG PIVS
P P TR P COS III, bare head r.
Reverse: GENIVS POP ROMANI,
Genius standing front, head r., with
scepter & cornucopia
Size: 18.9 mm
1 commentsNoah12/28/10 at 02:10David Atherton: Amazing portrait with an awesome reverse. Superb!
Gallienus~1.JPG
SOL168 viewsSol - god of the sun

Gallienus AE Antoninianus

Attribution: RIC 465a, Mediolanum
Date: AD 267-268
Obverse: GALLIENVS AVG, radiate
head r.
Reverse: AETERN AVG, Sol stg. l.,
r. hand raised & l. holding globe,
MT in exergue
Size: 19.1 mm
3 commentsNoah12/27/10 at 18:00mihali84: Great coin, it looks like Sol is holding back the ...
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II12/26/10 at 23:37Noah: Super "junk in the trunk" reverse!!
venus victrix forum.jpg
Venus Victrix - the rear view530 viewsSabina, AR denarius, 128 AD.
RIC 412, RSC 89, Sear RCV II,3927.
A gorgeous rear view of the goddess of love, with an elegant "Grecian bend"-curve to the figure, much more pleasing than the dumpy little ladies normally found on denarii of Domna, etc.
- Britannicus
4 commentsBritannicus12/26/10 at 23:37Noah: lovely...unequivocally fetching!!
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito12/26/10 at 23:34Noah: ...awkward...still a nice coin even with the added...
caracalla_261(d).JPG
Pluto(n)303 viewsCaracalla 198-217
AR - Antoninianus, 5.3g
Rome AD 215
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
cuirassed bust, radiate head r.
rev. PM TRP XVIII COS IIII PP
Pluto with polos on head seated l. on throne, sceptre in l. hand, r.
extended towards three-headed Cerberus l., before him.
RIC IV/1, 261(d); in Cohen only with Minotaur
Rare; nice EF, one of the earliest Antoniniani!
added to www.wildwinds.com

PLUTO(N), Greek HADES, god of the underworld, identified by the three-headed Cerberus. But the polos shows, that at this time Pluto was mixed up with Serapis. Caracalla should have built a Serapeion on the Quirinal.
2 commentsJochen12/26/10 at 23:31Noah: an incredible portrait!
caracalla_284~0.jpg
Luna/Diana270 viewsCaracalla AD 198 - 217
AR - Denar, 3.13g, 19mm
Rome AD 217
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head r.
rev. PM TRP XX COS IIII PP
Luna/Diana with crescent on head and scarf flying
behind her, standing in bull-biga, driving l.
RIC IV, 284; C.396
Scarce; good EF

LUNA, goddess of the moon. Her usual attribute is a crescent worn at top of her head. She first appears early 2nd century BC on Bigati. Equated with DIANA and sometimes impossible to make any clear distinction between these two. The bull is connected to DIANA by a myth, in which sacrificing a big bull would bring great power to the city of the person who sacrificed him. Thus Rome was given the imperium! Diana was the patron of the Biga racing driver too!
2 commentsJochen12/26/10 at 23:30Noah: truly splendid
gord2~1.jpg
Hercules292 viewsThis medallion of Gordian III represents the third labour of Hercules. This labour was to capture the Hind of Cerynaea, the hind was known as Cerynitis. Eurystheus bestowed this task upon Heracles knowing full well that the animal was the sacred property of Artemis, that meant he would be committing impiety against the goddess. Artemis found a small herd of five while out hunting, she captured four to harness to her chariot, but the fifth escaped to Mount Cerynaea which borders Arcadia and Achaea. The animal was larger than a bull, brazen-hoofed also with huge golden horns or antlers of a stag.
With the hind being swift of foot it took Heracles a whole year to get close to the creature. He tracked the hind through Greece and into Thrace, (in some versions it says the chase took Heracles as far as Istria and the northern lands of the Hyperboreans). Never daunted by the long chase, Heracles was waiting for the hind to tire, this was not to be, and the hind seemed to have plenty of stamina and agility left.
Heracles knew he must disable the creature in some way, then by chance the hind stopped to drink at a river. Taking an arrow and removing the blood of the Hydra from the tip, Heracles took aim and hit the hind in the leg, making it lame, this made catching the creature much easier. Heracles bound the wound and then set off on his long journey home. On the way to the palace of Eurystheus he was met by the goddess Artemis and her twin brother Apollo. On seeing the Ceryneian Hind, the huntress accused Heracles of sacrilege. Heracles pleaded with them, saying it was a necessity to return the sacred hind to the court of king Eurystheus, as he was bound by the labor imposed on him. Artemis granted Heracles forgiveness and he was allowed to carry the hind alive to the palace.
Upon bringing the hind to Eurystheus, he was told that it was to become part of the King's menagerie. Heracles knew that he had to return the hind as he had promised, so he agreed to hand it over on the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. The King came out, but the moment Heracles let the hind go, it sprinted back to its mistress, and Heracles left saying that Eurystheus had not been quick enough

5 commentsbenito12/26/10 at 23:29Noah: great coin...spectacular reverse!
geta3.jpg
FORTUNA REDUX.229 viewsAE sestertius. Rome, 211 AD. 28.05 gr. Laureate head right. P SEPTIMIVS GETA PIVS AVG BRIT. / Fortuna seated left on throne, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae, wheel under seat. FORT RED TR P III COS II P P S C. BMCRE 40. RIC 168a.
Fortuna is the Roman Goddess of Luck, Fate, and Fortune. Usually depicted holding in one hand a cornucopia, or a horn of plenty, from which all good things flowed in abundance, representing her ability to bestow prosperity; in the other she generally has a ship's rudder, to indicate that She is the one who controls how lives and fates are steered. She could also be shown enthroned, with the same attributes of rudder and cornucopia, but with a small wheel built into the chair, representing the cycles of fate and the ups and downs of fortune.
Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars—redux means "coming back" or "returning". She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of Her is of an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 BCE for the safe return of the Emperor Augustus
3 commentsbenito12/26/10 at 23:28Noah: super portrait!
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T12/26/10 at 23:27Noah: phenomenal!
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm12/26/10 at 23:26Noah: Splendid and bold portrait, nice one!
Pergamon.jpg
Bacchus, Cista Mystica366 viewsTetradrachm of Pergamon, Mysia (133-67 B.C.)
Obv: Cista mystica containing serpent, all within wreath (of grapes?).
Anepigraphic.
Rev: Bow case between two coiled serpents, MOE above, snake entwined Asklepian staff to right, mint monogram to left.
25.8 mm 12.2 gm

They can keep the snakes, but a healthy glass of wine about now would be a winner!
Massanutten
1 commentsMassanutten12/26/10 at 23:24Noah: I've always thought this was a cool looking co...
RI 066ba img.jpg
Aesclepius563 viewsCaracalla denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate bust right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P, Aesculapius standing front, head left, with serpent-entwined wand; globe on ground at right
Minted in Rome in A.D. 215
References:- BMCRE 103, RIC 251, RSC 302

Aesclepius is the god of medicine and holds staff with a snake entwined around it.
3 commentsmaridvnvm12/26/10 at 23:23Noah: fabulous
Bactria,_Antimachos_I_AR_Tetradrachm~0.jpg
Poseidon - Ποσειδῶν441 viewsPoseidon is portrayed on the reverse of this Baktrian tetradrachm issued by Antimachos I (ca. 175-170 BC). A uniquely curious choice for a landlocked country, although the association of Poseidon with earthquakes (which regularly shake the region of Afghanistan) may have been a determining factor in Antimachos choice of a patron god.

Poseidon (Ποσειδῶν) was the god of the sea and the earth-shaker (god of earthquakes) of Greek mythology. He was the protector of many Hellenic cities, although he lost the contest for Athens to Athena. The contest revolved around a gift of each god to the city, with the preferred one of the Athenians determining the outcome. Poseidon struck the ground with his trident, whereupon a spring came into being, only its water proved salty. Athena on the other hand, offered an olive tree making the choice of the Athenians decisive. To placate Poseidon on their choice the Athenians erected a temple to him (Poseidon) at Cape Sounion to the south of Athens.


4 commentsLloyd T12/26/10 at 23:22Noah: beautiful coin!
gord2~1.jpg
Hercules292 viewsThis medallion of Gordian III represents the third labour of Hercules. This labour was to capture the Hind of Cerynaea, the hind was known as Cerynitis. Eurystheus bestowed this task upon Heracles knowing full well that the animal was the sacred property of Artemis, that meant he would be committing impiety against the goddess. Artemis found a small herd of five while out hunting, she captured four to harness to her chariot, but the fifth escaped to Mount Cerynaea which borders Arcadia and Achaea. The animal was larger than a bull, brazen-hoofed also with huge golden horns or antlers of a stag.
With the hind being swift of foot it took Heracles a whole year to get close to the creature. He tracked the hind through Greece and into Thrace, (in some versions it says the chase took Heracles as far as Istria and the northern lands of the Hyperboreans). Never daunted by the long chase, Heracles was waiting for the hind to tire, this was not to be, and the hind seemed to have plenty of stamina and agility left.
Heracles knew he must disable the creature in some way, then by chance the hind stopped to drink at a river. Taking an arrow and removing the blood of the Hydra from the tip, Heracles took aim and hit the hind in the leg, making it lame, this made catching the creature much easier. Heracles bound the wound and then set off on his long journey home. On the way to the palace of Eurystheus he was met by the goddess Artemis and her twin brother Apollo. On seeing the Ceryneian Hind, the huntress accused Heracles of sacrilege. Heracles pleaded with them, saying it was a necessity to return the sacred hind to the court of king Eurystheus, as he was bound by the labor imposed on him. Artemis granted Heracles forgiveness and he was allowed to carry the hind alive to the palace.
Upon bringing the hind to Eurystheus, he was told that it was to become part of the King's menagerie. Heracles knew that he had to return the hind as he had promised, so he agreed to hand it over on the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. The King came out, but the moment Heracles let the hind go, it sprinted back to its mistress, and Heracles left saying that Eurystheus had not been quick enough

5 commentsbenito12/07/10 at 19:25Randygeki(h2): wow! nice!
gord2~1.jpg
Hercules292 viewsThis medallion of Gordian III represents the third labour of Hercules. This labour was to capture the Hind of Cerynaea, the hind was known as Cerynitis. Eurystheus bestowed this task upon Heracles knowing full well that the animal was the sacred property of Artemis, that meant he would be committing impiety against the goddess. Artemis found a small herd of five while out hunting, she captured four to harness to her chariot, but the fifth escaped to Mount Cerynaea which borders Arcadia and Achaea. The animal was larger than a bull, brazen-hoofed also with huge golden horns or antlers of a stag.
With the hind being swift of foot it took Heracles a whole year to get close to the creature. He tracked the hind through Greece and into Thrace, (in some versions it says the chase took Heracles as far as Istria and the northern lands of the Hyperboreans). Never daunted by the long chase, Heracles was waiting for the hind to tire, this was not to be, and the hind seemed to have plenty of stamina and agility left.
Heracles knew he must disable the creature in some way, then by chance the hind stopped to drink at a river. Taking an arrow and removing the blood of the Hydra from the tip, Heracles took aim and hit the hind in the leg, making it lame, this made catching the creature much easier. Heracles bound the wound and then set off on his long journey home. On the way to the palace of Eurystheus he was met by the goddess Artemis and her twin brother Apollo. On seeing the Ceryneian Hind, the huntress accused Heracles of sacrilege. Heracles pleaded with them, saying it was a necessity to return the sacred hind to the court of king Eurystheus, as he was bound by the labor imposed on him. Artemis granted Heracles forgiveness and he was allowed to carry the hind alive to the palace.
Upon bringing the hind to Eurystheus, he was told that it was to become part of the King's menagerie. Heracles knew that he had to return the hind as he had promised, so he agreed to hand it over on the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. The King came out, but the moment Heracles let the hind go, it sprinted back to its mistress, and Heracles left saying that Eurystheus had not been quick enough

5 commentsbenito12/07/10 at 11:44Emperor Mat: Nice, love the reverse
gord2~1.jpg
Hercules292 viewsThis medallion of Gordian III represents the third labour of Hercules. This labour was to capture the Hind of Cerynaea, the hind was known as Cerynitis. Eurystheus bestowed this task upon Heracles knowing full well that the animal was the sacred property of Artemis, that meant he would be committing impiety against the goddess. Artemis found a small herd of five while out hunting, she captured four to harness to her chariot, but the fifth escaped to Mount Cerynaea which borders Arcadia and Achaea. The animal was larger than a bull, brazen-hoofed also with huge golden horns or antlers of a stag.
With the hind being swift of foot it took Heracles a whole year to get close to the creature. He tracked the hind through Greece and into Thrace, (in some versions it says the chase took Heracles as far as Istria and the northern lands of the Hyperboreans). Never daunted by the long chase, Heracles was waiting for the hind to tire, this was not to be, and the hind seemed to have plenty of stamina and agility left.
Heracles knew he must disable the creature in some way, then by chance the hind stopped to drink at a river. Taking an arrow and removing the blood of the Hydra from the tip, Heracles took aim and hit the hind in the leg, making it lame, this made catching the creature much easier. Heracles bound the wound and then set off on his long journey home. On the way to the palace of Eurystheus he was met by the goddess Artemis and her twin brother Apollo. On seeing the Ceryneian Hind, the huntress accused Heracles of sacrilege. Heracles pleaded with them, saying it was a necessity to return the sacred hind to the court of king Eurystheus, as he was bound by the labor imposed on him. Artemis granted Heracles forgiveness and he was allowed to carry the hind alive to the palace.
Upon bringing the hind to Eurystheus, he was told that it was to become part of the King's menagerie. Heracles knew that he had to return the hind as he had promised, so he agreed to hand it over on the condition that Eurystheus himself come out and take it from him. The King came out, but the moment Heracles let the hind go, it sprinted back to its mistress, and Heracles left saying that Eurystheus had not been quick enough

5 commentsbenito12/07/10 at 09:43ancientone: Well Done! Awesome coin!
geta3.jpg
FORTUNA REDUX.229 viewsAE sestertius. Rome, 211 AD. 28.05 gr. Laureate head right. P SEPTIMIVS GETA PIVS AVG BRIT. / Fortuna seated left on throne, holding rudder on globe and cornucopiae, wheel under seat. FORT RED TR P III COS II P P S C. BMCRE 40. RIC 168a.
Fortuna is the Roman Goddess of Luck, Fate, and Fortune. Usually depicted holding in one hand a cornucopia, or a horn of plenty, from which all good things flowed in abundance, representing her ability to bestow prosperity; in the other she generally has a ship's rudder, to indicate that She is the one who controls how lives and fates are steered. She could also be shown enthroned, with the same attributes of rudder and cornucopia, but with a small wheel built into the chair, representing the cycles of fate and the ups and downs of fortune.
Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars—redux means "coming back" or "returning". She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of Her is of an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 BCE for the safe return of the Emperor Augustus
3 commentsbenito12/06/10 at 12:23Tibsi: Amazing!
Herakles_plus_Zeus_Aetophoros_accompanied_by_Helios.jpg
Herakles plus Zeus Aetophoros accompanied by Helios316 viewsHerakles on the obverse with Zeus seated with his eagle (Zeus Aetophoros) on the reverse was the standard reverse typology of Alexander the Great and his immediate successors (the Diadochi). On this coin of Babylon the image of Zeus Aetophoros is accompanied by an image of Helios in the left field. Three gods for the price of one!

Further background http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60892
3 commentsLloyd T12/01/10 at 14:32Achim: Beautiful coin, beautiful reverse.
rome_AD232_AE-sestertius_mars-ultor_ANACS-VF20_obv_01_rev_01_90%.JPG
MARS ULTOR - Severus Alexander AE Sestertius202 viewsSeverus Alexander. AD232. AE Sestertius.
Graded VF 20 by ANACS before I removed it from the slab.

obv: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, seen from front, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MARS VLTOR - SC below - Mars with spear and shield in the 'Ready-for-Action' position.
22.3 grams.
2 commentsrexesq11/25/10 at 05:05rexesq: Thank you. It's just got such great flat and s...
Tanit.jpg
Tanit156 viewsTanit was a Phoenician lunar goddess worshiped as the patron goddess of Carthage.

Background to the coin type http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-60562
1 commentsLloyd T11/24/10 at 15:19Achim: A beauty.
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T11/22/10 at 23:45Randygeki(h2): not bad.
rome_AD232_AE-sestertius_mars-ultor_ANACS-VF20_obv_01_rev_01_90%.JPG
MARS ULTOR - Severus Alexander AE Sestertius202 viewsSeverus Alexander. AD232. AE Sestertius.
Graded VF 20 by ANACS before I removed it from the slab.

obv: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG - Laureate bust right, seen from front, draped and cuirassed.
rev: MARS VLTOR - SC below - Mars with spear and shield in the 'Ready-for-Action' position.
22.3 grams.
2 commentsrexesq11/22/10 at 23:45Randygeki(h2): nice one
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T11/18/10 at 09:26areich: Wonderful reverse and the toning adds to it.
Deified_Alexander_.jpg
Athena and Deified Alexander393 viewsThe deified Alexander the Great is depicted on the obverse of this coin of Lysimachos, dating to the early third century BC.

In the years following his death Alexander the Great came to be the subject of cult worship throughout the Mediterranean basin. His corpse was appropriated by Ptolemy I who transported it to Egypt, initially interring it at Memphis, then to a mausoleum and center of worship in Alexandria. It survived until the 4th century AD when Theodosius banned paganism, only to disappear without trace.

Athena depicted on the reverse of this coin was the patron goddess of Athens. She came to be worshiped throughout much of the Mediterranean basin during Hellenistic period.
7 commentsLloyd T11/18/10 at 07:59Jochen: One of the classical coins with neat details on th...
severus_alexander_246~0.jpg
Mars Ultor262 viewsSeverus Alexander 222-235
AR - Denar, 3.12g, 20.5mm
Rome 232
obv. IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped, cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
rev. MARS - VLTOR
Mars walking r., holding spear and shield
RIC IV/2, 246; BMCR 831; C.161
near EF, toned

MARS ULTOR, Mars the Avenger. Two temples were dedicated to him during the reign of Augustus. The first 20 BC on the Capitol for the standards recovered from the Parthians (showed on coins!), the second 2 BC vowed during the battle of Philippi in 42 BC as a memorial to Julius Caesar.
1 commentsJochen11/17/10 at 21:20rexesq: Very nice coin. Great detail in the depiction of M...
Metapontum_Demeter_200.JPG
Demeter219 viewsMetapontum, Lucania
AR Didrachm (21mm, 7.8g)
330-300 BC
O: Head of Demeter right, wreathed in grain and wearing triple earring and necklace; ΔAI under chin.
R: Ear of barley with seven grains, leaf to right; plow above leaf, MAX below, META to left.
SNG ANS 470 / SNG Cop 1227 / HN Italy 1581 / Johnston C-1 / Sear 416v

2 commentsEnodia11/15/10 at 15:41Jay GT4: Beauty
Metapontum_Demeter_200.JPG
Demeter219 viewsMetapontum, Lucania
AR Didrachm (21mm, 7.8g)
330-300 BC
O: Head of Demeter right, wreathed in grain and wearing triple earring and necklace; ΔAI under chin.
R: Ear of barley with seven grains, leaf to right; plow above leaf, MAX below, META to left.
SNG ANS 470 / SNG Cop 1227 / HN Italy 1581 / Johnston C-1 / Sear 416v

2 commentsEnodia11/15/10 at 02:40Romanorvm: Great coin.
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm09/18/10 at 18:14neander: This is a strong specimen! Pleasant...
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/12/10 at 06:21Tibsi: Amazing!
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/11/10 at 11:37maridvnvm: absolutely wonderful!
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/11/10 at 01:14mihali84: Great portrait!
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/10/10 at 08:39xintaris75: Nice
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/10/10 at 05:31Enodia: an absolutely beautiful depiction of Zeus, as time...
GAE657_O.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy V290 viewsAE 36 28.4gm 12h
Svoronos 1058
Tyre Provincial Mint
Ptolemy V
ca. 205-180BC
Unusual Style - Stern and Expressive Zeus Portrait
6 commentsPtolemAE09/10/10 at 05:22rover1.3: yes..superb portrait.
Hadrian. Hades.jpg
Hades, Hadrian274 viewsHadrian. (117-138 AD). Silver cistophoric tetradrachm (11.35 gm). Lydia, Sardes. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, head bare right / COS III, Hades standing left in quadriga of horses leaping right, carrying away protesting Persephone and holding scepter and reins in left hand.2 commentsROMA08/18/10 at 12:52rexesq: Wow, that's a great one. Fantastic reverse des...
L.Censorinus_marcia_24.jpg
Marsyas291 viewsL. Censorinus, gens Marcia
AR - Denar, 3.68g, 24.17mm
Rome 82 BC
obv. (no legend)
bust of Apollo, laureate, r.
rev. L. CENSOR
Marsyas walking l., gazing upwards, raising r. Hand, with wineskin above
shoulder; tall column behind, surmounted by a draped figure (Minerva?)
Crawf. 363/1d; Syd. 737; Marcia 24
gVF/nEF

Marsyas was a Silen who found the flute which Athene had invented some times before. But when Athene saw in a mirror how awful her face was looking when playing the flute, she throw it away with a curse. Marsyas then learned to play the flute better as everyone else so that he challenged Apollo to a contest. The Muses should be the arbiters. But in this contest Apollo outsmarts Marsyas by singing to the cithara what Marsyas was not able to do with his flute. So he lost the contest and Apollo hung him up in a tree and let him skinned by a Skyth alive. His blood or the tears of the Muses then became the river Marsyas.
(Ovid, Metamorphoses, lib.VI, 382-400)
1 commentsJochen08/15/10 at 02:00Randygeki(h2): very nice
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE07/23/10 at 17:31Frans Diederik: Just Superb!
claude_ii_regi_artis.jpg
Vulcan, Claudius II antoninianus968 viewsIMP C CLAVDIVS AVG
REGI ARTIS
RIC 215 ; Cohen 239 (30 fr.)
RIC rate it Common, but it's a very rare coin, Volkano is rarely seen on roman imperial coins.
fredericweber.com
2 commentsfrederic W04/09/10 at 02:41Vincent: What a Great Reverse-I have one of these too..not ...
severus_alexander_236.jpg
Jupiter Propugnator229 viewsSeverus Alexander 222 - 235
AR - Denar, 3.21g, 20mm
Rome AD 232
obv. IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped bust, laureate head r.
rev. IOVI PRO - PVGNATORI
Jupiter in fighting attitude l., with feet opened,
head turned r., hurling thunderbolt with r., holding
eagle in l.
RIC IV, 236; C.77
about VF
Jupiter, god of the bright heaven, one of the oldest Roman deities,
his attribute the thunderbold, with many epithets, here:
JUPITER PROPUGNATOR = Jupiter the champion(?), the defender,
the protector (oft the emperor naturally!)
1 commentsJochen04/06/10 at 17:08Jay GT4: How have I missed this one for so long? Beautiful...
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert03/21/10 at 11:01Jochen: AMNG I/1, 1933; H/J 8.26.18.1
DOMNA-15.jpg
Three Graces, Goddesses of charm, beauty and culture.278 viewsJulia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, Augusta, 193-217 CE.
Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Æ (24mm, 8.6 gm).
Obv: IOLAIA DOMNA CEB, Draped bust right, hair in bun.
Rev: MARKIANOPOLITWN, Statuary group of the Three Graces side by side.
Sear Greek Imp. 2313; AMNG (Pick) 603; Moushmov 417.

The three Graces, named Euphrosyne, Aglaia and Thalia, were the attendants of Venus/Aphrodite. They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, nude and sometimes holding apples.
2 commentsEmpressCollector02/18/10 at 10:21Jochen: Hristova/Jekov No.6.17.26.2 (same dies!)
ClauClauClau.jpg
Minerva338 viewsTI CLAVDIVS CAESAR AVG P M TR P IMP P P
Bare head of Claudius, left.
S C
Minerva advancing, right, brandishing spear and holding shield.
Copper As. 28.5 mm 10.9 gm 180 die alignment

Ancient even for the Romans. Italian or Etruscan origin for this goddess and directly identified with the Greek Athena. Shown here wearing a Corinthian helmet. Although a war goddess, she is also the patron of wisdom and handicrafts. This latter is probably what made her attractive to Claudius who reportedly authored several histories, none of which, unfortunately, have survived.
Massanutten
1 commentsMassanutten02/05/10 at 12:13Noah: excellent portrait
soaemias3.jpg
Hekate Triformis378 viewsJulia Soaemias -- AE20 from Mastaura (Lydia).
Hekate Triformis, was a goddess from Asia minor. Her main holy shrine was in Lagina. The Triformis created by Alkamenes, end of 5. century. Her companion a dog.
2 commentsfeatherz02/05/10 at 12:12Noah: excellent reverse
Hadrian. Hades.jpg
Hades, Hadrian274 viewsHadrian. (117-138 AD). Silver cistophoric tetradrachm (11.35 gm). Lydia, Sardes. HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, head bare right / COS III, Hades standing left in quadriga of horses leaping right, carrying away protesting Persephone and holding scepter and reins in left hand.2 commentsROMA02/05/10 at 12:10Noah: very, very nice coin
RI 132ep img.jpg
Abundantia871 viewsObv:– IMP C PROBVS . P . F . AVG, Radiate, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– ABVNDANTIA AVG, Abundatia, standing right, empting cornucopiae
Minted in Lugdunum (IIII in exe.) Emission 4 Officina 4
Date Minted – Middle to End 277 A.D.
References: Cohen 1. Bastien 195 (54 examples). RIC 17 Bust type F (Common)

Abundantia stands for abundance or plenty. Her attributes are ears of corn (grain) and cornucopiae. She is sometimes (as here) shown emptying the cornucopiae and sometimes shown seated. Her Greek name is Euthenia
1 commentsmaridvnvm02/05/10 at 12:03Noah: What an excellent portrait!
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II01/16/10 at 16:53Johny SYSEL: beautiful contrast ! 5/5
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II01/15/10 at 16:10Jay (Titus Pullo): All I can say is
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II01/15/10 at 14:52mihali84: yes very attractive patina, wonderful color!
0035-510.jpg
NEPTUNE252 viewsPosthumous issue of Caligula, in honour of his grandfather Agrippa
Rome mint, ca AD 37/41
M AGRIPPA L F COS III, head of Agrippa left with rostral crown
Neptun standing left, holding trident and dolphin. Large S C in fields
10.9 gr
Ref : RCV #1812, Cohen #3
Ex Alwin collection
4 commentsPotator II01/15/10 at 11:38Noah: Stunning coin! It is absolutely gorgeous!!
0240-210.jpg
IOVI VLTORI228 viewsSeverus Alexander, Denarius minted in Rome in AD 225
IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head of Severus Alexander right
IOVI VLTORI, Jupiter seated left holding victory and spear
3.26 gr
Ref : RCV #7873, Cohen #97
4 commentsPotator II01/02/10 at 14:48Tibsi: Amazing!
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II01/02/10 at 14:46Tibsi: Great!
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito12/21/09 at 18:35Nikos K: Very beautiful coin
lucius_verus_463~0.JPG
Providentia Deorum298 viewsLucius Verus, Co-Emperor AD 161 - 169
AR - Denar, 3.59g
obv. IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG
bare head r.
rev. PROV DEOR TRP COS II
Providentia standing l., holding globe and cornucopiae
RIC II, 463; C.144
nice EF

PROVIDENTIA, foreseeing, especially of the emperor, a so-called emperor's virtue in the emperor's cult. 'Monarchy, in fact, is Providence', Charlesworth. As legend it appears first under Tiberius, showing the Altar of Providence. Under Hadrian the idea of PROVIDENTIA DEORUM (Divine Providence) begins to be symbolized as the foresight of the gods.
2 commentsJochen11/25/09 at 11:28Noah: absolutely gorgeous
severus_ocean_ag.jpg
Oceanus, Septimus Severus, denarius211 viewsSEVERVS PIVS AVG
PM TR P XVII COS III PP
RIC 229 (R) ; Cohen 530 (20 fr.)
RIC say Triton, BMC Ocean, Cohen which misdicribe this coin say Tiber, david Sear suggest the Tyne This could be the Channel too. But I thinks it's Ocean.
Frederic Weber collection
1 commentsfrederic W11/23/09 at 18:09neander: Great - very rare Severvs type!
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE09/28/09 at 21:28neander: Very impressive! Thank you!
gordianIII_SNGlev774~0.jpg
Aphrodite512 viewsAphrodite is the greek goddess of beauty and love. She is much older and more primordial than Venus. Venus was a more local goddess and came to Rome not before the 4th century. Aphrodite is melted together of indoeuropean-hellenistic, aegaean-anatolean and semitic-oriental elements. The origin of her name is unknown, perhaps it is related to the sem.*asthart. Her relation to Cyprus is referring to that origin. Possibly the name of the month April comes from etruscan *aprodita. So there could be an etruscan intermediation. She seems to be a conglomerate of old fertility goddesses. Her attributes dolphin and shell points to marine, dove, sparrow and and swane to caelestic and apple, rose and pomegranat to herbal sexual spheres. With Homer Aphrodíte replaces the dark weird deities as a light goddess of charm and gracefulness. She was called 'philommeides', the smiling, and she was the mistress of the Graces.
On the rev. of this coin we see Aphrodite as a later depiction as goddess of grace and seduction. She holds a mirror as the symbol of vanity. Her companions are two Erotes with torches to ignite love.
2 commentsJochen09/13/09 at 20:55arizonarobin: I love this reverse! Absolutely wonderful.
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE09/02/09 at 07:31randy h2: wow, very nive!
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE09/02/09 at 04:14mihali84: Excellent!
RI 066b img.jpg
Sol, holding whip266 viewsCaracalla Denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XX COS IIII P P, Sol standing left, holding right hand up in salute and whip
Minted in Rome in A.D. 217
References:– VM 6/5, RIC 293d (Common), RSC 389
2 commentsmaridvnvm07/26/09 at 21:59Noah: really nice!
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II06/23/09 at 14:18David Atherton: Ok, now I'm jealous! What a great coin.
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II06/21/09 at 19:24brian l: nice reverse
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II06/21/09 at 16:54Marsman: Beautiful coin. Charming reverse
0092-210.jpg
VENVS247 viewsJulia Titi, denarius minted in Rome, c.79-81 AD
IVLIA AVGVSTA T AVG F, Bust of Julia right
VENVS AVG, Venus leaning on a column, holding helmet and sceptre
3.03 gr
Ref : Cohen #12, RCV #2611
6 commentsPotator II06/21/09 at 15:15Titus Pullo: Exquisite coin! Congratulations!
0240-210.jpg
IOVI VLTORI228 viewsSeverus Alexander, Denarius minted in Rome in AD 225
IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head of Severus Alexander right
IOVI VLTORI, Jupiter seated left holding victory and spear
3.26 gr
Ref : RCV #7873, Cohen #97
4 commentsPotator II06/08/09 at 01:36dupondius: really fantastic
GAE099_O.jpg
ZEUS323 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
4 commentsPtolemAE04/23/09 at 03:23PtolemAE: Top $ = ? It'd take serious $ to persuade me ...
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE04/03/09 at 16:58areich: A great portrait.
GAE099_O~1.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria261 viewsAE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON control letter between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right.
REF - Svoronos 446 SNGCOP 142
2 commentsPtolemAE04/03/09 at 04:48PtolemAE: Thanks. One of my favorites for artistry and on s...
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE04/03/09 at 04:46PtolemAE: Thanks. We now know of 8 coins from this die. Th...
GAE099_O~1.jpg
Zeus Ammon, Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria261 viewsAE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON control letter between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right.
REF - Svoronos 446 SNGCOP 142
2 commentsPtolemAE04/02/09 at 23:41Johnny: beautiful portrait with great details
GAE371_O.jpg
ZEUS, Ptolemy II Philadelphos, Syracuse Issue of Hieron II, Diobol - 285/246BC342 viewsAE 26.3-27.5mm : 18.282gm : 3h
OBV - Laureate Zeus facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt facing left, wing open, head facing left, no leg monogram, shield in left field. BASILEOS right, PTOLEMAIOY left
REF - Svoronos 610 (Plate 12 #17) SNGCop 114 Weiser 18
NOTE - This type actually struck in Syracuse by Hieron II ca. 265BC. New research just published on this subject (2007). The paper that presents this new attribution is available online at www.ptolemybronze.com.
7 commentsPtolemAE04/02/09 at 23:40Johnny: this one's detail and features are fantastic, ...
0070-310~0.jpg
ROMA164 viewsNero Dupondius minted in Rome in 65 AD
NERO CLAVD CAESAR AVG GER PM TR P IMP PP, Radiate head of Nero right
ROMA in ex, SC in field, Roma seated left holding wreath and parazonium, , right foot on a helmet
13.06 gr
Ref : RCV #1966, Cohen #280
1 commentsPotator II03/18/09 at 18:05neander: Uncleaned!? Real ancient thing from soil - pleasan...
0240-210.jpg
IOVI VLTORI228 viewsSeverus Alexander, Denarius minted in Rome in AD 225
IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head of Severus Alexander right
IOVI VLTORI, Jupiter seated left holding victory and spear
3.26 gr
Ref : RCV #7873, Cohen #97
4 commentsPotator II02/14/09 at 11:08*Alex: Lovely details, a very attractive coin.
GAE099_O.jpg
ZEUS323 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
4 commentsPtolemAE10/02/08 at 00:58Bookman55: Would you be willing to sell this coin for top dol...
Trajan drachm2~0.jpg
Arabia249 viewsTrajan (98-117) AR Drachm of Arabia Patraea, Bostra. Struck 112-117.
Obverse: AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANO CEB ΓEΣ M Δ Ak , laureate bust right, drapery on far shoulder.
Reverse:Arabia standing left holding branch & cinnamon sticks, camel behind.
Sydenham 189; SNG Cop. 205
1 commentsROMA08/06/08 at 08:40sorin: AYTOKP KAIC NEP TPAIANO CEB ΓEΣ M Δ...
pixo.jpg
Apollo / Zeus Labraundos, Pixodaros Didrachm482 views340-334 BC. AR Didrachm (21mm, 6.98 g). Laureate head of Apollo, facing slightly right / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre.5 commentsember06/11/08 at 18:52Dominicus: :shoc...
diocletian_ticinum_43a.jpg
Moneta219 viewsDiocletian 284 - 305
AE - AE 2, 10.5g, 25mm
Ticinum 2. officina, ca. 300- 303
obv. IMP C DIOCLETIANVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SACRA MONET AVGG - CAESS NOSTR
Moneta standing l., r. holding scales, r. cornucopiae
exergue: ST dot
RIC VI, Ticinum 43(a); C.436
VF

MONETA, appears first as a title of Juno. 344 BC a temple was dedicated to JUNO MONETA on the Capitoline hill. The origin of this name from lat. monere = warning is doubtful. Because the first Mint of Rome stands near this temple MONETA became the personification of the Mint itself. Her attributes are like those of Aequitas: Scales and a Cornucopiae.
SACRA MONETA means: Mint of the emperor(s).
1 commentsJochen05/28/08 at 23:23Noah: really nice detail
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito01/07/08 at 08:39*Alex: Cogito didn't read the small print.
GAE099_O.jpg
ZEUS323 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
4 commentsPtolemAE12/27/07 at 13:28Noah: That is a beautiful portrait!
GAE099_O.jpg
ZEUS323 viewsPtolemaic Egypt, Ptolemy Coin GAE099
Ptolemy II Philadelphos Drachm - 285/246BC - Alexandria
AE 47.4-48.1mm : 95.66gm
OBV - Zeus Ammon, facing right
REV - Eagle standing on thunderbolt, wing open on right side of coin, head reverted over open wing, EPSILON monogram between legs. BASILEOS on left, PTOLEMAIOY on right. Denomination A.
REF - SNGCOP 142 Svoronos 446 (Plate 17 #2)
4 commentsPtolemAE12/27/07 at 01:01PtolemAE: I'm partial but this is the finest AE48 Ptolemaic ...
venus victrix forum.jpg
Venus Victrix - the rear view530 viewsSabina, AR denarius, 128 AD.
RIC 412, RSC 89, Sear RCV II,3927.
A gorgeous rear view of the goddess of love, with an elegant "Grecian bend"-curve to the figure, much more pleasing than the dumpy little ladies normally found on denarii of Domna, etc.
- Britannicus
4 commentsBritannicus12/16/07 at 03:29fofura: This is absolutely incredible!!! Somebody is lucky...
DOMNA-15.jpg
Three Graces, Goddesses of charm, beauty and culture.278 viewsJulia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, Augusta, 193-217 CE.
Moesia Inferior, Marcianopolis, Æ (24mm, 8.6 gm).
Obv: IOLAIA DOMNA CEB, Draped bust right, hair in bun.
Rev: MARKIANOPOLITWN, Statuary group of the Three Graces side by side.
Sear Greek Imp. 2313; AMNG (Pick) 603; Moushmov 417.

The three Graces, named Euphrosyne, Aglaia and Thalia, were the attendants of Venus/Aphrodite. They are shown on Roman provincial coins as a statuary group, nude and sometimes holding apples.
2 commentsEmpressCollector12/16/07 at 03:26fofura: One can only hope to come across this coin!
erf_rp3321.jpg
Pan259 viewsΑV ΚΑΙ ΠΟ ΛΙ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right, large B before / Α[ΡΧ ΙΑ]CΟΝΟC CΙΛΒΟV ΤΑΒΗ / ΝΩΝ, Goat-legged horned Pan, dancing left, playing syrinx.

Tabae in Caria, Æ31, Gallienus, BMC 103
1 commentsflinn12/16/07 at 03:22fofura: Wow! I hope to be so lucky as to find this coin!!!
RI 077v img~0.jpg
Romulus260 viewsSeverus Alexander Denarius
Obv:– IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P VII COS II P P, Romulus advancing right with spear & trophy
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 85. RSC 351

Romulus, founder of the city, shares the attributes of Mars but not helmeted.
3 commentsmaridvnvm04/03/07 at 06:57maridvnvm: Romulus is a male, wearing clothes and not wearing...
helena_39~0.jpg
Securitas218 viewsHelena, died AD 328, mother of Constantin I
AE - AE3, 2.96g, 17mm
Cyzikus 2. officina, AD 325/6
obv. FL HELENA - AVGVSTA
bust draped, with necklace, pearl-diademed head r.
rev. SECVRITAS - REI PVBLICE
Securitas draped, diademed, standing l., with r. hand holding down a branch,
with l. raising her robe
exergue: SMK[B] dot
RIC VII, Cyzicus 39; cf. C.39; LRBC.1177
R2; uncirculated, partially silvered

SECURITAS, security, connected with the ideas of Peace and Victory. Sometimes depicted as leaning on a column (meaning security for itself). Here providing security for the empire.
1 commentsJochen04/02/07 at 12:44Aamil Qureshi: Beautiful coin with beautiful silvering
RI 077v img~0.jpg
Romulus260 viewsSeverus Alexander Denarius
Obv:– IMP SEV ALEXAND AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P VII COS II P P, Romulus advancing right with spear & trophy
Minted in Rome
Reference:– RIC 85. RSC 351

Romulus, founder of the city, shares the attributes of Mars but not helmeted.
3 commentsmaridvnvm04/02/07 at 12:43Aamil Qureshi: How can one tell if he is Romulus?
severus_alexander_254.jpg
Spes281 viewsSeverus Alexander AD 222 - 235
AR - Denar, 3.35g, 18mm
Rome AD 232
Av.: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped and cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
Rv.: SPES PV - BLICA
Spes draped advancing l., holding flower r.,raising robe with l.
RIC IV/2, 254; C.546; BMCR.897
VF

SPES, hope, with near relations to Fortuna and Salus. Under the Principat part of the religion of loyality. Depicted like Aphrodite in the Greek art, holding flower, raising garment.
2 commentsJochen07/26/06 at 17:58slokind: Like Archivum, I know of no reason to think of Aph...
severus_alexander_254.jpg
Spes281 viewsSeverus Alexander AD 222 - 235
AR - Denar, 3.35g, 18mm
Rome AD 232
Av.: IMP ALEXANDER PIVS AVG
draped and cuirassed bust, laureate head r.
Rv.: SPES PV - BLICA
Spes draped advancing l., holding flower r.,raising robe with l.
RIC IV/2, 254; C.546; BMCR.897
VF

SPES, hope, with near relations to Fortuna and Salus. Under the Principat part of the religion of loyality. Depicted like Aphrodite in the Greek art, holding flower, raising garment.
2 commentsJochen07/26/06 at 16:55archivum: Spes is pictured as a standard archaic maiden-figu...
caracalla_261(d).JPG
Pluto(n)303 viewsCaracalla 198-217
AR - Antoninianus, 5.3g
Rome AD 215
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
cuirassed bust, radiate head r.
rev. PM TRP XVIII COS IIII PP
Pluto with polos on head seated l. on throne, sceptre in l. hand, r.
extended towards three-headed Cerberus l., before him.
RIC IV/1, 261(d); in Cohen only with Minotaur
Rare; nice EF, one of the earliest Antoniniani!
added to www.wildwinds.com

PLUTO(N), Greek HADES, god of the underworld, identified by the three-headed Cerberus. But the polos shows, that at this time Pluto was mixed up with Serapis. Caracalla should have built a Serapeion on the Quirinal.
2 commentsJochen04/13/06 at 01:23wolfgang336: An excellent example of the first antoninianii!
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito01/19/06 at 23:12whitetd49: What is going on?!
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito01/19/06 at 19:26cogito: Mr. Sermarini, please delete this gallery entry. ...
pixo.jpg
Apollo / Zeus Labraundos, Pixodaros Didrachm482 views340-334 BC. AR Didrachm (21mm, 6.98 g). Laureate head of Apollo, facing slightly right / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre.5 commentsember01/12/06 at 12:09Bacchus: A pleasure to view coins like this - must be even ...
pixo.jpg
Apollo / Zeus Labraundos, Pixodaros Didrachm482 views340-334 BC. AR Didrachm (21mm, 6.98 g). Laureate head of Apollo, facing slightly right / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre.5 commentsember01/12/06 at 11:19Jochen: What a portrait! Thats's greek art!
pixo.jpg
Apollo / Zeus Labraundos, Pixodaros Didrachm482 views340-334 BC. AR Didrachm (21mm, 6.98 g). Laureate head of Apollo, facing slightly right / Zeus Labraundos standing right, holding double axe (labrys) and lotus-tipped sceptre.5 commentsember01/12/06 at 07:13Pscipio: Great, superb, I don't know what to say anymore - ...
RI 066ba img.jpg
Aesclepius563 viewsCaracalla denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate bust right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P, Aesculapius standing front, head left, with serpent-entwined wand; globe on ground at right
Minted in Rome in A.D. 215
References:- BMCRE 103, RIC 251, RSC 302

Aesclepius is the god of medicine and holds staff with a snake entwined around it.
3 commentsmaridvnvm04/30/05 at 08:49Miguel Sommariva: I want this one
thrace_byzantion_tet.jpg
Demeter, Thrace, Byzantion (220-240BC)483 viewsTHRACE, Byzantion. Circa 240-220 BC. AR Tetradrachm (26mm, 12.07 gm). Veiled and wreathed head of Demeter right / Poseidon seated right on rocks, holding trident in left arm, aphlaston in right hand. Magistrate [EPI SI]LWN[OS], a man called Silo, is located below Poseidon.

Schoenert-Geiss, Byzantion, p. 135, no. 1004, pl. 44, citing and illustrating Naville I, 1920, 1135, same dies. SNG Black Sea 59-61.

From the Garth R. Drewry Collection; ex. Superior Galleries, May 30, 1995.

Owned & posted by Cogito
6 commentscogito04/15/05 at 22:03Jochen: greek aphlaston, lat. aplustria, name of the curve...
lucius_verus_463~0.JPG
Providentia Deorum298 viewsLucius Verus, Co-Emperor AD 161 - 169
AR - Denar, 3.59g
obv. IMP L AVREL VERVS AVG
bare head r.
rev. PROV DEOR TRP COS II
Providentia standing l., holding globe and cornucopiae
RIC II, 463; C.144
nice EF

PROVIDENTIA, foreseeing, especially of the emperor, a so-called emperor's virtue in the emperor's cult. 'Monarchy, in fact, is Providence', Charlesworth. As legend it appears first under Tiberius, showing the Altar of Providence. Under Hadrian the idea of PROVIDENTIA DEORUM (Divine Providence) begins to be symbolized as the foresight of the gods.
2 commentsJochen04/15/05 at 14:02divvsavgvstvs: That is the nicest Verus I've ever seen.
venus victrix forum.jpg
Venus Victrix - the rear view530 viewsSabina, AR denarius, 128 AD.
RIC 412, RSC 89, Sear RCV II,3927.
A gorgeous rear view of the goddess of love, with an elegant "Grecian bend"-curve to the figure, much more pleasing than the dumpy little ladies normally found on denarii of Domna, etc.
- Britannicus
4 commentsBritannicus02/02/05 at 15:33whitetd49: That is a remarkable reverse!
julia_domna_388.jpg
Venus Genetrix237 viewsJulia Domna, died AD 217(?), wife of Septimius Severus
AR - Antoninianus, 4.89g, 21mm
Rome AD 216
obv.: IVLIA PIA - FELIX AVG
draped bust on crescent, diademed head r.
rev.: VENVS GENETRIX
Venus sitting l. on throne, holding long sceptre l. and extending r. hand
RIC IV/1, Caracalla 388(a); C.211; BMCR.434
Scarce; about VF

VENUS GENETRIX. After the defeat at the Trasumenian lake AD 217 under Q.Fabius Maximus begin of the mythos of the troian origin of the Romans as anti-karthag.-pro-greek propaganda. Getting political importness in the 1st century BC as Aeneadum Genetrix and so becoming mother of the Gens Iulia and the Roman People. V.Genetrix first used by Sulla, then at the height by Caesar, reflected in Vergil's Aeneis.
1 commentsJochen01/24/05 at 12:39Tiathena: Lovely portrait of Julia Domna...
RI 066ba img.jpg
Aesclepius563 viewsCaracalla denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate bust right
Rev:– P M TR P XVIII COS IIII P P, Aesculapius standing front, head left, with serpent-entwined wand; globe on ground at right
Minted in Rome in A.D. 215
References:- BMCRE 103, RIC 251, RSC 302

Aesclepius is the god of medicine and holds staff with a snake entwined around it.
3 commentsmaridvnvm01/24/05 at 10:48Tiathena: Absolutely beautiful & fantastic coin, in every wa...
RI 066b img.jpg
Sol, holding whip266 viewsCaracalla Denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM, Laureate head right
Rev:– P M TR P XX COS IIII P P, Sol standing left, holding right hand up in salute and whip
Minted in Rome in A.D. 217
References:– VM 6/5, RIC 293d (Common), RSC 389
2 commentsmaridvnvm01/24/05 at 10:46Tiathena: Beautiful coin...
RI 066c img.jpg
Serapis239 viewsCaracalla Denarius
Obv:– ANTONINVS PIVS AVG BRIT, Laureate bust right
Rev:- P M TR P XVI COS IIII P P, Serapis his chest bare and a modius on his head standing left holding sceptre and raising hand
Minted in Rome, A.D. 213
References, VM 60.1, RIC 208, RSC 211.

Serapis was imported from Egypt and became popular at Rome in the 3rd century A.D. He is bearded, wears a tall headdress and carries a staff. He usually is shown gesturing with a raised hand.
1 commentsmaridvnvm01/24/05 at 10:43Tiathena: Lovely coin: one of my favorite portrait types (lo...
venus victrix forum.jpg
Venus Victrix - the rear view530 viewsSabina, AR denarius, 128 AD.
RIC 412, RSC 89, Sear RCV II,3927.
A gorgeous rear view of the goddess of love, with an elegant "Grecian bend"-curve to the figure, much more pleasing than the dumpy little ladies normally found on denarii of Domna, etc.
- Britannicus
4 commentsBritannicus11/24/04 at 20:38Jochen: Oh, what a wife!
plautilla_369~0.jpg
Venus Victrix272 viewsPlautilla, killed 212, wife of Caracalla
AR - Denar, 3.6g, 18mm
Rome AD 204(?), struck under Septimius Severus
obv. PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. VENVS VICTRIX
Venus bare to waist, standing l., holding apple and palmbranch, and
resting left elbow on shield; at her feet l., Cupido, holding helmet
RIC IV/1, 369; C.25; BMCR. 429
Scarce; about VF

VENUS VICTRIX, the victorious Venus. It was first Sulla who in a dream saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her to his personal patroness. Pompeius then was inaugurating the cult of Venus Victrix in Rome. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 BC Pompeius was dreaming of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign -, whereas Caesar was sacrifying to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompeius!
2 commentsJochen10/30/04 at 18:37Gunner: She's quite cute on my lil Plautilla Denarius. Ma...
plautilla_369~0.jpg
Venus Victrix272 viewsPlautilla, killed 212, wife of Caracalla
AR - Denar, 3.6g, 18mm
Rome AD 204(?), struck under Septimius Severus
obv. PLAVTILLA - AVGVSTA
draped bust, bare head r.
rev. VENVS VICTRIX
Venus bare to waist, standing l., holding apple and palmbranch, and
resting left elbow on shield; at her feet l., Cupido, holding helmet
RIC IV/1, 369; C.25; BMCR. 429
Scarce; about VF

VENUS VICTRIX, the victorious Venus. It was first Sulla who in a dream saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her to his personal patroness. Pompeius then was inaugurating the cult of Venus Victrix in Rome. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 BC Pompeius was dreaming of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign -, whereas Caesar was sacrifying to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompeius!
2 commentsJochen10/30/04 at 17:45wolfgang336: Not exactly a pretty lady was she?
CRISPINA-4.jpg
Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.350 viewsCrispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
4 commentsEmpressCollector09/18/04 at 10:04EmpressCollector: Asklepios and Hygieia/Salus have sacred snakes wit...
maximinusII_92.jpg
Serapis311 viewsMaximinus II Daia 309 - 313
AE - Follis (Bronce), 5.00g, 22.2mm
Cyzokus 4. officina, 311 - 312
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SOLE IN - VICTO
Sol radiate standing l. in long robe, r. raised, l. holding head of Serapis
field: Delta
exergue: MKV
RIC VI, Cyzikus 92; C.156
Scarce; good VF
from Forum Ancient Coins, ex Scott coll., thanks!
SERAPIS was a syncretic deity made of Osiris and Apis. Introduced by Ptolemaeus
as state deity. Later he was the highest deity with reminiscence of Zeus and even Christ(!). Because of that he connected Eastern, Egyptian religion with the Western world. Replaced by Christianity, after a short attempt by Julian II.
3 commentsJochen09/17/04 at 06:24Gert: Wonderful and interesting reverse!
maximinusII_92.jpg
Serapis311 viewsMaximinus II Daia 309 - 313
AE - Follis (Bronce), 5.00g, 22.2mm
Cyzokus 4. officina, 311 - 312
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SOLE IN - VICTO
Sol radiate standing l. in long robe, r. raised, l. holding head of Serapis
field: Delta
exergue: MKV
RIC VI, Cyzikus 92; C.156
Scarce; good VF
from Forum Ancient Coins, ex Scott coll., thanks!
SERAPIS was a syncretic deity made of Osiris and Apis. Introduced by Ptolemaeus
as state deity. Later he was the highest deity with reminiscence of Zeus and even Christ(!). Because of that he connected Eastern, Egyptian religion with the Western world. Replaced by Christianity, after a short attempt by Julian II.
3 commentsJochen08/20/04 at 18:23Optimus: Very nice coin. The reverse looks a bit spooky
maximinusII_92.jpg
Serapis311 viewsMaximinus II Daia 309 - 313
AE - Follis (Bronce), 5.00g, 22.2mm
Cyzokus 4. officina, 311 - 312
obv. IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS PF AVG
laureate head r.
rev. SOLE IN - VICTO
Sol radiate standing l. in long robe, r. raised, l. holding head of Serapis
field: Delta
exergue: MKV
RIC VI, Cyzikus 92; C.156
Scarce; good VF
from Forum Ancient Coins, ex Scott coll., thanks!
SERAPIS was a syncretic deity made of Osiris and Apis. Introduced by Ptolemaeus
as state deity. Later he was the highest deity with reminiscence of Zeus and even Christ(!). Because of that he connected Eastern, Egyptian religion with the Western world. Replaced by Christianity, after a short attempt by Julian II.
3 commentsJochen08/20/04 at 16:45BenB: Awesome detail on Sol and Serapis's faces!
DOMNA-13~0.JPG
Four Seasons311 viewsJulia Domna, wife of Septimius Severus, Augusta, 193-217 C.E.
AR Denarius (3.24g, 20.0mm), Rome mint, AD 207.
Obv: IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bust right.
Rev: FECVNDITAS, Terra reclining left under tree, left arm on basket of fruits, right hand set on globe, spangled with stars, in background four children representing the four Seasons.
RIC 549, RSC 35, BMC 21, Sear 6579.
Ex FORVM Ancient coins.

The four seasons--spring, summer, fall and winter--are typically personified by four nude boys at play.
1 commentsEmpressCollector08/17/04 at 01:33Jericho: Great portrait, very nice!
erf_rp2012.jpg
Horus (Harpokrates) & Bes308 viewsΑVΤ Κ Π ΛΙΚ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC CΕΒ, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right / LΙ_Ε, Horus (Harpokrates) standing facing, head right, palm in right field, Bes in left. Regnal year across fields.3 commentsflinn08/16/04 at 06:08mauseus: How nice is that!!!!!! Want it!
caracalla_284~0.jpg
Luna/Diana270 viewsCaracalla AD 198 - 217
AR - Denar, 3.13g, 19mm
Rome AD 217
obv. ANTONINVS PIVS AVG GERM
laureate head r.
rev. PM TRP XX COS IIII PP
Luna/Diana with crescent on head and scarf flying
behind her, standing in bull-biga, driving l.
RIC IV, 284; C.396
Scarce; good EF

LUNA, goddess of the moon. Her usual attribute is a crescent worn at top of her head. She first appears early 2nd century BC on Bigati. Equated with DIANA and sometimes impossible to make any clear distinction between these two. The bull is connected to DIANA by a myth, in which sacrificing a big bull would bring great power to the city of the person who sacrificed him. Thus Rome was given the imperium! Diana was the patron of the Biga racing driver too!
2 commentsJochen08/03/04 at 01:04Jericho: Wow, this coin couldn't be any better! ...
erf_rp2012.jpg
Horus (Harpokrates) & Bes308 viewsΑVΤ Κ Π ΛΙΚ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC CΕΒ, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right / LΙ_Ε, Horus (Harpokrates) standing facing, head right, palm in right field, Bes in left. Regnal year across fields.3 commentsflinn07/31/04 at 23:12flinn: Bes is a dwarf, often associated with Horus. Some...
erf_rp2012.jpg
Horus (Harpokrates) & Bes308 viewsΑVΤ Κ Π ΛΙΚ ΓΑΛΛΙΗΝΟC CΕΒ, Laureate draped cuirassed bust right / LΙ_Ε, Horus (Harpokrates) standing facing, head right, palm in right field, Bes in left. Regnal year across fields.3 commentsflinn07/31/04 at 22:35Jochen: Interesting coin! Please, add a bit information! W...
RI 096e img.jpg
Pannonia229 viewsTrajan Decius Ant.
Obv:– IMP C M Q TRAIANVS DECIVS AVG, Radiate, draped, cuirassed bust right
Rev:– PANNONIAE, The two Pannoniae, each holding a standard, standing half left but looking in opposite directions
Minted in Rome. A.D. 249 - 251
Reference:– Van Meter 16/1. RIC 21b. RSC 86

Pannonia was a Roman province between the Danube and the Alps, later divided into Upper and Lower Pannonia. Trajan Decius was the first emperor to come from the Danube region
1 commentsmaridvnvm07/26/04 at 19:07Jochen: Better then mine!
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm07/26/04 at 17:08tacrolimus: Gorgeous coin!
Probus MARS VICTOR RIC 38~0.jpg
Mars Victor257 viewsAnt. IMP C PROBVS PF AVG, Radiate and cuirassed bust R. MARS VICTOR, Mars walking R holding spear and trophy. II in exe. Lugdunum. RIC 38, Common.

Mars was the god of war. I love this giant figure striding along with a trophy casually slung over his shoulder.
1 commentsRobert_Brenchley07/23/04 at 20:00Jochen: I can hear him whistling like a wanderer!
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm07/18/04 at 12:45jimwho523: Beautiful!! This is one I've never seen before, an...
erf_rp3040.jpg
Athena Panthea - Goddess of one-stop shopping487 viewsAttributes: the wings of Nike, the rudder of Tyche, the sistrum of Isis, the grain ears of Demeter, the cornucopia of nearly everybody, and her own shield.1 commentsflinn07/04/04 at 21:35Jochen: Very interesting goddess! Never seen before!
RI 064t img~0.jpg
Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage385 viewsSeptimius Severus Denarius
Obv:– SEVERVS PIVS AVG, Laureate head right
Rev:– INDVLGENTIA AVGG / IN CARTH, Dea Caelestis, goddess of Carthage, with elaborate headdress, looking front, riding right on springing lion, holding thunderbolt and sceptre, water gushing from rocks at left below
Minted in Rome, A.D. 203 A.D.
References:– RIC 266, RCV02 6285, RSC 222
5 commentsmaridvnvm06/28/04 at 01:44Jericho: Superb coin, portrait and reverse.
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert06/26/04 at 02:04featherz: I still need one of these.. Ah, someday..
ElagabalusPanobre~0.JPG
Pan332 viewsAE27 Elagabalus (218-222)
Nikopolis ad Istrum, consular legate Novius Rufus
Obv: AVT K M AVPH ANTΩNINOC. Laur. draped and cuir. bust r.R
Rev: VΠ NOBIOV ROVΦOV NIKOΠOΛITΩN ΠPO; In ex: CICTPΩ· Pan, stg.r., horned, holding rabbitcatcher (lagobalon) over shoulder, flute in hand, foot on panther lying supile on the ground.
27 mm / Porosity
Moushmov 1436
4 commentsGert06/25/04 at 20:20Jericho: Wonderful reverse! Never seen this type before.
CRISPINA-4.jpg
Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.350 viewsCrispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
4 commentsEmpressCollector06/23/04 at 18:24Jochen: Treading on a snake with human head as symbol of e...
julia_mamaea_338.jpg
Felicitas270 viewsJulia Mamaea, died 235, mother of Severus Alexander
AR - Denar, 3.22g, 19mm
Rome AD 230
obv. IVLIA MA - MAEA AVG
draped bust, diademed head r.
rev. FELICITAS - PVBLICA
Felicitas sitting l., holding caduceus l. and cornucopiae r.,
l. foot on footstool

FELICITAS, personification of 'happiness' in the sense of prosperity and
success, here of the state (PVBLICA)
1 Caduceus, herald's staff, originally carried by Mercury, later decorated
at the top with a pair of serpents and often winged. Suggesting peace,
stability and concord
2 Cornucopiae, 'horns of plenty', overflowing with fruits and ears of grain,
a motif borrowed from Greek art, symbol of prosperty (brought to the people by
the emperor)
1 commentsJochen06/23/04 at 15:52Jochen: CORRECTION Forgot the attribution under the descri...
soaemias3.jpg
Hekate Triformis378 viewsJulia Soaemias -- AE20 from Mastaura (Lydia).
Hekate Triformis, was a goddess from Asia minor. Her main holy shrine was in Lagina. The Triformis created by Alkamenes, end of 5. century. Her companion a dog.
2 commentsfeatherz06/23/04 at 09:26Jochen: A goddess from Asia minor, main holy shrine in Lag...
CRISPINA-4.jpg
Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.350 viewsCrispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
4 commentsEmpressCollector06/21/04 at 19:29wolfgang336: So what's the meaning of the snake on the SPES PVB...
CRISPINA-4.jpg
Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.350 viewsCrispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
4 commentsEmpressCollector06/21/04 at 18:34Jochen: Interesting the change of the meaning of the snake...
LUCILLA-2.jpg
Juno Lucina, the protectress of midwives and childbirth.287 viewsLucilla, wife of Lucius Verus, sister of Commodus. Augusta, 164-182/3 CE.
AR denarius (18mm, 3.24g), Rome mint, 166 CE.
Obv: LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, Bare-headed and draped bust right.
Rev: IVNONI LVCINAE, Juno standing. l., holding baby in swaddling clothes in left arm.
RIC-771, Sear-5485, BMC-313, Cohen-38.

Lucina is the Roman name for the Greek goddess, Eileithyia, who was the protectress of midwives and who assisted during birth. She was later identified with Hera or Artemis. On Roman coins, Lucina is identified as an aspect of the goddess Juno associated with light and childbirth, during which she eased the pain and made sure all went well. Coins portraying Lucina may commemorate a birth in the Imperial family or that the help of the goddess had been invoked. She is usually portrayed with or holding children. A variety of objects may accompany her, sometimes a patera and scepter--attributes of Juno--or more commonly, a flower.
1 commentsEmpressCollector06/20/04 at 11:24EmpressCollector: See the bronzes of Lucilla and Crispina in my (EC)...
45ConstantineTheGreatSolInvictoRedFollis-med.jpg
SOL348 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG

Reverse: SOL INVIC-TO COMITI

Left Field: T
Right Field: F
Exergue: BTR
2 commentsGunner06/11/04 at 09:45Gunner: Thank you very much Mayadigger! It's even better ...
45ConstantineTheGreatSolInvictoRedFollis-med.jpg
SOL348 viewsObverse: IMP CONSTANTINVS AVG

Reverse: SOL INVIC-TO COMITI

Left Field: T
Right Field: F
Exergue: BTR
2 commentsGunner06/11/04 at 01:52Mayadigger: A remarkable example of this issue!
08691q00.jpg
Hilaritas966 viewsThe most amusing goddess! Silver denarius, S 5254, RIC M. Aur. 686, RSC 111, gVF, 2.92g, 16.6mm, 180o, Rome mint, 161-175 A.D.; obverse FAVSTINA AVGVSTA, draped bust right; reverse HILARITAS, Hilaritas standing left holding palm branch and cornucopia1 comments06/10/04 at 20:03ancientcoins: im lovin the coin right away
     
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