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Detail_of_a_mythical_man-lion__Basalt_relief_from_Carchemish__9th_cent__BC_jpg_PNG.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.Detail of a mythical man-lion. Basalt relief from Carchemish, 9th cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
VOTIVE_STELE.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Anatolian Museum of Civilisations.A votive stele, 2nd-3rd cent. BC.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Column_of_Julian_in_Ankara.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Column of JulianThe Column of Julian in Ankara was erected in dedication to his visit sometime in 362 AD. It has a strange ribbed design. In fact it looks like a giant marble kebab to me.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Ankara__baths.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Roman BathsPhotograph by Will Hooton*Alex
Roman_Baths__Ankara.jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Roman BathsPhotograph by Will Hooton*Alex
Temple.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, The Temple of the Divine Augustus and RomeThe Temple of the Divine Augustus and Rome in the centre of Ankara, which now stands besides a mosque. I was unable to get any closer due this being Ramazan, the area was cordoned off in preparation for iftar.

Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Theatre,_Ankara_(1).jpg
Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (1)Not to far from the Anatolian Museum in Ankara, a theatre is currently being excavated. It certainly looks promising, although excavation is expected to continue for a long while. To excavate something like this in the middle of a metropolitan city is quite extraordinary!
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Theatre_at_Ankara.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Theatre (2)Another view of the Theatre.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Ankara__Tombstones.JPG
Turkey, Ankara, Tombstones.Situated in the town's palestra, a short distance away from the Roman Baths, are a large selection of Roman tombstones some of which are very interesting.
Photographs by Will Hooton
*Alex
LimyraTheater.jpg
Turkey, Antalya Province, Limyra - TheaterLimyra was a small city in Lycia on the southern coast of Asia Minor, on the Limyrus River, about 5 1/2 KM from the mouth of that river. The ruins are about 5 km northeast of the town of Finike (ancient Phoenicus) in Antalya Province, Turkey. It was a prosperous city, and one of the oldest cities in Lycia. It had rich and abundant soil, and gradually became one of the finest trade settlements in Greece. Pericles adopted it as the capital of the Lycian League. The city came under control of the Persian Empire after it was conquered by Cyrus the Great. He later annexed Lydia and its territories after a decisive victory at the Battle of Thymbra and the Siege of Sardis, where he defeated armies twice as large as his. Cyrus then got his greatest general: Harpagus of Media to conquer the much smaller kingdoms in Anatolia, while he went to conquer the Neo-Babylonian Empire. Anatolia would become an important place for the Persian monarchs who succeeded Cyrus. The massive Royal road constructed by Darius went from the Persian capital of Persepolis, to the Anatolian city of Sardis. Limyra would stay under Persian control until it was conquered and sacked by Alexander the Great. It is mentioned by Strabo (XIV, 666), Ptolemy (V, 3, 6) and several Latin authors. Gaius Caesar, adopted son of Augustus, died there (Velleius Paterculus, II, 102). Ruins consist of a theater, tombs, sarcophagi, bas-reliefs, Greek and Lycian inscriptions etc. About 3 km east of the site is the Roman Bridge at Limyra, one of the oldest segmented arch bridges of the world.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:LimyraTheater1.jpg
Photo by Kpisimon, 8 May 1988
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Joe Sermarini
JULIA_SOAEMIAS.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue attributed to Julia Soaemias, mother of  Elagabalus.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Herakles.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Herakles.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Hadrian.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Hadrian in military dress.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
ATHENA.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Athena.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
artemis_perge.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Artemis, removed from Perge.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
TYCHE.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Tyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
TRAJAN~0.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Trajan in military dress.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Private_Citizen.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of a private citizen.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
POSSIBLY_FORTUNA.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue, probably of Fortuna.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Mercury.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Mercury.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
UNATTRIBUTED_EMPEROR.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Unattributed statue of an emperor.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
The_three_Graces.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.The Three Graces, removed from Perge.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Red_figure_pottery_(3).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.An example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton.
*Alex
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(2).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.An example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
RED_FIGURE_POTTERY_(1).JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.An example of the wonderful collection of red figure pottery housed at the museum.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_details.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Details from a sarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photographs by Will Hooton
*Alex
Sarcophagus__Labours_of_Herakles_.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Sarcophagus featuring the 10 labours of Hercules.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
Heroic_Hadrian.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Heroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
*Alex
H2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Heroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
H1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. Heroic statue of Hadrian.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Sarapis1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Serapis.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Tyche2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya. Tyche
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Athena2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Athena.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Herakles2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of Herakles.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Hermes2.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
Hermes1.JPG
Turkey, Antalya, Archaeological Museum of Antalya.Statue of a Hermes.
Photograph by Will Hooton
Joe Sermarini
1280px-Antalya_-_Hadrian_#39;s_Gate.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, Hadrian's Gate in AntalyaHadrian's Gate in Antalya
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antalya
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Ingo Mehling - 17 May 2012
Joe Sermarini
Sunrise_apollo_side~0.jpg
Turkey, Antalya, The ruins of the Temple of Apollo at SideThe ruins of the Temple of Apollo at Side, Antalya, Turkey
21 October 2011
Photo by:
Saffron Blaze, via http://www.mackenzie.co
This file was a finalist in Picture of the Year 2012.
This is a featured picture on Wikimedia Commons (Featured pictures) and is considered one of the finest images.
Joe Sermarini
Tempio_di_Afrodite_e_tetrapylon.JPG
Turkey, Aphrodisias - Aphrodite's temple with tetrapylonMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Aspendos_1.JPG
Turkey, Aspendos - Theater's entranceMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Aspendos_theatre_seating.jpg
Turkey, Aspendos, Roman theatre, SeatingAspendos has a strong claim to possess the best-preserved Roman theatre in the world. It dates from the mid-second century, completed during the last years of the reign of Antoninus Pius, to a design by a local architect, Zenon. The cavea seats over 10,000; walking around the top level, you can still find the original post holes for the masts fixing the velarium. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
Aspendos_theatre_stage_building.jpg
Turkey, Aspendos, Roman theatre, Stage buildingThe scaenae frons is similarly largely undamaged. The stage building had secondary use, first as a caravanserai and later as a residence for the Seljuk governor of the city! Abu Galyon
s_Arch.jpg
Turkey, Attalia (Antalya) - Hadrian's gateA stylish triple-arched gateway erected in 130 CE to mark the emperor Hadrian’s visit to the city. It’s still used as one of the principal entrances to the historic Kaleiçi quarter of today’s Antalya. And it’s a very visible reminder of how much lower the street level was in Roman times. At the base of the central arch there are quite deep grooves formed by the passage of carts: hence the glass-bottomed footbridge, designed to save the modern pedestrian from a twisted ankle. Abu Galyon
atalhyk.jpg
Turkey, ÇatalhöyükÇatalhöyük (SE of Konya in Anatolia) is an outstanding Neolithic site. Excavation is ongoing, with the delicate mud brick architecture preserved under two large domes. There are no streets in Çatalhöyük; the buildings all abut one another and were accessed (using ladders) from the roof. The people of Çatalhöyük, it seems, had discovered how to construct houses, but hadn’t yet worked out the technology of doors and windows. 1 commentsAbu Galyon
UzuncaburcZeus.jpg
Turkey, Cilicia, Olba, Temple of ZeusPhoto by Klaus-Peter Simon 1995. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olba_(ancient_city)Joe Sermarini
Tel_at_Colossae.JPG
Turkey, ColossaeAnother Anatolian tel awaiting excavation (or perhaps looters if the archaeologists delay too long): this is the site of ancient Colossae in the Lycus valley. Modern Christian pilgrims touring the ‘Seven Churches of Asia’ visit nearby Laodicea but generally ignore this place, which is slightly odd because Saint Paul did address one of his letters to the congregation resident here. Of course, there’s little to see apart from the usual surface scatter of shards. Abu Galyon
Turkey_ancient_tombs.jpg
Turkey, Dalyan - The rock tombs of KaunosOutside the official Kaunos archeological site, near Dalyan, Turkey there are six rock tombs on the Dalyan river (4th – 2nd century BC). The façades of the rock tombs resemble the fronts of Hellenistic temples with two Ionian pillars, a triangular pediment, an architrave with toothed friezes, and acroterions shaped like palm leaves.1 commentsJoe Sermarini
Cliffside_Tombs,_Ancient_Kaunos,_Dalyan,_Turkey.jpg
Turkey, Dalyan, Cliffside Tombs of Ancient city of KaunosToday, these elaborate graves form part of the UNESCO-recognised Ancient City of Kaunos, a 2,500-year-old archaeological site also home to a 5,000-seat Hellenistic theatre, a rock-cut Roman bath, and several Lycian temples and churches.
Dating back to the 4th century BC, the “Lycian King Tombs of Kaunos” feature Greek-style pillars and intricate hand-carved reliefs depicting gods, angels and spirits. Inside, ancient monoliths and limestone-lined chambers mark the final resting place of the Lycian elite.
The remarkable structures pictured above are in fact only a small proportion of the 170 or more rock-cut graves of various shapes, making up the Kaunian necropolis. These temple tombs, clustered in two main groups, are the most elaborate graves of the city.
*Alex
Eflatun_pinar.jpg
Turkey, Eflatun pinarThe name means ‘lilac spring’. If you are travelling between Konya (Iconium) and Yalvaç (Pisidian Antioch) it’s only a short detour to visit this delightfully secluded site near Lake BeyÅŸehir. The stones are the remains of a small Hittite temple or sanctuary, dating from perhaps the 14th or 13th century BCE. Abu Galyon
Theater_Elaiussa.jpg
Turkey, Elaioussa Sebaste, Islands off Cilicia, TheaterElaiussa, meaning olive, was founded in the 2nd century B.C. on a tiny island attached to the the southern coast of Anatolia (in modern-day Turkey) by a narrow isthmus in Mediterranean Sea. During the reign of Augustus, the Cappadocian king Archelaus founded a new city on the isthmus. Archelaus called it Sebaste, which is the Greek equivalent word of the Latin "Augusta." The city entered a golden age when Vespasian purged Cilicia of pirates in 74 A.D. Towards the end of the 3rd century A.D. however its importance began to wane, due in large part to incursions by the Sassanian King Shapur I in 260 and later by the Isaurians. When its neighbor Corycus began to flourish in the 6th century A.D., Elaiussa Sebaste slowly disappeared from history.

The theater, dating to the 2nd century A.D., is small with only 23 rows of seats, whose steps and decorations unfortunately succumbed to centuries of plunder. Next to the theater is the agora, built in all great probability during the imperial period. At the entrance of the agora, which is surrounded by a semi-destroyed defense wall once rose two monumental fountains in the shape of lions. Inside the agora stands a large church, its floor is covered by sand to protect the mosaic pavement. Elaiussa's only temple stands outside the city on a hill overlooking the sea; only two of the Corinthian columns of this temple, which had 12 on the long and 6 on the short side originally, are standing today. A large bath complex among the lemon groves between the temple and the agora was built with a Roman technique little used in Anatolia. The necropolis is the richest and most impressive of cities of ancient Cilicia. The "Avenue of Graves," located on a hill to the north of the city, preserves close to a hundred graves of various shapes and sizes scattered among the lemon trees. The ancient aqueducts that carried water to the ruins from the Lamos ("Lemon") river also adorn the city’s two entrances. The aqueduct to the west of the city in particular is in relatively good condition. Centuries ago the aqueduct actually ran all the way to Corycus.
Joe Sermarini
Ephesus_Celsus_Library_Facade.jpg
Turkey, Ephesos, Façade of the Celsus library, in Ephesus, near Selçuk, west Turkey.Turkey, Ephesos, Façade of the Celsus library, in Ephesus, near Selçuk, west Turkey.

The Library of Celsus is an ancient Roman building in Ephesus, Anatolia, now part of Selçuk, Turkey. The building was commissioned in the 110s A.D. by a consul, Gaius Julius Aquila, as a funerary monument for his father, former proconsul of Asia Tiberius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus, and completed during the reign of Hadrian, sometime after Aquila's death. The library is considered an architectural marvel, and is one of the only remaining examples of a library from the Roman Empire. The Library of Celsus was the third-largest library in the Roman world behind only Alexandria and Pergamum, believed to have held around twelve thousand scrolls. Celsus is buried in a crypt beneath the library in a decorated marble sarcophagus. The interior measured roughly 180 square metres (2,000 square feet). The interior of the library and its contents were destroyed in a fire that resulted either from an earthquake or a Gothic invasion in 262 C.E., and the façade by an earthquake in the tenth or eleventh century. It lay in ruins for centuries until the façade was re-erected by archaeologists between 1970 and 1978.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ephesus_Celsus_Library_Fa%C3%A7ade.jpg
Benh LIEU SONG, 21 June 2010
Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Joe Sermarini
08F77.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - Library of CelsusThis building had two-storied façade but was three-storied.
built ca. CE 125 by Gaius Julius Aquila
once held nearly 12,000 scrolls
Johny SYSEL
terrace1.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Central SquarePart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.
temphad.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Central square of Terrace HousesPart of the central square of the terrace houses in Ephesus.1 comments
waystr.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Curetes StreetLooking down Curetes Street named after the priests who presided over the sacred fire of Hestia. The street is paved with marble slabs with sidewalks covered in mosaics.
3 comments
Tempio_di_Domiziano.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - Domitian's templeMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
08F75.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - Gate of Augustusgate to agoraJohny SYSEL
Ephese_Bibliotheque-2.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - LibraryEaster 20071 commentsPotator II
08F78.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - Library of CelsusJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - Library of CelsusJohny SYSEL
pubtoilets.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Public ToiletsMinus the slaves to warm the seats in winter and the live entertainment1 comments
hadtemp3.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Relief inside temple of Hadrian1 comments
Sculptured Drum of Column from Ephesus.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Sculptured Drum of Column from Ephesus
08F67.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - street connecting upper and lower townJohny SYSEL
08F58.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - street in upper townJohny SYSEL
08F81.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - street leading from harbour to agoraJohny SYSEL
08F84.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - street leading to harbourIn ancient times Ephesus had harbour but alluviums of local river moved coast 5,6 km further.Johny SYSEL
08F54.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - temple of Artemis - 1 of the 7 wonders of ancien worldWe can only dream up what it was once.2 commentsJohny SYSEL
hadtempdet.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - temple of HadrianA magnificent relief of Medusa filling the interior arch of the temple of Hadrian. Other reliefs of Amazons and the Olympian gods grace the interior.
08F73+++++++.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - temple of HadrianJohny SYSEL
Ephese_Hadrien.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - Temple of Hadrian - Easter 2007Potator II
terrace2.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Terrace HouseLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Lovely floor mosaic
ephtheat.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - TheaterOne of the largest in the ancient world. The apostle Paul spoke here before getting booted out for causing riots.1 comments
08F82.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - theatreJohny SYSEL
08F83.JPG
Turkey, Ephesus - theatre44000 spectators - maybe the largest ancient theatreJohny SYSEL
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Turkey, Ephesus - theatreJohny SYSEL
wallpainting.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus - Wall frescoLocated in the ongoing excavation of the upper-class terrace houses. Note the opening in the wall for circulation. The entire complex must have appeared like a luxury hotel with a central arbitorium.
celsus34.jpg
Turkey, Ephesus, Library of CelsusOne of the true glories of Ephesus is the reconstructed facade of the Library of Celsus. Dedicated in 120 A.D to the former governor of Asia Gaius Julius Celsus Polemaeanus, the library contained up to 12,000 scrolls. It was burned when the Goths sacked the city in 260 A. D. The edifice to the right is the Gate of Hadrian which connected the library to the public agora or marketplace.1 comments
Erythrai_amphitheatre.jpg
Turkey, Erythrai amphitheatreErythrai amphitheatre ruins in Turkey, 2009.Joe Sermarini
Hierapolis.JPG
Turkey, Hierapolis - Easter 2007Potator II
23580098.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - main streetHierapolis was used as spa since Hellenistic times.Johny SYSEL
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Turkey, Hierapolis - main streetHierapolis was used as spa since Hellenistic times.Johny SYSEL
23579803.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolisJohny SYSEL
23579612.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolisJohny SYSEL
23579518.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - necropolisJohny SYSEL
23579955.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - roman bath(northern bath)Johny SYSEL
941939.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - theatreJohny SYSEL
23580149.jpg
Turkey, Hierapolis - theatreJohny SYSEL
Teatro.JPG
Turkey, Hierapolis of Phrygia - TheaterMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
Ilium_-_Odeon.JPG
Turkey, Ilium - Troy (Turkey) - OdeonMay 2011FlaviusDomitianus
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