Classical Numismatics Discussion - Members' Coin Gallery
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Share Your Collection With Your Friends And With The World!!! A FREE Service Provided By Forum Ancient Coins No Limit To The Number Of Coins You Can Add - More Is Better!!! Is Your Coin The Best Of Type? Add It And Compete For The Title Have You Visited An Ancient Site - Please Share Your Photos!!! Use The Members' Coin Gallery As A Reference To Identify Your Coins Please Visit Our Shop And Find A Coin To Add To Your Gallery Today!!!

Member Collections | | Login | Album list | Last uploads | Last comments | Most viewed | Top rated | My Favorites | Search
Home > Members' Coin Collection Galleries > orfew

Other Coins


lot_272_cng_aug.jpg

3 files, last one added on Sep 04, 2019

Coins of Domitian


d605_new.jpg

Thanks to David Atherton for suggesting that I create separate galleries for my Flavian coins. When I only had a few it did not matter as much. However, now that I have a significant number of Domitian denarii, I think it was time. David also made the point that I have many coins of Domitian that others do not have and that some people may want to find a specific coin more easily. I hope that this gallery serves that purpose. Comments on individual coins are always welcome and if you have any questions about my coins please do not hesitate to send me a pm.

66 files, last one added on May 12, 2021

Coins of Vespasian


V_1477_new-removebg.jpg

48 files, last one added on Apr 13, 2021

Coins of Titus


New_v690_titus.jpg

21 files, last one added on Mar 24, 2021

Sold Coins


Titus_RIC_695.jpg

13 files, last one added on Mar 11, 2020

 

5 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - orfew's Gallery
d605_new.jpg
RIC 0605Domitian AR Denarius 88 CE September 14-December 31(Third Issue)
(3.14g)
Obv: Head laureate left; IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM
Rev: COS XIIII across field; Column inscribed LVD SAEC FEC; All within laurel wreath
RIC 605 (R3)
Purchased from Dr. Busso Peus Nach April 16, 2021


I never thought that I would own one of these. All left-facing portraits of Domitian are very rare to extremely rare on his denarii. This is now my fourth left-facing denarius for Domitian and this is the most important one I have acquired. In fact, this may be the most important coin in my collection.

This coin is desirable because it is a secular games denarius. Though some of these are available to the collector on a fairly consistent basis, some from this series are incredibly rare. However, rarity aside, all of the secular games denarii are very much sought after. When they appear they are usually snapped up very quickly indeed. One reason for this is that the denarii of Domitian are dominated by the 4 Minerva reverses. Though I love those coins too, because of some hidden treasures in the midst of some extremely common issues, many collectors feel differently. In fact, I understand while many would call Domitian denarii boring. However, this new acquisition is anything but boring.

First, just look at the portrait. Domitian denarii struck between 84-88 are known for some amazing portraits executed by very talented engravers. In fact, within my collection, I have examples from the same engraver on different denarii! The style of this one is so superb and distinctive that I should be able to match this coin to other examples of the engraver's work. Given the rarity of this coin, it is no surprise that my coin is a double-die match to the RIC plate coin. The plate coin is held by the ANS in New York City. Just how rare is the coin? RIC lists it as R3 which means that one example was known to the authors of RIC (2007) at the time of publication. That has 2 implications. First, it means that mine is the second one known and secondly, it means that my coin is the only one known in private hands. That means that I have the responsibility of keeping this coin secure until it passes to the next owner. I am just a temporary guardian for this coin struck almost 2000 years ago.

It may be said that perhaps as a coin of Domitian it is not so important. Domitian's coinage is not avidly pursued like the coins of more famous figures such as Nero, Augustus, Julius Caesar, Brutus, and others. However, I would argue it is an important coin because it marks the secular games; a known historical event. Of course, Domitian is also important as the last member of the Flavian family of emperors. The Flavian era brought stability after the disastrous year of the four emperors. Domitian's father Vespasian would initiate the building of the Flavian Amphitheatre, known today as the colosseum. Domitian's brother Titus finished the construction after the death of Vespasian. I would therefore say that this coin is an artifact of a very interesting historical period and as such is historically interesting.

No one knows why these left-facing portraits are so rare on Domitian's denarii. Left-facing portraits appear regularly on the bronze issues of Domitian. Also, left-facing portraits of Titus and his father Vespasian do appear on their denarii. While true that some of these are rare to very rare, many are not. In fact, some are very common indeed.

I like these unsolved mysteries associated with ancient coins. While it might someday be discovered why Domitian's denarii include so few left-facing portraits, it may also remain unknown for the foreseeable future. In the meantime, I find myself thrilled to be the temporary custodian of this piece. I am also going to keep my eyes open for other left-facing denarii of Domitian that become available.
4 commentsorfewMay 12, 2021
D393_new.jpg
RIC 393Domitian AR Denarius 88 CE (Sixth issue)
(3.49g)
Obv: Laureate head right; IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P IIII
Rev: Minerva standing left with spear; IMP XI COS XI CENS PP P
RIC 393; BMC 87; RSC 189
Ex: Calgary coin
Ex: Savuto collection

This coin is the first from the sixth issue of 85 CE that I have seen available in the last several years. Rarity aside, this coin is very special because of the amazing portrait. It is generally accepted that the best portraits on Domitian’s denarii were struck between 84-88 CE. This one is certainly no exception. I would have to check but I do not remember seeing another portrait on these denarii by this engraver. I do have examples of Domitian denarii that were executed by the same engraver.

I will pick up the denarii from 85 CE whenever I can. However, before you go looking for one I would caution that a friend was looking for one for 1.5 years before he was able to purchase one. First, they are rare coins. Secondly, the quality of the portraits ranges from very good to amazing. Also, collectors of Domitian’s denarii are always looking for coins from this year of issue. Therefore, when these coins appear there is sometimes quite a bit of competition for them. Even those who do not specialize in Domitian may want one because of the excellent portraits.

This is my first Domitian denarius from the sixth issue. I hope to add the others someday, but it might take a while to find another. Thanks go to my friend Jay for agreeing to part with this coin so I could make it a part of my collection.
3 commentsorfewMay 07, 2021
D338_new.jpg
RIC 0338Domitian AR Denarius 85 CE (Fourth issue)
(3.13g)
Obv: Laureate bust right, IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM PM TR P IIII
Rev: Minerva standing left with spear; IMP VIIII COS XI CENS POT PP
RIC 338
Ex: Aegean store on Vcoins
Ex: Savuto collection
Apart from this one I have not seen one of these come to market since I started collecting. I purchased this one from a friend who was able to spot this rarity. This coin was misattributed and so was overlooked by other collectors. Thank you Jay for allowing me to add this one to mu collection.

As mentioned this coin is very rare. It is a coin from the fourth issue of precious metal coinage from 85 CE. If you are very luck and you are looking for it, you just might find one of these for yourself. All denarii from 85 CE are rare. Another friend of mine finally found one after actively looking for more than 1.5 years. The fourth issue is interesting because within it there are 2 parallel groups. One group has the Aegis on the portrait and the other does not. This is true for all of the Minerva types except M1-Minerva advancing right. I have been informed that this coin has now surfaced which means the parallel groups are complete.

My goal is to collect all of the denarii in the fourth and fifth issues from 85 CE. They are very elusive. What makes these issues special is the CENS POT in the reverse legend. This is a departure from the common CENS PPP. However, there is another reason I collect the denarii of 85 CE. Some of them have incredible portraits. The portrait above is very nice but not quite the most artistic representation. If you want a great portrait of Domitian look for a denarius dated between 84-88 CE. Having said that I think the Minerva on the reverse is rendered in very fine style.

Take a look at my other denarii from 85 CE on this site if you want to see some great portraits. Thanks for taking a look.
3 commentsorfewMay 07, 2021
D604_edit.jpg
RIC 0604Domitian AR Denarius Struck 88 CE (Third Issue)
(20 mm, 2.96 g)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VIII, laureate head right
Rev: COS XIIII - LVD SAEC FEC, COS XIII across field Column inscribed LVD SAEC FEC, all within Laurel wreath.
RIC 604, RSC 70, BMC 137
Ex: Luc Corso collection
EX: CGB France Purchased February 17, 2020

This is a nice example of a relatively common but interesting coin. The denarii of Domitian which feature Secular Games reverses are very popular coins. One reason is that the reverse of Domitian denarii are dominated by Minerva and many consider these coins repetitive and dull. I am not one of these people. I find looking for the small differences in some of these denarii is very interesting. I have located a number of overlooked rarities this way. I think it is important to remember that the many titles of Domitian that one sees on the denarii are not just random dates. They do in fact represent actual historical events such as victories won in the many battles Domitian had with his adversaries. While it is true that we may have no other record of these encounters, the shifting titles on the coins tell us that some kind of event happened that resulted in the rewarding of titles to Domitian.

As for this coin, it was very difficult to get an accurate photo. I, but has quite dark toning. The photo is not perfect but it is a fairly accurate representation of how the coin actually looks. There are still a few Secular Games denarii I am looking for. A few of these I have seen available, but a couple of others I have not seen for sale on the last 5 years. I would also like to find the Secular Games quinarius.
8 commentsorfewApr 23, 2021
d658_new-removebg-preview_copy.jpg
RIC 0658Domitian (81-96). AR Denarius, 88-89.
( 19.00 mm. 3.39 g.)
Obv. Head right, laureate; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG GERM P M TR P VIII
Rev. Minerva standing right on rostral column, holding spear and shield; at feet, owl; IMP XVII COS XIIII CENS PP P
RIC 658. Lightly toned.
EX: Artemide Aste E-Live Auction 17, March 27, 2021 Lot 380

This unassuming denarius is quite a rarity in 2 regards. First, as an individual coin type this particular coin is extremely hard to find. Secondly, the detail that makes this coin rare is a rare occurrence for the denarii of Domitian. So, if you went looking for D658 you would not find many documented. As to why it is rare, you need look no further than the obverse legend. Note the use of DOMITIANVS instead of the common DOMIT found on the vast majority of Domitian denarii. Legend variations on the Minerva denarii for Domitian are very rare. Another one that comes to mind is GERMAN instead of GERM. Of course, there are a few others that are used instead of GERM but that is a topic for another post.

Many consider the Minerva denarii to be quite dull or even excruciatingly boring. However, if you look carefully there is enough variation to make things interesting. The problem is sifting through Minerva after Minerva looking for the exceptions. I like spending my time this way but others may be forgiven for not feeling the same. As a result, the variations are often overlooked by sellers and collectors alike. That is okay by me since it means I get to find some of these gems, but there really should be more collectors of these interesting coins. It is easy I suppose to become indifferent to all the intricacies of the multiple titles that Domitian held, but these titles are not some random letter and number combinations. Instead, they refer to life and death struggles, forgotten wars, and past triumphs. All of these involved humans who were born lived and died almost 2000 years ago. However dim that past may now seem, we share their humanity.
7 commentsorfewApr 15, 2021
V_1477_new-removebg.jpg
RIC 1477Vespasianus (69 - 79 CE).
Denar (Silber). 76 CE Uncertain ‘o’ mint, possibly Ephesus
(18mm. 2.92g)
Obv: Kopf mit Lorbeerkranz rechts; IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG. Kopf mit Lorbeerkranz rechts.
Rev: Geflügelter Cadeceus; PON MAX TR P COS VII.
RIC 1477; BMC 483; RSC 375a
Ex: Solidus Auction 76 April 6, 2021 Lot 1247

I am very happy to add this unusual denarius of Vespasian to my collection. It is obvious from the portrait that this is no ordinary denarius of Vespasian. What is also clear is that this coin was definitely not struck in Rome. In fact, there is still some mystery as to where it was actually struck. RIC places this coin as "Uncertain Mint(s) of Asia Minor Uncertain: Ephesus?" I agree with placing this coin in Asia Minor and I do not think it likely that it was struck at Ephesus. The portraits on the Ephesian denarii do not at all look like the portrait on this coin. The other mystery concerns the mint mark found on these coins. Though not visible on this coin a mint mark in the form of a ring or annulet ocurrs under the neck truncation. Many call these 'O' mint denarii because of the annulet. All of these coins are rare to extremely rare. 'O' mint denarii were also struck for Titus and Domitian. This is my third denarius from the series. I am always looking to add more but there are other Flavian collectors who feel exactly the same way, so there tends to be competition for them when they appear.
5 commentsorfewApr 13, 2021
New_v690_titus.jpg
RIC 0690 [Vespasian]Titus as Caesar AR denarius 74 CE
Obv: Head laureate right; T CAESAR IMP VESP
Rev: COS III across field; 2 laurel trees upright
RIC 690 [VESP]; BMC * p. 28 Note, RSC 47
Ex: Salon Numizmatyczny Mateusz Wójcicki (27/02/2021
4 commentsorfewMar 24, 2021
D31.jpg
RIC 0031Domitian AR Denarius 81 CE (Group 3)
(3.22g)
Obv: Head laureate right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PONT
Rev: Draped seat, Semi-circular frame with crescents; COS VII DES VIII PP
RIC 31; BMC 7; RSC 59
Purchased from Munzencontor Kornblum on MA-Shops

I was very happy to add this coin to my collection. It is not everyday when one gets the opportunity to add a rare PONT denarius to the collection. I try to add these when they appear for sale but there are several other collectors of Flavian coins that are also on the lookout for these.The speculation is that PONT was used before Domitian assumed the title PONTIFEX MAXIMUS. Of course the rarity is only one feature of this coin. As you can see from the obverse, this coin has an amazing portrait. While it is not apparent in the photo, this coin has some lovely iridescent toning. The reverse is also lovely. This is a group 3 denarius. While all of the group 2 denarii are very rare to extremely rare, group 3 also contains its share of rare denarii.
4 commentsorfewMar 09, 2021
D26_.JPG
RIC 0026Domitian AR Denarius 891 CE (Group 3)
(18mm 3.29g)
Obv: Laureate head right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM
Rev: Dolphin wrapped around anchor; COS VII DES VIII
RIC 26 (R); BMC page 300 +; RSC 63
Solidus Numismatik February 23, 2021

Another interesting first year denarius. This one features a great portrait with a very Flavian nose and even has the beard featuring prominently on this coin. The condition is superb and the toning is lovely. This is also not an easy coin to come by.Though not terribly rare, it is difficult to find one if you are looking for one. While the reverse is very nice overall, the dolphin is extremely well executed on this coin. It is rendered in very artistic style.
2 commentsorfewMar 05, 2021
V1457.jpg
RIC 1457Vespasian AR Denarius 74 CE (Group 8)
Obv: Laureate head right; IMP CAESAR VESPAS AVG COS V TR P PP
Rev: Victory advancing right with wreath and palm; star at lower right; PACI AVGUVSTAE
RIC 1457(C); BMC 475; RSC 277
NGC Cert # 4683673-004; CH VF
Stacks Bowers The February 2021 World Collectors Choice Online Auction Lot 71059 February 23, 2021

2 commentsorfewMar 05, 2021
Vespasian_RIC_1399_new.jpg
RIC 1399Vespasian 69-70 CE AR Denarius Ephesus
(17mm 3.15g)
Obv: Laureate head right; IMP CAES VESPAS AVG
Rev: AVG and symbol in Oak wreath
RIC 1399; BMC 434; RSC 37
Ex: Stephen M Huston Sale 153 Lot 88
Purchased from Musa Numismatics June 24, 2020
1 commentsorfewFeb 25, 2021
D24.jpg
RIC 0024Domitian AR Denarius 81 CE (Group 3)
Obv: Head laureate right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM
Rev: Curule chair; above wreath; COS VII DES VIII PP
RIC 24 (R2); BMC P. 299; RSC 58a
NGC Cert # 4683673-007; XF
Not in RIC plates
Stacks Bowers The February 2021 World Collectors Choice Online Auction Lot 71061 February 23, 2021

I cannot resist these early denarii for Domitian. If the denarius was struck in 81 CE, then I am interested. The short legend on the reverse makes this a group 3 denarius. I have been lucky enough to add a few of these to my collection. Note that the reverse legend does not include TR P. Since TR P would have been assumed as soon as Domitian rose to the purple, it is a mystery as to why it was omitted on these coins. Of course there are other reasons to like this coin. This includes the really interesting portrait and the overall look of the coin.
3 commentsorfewFeb 25, 2021

Random files - orfew's Gallery
Titus_ric_949.jpg
RIC 0949 (Vespasian)TITUS, as Caesar AD 69-79 AR Denarius.
Rome mint, AD 77-78
(19.1 mm 3.07g)
RIC 949; BMC 222, RSC 66
OBV: laureate head right; T CAESAR IMP VESPASIANVS
REV: Mars standing left holding spear and trophy, large wheat ear behind him; COS VI
orfew
D24.jpg
RIC 0024Domitian AR Denarius 81 CE (Group 3)
Obv: Head laureate right; IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG PM
Rev: Curule chair; above wreath; COS VII DES VIII PP
RIC 24 (R2); BMC P. 299; RSC 58a
NGC Cert # 4683673-007; XF
Not in RIC plates
Stacks Bowers The February 2021 World Collectors Choice Online Auction Lot 71061 February 23, 2021

I cannot resist these early denarii for Domitian. If the denarius was struck in 81 CE, then I am interested. The short legend on the reverse makes this a group 3 denarius. I have been lucky enough to add a few of these to my collection. Note that the reverse legend does not include TR P. Since TR P would have been assumed as soon as Domitian rose to the purple, it is a mystery as to why it was omitted on these coins. Of course there are other reasons to like this coin. This includes the really interesting portrait and the overall look of the coin.
3 commentsorfew
Domitian_ric_68.jpg
RIC 0068Domitian AR Denarius
(3.13gr 18mm)
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG PONT; laureate head right
Rev: TR P COS VII DES VIII P P; seat, draped, above, a winged thunderbolt placed horizontally.
RIC 68 (R2)
Ebay: August 24, 2019

I really wanted to wait before writing comments on this one because I wanted an upgrade. Well, almost 2 years have gone by and I have not seen another. One sold in 2008, and there are 0 examples on OCRE. There are 5 on forum including this one. This coin is a very rare PONT denarius. You can see PONT in the obverse legend. To me these denarii are an important part of the first year denarii for Domitian. I am always on the lookout for these rare coins but I am also aware that I am not the only one looking for them.
2 commentsorfew

All coins are guaranteed for eternity
Forum Ancient Coins
PO BOX 1316
MOREHEAD CITY NC 28557


252-497-2724
customerservice@forumancientcoins.com
Facebook   Instagram   Pintrest   Twitter