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Imperial Coinage of Vespasian


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Titus Flavius Vespasianus - Augustus 69-79 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• RSC - Roman Silver Coins II, H.A. Seaby (London, 1979)
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)
• Hendin - Guide to Biblical Coins, D. Hendin (New York, 2010)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

263 files, last one added on Jul 22, 2021

Imperial Coinage of Titus


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Titus Flavius Vespasianus - Caesar 69-79 AD, Augustus 79-81 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• RSC - Roman Silver Coins II, H.A. Seaby (London, 1979)
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)
• Hendin - Guide to Biblical Coins, D. Hendin (New York, 2010)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

185 files, last one added on Jul 27, 2021

Imperial Coinage of Domitian


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Titus Flavius Domitianus - Caesar 69-81 AD, Augustus 81-96 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• RSC - Roman Silver Coins II, H.A. Seaby (London, 1979)
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)
• Hendin - Guide to Biblical Coins, D. Hendin (New York, 2010)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

Common Minerva Types:
M1 Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear
M2 Minerva advancing right, brandishing spear, on capital of rostral column, accompanied by owl
M3 Minerva standing, facing left, with thunderbolt and spear and shield behind her feet
M4 Minerva standing left with spear

289 files, last one added on Jul 25, 2021

Imperial Coinage of Julia Titi


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Flavia Julia Titi - Augusta 80-91 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• RSC - Roman Silver Coins II, H.A. Seaby (London, 1979)
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

4 files, last one added on Jan 17, 2020

Imperial Coinage of Domitia


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Domitia Longina - Augusta 81-96 AD

Imperial coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• RSC - Roman Silver Coins II, H.A. Seaby (London, 1979)
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

1 files, last one added on Jul 25, 2018

Provincial Coinage of the Flavian Dynasty


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Flavian Dynasty 69-96 AD

Provincial coins are arranged according to RPC II.

References cited:
• RPC - Roman Provincial Coinage II, A. Burnett, M. Amandry, I. Carradice (London and Paris, 1999)
• Hendin - Guide to Biblical Coins, D. Hendin (New York, 2010)
• Emmett - Alexandrian Coins, K. Emmett (Lodi, Wisconsin, 2001)
• Dattari-Savio - Catalogo completo della collezione Dattari Numi Augg. Alexandrini, A. Savio, ed. (Trieste, 1999)
• Prieur - The Syro-Phoenician Tetradrachms and their Fractions from 57 BC to AD 258, M. Prieur & K. Prieur (Lancaster, PA, 2000)

RPC frequency is determined by the number of specimens in the 'core collections'.

Core collections:
Berlin, Staatliche Museen
Cambridge, Fitzwilliam Museum
Copenhagen, Nationalmuseet
Glasgow, Hunterian Museum
London, British Museum
Munich, Staatliche Münzsammlung
New York, American Numismatic Society
Oxford, Ashmolean Museum
Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France
Vienna, Kunsthistorisches Museum

103 files, last one added on Jul 09, 2021

Restoration Coinage of the Flavian Dynasty


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Flavian Dynasty 69-96 AD

Restoration coins are arranged according to the new RIC II Part 1.

References cited:
• RIC - The Roman Imperial Coinage II Part 1, I. Carradice and T.V. Buttrey (London, 2007)
• BMC - Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum II, H. Mattingly (London, 1966)
• BNC - Monnaies de l'Empire Romain III, J.-B. Giard (Paris, 1998)

RIC frequency ratings:
R3 = unique
R2 = very few examples known
R = rare
C = common
C2 = very common
C3 = extremely common

6 files, last one added on Jun 24, 2021

 

7 albums on 1 page(s)

Last additions - David Atherton's Gallery
T506.jpg
Titus RIC-506Æ Quadrans, 3.29g
Eastern Mint (Thrace?), 80-81 AD
Obv: IMP T CAES DIVI VES F AVG; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IVLIA AVGVSTA; Julia std. l., with patera and sceptre
RIC 506 (R2). BMC -. BNC -. RPC p. 137.
Acquired from Praefectus Coins, July 2021.

An unidentified Eastern mint struck coins for Titus sometime between 80-81. The style, fabric, and unique obverse legends (DIVI VES F in this case) all suggest a mint other than Rome. Attributing exactly where these coins were struck has historically been a moving target - Mattingly in BMCRE thought Lugdunum, H.A. Cahn believed somewhere in Bithynia. More recent scholarship has looked towards Thrace as a possible location for production based on the Balkan distribution pattern of found specimens. Although the region of mintage has been narrowed down, the city itself remains elusive. RPC has suggested possibly Perinthus. Presumably a shortage of bronze coins in the region during Titus' reign prompted a localised imperial issue.

This extremely rare orichalcum quadrans featuring Titus's daughter teenage Julia Titi on the reverse is unique to this mint. It is also the only time both father and daughter appeared jointly on an imperial coin. Julia was granted the title Augusta sometime in 80 or 81 which may have prompted her presence on the coinage. Missing from both the BM and Paris collections and only referenced in RPC (p. 137) as possibly from Rome with no specimen in the plates. Attractive dark patina with golden highlights.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 27, 2021
D446.jpg
Domitian RIC-446AR Denarius, 3.09g
Rome mint, 86 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P VI; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IMP XII COS XII CENS P P P; Minerva stg. r. on capital of rostral column, with spear and shield; to r., owl (M2)
RIC 446 (R2). BMC 96. RSC 204c. BNC -.
Ex Andrew Short Collection, purchased from Kölner, June 2021.

A very rare M2 type from the third issue of 86. This rare dating combination could not have been struck for very long after Domitian became TR P VI in mid September due to the the issue's extreme rarity, probably produced for just a few short weeks at the end of September. Imperial acclamations were awarded to Domitian at a fairly quick pace during 86 because of the Dacian campaign with many issues being struck rather briefly before news arrived of a new imperial salutation. The portrait is of an extremely fine style typical of Domitian's coinage during this time period. Hints of iridescent toning add to the piece's appeal.
4 commentsDavid AthertonJul 25, 2021
D297.jpg
Domitian RIC-297Æ Dupondius, 13.36g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIAN AVG GERM COS XI; Head of Domitian, radiate, bearded, r.
Rev: VICTORIAE AVGVSTI; S C in field; Victory stg. l., inscribing shield set on trophy to l., and holding palm
RIC 297 (R). BMC -. BNC 334.
Acquired CGB.fr, June 2021.

A 'Germania Capta' dupondius struck during Domitian's first issue of 85, the first bronze issue that fully celebrated the German victory. The war with the German tribe the Chatti likely took place in either 82 or 83 and Domitian acquired the title 'Germanicus' in 83, the year of his German triumph. Why it took so long for these achievements to be commemorated on the bronze coinage is a mystery. Perhaps the bronze mint was not in full operation due to reorganisation until 85. These 'Germania Capta' types would be produced for only a few years between 85-88. This Victory inscribing shield was struck somewhat commonly for the dupondii and sparingly for the asses. The motif was borrowed, with some minor modifications, from Vespasian's coinage. Rare lacking aegis portrait and missing from the BM.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 23, 2021
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Vespasian-RIC-1375AAR Denarius, 3.13g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: SECVRITAS P R; Securitas std. l., with sceptre
RIC 1375A (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex NAC 125, 24 June 2021, lot 512. Ex Harry Sneh Collection.

An uncertain mint in the western provinces produced this extremely rare denarius for Vespasian sometime near the end of the Civil War of 69 AD. These denarii contain some stylistic affinities with contemporary Spanish coins, but more decisively, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish issues. It is very likely these early military denarii were struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian. The upward gaze and unVespasian-like portraits are hallmarks of the issue.

This is the second know example of the denarius Securitas type struck for the series (this coin cited in the RIC A&C). The first one was discussed on the Forvm discussion board in 2007. https://www.forumancientcoins.com/board/index.php?topic=38431.msg243240#msg243240 It later became the RIC plate coin for the newly discovered type.

Certainly a most appropriate and valuable propaganda type coming out of a Civil War!
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 22, 2021
V1359.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1359AR Denarius, 3.29g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: ROMA PERPETVA; Roma seated l. on cuirass, holding Victory and parazonium
RIC 1359 (R2). BMC 423. RSC 423. BNC 380.
Ex NAC 125, 24 June 2021, lot 504.

In the wake of the Flavian victory in the Second Battle of Cremona came a flurry of early denarius issues fleetingly struck somewhere in the western provinces. These issues contain some stylistic affinities with the contemporary Spanish issues, but more decisively, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian. This ROMA PERPETVA reverse is a brand new innovation with no previous proto-types. Despite the obvious propaganda value this is the only appearance of this evocative legend in the Flavian numismatic canon. Note the engraver's double guide circles on the reverse.

This is the fourth known example of this extremely rare type - remarkably two reside in the BM (#423 a reverse die match) and another in Paris (#380 a double die match). I know of no other specimens. All the coins from these early military issues are exceedingly rare likely owing to the short window of time in which they were struck, perhaps for only a few weeks in late 69.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 17, 2021
V1361.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1361AAR Denarius, 3.29g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: S P Q R / OB C S in two lines within oak wreath
RIC 1361A (R3, this coin cited in the A&C). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex NAC 125, 24 June 2021, lot 505. Privately purchased from Klassische Münzen 2008.

Many mints were operating during the civil war of 68/69 in the west and it is sometimes difficult to pin down certain issues to a specific one. A small military issue was struck at an uncertain mint somewhere in the western empire - Mattingly thought perhaps Aquileia. The issue contains some stylistic affinities with the Spanish series, but more importantly, recent metal analysis by K. Butcher and M. Ponting show the silver content is almost identical to that of the Spanish coins. It is very likely these early military denarii were also struck in Spain in late 69 soon after the province went over to Vespasian. The SPQR wreath reverse type symbolises the corona civica which was awarded to Vespasian by the Senate for rescuing the Roman people from civil war and bringing about peace. It echoes a similar reverse formerly struck for Galba.

Although this unique piece was recently assigned in the RIC Addenda & Corrigenda to uncertain/military mint group 3, stylistically the portrait has much more in common with the denarii of group 4 (heavy brow, upward gaze, crude style) and probably should be reassigned there.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 16, 2021
V1382.jpg
Vespasian-RIC-1382AR Denarius, 3.23g
Uncertain mint, 69-71 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: CONSEN EXERCIT (in two upright parallel lines); soldiers, two, each holding aquila and clasping hands
RIC 1382 (R3, this coin?). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex NAC 125, 24 June 2021, lot 507. Ex DNW A11, 27 September 2011, lot 2198 (part). Ex John Quinn Collection.

This iconic reverse type of two soldiers clasping hands with the legend CONSEN EXERCIT (in two vertical lines!) symbolises the harmony of the legions coming together for Vespasian during the Year of the Four Emperors. The propaganda value of such a reverse type cannot be underestimated. The coin likely would have circulated amongst the troops newly won over or the Vitellian forces that were wavering just after the second battle of Cremona in October 69. Oddly, the type is very rare and was not struck in any large quantities, probably because the window of time for such an appropriate issue was very narrow, perhaps only a few weeks.

The type is listed as unique in RIC uncertain military issue group 5 (distinguished from group 4 by superior style). This may be the coin RIC actually cites, but I do not have access to Spink Numismatic Circular 100.8 to be certain. Either way an extremely rare piece. Formerly from the John Quinn Collection. Quinn (1870-1924) was an attorney, patron, and art collector from NYC whose legendary modern art collection is still heralded today as one of the finest ever assembled and help shaped American tastes in the arts.
3 commentsDavid AthertonJul 15, 2021
V1483.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC-1483AR Denarius, 3.33g
Ephesus (?) mint, 76 AD
Obv: T CAESAR IMP VESP CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, r. 'o' mint mark below neck
Rev: COS V; Bull, stg. r.
RIC 1483n (R2, this coin). BMC 486. RSC 56. RPC 1458 (3 spec.). BNC 374.
Ex NAC 125, 24 June 2021, lot 583. Ex Harry N Sneh Collection. Ex Gorny & Mosch 142, 10 October 2005, lot 2398.

The infamous 'o' mint denarii (the 'o' is often not visible but is quite bold on this specimen!) struck for Vespasian, Titus Caesar, and Domitian Caesar are thought to have been minted at Ephesus due to a similar 'o' mint mark previously used at that mint. The types are the same as those struck somewhat contemporaneously at Rome. Mules are a hallmark of the series, perhaps indicating a lack of care in their production. This bull reverse copies a much more common Rome mint 'Cow of Myron' proto-type. The exact sex of the bovine is in doubt - some catalogues call it a cow, others a bull. RIC also makes a distinction between 'humped' and 'non-humped' bulls and uses the above coin in the plates to illustrate the 'non-humped' variant. Very rare, only a handful of specimens known.
5 commentsDavid AthertonJul 10, 2021
RPC2402a.jpg
RPC-2402-VespasianAR Tetradrachm, 12.77g
Alexandria mint, 69 AD
Obv: AYT TIT ΦΛAYI OYEΣΠAΣIAN KAIΣ ; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r., date LA before neck
Rev: No Legend; Nike flying l., with wreath and palm
RPC 2402 (15 spec.). Emmett 205.1. Dattari-savio 359.
Ex Den of Antiquity, ebay, 24 June 2021.

The first coins struck for Vespasian anywhere in the empire are those dated "Year 1" (LA) from Alexandria Egypt. The two legions stationed there under the Prefect Tiberius Julius Alexander were the first to declare him emperor. According to Tacitus - "The first move to convey imperial status to Vespasian took place at Alexandria. This was due to the eagerness of Tiberius Alexander, who caused his legions to swear allegiance to the new emperor on 1 July" (Hist 2.79). The year 1 coins were struck between 1 July and 28 August. The obverse legend of these first coins lack the title Augustus (sebastos). However, those dated Year 2 (29 August 69 - 28 August 70) include the title, which is strong evidence that Vespasian did not immediately adopt it during the first two months of his reign. Vespasian did not arrive in Alexandria until December, so the Alexandrian die engravers probably had no idea of the new emperor's appearance. Understandably, these early portraits have more than a passing similarity to those of Vitellius. This Nike reverse is also a Vitellian carry-over type. It is interesting to note this tetradrachm was struck nearly 6 months before the senate in Rome recognised Vespasian as emperor and the first imperial coins in his name were struck there.

I had a devil of a time acquiring an example of this 'common' type from regnal year 1. Perhaps not as prevalent in trade as once thought?
David AthertonJul 09, 2021
V621.jpg
Titus as Caesar RIC 621 [Vespasian]Æ As, 10.35g
Rome mint, 73 AD
Obv: T CAES IMP PON TR P COS II CENS; Head of Titus, laureate, bearded, l.
Rev: AEQVITAS AVGVST; S C in field; Aequitas stg. l., with scales and rod
RIC 621 (R). BMC -. BNC 681.
Acquired from CGB.fr, July 2021.

Aequitas holding her scales and measuring rod was probably based on a cult image of the deity. She first shows up as an imperial virtue on the coinage under Galba. Not a common type for Titus Caesar. Missing from the BM collection.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 08, 2021
RPC1825var.jpg
RPC-1825 var.-Domitian as Caesar [Vespasian]Æ29, 12.38g
Koinon of Cyprus, 75-76 AD
Obv: ΚΑΙϹΑΡ ΔΟΜΙΤΙΑΝΟϹ; Head of Domitian, laureate, r.
Rev: ΚΟΙΝΟΝ ΚΥΠΡΙΩΝ ƐΤΟΥϹ Η; Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos, in which canonical xoanon; paved semicircular walled courtyard; garland between two antae; star on either side of xoanon; dove facing inwards on apex
RPC 1825 var.
Acquired from Forvm ancient Coins, June 2021.

A smattering of bronzes were struck under the name of the Koinon of Cyprus during Vespasian's reign dated regnal year 8 in either 75 or 76. All are fairly rare today. Just like the Cypriot tetradrachms, two reverse designs were employed: a standing Zeus and the Temple of Aphrodite at Paphos. This Æ29 temple reverse struck for Domitian Caesar is apparently unique. RPC 1825 list one specimen in Berlin, but it is an Æ33 weighing 24.31g, twice the weight of the above piece. https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1825 RPC 1826 has the same temple reverse description as 1825, which clearly is a mistake - it should to be the smaller bronze standing Zeus type pictured in the plates. https://rpc.ashmus.ox.ac.uk/coins/2/1826

Either way, I cannot find another example of the temple reverse in the smaller denomination. So, for now I'll catalogue it as RPC 1825 var.
1 commentsDavid AthertonJul 03, 2021
D144c.jpg
Domitian RIC-144cAR Denarius, 3.53g
Rome mint, 82-83 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMITIANVS AVG P M; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: IVPPITER CONSERVATOR; Eagle stg. front on thunderbolt, wings outspread flat, head l.
RIC 144c (R). BMC 52 var. RSC 320 var. BNC 53 var.
Acquired from Kölner, June 2021. Ex Obolos 19, 8 May 2021, lot 835, Ex Brett Telford Collection. Ex CNG E302, 8 May 2013, lot 359.

In 82 AD Domitian banished his a rationibus Tiberius Julius and then proceeded to increase the fineness of both the silver and gold coins to pre-Neronian standards. The portraits also became more refined and stylish. This denarius from the first post reform issue features a reverse which possibly commemorates Domitian's escape from Vitellian forces after hiding in the Temple of Jupiter during the last days of the Civil War of 69 AD. There are three variants of this reverse type with the eagle's wings either: a. upright, b. hunched, or c. flat. This type c. is extremely rare - out of 76 specimens in the asearch.com database only 6 feature 'flat' wings, the remainder are the common 'hunched' variant. Type a. is only known on the aureus.
2 commentsDavid AthertonJul 01, 2021

Random files - David Atherton's Gallery
vespasian pax standing.JPG
Vespasian RIC 27AR Denarius, 3.40g
Rome Mint, January - June 70 AD
Obv: IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG; Head of Vespasian, laureate, r.
Rev: COS ITER TR POT; Pax, draped, standing l., holding branch extended in r. hand and winged caduceus in l.
RIC 27 (C). BMC 21. RSC 94g. BNC 15.
Ex Amphora Coins, ebay, February 2006.

A first year issue of Vespasian's and one of his first Pax reverses. A nice sentiment after a bloody year of Civil War.
Not as common as the Pax seated types.
3 commentsDavid Atherton
D323.jpg
Domitian RIC-323AR Denarius, 3.36g
Rome mint, 85 AD
Obv: IMP CAES DOMIT AVG GERM P M TR P IIII; Bust of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r., with aegis
Rev: IMP VIIII COS XI CENSORIA POTESTAT P P; Minverva stg. l., with spear (M4)
RIC 323 (R2). BMC -. RSC -. BNC -.
Ex Heritage Auction 232117, 28-29 April 2021, lot 65186. Formerly in NGC holder #5749336-008, grade VF.

An extremely rare denarius from the second issue of 85, struck before Domitian reformed the precious metal coinage once again by slightly lowering the silver fineness after raising it to nearly 100% in 82. This was also the first denarius issue produced after Domitian assumed the censorship (given right to conduct census), note the full spelling of the title in the reverse legend.
5 commentsDavid Atherton
dom as caesar helmet.jpg
Domitian as Caesar RIC-271 [Titus]AR Denarius, 2.74g
Rome Mint, 80 AD
Obv: CAESAR DIVI F DOMITIANVS COS VII; Head of Domitian, laureate, bearded, r.
Rev: PRINCEPS IVVENTVTIS; Square seat, draped with cloth hanging in folds, with tassels: on it, crested Corinthian helmet
RIC 271 (C2). BMC 98. RSC 399a. BNC 79.
Acquired from Et Tu Antiquities, November 2007.

Domitian as Caesar issued this denarius under Titus in 80 AD. The reverse is part of the pulvinaria series which commemorates the opening of the Colosseum in 80 AD.

Pulvinaria were sacred couches of the gods which had symbolic attributes set upon them. In this case, the Corinthian helmet and table are attributes of Minerva, the patron goddess of Domitian.

A wonderful denarius with a good portrait in a fine style.

6 commentsDavid Atherton

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