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Home > Coin Collecting Theme Galleries > The Pantheon - Gods, Goddesses and Personifications

Salus, goddess of health safety and general welfare.
Crispina -- Died 182/3 CE. Wife of Commodus. Augusta, 177-182/3 CE.
Orichalcum Sestertius (31 mm, 21.12 gm). Rome mint, 177-182 CE.
Obv: CRISPINA AVGVSTA, Bare-headed & draped bust r.
Rev: SALVS SC, Salus seated l., feeding out of patera snake coiled round altar, l. arm on side of chair.
RIC-672a, BMC-420, Cohen-33, Sear-6010.

Salus was an old Roman goddess often identified with Hygieia, a daughter of Aesculapius. While the name SALVS appears on many Roman coins, it is often not in a true medical context, but rather in a political sense that peace and safety prevailed in the Empire. She usually holds a scepter and is shown feeding a snake from a patera.
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Filename:CRISPINA-4.jpg
Album name:EmpressCollector / The Pantheon - Gods, Goddesses and Personifications
Rating (3 votes): (Details)
Keywords:Salus health welfare patera snake altar chair
File Size:24 KB
Date added:Jun 21, 2004
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URL:http://www.forumancientcoins.com/gallery/displayimage.php?pos=-665
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Jochen  [Jun 21, 2004 at 06:34 PM]
Interesting the change of the meaning of the snake after the Christianization of the Empire!
wolfgang336  [Jun 21, 2004 at 07:29 PM]
So what's the meaning of the snake on the SPES PVBLIC issue of Const. I?
Jochen  [Jun 23, 2004 at 06:24 PM]
Treading on a snake with human head as symbol of evil, that's Christian!
EmpressCollector  [Sep 18, 2004 at 10:04 AM]
Asklepios and Hygieia/Salus have sacred snakes with healing properties.