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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Byzantine Coins||View Options:  |  |  |   

Byzantine Coins

Byzantine Empire, Levante or Alexandria, c. 5th - 6th Century A.D., Jewish Menorah Lead Token

|Holy| |Land| |Antiquities|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Levante| |or| |Alexandria,| |c.| |5th| |-| |6th| |Century| |A.D.,| |Jewish| |Menorah| |Lead| |Token||token|
The purpose of Byzantine era lead tokens is unknown. Many appear closely related to seals differing only by the absence of a cord or channel for attachment to a container or document. Many late Roman and early Byzantine seals have a figural type on one side and a legend in two lines in Latin or Greek on the other side. Seals with a menorah are known, usually with a blank globular reverse, but some also have a name on the other side.
JD98657. Lead token, personal token of Rodanos(?); Roma e-sale 53 (7 Feb 2019), lot 504 (same dies), VF, highlighting earthen deposit desert patina, weight 3.077 g, maximum diameter 14.1 mm, die axis 180o, c. 5th - 6th century A.D.; obverse Menorah of seven branches, flanked by lulav on left and etrog on right; reverse PO∆A/NOY in two lines across field, palm frond above; ex CNG e-auction 435 (2 Jan 2019), lot 401; extremely rare; $1800.00 SALE PRICE $1440.00


Byzantine Empire, Nicephorus Basilacius, Usurper, Summer 1078 A.D., Anonymous Class N Follis

|Nicephorus| |Basilacius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Nicephorus| |Basilacius,| |Usurper,| |Summer| |1078| |A.D.,| |Anonymous| |Class| |N| |Follis||follis|
Until 1976 this type was regarded as anonymous (Class N) because neither of the two known specimens had a visible legend. In 1976, Grierson published a new specimen with a legend naming the ruler, Nicephorus (Grierson, P. "Nicephorus Bryennius or Nicephorus Basilacius?" in NumCirc LXXXIV.1 (January 1976), type a). There were two candidates, Nicephorus Bryennius and Nicephorus Basilacius, both usurpers, Bryennius in 1077 - 1078, and Basilacius in Thessalonica for a few months during 1078. In 1992, Roger Bland published an example with the legend on the obverse right side reading POCBAC, which has been accepted as proving this type was struck by Basilacius (Bland, R. "A Follis of Nicephorus Basilacius?" NC 1992, p. 175 ff. and pl. 36, B). Our coin has a different more complete but blundered and obscure inscription on the obverse right side.
BZ99035. Bronze follis, DOC III-2 p. 706, N.1 (anonymous class N follis); Grierson 1976, type a; Bland Basilacius pl. 36, B; SBCV 1903A (Ex. Rare); Sommer 58.1, F, uneven strike, overstruck with strong undertype effects, weight 5.863 g, maximum diameter 30.7 mm, Thessalonica (Salonika, Greece) mint, summer 1078 A.D.; obverse +NIKHΦW-POC BACIΛE (or similar), facing bust of Christ, nimbus cross with plain arms, wearing tunic and himation, right hand raised in blessing, Gospels in left, IC-XC flanking across field; reverse patriarchal cross on base; IC-XC / NI-KA (Jesus Christ conquers) in the quarters; from a Las Vegas dealer; extremely rare; $800.00 SALE PRICE $640.00


Byzantine Empire, 21 Bronze Coins, c. 400 - 1250 A.D.

|Byzantine| |Bulk| |Lots|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |21| |Bronze| |Coins,| |c.| |400| |-| |1250| |A.D.||Lot|
The following list was provided by the consignor and has not been verified by FORVM:
1) Theodosius II, nummus, 0.74g, cross in wreath.
2) Vandals, barbaric nummus, /OT TIVS IIII.
3) Anastasius, follis, 12.68g, cf. SBCV 19 but imitative.
4) Anastasius, follis, SBCV 19, obverse double struck at 180 degrees.
5) Anastasius, nummus, monogram, SBCV 13.
6) Justinian I, AE10 nummi, Ravena mint, SBCV 326.
7) Justin I and Justinian I, AE follis, SBCV 125.
8) Justinian I, AE12 nummi, Alexandria, SBCV 247.
9) Justin II, follis, SBCV 94.
10) Maurice Tiberius, 1/2 follis, Thessalonika mint, SBCV 508.
11) Maurice, follis, NIK, cf. SBCV 511.
12) Heraclius, Isaura mint, SBCV 848.
13) Heraclius, follis, SBCV 805.
14) Heraclius or Sassanian, 12 nummi, Alexandria, cf. SBCV 855, ragged flan.
15) Heraclius, follis, Imitative of SB 848, Cyprus mintmark.
16) Constans II, 20 nummi, Carthage, SBCV 1059.
17) Constantine IV, SBCV 1208.
18) Leo VI, follis, SBCV 1729.
19) Anonymous, follis, SBCV 1813.
20) Isaac of Cyprus, trachy, SBCV 1991, pierced.
21) Latin Kingdom, trachy, brockage, incuse / emperor standing, holding globe.
LT96228. Bronze Lot, 21 Byzantine bronze coins, F or better, mostly VF, c. 400 - 1250 A.D.; 6 coins with Moneta Numismatic Service tags, 1 coin with a Sayles & Lavender tag, 14 coins with no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photograph, as-is, no returns, 21 coins; $450.00 SALE PRICE $405.00


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
LT96895. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $400.00 SALE PRICE $360.00


Lot of 100 Bronze Ancient Trilobate Arrowheads, Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D.

|Metal| |Arrowheads|, |Lot| |of| |100| |Bronze| |Ancient| |Trilobate| |Arrowheads,| |Hellenistic| |-| |Byzantine,| |c.| |300| |B.C.| |-| |1000| |A.D.|
 
LT96894. Lot of 100 bronze trilobate arrowheads, mostly or all Hellenistic - Byzantine, c. 300 B.C. - 1000 A.D., c. 12 - 28 mm, some complete and intact, some with chips or bends, unattributed to type, no tags, from the same larger lot as the arrowheads in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $400.00 SALE PRICE $320.00


Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

|Aelia| |Flaccilla|, |Aelia| |Flaccilla,| |Augusta| |19| |January| |379| |-| |386| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Theodosius| |I||maiorina|
On the throne Aelia Flaccilla was a shining example of Christian virtue and ardent charity. St. Ambrose describes her as "a soul true to God." Theodoret in particular exalts her humility, charity and benevolence (Church History V.19, ed. Valesius, III, 192 sq.). He tells us how she personally tended the disabled, and quotes a saying of hers: "To distribute money belongs to the imperial dignity, but I offer up for the imperial dignity itself personal service to the Giver." Aelia Flaccilla is commemorated as a saint by the Eastern Orthodox Church; her feast day is 14 September.
SL94885. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX 82.1 (S) var. (only 5th officina listed), LRBC II 2170 var. (same), SRCV V 20618 var. (same), Cohen VIII 6, NGC XF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5, repatinated (6555578-003), weight 4.216 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), empress standing facing, head right, arms folded on breast, CONSB in exergue; NGC| Lookup; scarce; $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius & Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |&| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||hexagram|
In 616, the Jews of Jerusalem gained complete control over the city, much of Judea and Galilee became an autonomous Jewish province of the Sasanian Persian Empire. The Jewish Temple was rebuilt by Nehemiah ben Hushiel (exilarch of Jerusalem) who establish a High Priesthood. In September 629 the Byzantines retook Jerusalem after 15 years of Persian occupation. In 630, Heraclius decreed that all Jews must become Christian; a massacre followed around Jerusalem and in Galilee, some survivors fled to the Dara'ah area.
BZ99096. Silver hexagram, DOC II-1 64, Wroth BMC 100, Morrisson BnF 10/Cp/AR/06, Tolstoi 216, Ratto 1390, Hahn MIB III 140, Sommer 11.47, SBCV 798, aVF, very broad flan toned, scratches, die wear, weight 6.432 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 615 - 638 A.D.; obverse dd NN hERACLIUS ET hERA CONSTI (Our lords, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine), Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine enthroned facing, each holds globus cruciger, cross above; reverse dEUS AdIUTA ROmANIS (May God help the Romans), cross potent on globe above three steps, K right; from the Robert Wachter Collection; scarce; $180.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Duchy of Durazzo (Republic of Venice), 1205 - 1213, Imitative of Byzantine, Alexius I Tetarteron, 1093 - 1118

|Greece|, |Duchy| |of| |Durazzo| |(Republic| |of| |Venice),| |1205| |-| |1213,| |Imitative| |of| |Byzantine,| |Alexius| |I| |Tetarteron,| |1093| |-| |1118||tetarteron|
The Duchy of Durazzo was a short-lived overseas colony of the Republic of Venice, encompassing the port city of Durazzo (modern Durrs in Albania) and its environs. It was established in 1205, following the dissolution of the Byzantine Empire in the aftermath of the Fourth Crusade, and lasted until it was reclaimed by the Byzantine Despotate of Epirus in 1213.

The Durrs Hoard discovered in 1967, near the apse of the chapel of the amphitheater of Dyrrachion, included 862 ornamented cross-type copper coins imitative of tetartera of the Byzantine Emperor Alexius I Comnenus. Similar types to our imitative coin. Pagona Papadopoulou studied the hoard and concluded the coins were hidden in the chapel when the forces of Michael I Comnenus Ducas, the Despot of Epirus (1204-1215) attacked and put an end to the Venetian Duchy in 1214. She also studied many other finds of the type and concluded the coins were struck by the Venetians beginning shortly before or after 1204 A.D., probably at Corinth.
Durazzo
BZ99037. Bronze tetarteron, cf. Papadopoulou type IIa, Sommer 59.26.2; Hendy pl. 8, 11; for the prototype see DOC IV-1 40 (Byzantine, Alexius I, Thessalonica, 1093 - 1118 A.D.), aEF, green patina, crude, porous, weight 1.130 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth (Greece) or Durazzo (Durrs, Albania) mint, 1203 - 1213 A.D.; obverse crude Maltese cross fourche with arms of equal length, no base, no X at center, globus and two pellets at the end of each arm, Φ - C / X - [?] in the angles; reverse no legend, barbarous half-length bust facing, bearded, wearing crown with pendilia and jeweled chlamys, cruciform scepter in right hand, globus cruciger with four-pellet cross in left hand, pellets left and right; from a Las Vegas dealer; rare; $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00


Byzantine Empire, Heraclius and Heraclius Constantine, 23 January 613 - 11 January 641 A.D.

|Heraclius|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Heraclius| |and| |Heraclius| |Constantine,| |23| |January| |613| |-| |11| |January| |641| |A.D.||decanummium|
Heraclius offered peace to Khusro, presumably in 624, threatening otherwise to invade Persia, but Khusro rejected the offer. Heraclius marched into Persia with an army of probably less than 25,000 men, willingly abandoning any attempt to secure his rear or maintain lines of communication. Heraclius fought brilliantly and bravely repeatedly defeated the Persian forces. When the war ended in 628, Khusro had been murdered by his own men, the Byzantines regained all their lost territories, their captured soldiers, a war indemnity, and most importantly for them, the True Cross and other relics that were lost in Jerusalem in 614.
BZ93528. Bronze decanummium, Anastasi 61, DOC II-1 256 (not in collection), Ricotti 32 bis, Sommer 11.117, SBCV 886, Hahn MIB 241, Wroth -, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Tolstoi -, VF, nicely centered reverse, green patina, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 180o, Sicily, Catania mint, 624 - 625 A.D.; obverse facing busts of Heraclius on left, bearded, and Heraclius Constantine on right, beardless; both crowned, draped and cuirassed; cross between their heads; reverse large I (10 nummi), A/N/N/O (year) in column left, X/V (15) in two lines right, CAT in exergue; from the Errett Bishop Collection; scarce; $140.00 SALE PRICE $112.00


Byzantine Empire, Nicephorus III Botaniates, 7 January 1078 - 1 April 1081

|Nicephorus| |III|, |Byzantine| |Empire,| |Nicephorus| |III| |Botaniates,| |7| |January| |1078| |-| |1| |April| |1081||follis|
After the inept rule of Michael VII led to several revolts, Nicephorus seized the capitol and was crowned emperor. His wife died shortly after. To gain the aura of royalty and the support of the powerful Ducas family, he married Michael's wife, Empress Maria of Alania (despite that her husband was still alive). Instead of strengthening his position, the marriage would lead to his downfall. In order to ensure the succession of her son Constantine, Empress Maria conspired with Alexius Comnenus to dispose of Nicephorus. Just as Nicephorus had banished Michael to a monastery, Alexius Comnenus banished Nicephorus to a monastery. He died soon after.
BZ99036. Bronze follis, DOC III-2 9, Morrisson BnF 56/Cp/AE/02, Wroth BMC 12, Ratto 2053, Sommer 56.5, SBCV 1888, VF, dark green patina, scratches, light deposits, overstruck (on anonymous follis class H?), weight 6.954 g, maximum diameter 28.8 mm, die axis 0o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 7 Jan 1078 - 1 Apr 1081; obverse 3/4 length figure of Christ standing facing, wearing nimbus cruciger, pallium, and colobium, raising right hand in benediction, Gospels in left hand, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iησοúς Xριστος - Jesus Christ) above stars left and right; reverse cross with pellet at each end, eight ray star in circle at center, C - Φ / N − ∆ (Greek abbreviation: Σταυρε Φυλαττε Nικηφοπον ∆εσποτη - May the cross protect Despot Nicephorus) in the quarters of cross; from a Las Vegas dealer; rare; $140.00 SALE PRICE $112.00




  






REFERENCES|

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