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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Asian Coins| ▸ |Afghanistan to India||View Options:  |  |  |   

Afghanistan to India

Baktria, Diodotus I as Satrap for Antiochus II Theos, c. 255 - 250 B.C.

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Diodotus I was the Seleukid governor of Baktro-Sogdiana early in Antiochos II's reign. His first coinage was issued with the Seleukid monarch's portrait. He then issued coins, like this one, with his own portrait, yet retaining the name of Antiochos as king. Diodotus' territory was so remote that he was king in all but title. About 250 B.C., he took the title too and issued coins as king in his own name (BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆IO∆OTOY).

Recent scholarship shows that Ai Khanoum (Greek name uncertain) was the principal mint of the region, located on the frontier between Afghanistan and the former Soviet Union.
SH42566. Gold stater, Houghton-Lorber I 630, Newell ESM 723, SGCV II 7497, VF, test cut on obverse, weight 8.380 g, maximum diameter 17.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ai Khanoum mint, obverse diademed head of middle-aged Diodotus I right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Zeus striding left, naked, aegis over extended left arm, hurling fulmen with raised right, wreath over eagle inner left; rare; SOLD


Baktria, Diodotus I as Satrap for Antiochus II Theos, c. 255 - 250 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Diodotus I was the Seleukid governor of Baktro-Sogdiana early in Antiochos II's reign. His first coinage was issued with the Seleukid monarch's portrait. He then issued coins, like this one, with his own portrait, yet retaining the name of Antiochos as king. Diodotus' territory was so remote that he was king in all but title. About 250 B.C., he took the title too and issued coins as king in his own name (BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆IO∆OTOY).

Recent scholarship shows that Ai Khanoum (Greek name uncertain) was the principal mint of the region, located on the frontier between Afghanistan and the former Soviet Union.
SH33186. Gold stater, Houghton-Lorber 630, Newell ESM 723, SGCV II 7497, gVF, obverse test cut, weight 8.310 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 180o, Ai Khanoum mint, obverse diademed head of middle-aged Diodotus I right; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ANTIOXOY, Zeus striding left, naked, aegis over extended left arm, hurling fulmen with raised right, wreath over eagle inner left; rare; SOLD


Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I, c. 171 - 145 B.C.

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Eucratides I Megas replaced the Euthydemid dynasty with his own. He fought the Indo-Greek kings, the easternmost Hellenistic rulers in northwestern India, temporarily holding territory as far as the Indus, until he was defeated and pushed back to Bactria. His vast coinage suggests a rule of considerable importance.
SH48876. Silver tetradrachm, Bopearachchi 6DD; SNG ANS 474; Mitchiner IGIS I 177cc & 177 ff var. (slightly different monogram); Bopearachchi & Rahman -, Choice gVF, weight 16.863 g, maximum diameter 34.4 mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull's horn and ear; all within bead-and-reel border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATI∆OY, the Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, each holds a spear in his right, and palm fronds in left; monogram below horses; perfectly centered on a broad medallic flan, a very pleasing specimen; SOLD


Bactrian Kingdom, Eukratides I, c. 171 - 135 B.C.

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Struck on the Attic weight tetradrachm standard. This example shares the same design, style and monogram as the huge gold twenty-stater (c. 169.6 grams) of Eukratides I.
SH21632. Silver tetradrachm, Mitchiner IGIS I, p. 92, type 177(cc); SNG ANS 474, Choice gVF, weight 16.778 g, maximum diameter 32.6 mm, die axis 0o, chief workshop, Pushkala mint, c. 160 - 135 B.C.; obverse helmeted, draped and diademed bust right, fillet border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATI∆OY, the Dioskouroi on horseback right, each holding a palm branch and spear, monogram below right; scarce; SOLD


Bactrian Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, c. 200 - 185 B.C.

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Alexander's successors in India became increasingly isolated and eventually became an island of Hellenic people, completely cut off from their western kinsman. Surrounded on all sides, they succumbed to the superior numbers of local people and disappeared from history.
SH17286. Silver tetradrachm, SNG ANS 188 - 189, SGCV II 7526, gF, porous, grainy, weight 15.235 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, c. 200 - 185 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust right wearing elephant-skin headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆IMHTPIOY, young naked Herakles standing facing, crowning himself, in right holding club and lion-skin, monogram lower left; scratches; scarce; SOLD


Kindarite Huns, Peroz, c. 345 - 350 A.D.

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The Kindarite coins betray little of their Hun origins as the designs were copied from coins issued by the Kushan and Kushano-Sasanian kings, whom they succeeded. In Bactria, the coins of were struck in the name of the last Kushano-Sasanian king, Varahran Kushanshah, whom they may have retained as a puppet ruler, but the real power is identified by a Kindarite tamga.
SH48317. Gold stater, ANS Kushan 2420, Mitchiner ACW 3592, Göbl Kushan 608, aEF, weight 7.796 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Gandhara mint, c. 345 - 350 A.D.; obverse Kushan style king standing facing, head left, nimbate, diademed, wearing pointed cap, sacrificing at altar from right hand, staff in left hand, trident above left; Brahmi inscriptions: Kapana next to altar, Peroyasa under left arm, Gadahara right; reverse goddess Ardochsho (Lakshmi) enthroned facing, nimbate, crescent on top of head, diadem with ladder-like ribbons in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, tamga upper left, Brahmi monogram sha right; SOLD


Bactrian Kingdom, Antimachos I Theos, c. 185 - 170 B.C.

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Antimachos I was king of parts of Bactria and probably also Arachosia in southern Afghanistan. He was either defeated by the usurper Eucratides, or his main territory was absorbed by the latter upon his death. On his coinage, Antimachus called himself Theos, "The God," a first in the Hellenistic world.
SH68872. Silver tetradrachm, Bopearachchi 1D, Mitchiner IGIS 124b, SNG ANS 276 - 277, gVF/F, deeply toned, surface flaws, edge defect, weight 16.191 g, maximum diameter 31.1 mm, die axis 0o, Balkh(?) mint, c. 185 - 170 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust right, wearing Macedonian kausia, dotted border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ΘEOY ANTIMAXOY, Poseidon standing facing, grounded trident vertical in right, filleted palm frond in left, N within circle inner right; fantastic high-relief and subtly smiling portrait; SOLD


Baktrian Kingdom, Demetrios I, c. 200 - 185 B.C.

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Demetrius I conquered extensive areas in what now is eastern Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan, creating an Indo-Greek kingdom far from Hellenistic Greece. He was never defeated in battle, posthumously earning him the title Aniketos, or "the Invincible."
SH57455. Bronze trichalkon, Bopearachchi Série 5E, Mitchiner IGIS 108b, SNG ANS 209 ff., SNG Cop -, aEF, weight 9.820 g, maximum diameter 27.4 mm, die axis 0o, Baktria, Merv mint, 200 - 185 B.C.; obverse head of elephant right, bell around neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ ∆HMHTPIOY, caduceus in center, monogram in inner left field; SOLD


Baktrian Kingdom, Eukratides I Megas, c. 171 - 145 B.C.

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Eucratides I Megas replaced the Euthydemid dynasty with his own. He fought the Indo-Greek kings, the easternmost Hellenistic rulers in northwestern India, temporarily holding territory as far as the Indus, until he was defeated and pushed back to Bactria. His vast coinage suggests a rule of considerable importance.
SH58903. Silver tetradrachm, Bopearachchi-Rahman 245 corr., Bopearachchi 6W var. (monogram right), SNG ANS 469 ff. var. (same), Mitchiner IGIS 177f var. (same), VF, rough, weight 15.631 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 0o, Balkh mint, 160 - 135 B.C.; obverse diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing crested helmet adorned with bull's horn and ear; all within bead-and-reel border; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ MEΓAΛOY EYKPATI∆OY, the Dioskouroi on rearing horses right, each holds a spear in his right, and palm fronds in left; monogram lower left; ex Ancient Numismatic Enterprise; rare variety; SOLD


Tiberius, 19 August 14 - 16 March 37 A.D., Tribute Penny of Matthew 22:20-21, Ancient Eastern Imitative

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Part of a hoard of nearly 200 Tiberius and Augustus denarii found in India. Imitations, such as this coin, were produced in India, and used for local trade. Some of these imitations appear to have be struck, some cast. This coin was cast.
RS27887. Silver cast imitative denarius, cf. Giard Lyon, group 2, 146; RIC I 28 (S); BMCRE I 44; RSC II 16b; SRCV I 1763 (official Roman, struck, Lugdunum mint, c. 15 - 18 A.D.), VF, weight 3.404 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 45o, obverse TI CAESAR DIVI AVG F AVGVSTVS, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF MAXIM (high priest), Pax (or Livia as Pax) seated right on chair with ornately decorated legs set on base, long scepter vertical behind in her right hand, branch in left hand, no footstool; ex Triton X, lot 1559; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Alram, M. Iranisches Personennamenbuch: Nomina Propria Iranica In Nummis. (Wien, 1986).
Bopearachchi, O. Indo-Greek, Indo-Scythian and Indo-Parthian Coins in the Smithsonian Institution. (Washington D.C., 1993).
Bopearachchi, O. Monnaies Gréco-Bactriennes et Indo-Grecques. (Paris, 1991).
Bopearachchi, O & A. ur Rahman. Pre-Kushana Coins in Pakistan. (Karachi, 1995).
Cribb, J. "Numismatic Evidence for Kushano-Sasanian Chronology" in Studia Iranica 19 (1990).
Friedberg, A. & I. Gold Coins of the World, From Ancient Times to the Present, 8th ed. (2009).
Fröhlich, C. Monnaies indo-scythes et indo-parthes, Catalogue raisonné Bibliothčque nationale de France. (Paris, 2008).
Gardner, P. The Coins of the Greek and Scythic Kings of Bactria and India in the British Museum. (London, 1886).
Göbl, R. Münzprägung des Kusanreiches. (Wien, 1984).
Gupta, P. & T. Hardaker. Punchmarked Coinage of the Indian Subcontinent - Magadha-Mauryan Series. (Mumbai, 2014).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Baktria and Ancient India...5th Century BC to First Century AD. HGC 12. (Lancaster, PA, 2013).
Kritt, B. Dynastic Transitions in the Coinage of Bactria: Antiochus-Diodotus-Euthydemus. CNS 4. (Lancaster, 2001).
Lahiri, A. Corpus of Indo-Greek Coins. (Calcutta, 1965).
Mitchiner, M. Ancient Trade and Early Coinage. (London, 2004).
Mitchiner, M. Indo-Greek and Indo-Scythian Coinage. 9 Vols. (London, 1975-1976).
Mitchiner, M. Oriental Coins and Their Values, Vol. 3: Non-Islamic States & Western Colonies. (London, 1979).
Mitchiner, M. Oriental Coins: the Ancient and Classical World. (London, 1978).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
Senior, R. Indo-Scythian Coins and History. (London, 2001).
Senior, R. The Coinage of Hermaios and its imitations struck by the Scythians. CNS 3. (Lancaster, PA, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Volume 7: Cyprus to India. (New Jersey, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, The Collection of the American Numismatic Society, Part 9: Graeco-Bactrian and Indo-Greek Coins. (New York, 1998).
Whitehead, R. Catalog of Coins in the Panjab Museum, Lahore, Vol. I: Indo-Greek Coins. (Oxford, 1914).

Catalog current as of Thursday, September 19, 2019.
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Afghanistan to India