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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Under $50||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins and Antiquities Under $50

Coins are listed from highest |price| to lowest. If you are a serious bargain hunter, click the last page first and move backwards to the first page.


Constantine Era Bronze Coin in Plastic Holder, 307 - 364 A.D.

|Under| |$50|, |Constantine| |Era| |Bronze| |Coin| |in| |Plastic| |Holder,| |307| |-| |364| |A.D.|, coin
The coin in the photo is randomly selected example, not the actual coin you will receive.
SL35619. Bronze coin, Constantine and his family, in plastic holder, Fine or better, no grades on holders, one coin; $2.90 (2.61)


Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

|Lead| |Glandes| |Sling| |Bullets|, |Roman| |Republic,| |Lead| |Glandes| |Sling-Bullet,| |2nd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.|,
According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 (18.00)


Kingdom of Persis, Second Unknown King, 1st Century A.D.

|Kingdom| |of| |Persis|, |Kingdom| |of| |Persis,| |Second| |Unknown| |King,| |1st| |Century| |A.D.|, hemidrachm
Persis was located in what is now southern Iran. "Persians" settled the area as early as the 8th century B.C. From the time after its conquest by Alexander the Great, Persis was most often quasi-independent, under the hegemony of a Seleukid or Parthian king. Immediately following Alexander's death, Persis was subject to the Seleucid Kingdom. About 290 B.C., Persis regained independence. The coins produced during this period were Greek-inspired, but inscriptions were Aramaic, symbolic of Persis' rejection of the Greek ruling class. Sometime between c. 250 and 223 B.C., the Seleucids regained control. Mithradates II later incorporated Persis as a sub-kingdom of Parthia. Under Parthian domination, the coins and appearance of the kings depicted on them assumed the Parthian style. The last King of Persis, Artaxerxes, defeated the Parthians and founded the Sassanian Empire.
GS63310. Silver hemidrachm, BMC Arabia p. 238, 10; Alram IP 619; Sunrise 647 var. (different tiara), VF, uneven toning, weight 0.9499 g, maximum diameter 13.11 mm, die axis 0o, Persepolis (Fars Province, Iran) mint, 1st century A.D.; obverse bearded bust left, wearing diadem with two-loop tie and Parthian-style tiara with two rows of pellets enclosing crescent with horns upward, triskeles turning right behind; reverse diadem, two ties laid across center, blundered imitation of an Aramaic legend; $45.00 (40.50)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D.

|Valerian| |I|, |Valerian| |I,| |October| |253| |-| |c.| |June| |260| |A.D.|, antoninianus
Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS64723. Silver antoninianus, RIC V-1 219 (Viminacium), RSC IV 155, Gbl MIR 1563a, Cunetio 818 (8 spec.), SRCV III 9956, Hunter IV - (p. xxxviii), VF, toned, porous, reverse off center, edge cracks, weight 3.007 g, maximum diameter 23.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, c. 254 - 255 A.D.; obverse IMP C P LIC VALERIANVS P F AVG, radiate and draped bust right; reverse PIETATI AVGG (to the piety of our two emperors), Pietas standing left, long scepter in right hand, leaning with left elbow on short column; $45.00 (40.50)


Kingdom of Naples, Phillip III of Spain, 13 September 1598 - 31 March 1621

|Italy|, |Kingdom| |of| |Naples,| |Phillip| |III| |of| |Spain,| |13| |September| |1598| |-| |31| |March| |1621|, 2 cavalli
Naples was ruled by the Crown of Aragon as part of the Spanish Empire from 1504 to 1714.
ME66316. Bronze 2 cavalli, MIR Napoli 231 (R2), F, uneven strike, tight flan, weight 2.182 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Naples mint, obverse + PHILIPP III D G REX ARA, two flints and two flint locks forming a cross, a flame in each angle; reverse SICILIAE ET HIERVSA, crown, two crossed scepters inside; rare; $45.00 (40.50)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

|Italy|, |Kingdom| |of| |Naples| |and| |Sicily,| |Charles| |I| |of| |Anjou,| |1266| |-| |1285|, denaro
Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME66338. Billon denaro, MIR 10 347 (R3), Biaggi 493 var. (R), MEC Italy III 643, VF, weight 0.405 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 135o, Apulia, Brindisi mint, early coinage, 1266 - 1278; obverse K DEI GRA REX SCL, cross fleury; reverse + DVC AP ET PRIC CAPE, shield with lis and three pendants, flanked by two small lis; rare; $45.00 (40.50)


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

|Armenian| |Kingdom|, |Armenian| |Kingdom,| |Tigranes| |V| |(Herodian| |Tigranes| |I),| |c.| |6| |-| |12| |A.D.|, two chalkoi
"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66376. Bronze two chalkoi, Kovacs AJN 20 6, Nercessian ACV 159 (Tigranes IV), Bedoukian CCA 154 (same), aF, weight 4.718 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 45o, Damascus(?) mint, 8 - 5 B.C.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara with five points, surrounded by dotted pearls, adorned with star; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, Herakles standing slightly left, nude, right hand resting on grounded club, Nemean lion skin draped on left arm; rare; $45.00 (40.50)


Armenian Kingdom, Tigranes V (Herodian Tigranes I), c. 6 - 12 A.D.

|Armenian| |Kingdom|, |Armenian| |Kingdom,| |Tigranes| |V| |(Herodian| |Tigranes| |I),| |c.| |6| |-| |12| |A.D.|, chalkous
"The reign of Tigranes V has generally been described as uneventful; his coins are similarly unremarkable. They do not commemorate any historical or military events but merely copy designs common to the Seleucid and autonomous city coinage of Mesopotamia, Syria, and Phoenicia. The standing Herakles/Vahagn, which was employed extensively by Tigranes the Great (CCA, 99-103), would have had particular appeal for the Phoenician population, as well as the Armenian." -- Frank L. Kovacs in "Tigranes IV, V, and VI: New Attributions"
SH66378. Bronze chalkous, Kovacs AJN 20 10, Bedoukian CCA 156 (Tigranes IV), Nercessian ACV 166 (same, half chalkous), F, green patina, tight flan, off-center, weight 2.347 g, maximum diameter 13.7 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus(?) mint, c. 6 - 12 A.D.; obverse heavily bearded head of Tigranes IV right, wearing Armenian tiara; reverse BAΣIΛEΩC TIΓPANOY MEΓAΛOY, eagle standing left, wings closed; rare; $45.00 (40.50)


Kingdom of Naples and Sicily, Charles I of Anjou, 1266 - 1285

|Italy|, |Kingdom| |of| |Naples| |and| |Sicily,| |Charles| |I| |of| |Anjou,| |1266| |-| |1285|, denaro
Charles I of Anjou was the King of Sicily by conquest from 1266, though he had received it as a papal grant in 1262. He was expelled from the island in the aftermath of the Sicilian Vespers of 1282.
ME66658. Bronze denaro, MIR 10 356 (R), MEC Italy III 665, Biaggi 499 var. (legends reversed, NC), VF, weight 0.546 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 90o, Brindisi mint, 1277; obverse + DEIGRAREXSICIL, K in frame of six arches; reverse + DVC APVL PRIC CAP, cross with trefoil at each end and star in each quarter; $45.00 (40.50)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Iberian(?) Barbaric Imitative

|Augustus|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.,| |Iberian(?)| |Barbaric| |Imitative|, as
 
RB70583. Copper as, cf. RIC I 431, BMCRE 226, Cohen I 515, BnF I 687, SRCV I 1685 (official, Rome mint, 7 B.C.), F, interesting crude style, nice green patina, edge cracks, scratches, pits on reverses, weight 10.390 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 225o, Iberian(?) unofficial mint, obverse bare head right; reverse large S C; $45.00 (40.50)




  



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Under $50