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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies| ▸ |Seleucid Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |     

Ancient Coins of the Seleucid Kingdom

The Seleucid Kingdom, ruled by the Hellenistic Seleucid dynasty, existed from 312 B.C. to 63 B.C. Seleucus I Nicator received Babylonia in the division of Alexander the Great's empire in 321 B.C. He expanded his domain, and at the height of its power, the Seleucid Empire included central Anatolia, Persia, the Levant, Mesopotamia, and what is now Kuwait, Afghanistan, and parts of Pakistan and Turkmenistan. They were defeated by the Roman Republic and their Greek allies in 190 B.C. The subsequent Treaty of Apamea in 188 B.C. required costly war reparations and loss of territory west of the Taurus Mountains. The Parthians conquered much of the remaining empire in the mid-2nd century B.C. The Seleucid kings continued to rule a smaller state from Syria until the invasion by Armenian king Tigranes the Great in 83 B.C. and their ultimate overthrow by the Roman general Pompey in 63 B.C.

Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius I Soter, 162 - 150 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |I| |Soter,| |162| |-| |150| |B.C.||AE| |26|
As required by the Treaty of Apamea, Demetrius, son of Seleucus IV, was held in Rome as a hostage. After Antiochus IV (his uncle) died, he claimed the right to rule but Rome preferred Antiochus V, a weak child. Demetrius escaped, was welcomed in Syria and took his throne. Antiochus V and his regent were executed. Demetrius defeated Judas Maccabaeus and restored Seleukid control over Judaea.
GY89198. Bronze serrated AE 26, Houghton-Lorber II 1648, SNG Fitzwilliam 5673, SNG Cop 240 var. (control), Babylon Rois 725 var. (control), F, well centered, central cavities, weight 17.365 g, maximum diameter 25.8 mm, die axis 0o, perhaps Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 162 - 150 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right bow and quiver at his shoulder; reverse tripod lebes, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΔHMHTPIOY downward on left, ΠoE monogram (control) outer left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IV| |Epiphanes,| |175| |-| |164| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Baal-Berit, the local god of Berytus, was assimilated to the Greek Poseidon.

In an attempt to assimilate the Jews and consolidate his empire, Antiochus IV outlawed Judaism and erected an altar to Zeus in the Temple. The Jews revolted and the Maccabees again and again defeated large Seleukid armies. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple after its desecration by the forces of Antiochos IV. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY26738. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 1449; cf. SNG Spaer 1077; Houghton CSE 704 f.; BMC Seleucid p. 39, 57; Sawaya 5 ff., Rouvier JIAN III, p. 267, 443 ff., gF, green patina, scratches, light earthen deposits, weight 5.006 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Berytus (Beirut, Lebanon) mint, c. 168 - 164 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos IV right, one diadem end flying behind, the other falling forward over shoulder, uncertain Greek control letter(s) behind; reverse Phoenician script: (of Laodicea, mother in Canaan) counterclockwise on left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ clockwise on right, Ba'al-Berit (Poseidon) standing facing, phiale in right hand, trident in left hand, Λ / Α (mintmark) left, ΟΦ monogram right; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |14|
After his brother Demetrius was captured by the Parthians, Antiochus VII was made king. He married Demetrius' wife Cleopatra Thea. He defeated the usurper Tryphon at Dora and laid siege to Jerusalem in 134. According to Josephus, the Hasmonean king John Hyrcanus opened King David's sepulcher and removed three thousand talents, which he then paid Antiochus to spare the city. Sidetes then attacked the Parthians, supported by a body of Jews under Hyrcanus, and briefly took back Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Media before being ambushed and killed by Phraates II. His brother Demetrius II had by then been released, but the Seleucid realm was now restricted to Syria. Antiochus VII was the last Seleucid king of any stature.
JD06801. Bronze AE 14, SNG Spaer 2127, VF, weight 1.97 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Gaza mint, 136/5 or 135/4 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ, owl standing facing, date off-flan; attractive desert patina; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zabinas, 128 - 122 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |II| |Zabinas,| |128| |-| |122| |B.C.||half| |denomination|
Click here to see this coin before it was cleaned.
GY06493. Bronze half denomination, Houghton-Lorber II 2230(2), SNG Spaer 2396, HGC 9 1171 (R2), gVF, weight 3.32 g, maximum diameter 15.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 128 - 127 B.C.; obverse winged bust of Eros right, wearing myrtle wreath; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, upside-down anchor, Σ(?) outer left, low inner left date ΕΠΡ (year 185 of the Seleucid Era); scarce; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos III Keraunos, 226 - 223 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |III| |Keraunos,| |226| |-| |223| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Seleucus III Soter proved not to be the "Savior" that his official royal epithet advertised; nor did live up to his nickname Keraunos - "Thunder." He failed to reclaim western Asia Minor from his cousin, Attalus of Pergamum, and was assassinated after only a brief reign of only a few years.
GY54986. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber I 922(1)f, SNG Spaer 512, VF, weight 2.878 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse bust of Artemis right, quiver at shoulder, dot border; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow behind, C E over Λ outer left, ΘΕ exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |13|
Antiochus III's early campaigns against the Ptolemaic Kingdom were unsuccessful, but he later gained several military victories, for which he briefly assumed the epithet "the Great." He also took the title "Basileus Megas" (Greek for "Great King") the traditional title of the Persian kings and declared himself the "champion of Greek freedom against Roman domination." Antiochus III waged a war against the Roman Republic in mainland Greece in autumn of 192 B.C. He was defeated.
GY57104. Bronze AE 13, Houghton-Lorber I 1049; Newell WSM 1058; Dura Hoard 13; Lindgren III 1009; BMC Seleucid p. 28, 51 corr., VF, nice Syrian patina, weight 2.920 g, maximum diameter 13.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 223 - c. 210 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Antiochus III as Apollo right, dot border; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow, ΥΞ monogram over Δ(?) (controls) outer left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |19|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY57108. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 2368.(1), VF, weight 5.547 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 2nd Reign, 110 - 109 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Herakles right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ on right, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ on left, Athena standing left, Nike in extended right hand, resting left on shield, control marks outer left, ΓΣ (year 203) in exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C., Ake Ptolemais, Galilee

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IV| |Epiphanes,| |175| |-| |164| |B.C.,| |Ake| |Ptolemais,| |Galilee||AE| |14|
Ptolemais was a maritime city of Galilee (Acts 21:7). It was originally Accho, but was renamed Ptolemais under the rule of Ptolemy Soter.

The villain of Hanukkah. In 168 B.C., Antiochus IV ordered the Jews to worship Greek gods. The Temple in Jerusalem was seized and dedicated to Zeus. The Jews revolted and after three years of fighting, Judah Maccabee defeated the Seleukid army. Hanukkah, the Festival of Lights, commemorates the rededication of the Temple in 165 B.C. According to the Talmud, there was only enough consecrated olive oil to fuel the eternal flame in the Temple for one day. Miraculously, the oil burned for eight days, enough time to prepare and consecrate fresh oil.
GY57109. Bronze serrated AE 14, Houghton-Lorber II 1479; BMC Seleucid p. 38, 41; SNG Spaer 1130 ff.; Houghton CSE 791 ff.; Babelon Rois 572 ff.; HGC 9 726; SGCV II 6994, gVF, weight 1.962 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais (Acre, Israel) mint, c. 173 - 168 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Antiochus right, (control) behind, fillet border; reverse veiled and draped goddess (Hera or Demeter) standing facing, long scepter or torch in right hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII, 125 - 121 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Cleopatra| |Thea| |and| |Antiochus| |VIII,| |125| |-| |121| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Cleopatra, the widow of three Seleukid Kings, seized power on her own and made Antiochus VIII Grypus, her teenage son, coregent. They resided at Ptolemais where this coin was struck. In 121 B.C., his mother offered Grypus a cup of wine. Since this was not normal for her, he was suspicious and forced her to drink it. Poisoned, the wine killed her.
GY57648. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 2274(2)b, SNG Spaer 2478, VF, weight 4.272 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais (Acre, Israel) mint, 125 -124 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochus VIII right, no diadem ends visible; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ / ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ - ΚΑΙ / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, headdress of Isis resting on an inverted crescent, ΗΠΡ (year 188) over thunderbolt below; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius II Nikator, 146 - 138 and 129 - 125 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |II| |Nikator,| |146| |-| |138| |and| |129| |-| |125| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Demetrius II ruled for two periods, separated by years of captivity in Parthia. He gained the throne with the help of Egypt, but general Diodotus rebelled, took Antioch and made Antiochus VI Dionysus his puppet king. Demetrius then ruled part of the kingdom from Seleucia. In 38 B.C. he attacked the Parthians but was defeated and captured, ending his first reign. The Parthians released him in 129 B.C. when his brother, Antiochus VII Sidetes, marched against Parthia. They hoped the brothers would fight a civil war but the Parthians soon defeated Sidetes, and Demetrius returned to rule Syria. His second reign portraits show him wearing a Parthian styled beard. His second reign ended when he was defeated and killed by yet another usurper set up by Egypt, Alexander II Zabinas.
GY57132. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 1968(1), SNG Spaer 1679, HGC 9 1000 (R1-2), Cohen DCA 171 (S), VF, nice Syrian desert patina, weight 5.948 g, maximum diameter 18.7 mm, die axis 0o, Tyre (Lebanon) mint, 145 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Demetrios II right; reverse stern of galley left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ in two lines over ZΞP (Seleukid era year 167) above, ΤΥΡΙΩΝ over Phoenician script "of Tyre" below; scarce; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos II Kallinikos, 246 - 226 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |II| |Kallinikos,| |246| |-| |226| |B.C.||AE| |21|
The Seleukid Empire was under attack by Egypt when Kallinikos assumed the throne. He lost much of Thrace and coastal Anatolia to Ptolemy III. While he was fighting, his mother made his younger brother Antiochos Hierax joint ruler. Kallinikos agreed to partition the empire; however, Hierax wanted it all and Hierax and his Galatian mercenaries defeated him. Kallinikos managed to retain the lands east of the Tauros. The War of the Brothers weakened the empire, permitting regions such as Parthia to secede. Anatolia was soon lost. Kallinikos died after a fall from his horse.
GY57138. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber I 692, Newell WSM 1015 - 1016, HGC 9 322, VF, weight 10.224 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse draped bust of Athena right, wearing Corinthian helmet; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ, Nike standing left, extending wreath in right hand, palm frond in left over shoulder, anchor flukes up inner left; green patina with attractive earthen highlighting; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VIII Grypus, 121 - 96 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VIII| |Grypus,| |121| |-| |96| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Antiochus VIII Epiphanes Grypus (Hook-Nose) was crowned as a teenager, ruling jointly with his mother Cleopatra Thea. In 121 B.C., one day when he returned from a hunt, his mother offered him a cup of wine. Since this was not common behavior for her, Grypus was suspicious and forced her to drink the wine; poisoned, it killed her. Grypus fought a civil war with his brother that ended with his murder.
GY57144. Bronze AE 19, HGC 9 1212; cf. Houghton-Lorber II 2300, 2307, or 2308 (various dates and control symbols), VF, attractive highlighting earthen desert patina, weight 5.164 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 121 - 110 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos VIII right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, scepter under right wing, symbols and date left and in exergue off flan; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII, 125 - 121 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Cleopatra| |Thea| |and| |Antiochus| |VIII,| |125| |-| |121| |B.C.||AE| |18|
Cleopatra, the widow of three Seleukid Kings, seized power on her own and made Antiochus VIII Grypus, her teenage son, co-regent. They resided at Ptolemais where this coin was struck. In 121 B.C., his mother offered Grypus a cup of wine. Since this was not normal for her, he was suspicious and forced her to drink it. Poisoned, the wine killed her.
GY57649. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2274(3), SNG Spaer 2479; Newell LSM 17, HGC 9 1191 (R1), VF, nice patina, weight 6.008 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais (Acre, Israel) mint, 124 -123 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochus VIII right, no diadem ends visible; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ / ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ - ΚΑΙ / ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, headdress of Isis resting on an inverted crescent, V/Σ monogram inner right, ΘΠΡ (year 189) over winged thunderbolt below; SOLD


Arados, Phoenicia, 213 - 212 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Arados,| |Phoenicia,| |213| |-| |212| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Arwad, Syria, an island in the Mediterranean, was settled by Phoenicians early in the 2nd millennium B.C. In the Bible it is called Arvad. In Greek it was known as Arados. The city also appears in ancient sources as Arpad and Arphad. Antiochus I Soter renamed it Antiochia in Pieria.
GY57560. Bronze AE 19, Duyrat 1651, Cohen DCA 762; cf. BMC Phoenicia p. 13, 97 ff. (other years), VF, weight 6.519 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, 213 - 212 B.C.; obverse turreted bust of Tyche right; reverse prow of galley left, AP monogram between Phoenician letters taw - gimel above, Phoenician date (year 47) below; SOLD


Marathos, Phoenicia, 157 - 156 B.C.

|Phoenicia|, |Marathos,| |Phoenicia,| |157| |-| |156| |B.C.||AE| |16|
In 259 B.C. Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Aradus, to which the subsequent coins of Marathos are dated. The federation of cities was not completely independent. The Seleukids retained overlordship.
GY57567. Bronze AE 16, BMC Phoenicia p. 123, 25; Cohen DCA 833, VF, weight 3.889 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 0o, Marathos (near Tartus, Syria) mint, 157 - 156 B.C.; obverse turreted bust of Tyche right, palm frond behind; reverse Phoenician "mrth" on right, Marathos standing left, leaning with left elbow on column, aphlaston in right, Phoenician date (year 103) on left, control letters across lower field; scarce; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III Eucaerus, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III| |Eucaerus,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Demetrius III Eucaerus ("the Timely") was nicknamed Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean Priest King Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
GY70541. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 2454(4), SNG Spaer 2837, aVF, weight 6.809 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 45o, Damascus mint, 96 - 95 B.C.; obverse diademed and radiate head of Demetrios III right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΣΩΤΗΡΟΣ, Nike walking right, wreath in right hand, palm frond over shoulder in left, ΔΙ above N in outer left field, ΖΙΣ (Seleucid Era year 217) in ex; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos II Kallinikos, 246 - 226 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |II| |Kallinikos,| |246| |-| |226| |B.C.||AE| |18|
The Seleukid Empire was under attack by Egypt when Kallinikos assumed the throne. He lost much of Thrace and coastal Anatolia to Ptolemy III. While he was fighting, his mother made his younger brother Antiochos Hierax joint ruler. Kallinikos agreed to partition the empire; however, Hierax wanted it all and Hierax and his Galatian mercenaries defeated him. Kallinikos managed to retain the lands east of the Tauros. The War of the Brothers weakened the empire, permitting regions such as Parthia to secede. Anatolia was soon lost. Kallinikos died after a fall from his horse.
GB87749. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II addenda C72, Duyrat 1095 - 1111, Lindgren III 978, HGC 9 -, HGC 10 -, VF, dark green patina, off center, porous, weight 4.268 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 226 - 224 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress; reverse prow left with Athena figurehead, horizontal anchor left above; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |15|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY93776. Bronze AE 15, Houghton Lorber 2378(1), Babelon Rois 1509, SNG Spaer 2721, BMC Seleucid 32 - 34, VF, well centered, dark patina, highlighting earthen deposits, light marks, light corrosion, weight 2.202 g, maximum diameter 14.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain N. Syria, Phoenicia, or Coele Syria mint, 135 - 95 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse prow right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ / ANTIOXOY in two lines above, ΦIΛOΠATOPOΣ below; from the Errett Bishop Collection; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |15|
Antiochus III's early campaigns against the Ptolemaic Kingdom were unsuccessful, but he later gained several military victories, for which he briefly assumed the epithet "the Great." He also took the title "Basileus Megas" (Greek for "Great King") the traditional title of the Persian kings and declared himself the "champion of Greek freedom against Roman domination." Antiochus III waged a war against the Roman Republic in mainland Greece in autumn of 192 B.C. He was defeated.
GY57124. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber I 1049; Newell WSM 1058; Dura Hoard 13; Lindgren III 1009; BMC Seleucid p. 28, 51 corr., VF, weight 2.505 g, maximum diameter 15.4 mm, die axis 45o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 223 - c. 210 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Antiochus III as Apollo right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo seated left on omphalos, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow, ΥΞ monogram over Δ(?) (controls) outer left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus XII Dionysos, c. 88 - 84 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |XII| |Dionysos,| |c.| |88| |-| |84| |B.C.||AE| |21|
Antiochus XII rule was challenged by the Nabataeans, the Judaeans and by the Seleucids' perpetual fratricidal wars. Philip I took briefly took Damascus. Antiochus perished in battle at the hands of the Nabataeans, after which Damascus, the long time Southern stronghold of Seleucid power freely gave itself over to the benevolent rule of King Aretas III of Nabataea.
GY58539. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 2481, SNG Spaer 2881 - 2883, aVF, weight 6.288 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, c. 83 - 82 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped bust of Antiochos XII right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΔΙΟΝΥΣΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ ΚΑΛΛΙΝΙΚΟΥ, Zeus standing left Nike in right hand, scepter in left hand, monogram in exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VIII Grypus, 121 - 96 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VIII| |Grypus,| |121| |-| |96| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Antiochus VIII Epiphanes Grypus (Hook-Nose) was crowned as a teenager, ruling jointly with his mother Cleopatra Thea. In 121 B.C., one day when he returned from a hunt, his mother offered him a cup of wine. Since this was not common behavior for her, Grypus was suspicious and forced her to drink the wine; poisoned, it killed her. Grypus fought a civil war with his brother that ended with his murder.
GB87734. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber II 2300, HGC 9 1212, VF, dark green patina with earthen highlighting, obverse off center, beveled edge, weight 6.159 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 121 - 113 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Antiochos VIII right, one diadem end waving up behind, the other forward over shoulder; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ / ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ in three downward lines, first two on the right, last on the left, eagle standing left on thunderbolt, lotus tipped scepter transverse under far (right) wing, IE (control outer left, date (off flan) in exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleucus I, 312 - 280 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleucus| |I,| |312| |-| |280| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY93611. Bronze AE 22, Houghton-Lorber I 15(1), Newell WSM 911, SNG Spaer 3, HGC 9 77, VF, brassy surfaces with uneven black toning, scratches, porosity, edge crack, weight 7.821 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 300 - 280 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse Athena Promachos standing right, brandishing spear in raised right hand, shield in left hand, anchor flukes up (control) inner right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣEΛEYKOY downward on left; from the Errett Bishop Collection; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Sardes, Lydia

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |281| |B.C.,| |Sardes,| |Lydia||AE| |14|
The Indian humped bull type, along with his well-known anchor symbol, was used only by Nikator. The Indian humped bull on the reverse recalls when Nikator, with only his bare-hands, stopped a similar bull that had broken free while Alexander the Great was sacrificing it at the altar. Seleucus captured Sardes from Lysimachus in 282 B.C. This type has been attributed to Sardes based on find locations.
GY97882. Bronze AE 14, Houghton-Lorber I 6(2)b, Newell WSM 1628, HGC 9 107a (S), SNG Spaer 69 var. (monogram behind bull), SNG Cop 45 var. (same), aVF, green patina, slight porosity, tight flan, weight 2.293 g, maximum diameter 14.3 mm, die axis 270o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 282 - 281 B.C.; obverse winged head of Medusa right; reverse humped bull butting right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) above, ΣΕΛEYKOY in exergue, monogram between hind legs; from a Norwegian collection; scarce; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |12|
Newell attributed this type to Antioch. Houghton and Lorber assign it to Sardes based on control links. This coin was purchased in a group that appeared to be part of a hoard that included coins mostly from Ionia and Lydia, supporting the re-attribution to Sardes.
GY27255. Bronze AE 12, cf. Houghton-Lorber I 979, SNG Spaer 613 ff., and Newell WSM 1109 ff. (none with A control mark), gF, struck with high relief dies, weight 2.979 g, maximum diameter 12.2 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, obverse Apollo head right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, elephant left, A below; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, c. 3rd - 1st Century B.C., Ancient Imitative

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |c.| |3rd| |-| |1st| |Century| |B.C.,| |Ancient| |Imitative||AE| |16|
GY24565. Bronze AE 16, apparently unpublished, VF, weight 2.130 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, obverse diademed head right; reverse tripod, blundered legends around; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |15|
Antiochus' victory at the Battle of Panium in 198 B.C. transferred control of Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt to the Seleukid Kingdom. When Antiochos conquered Asia Minor, however, the Romans responded. Antiochos' losses were so great that the whole of his empire was shattered and he was forced to content himself with the region that he had held in the beginning, Syria.
GY82080. Bronze AE 15, Houghton-Lorber I 983, SNG Spaer 487 ff. (Hierax), Newell WSM 1428 (Hierax), VF, weight 4.038 g, maximum diameter 15.3 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair in corkscrew curls down neck; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo standing left, naked, examining arrow in right hand, resting left on tripod; nice green patina; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos VI, c. 96 - 94 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |VI,| |c.| |96| |-| |94| |B.C.||hemidrachm|
GS35411. Silver hemidrachm, cf. Houghton-Lorber 2777, Houghton 367, Newell SMA -, SNG Spaer -, aVF, weight 1.741 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, c. 95 - 94 B.C.; obverse diademed head right, with short curly beard, horn above temple, straight diadem ends; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ ΝΙΚΑΤΟΡΟΣ, cornucopia bound with fillet, Pk monogram left, C between lower curve of horn near tip and fillet; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |II| |Theos,| |261| |-| |246| |B.C.||double| |unit|
Antiochus II Theos was the son of Antiochus I and Princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes. He inherited a state of war with Egypt and while he was thus occupied, his satraps in Parthia and Bactria declared independence. To make peace with Egypt and to seal the treaty, Antiochus repudiated his wife Laodice I, exiled her to Ephesus, and married Ptolemy II's daughter Berenice. Antiochus later left Berenice and their infant son Antiochus, to live again with Laodice. Laodice poisoned him, had Berenice and her infant son murdered, and proclaimed her son Seleucus II as king.
GY38758. Bronze double unit, Houghton-Lorber I 588, Newell ESM 192, SNG Spaer -, aVF, weight 7.765 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 315o, Seleukeia on the Tigris (south of Baghdad, Iraq) mint, c. 255 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Athena standing left, helmeted, resting on spear, hand on hip, shield leaning against leg, two monograms across in fields; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander I Balas, 152 - 145 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |I| |Balas,| |152| |-| |145| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Alexander Balas, of humble origin, claimed to be Antiochus IV's son and heir to the Seleukid throne. Rome and Egypt accepted his claims. He married Cleopatra Thea, daughter of King Ptolemy Philometor of Egypt. With his father-in-law's help, he defeated Demetrius Soter and became the Seleukid king. After he abandoned himself to debauchery, his father-in-law shifted his support to Demetrius II, the son of Demetrius Soter. Balas was defeated and fled to Nabataea where he was murdered.
GY83440. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 1795(3)b, SNG Spaer 1459, SNG Cop 261, Babelon Rois 818, VF, black patina with earthen fill, very attractive, weight 6.654 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Apollo standing left, arrow in right, resting left on bow, A inner left, trident outer left, (ΠΑ monogram) in exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus XII Dionysos, c. 87 - 84 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |XII| |Dionysos,| |c.| |87| |-| |84| |B.C.||chalkon|
Antiochus XII was immediately challenged by the Nabataeans whose territories had grown during the Seleucids' perpetual fratricidal wars. While Antiochus was campaigning against the Nabataeans, these wars continued - Philip I took Damascus. Antiochus was forced to return to Damascus and evict his brother. Returning to the Nabataean front again, Antiochus, this time, had to overcome the resistance of Alexander Jannaeus en route. He soon perished in battle at the hands of the Nabataeans, leaving Damascus without a ruler. Damascus, the long time Southern stronghold of Seleucid power freely gave itself over to the benevolent rule of King Aretas III of Nabataea.
GY46334. Bronze chalkon, Houghton-Lorber II 2473, Houghton CSE 871, SNG Spaer 2897 ff.; BMC Seleucid p. 102, 4; Galilee Hoard H93 (this coin), VF, weight 6.642 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, first issue, c. 87 - 86 B.C.; obverse diademed and draped, beardless bust of Antiochos XII right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥC ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟC ΚΑΛΛΙΝΙΚΟΥ, Tyche standing left, turreted, palm in frond in right hand, scepter in left hand, Π outer left; ex Galilee Hoard (found north of the Sea of Galilee in 1989); SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III Eucaerus, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III| |Eucaerus,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||AE| |19|
Demetrius III Eucaerus ("the Timely") was nicknamed Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean Priest King Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
GY46350. Bronze AE 19, SNG Spaer 2876 (same obverse die); Houghton-Lorber II 2456(2); Galilee Hoard H55 (this coin), aVF, weight 4.655 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 96 - 87 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed, lightly bearded head of Demetrius III right; reverse ΒΑCΙΛΕΩC ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΜΗΤΟΡΟC CΩΤΗΡΟC, Hermes standing left on a square basis, kerykeion in right, palm frond in left, Ν over Θ left; ex Galilee Hoard (found north of the Sea of Galilee in 1989); SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Demetrius III Eucaerus, c. 96 - 87 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Demetrius| |III| |Eucaerus,| |c.| |96| |-| |87| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Demetrius III Eucaerus ("the Timely") was nicknamed Acaerus ("the Untimely) by the Jews. He defeated the Hasmonaean Priest King Alexander Jannaeus but was forced to withdraw from Judaea by the hostile population. While attempting to dethrone his brother, Philip I Philadelphus, he was defeated by the Arabs and Parthians, and taken prisoner. He was held in confinement in Parthia by Mithridates II until his death in 88 B.C.
SL46356. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber II 2455(3) (referencing only Spaer); SNG Spaer 2851; Galilee Hoard H44 (this coin), NGC Fine, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (4161251-008), weight 3.107 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 95 - 94 B.C.; obverse diademed, lightly bearded head of Demetrius III right; reverse ΒΑCΙΛΕΩC ΔΗΜΗΤΡΙΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΦΙΛΟΜΗΤΟΡΟC CΩΤΗΡΟC, Hermes standing facing, palm frond in right, kerykeion in left, Ν over Α outer left, ΗΙΣ (year 218) in exergue; ex Galilee Hoard (found north of the Sea of Galilee in 1989), NGC Certified (photographed before the coin was slabbed) - NGC| Lookup; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus VII Euergetes Sidetes, 138 - 129 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |VII| |Euergetes| |Sidetes,| |138| |-| |129| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Simon Maccabaeus, prince of Judea and High Priest of Judea, died in 135 B.C.
GY55369. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber II 2119(1), SNG Spaer 2116, Houghton CSE 880, Hoover 1102 (R1), VF, off-center obverse, weight 3.450 g, maximum diameter 16.8 mm, die axis 0o, Galilee, Ake Ptolemais (Acre, Israel) mint, 136 - 135 B.C.; obverse Helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ (on right) ΕΥΕΡΓΕΤΟΥ (on left), owl standing right, head facing front, ΓΑ monogram left, IOP in exergue (year 177); rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |19|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY57102. Bronze AE 19, cf. Houghton-Lorber II 2388.6-9 (various control marks), SNG Spaer 2736 - 2740 (same), VF, weight 5.321 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain (Phoenician?) mint, 112 - 101 B.C.; obverse winged bust of Eros right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ on right, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ on left, Nike advancing left, wreath in extended right hand, control marks outer left and exergue; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Cleopatra Thea and Antiochus VIII Grypus, 125 - 121 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Cleopatra| |Thea| |and| |Antiochus| |VIII| |Grypus,| |125| |-| |121| |B.C.||AE| |21|
The owl on amphora is copied from the "new style" tetradrachms of Athens.
GY58079. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 2263, VF, weight 6.109 g, maximum diameter 21.2 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 122 - 121 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochus VIII right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΙΣΣΗΣ ΚΛΕΟΠΑΤΡΑΣ ΚΑΙ ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, owl, looking forward, standing right on amphora, uncertain date and control-marks; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos IV Philopater, 187 - 175 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |IV| |Philopater,| |187| |-| |175| |B.C.||AE| |23|
Seleucus IV Philopator ruled Syria (then including Cilicia and Judea), Mesopotamia, Babylonia and Nearer Iran (Media and Persia). To help pay the heavy war-indemnity exacted by Rome, he sent his minister Heliodorus to Jerusalem to seize the Jewish temple treasury. On his return, Heliodorus assassinated Seleucus, and seized the throne for himself.
GY57127. Bronze serrated AE 23, Houghton-Lorber II 1315(3)e, BMC Seleucid p. 32, 23; SNG Spaer 877; HGC 9 584, F, weight 9.611 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 187 - 175 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, archaized style, hair rolled behind, locks falling down neck, ME monogram (primary control) behind; reverse Apollo standing left, leaning with left elbow resting on tripod, examining arrow in right hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (king) downward on right, ΣE-ΛEYKOY downward on left, AI (secondary control) inner left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zabinas, 128 - 122 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |II| |Zabinas,| |128| |-| |122| |B.C.||AE| |20|
Zabinas claimed to be an adoptive son of Antiochus VII, but may have been the son of an Egyptian merchant. He was used as a pawn by the Egyptian king Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon). Zabinas managed to defeat Demetrius II and thereafter ruled parts of Syria, but soon ran out of Egyptian support and was defeated by Demetrius' son Antiochus VIII Grypus. As a last resort, Zabinas plundered the temples of Antioch. He is said to have joked about melting down a statuette of the goddess of victory, Nike, which was held in the hand of a Zeus statue, saying "Zeus has given me Victory." Enraged by his impiety, the Antiochenes expelled Zabinas, who was captured and executed soon after. "Zabinas" is a derogatory name meaning "the bought one," implying he was Ptolemy's slave.
GB57149. Bronze AE 20, Houghton-Lorber II 2231(1)b, Houghton CSE 310, Babelon Rois 1316, SNG Spaer 2352, VF, beautiful highlighting desert patina, weight 7.989 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 128 - 123 B.C.; obverse head of Alexander II right, wearing lion-scalp headdress; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, Nike walking left, wreath in right hand, palm-branch over shoulder in left, over aphlaston (controls) inner left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus I Soter, 280 - 261 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |I| |Soter,| |280| |-| |261| |B.C.||AE| |14|
Antiochos' reign was marred by struggle against internal and external enemies, including the betrayal and revolt of his co-regent in the east, his eldest son, whom he was forced to execute. He earned the title savior (soter) of Asia by defeated roving bands of Galatians that had terrorized the cities for years. However, not long after, he lost southern and western Asia Minor to Ptolemy.
GB71677. Bronze AE 14, Houghton-Lorber 315a; Newell WSM 1369; BMC Seleucid p. 13, 58; SNG Spaer 233; SNG Cop 77; SGCV II 6883; HGC 9 167 (R2), Choice VF, nice dark green patina, typical tight flan, minor patina flaking (stable), slightest spots of corrosion, weight 2.117 g, maximum diameter 14.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 280 - 261 B.C.; obverse bust of Athena facing, wearing triple-crested Attic helmet; reverse Nike walking left, raising wreath in right hand, long palm frond over left shoulder in left hand, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on right, symbol in circle over line outer left (control); SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus II Theos, 261 - 246 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |II| |Theos,| |261| |-| |246| |B.C.||AE| |17|
Apollo's most important attribute is the tripod lebes, a cauldron in a three-legged stand used for religious rituals. The tripod lebes is symbolic of his prophetic powers. At his temple at Delphi, his priestess sat on his tripod chewing laurel leaves and inhaling hallucinating vapors from a fissure in the floor. After she mumbled her prophesy, a male priest would translate it for the supplicant.
GB71711. Bronze AE 17, Houghton-Lorber I 522(1)a; Newell WSM 1389; SNG Spaer 351; SNG Cop 88 ff. var. (controls); BMC Seleucid p. 15, 17 var. (same); HGC 9 253a, gVF, nice style, attractive green patina, well centered, light corrosion, weight 4.880 g, maximum diameter 17.0 mm, die axis 0o, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, 261 - 246 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse tripod lebes with lion paw feet, anchor below, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left, ΗΑΡ monogram outer left, ΜΙΛ downward outer right; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |I| |Nikator,| |312| |-| |281| |B.C.||AE| |16|
Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GY73107. Bronze AE 16, Houghton-Lorber I 22(1); Newell WSM 927; BMC Seleucid p. 6, 62; SNG Spaer 29; SNG Cop 38; HGC 9 107c (S-R1), aVF, porous, rough areas, weight 3.337 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 282 - 281 B.C.; obverse winged head of Medusa right; reverse humped bull butting right, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ above, ΣΕΛΕΥΚΟΥ over Ξ exergue; scarce; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |11|
Antiochus' victory at the Battle of Panium in 198 B.C. transferred control of Judaea from Ptolemaic Egypt to the Seleukid Kingdom. When Antiochos conquered Asia Minor, however, the Romans responded. Antiochos' losses were so great that the whole of his empire was shattered and he was forced to content himself with the region that he had held in the beginning, Syria.
GY59608. Bronze AE 11, Houghton-Lorber I 1064a, SNG Spaer 622, Newell WSM 1194 ff., aVF, desert patina, weight 2.119 g, maximum diameter 11.3 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, Apollo standing left, naked, examining arrow in right hand, resting left hand on grounded bow, ΔΕΛ monogram left; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus III the Great, c. 223 - 187 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |III| |the| |Great,| |c.| |223| |-| |187| |B.C.||AE| |19|
In 213 B.C., after a two-year siege, allied with Attalus I of Pergamum, Antiochus III captured the rebel capital Sardes and executed the rebel king Achaeus. Houghton and Lorber explain that this type is attributed to Sardes based on excavation finds, that the denomination does not fit Sardian tradition, and that it was probably struck to support Antiochus' troops during the siege.
GY62953. Bronze AE 19, HGC 9 488 (R2), cf. Houghton-Lorber I 975, Newell WSM 1193, aVF, rough, weight 7.019 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, near Sardes(?) mint, c. 215 - 213 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, hair rolled at back of neck; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ, tripod lebes, monogram outer left; very rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IV| |Epiphanes,| |175| |-| |164| |B.C.||AE| |21|
From the extraordinary "Egyptianizing" coinage of Antiochus IV, celebrating his triumphs over the Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt by using a reverse type strongly associated with the Lagid dynasty, an eagle perched on a thunderbolt.
GY78035. Bronze AE 21, Houghton-Lorber II 1415, Newell SMA 61, Houghton CSE 123, SNG Spaer 987, Svoronos 1418 (Antiochus III, occupied Egypt), HGC 9 665 (R1-2), F, green patina, obverse off-center, tight flan, corrosion, weight 9.079 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, autumn 169 - autumn 168 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Antiochos IV right, beveled edge; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ ΘΕΟΥ ΕΠΙΦΑΝΟΥΣ, eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head right, wings closed; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |23|
After Antiochus IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GY78038. Bronze AE 23, Houghton-Lorber II 2352a; Houghton CSE 498; SNG Spaer 2725; Babelon Rois 1484; BMC Seleucid p. 93, 22; HGC 9 1246 (S-R1), F, green patina, centered on tight flan, porous, weight 9.176 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 1st reign at Tarsos, c. 114 - 112 B.C.; obverse diademed head of Antiochus IX right, short curly beard, bevelled edge; reverse Dionysos standing left, kantharos in extended right hand, thyrsus vertical in left hand, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ in two downward lines on right, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ downward on left, E outer left high, NK monogram outer left center; from the Butte College Foundation, ex Lindgren; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos II Kallinikos, 246 - 226 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Seleukos| |II| |Kallinikos,| |246| |-| |226| |B.C.||AE| |17|
The Seleukid Empire was under attack by Egypt when Kallinikos assumed the throne. He lost much of Thrace and coastal Anatolia to Ptolemy III. While he was fighting, his mother made his younger brother Antiochos Hierax joint ruler. Kallinikos agreed to partition the empire; however, Hierax wanted it all and Hierax and his Galatian mercenaries defeated him. Kallinikos managed to retain the lands east of the Tauros. The War of the Brothers weakened the empire, permitting regions such as Parthia to secede. Anatolia was soon lost. Kallinikos died after a fall from his horse.
GY81366. Bronze AE 17, SNG Spaer 455, VF, weight 4.621 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain (Asia Minor) mint, obverse helmeted head of Athena right; reverse ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΣΕΛΕΥΧΟΥ, Apollo standing left, holding arrow and resting on bow, three monograms in fields; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IV Epiphanes, 175 - 164 B.C., Mallos, Cilicia

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IV| |Epiphanes,| |175| |-| |164| |B.C.,| |Mallos,| |Cilicia||double| |unit|
Mallos was an ancient city near the mouth of the Pyramus River (now the Ceyhan Nehri), on a hill opposite Magarsus, which served as its port. The river has changed course and the site is now inland a few km from the Mediterranean coast on an elevation, a few km from Karatas, Adana Province, Turkey.
GY54839. Bronze double unit, Houghton-Lorber II 1381, HGC 9 651, aVF, nice green patina, weight 5.042 g, maximum diameter 15.7 mm, die axis 0o, Mallos (near Karatas, Turkey) mint, obverse laureate bust of Zeus right, archaizing style, long beard, hair rolled behind in krobylos, long wavy lock falling forward over shoulder, spear over left shoulder, fillet border; reverse Nike standing left, crowning name with wreath, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right, ANTIOXOY downward on left; rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Alexander II Zabinas, 128 - 122 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Alexander| |II| |Zabinas,| |128| |-| |122| |B.C.||AE| |22|
Zabinas claimed to be an adoptive son of Antiochus VII, but may have been the son of an Egyptian merchant. He was used as a pawn by the Egyptian king Ptolemy VIII Euergetes II (Physcon). Zabinas managed to defeat Demetrius II and thereafter ruled parts of Syria, but soon ran out of Egyptian support and was defeated by Demetrius' son Antiochus VIII Grypus. As a last resort, Zabinas plundered the temples of Antioch. He is said to have joked about melting down a statuette of the goddess of victory, Nike, which was held in the hand of a Zeus statue, saying "Zeus has given me Victory." Enraged by his impiety, the Antiochenes expelled Zabinas, who was captured and executed soon after. "Zabinas" is a derogatory name meaning "the bought one," implying he was Ptolemy's slave.
GY57128. Bronze AE 22, Houghton-Lorber II 2237(1)b, Houghton CSE 307, Babelon Rois 1307, HGC 9 1164 (C-S), VF, weight 9.372 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 125 - 122 B.C.; obverse radiate and diademed head of Zabinas right, one diadem end flying up behind, the other falling forward over shoulder; reverse BAΣIΛEΩΣ AΛEΞANΔPOY, double cornucopia bound with fillet, A over club in inner left, Π in inner right; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus IX Cyzicenus, 114 - 95 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |IX| |Cyzicenus,| |114| |-| |95| |B.C.||AE| |18|
After Antiochos IX's father died, his uncle Demetrius II Nicator took the throne. For his safety, his mother, Cleopatra Thea, sent him to Cyzicus (leading to his nickname). He returned to Syria in 116 B.C. to claim the throne from his half-brother Antiochus VIII Grypus, with whom he eventually divided Syria. He was killed in battle by the son of Grypus, Seleucus VI Epiphanes.
GB73102. Bronze AE 18, Houghton-Lorber II 2379; BMC Seleucid p. 94, 31; Babelon Rois 1505; Houghton CSE 2, 775 var. (control); HGC 9 1253 (R2); SNG Spaer -; SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina, centered on a tight flan, corrosion, weight 4.934 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain (probably Syrian) mint, 114 - 95 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, with hair rolled, curly locks down neck; reverse Artemis standing facing, wearing short tunic and boots, spear vertical in right hand, bow in left, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ downward in two lines on right, ΦΙΛΟΠΑΤΟΡΟΣ downward on left, E (control) on side facing downward outer left; very rare; SOLD


Seleukid Kingdom, Antiochus I Soter, 280 - 261 B.C.

|Seleucid| |Kingdom|, |Seleukid| |Kingdom,| |Antiochus| |I| |Soter,| |280| |-| |261| |B.C.||AE| |19|
At the invitation of Nicomedes I of Bithynia, who required help in a dynastic struggle against his brother, three tribes of Celts crossed over from Thrace to Asia Minor. They numbered about 10,000 fighting men and about the same number of women and children. The Seleucid king Antiochus I, in 275 B.C., defeated them in a battle using Seleucid war elephants to shock the Celts. This victory was the origin of Antiochus' title of Soter (Greek for "savior"). These "Gauls" were not exterminated, many joined Antiochus' army as mercenaries. They established a long-lived Celtic territory in central Anatolia, called Galatia. Strengthened by fresh accessions of the same clans from Europe, the "Galatians" overran Bithynia and supported themselves by plundering neighboring countries.
GY87705. Bronze AE 19, Houghton-Lorber I 339(4), Newell ESM 946, HGC 9 148, F, well centered, corrosion, weight 6.277 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 300o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 278 - 268 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield decorated with anchor in center, six double arcs around; reverse horned elephant walking right, ΒΑΣΙΛΕΩΣ / ΑΝΤΙΟΧΟΥ above and below, monogram and club above, jawbone below; SOLD


Demetrias (|Damascus|?), Coele-Syria, c. 96 - 82 B.C.

|Other| |Syria|, |Demetrias| |(|Damascus|?),| |Coele-Syria,| |c.| |96| |-| |82| |B.C.||AE| |21|
The site of Demetrias is not entirely certain; most likely Damascus was refounded and renamed Demetrias during the reign of the Seleukid king Demetrios III (97 - 88 B.C.). Its uncertain how long the name was used. After the death of Antiochos XII in 83 or 82 B.C. the city handed itself over to the Nabataean king, Aretas III. It may have returned to Seleukid control for a time, but by 73 B.C. the city was ruled by Tigranes II of Armenia until 64 B.C., when it became part of the new Roman province of Syria. Mark Antony gave the city to Cleopatra VII in 36 B.C. After her death it again came under Roman control.
GB88242. Bronze AE 21, BMC Galatia p. 289, 3; De Saulcy 4; HGC 9 1460 (R1); SNG Munchen -; SNG Cop -, aVF, green patina, light earthen encrustation, weight 7.583 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 15o, Demetrias (|Damascus|?) mint, c. 95 - 85 B.C.; obverse laureate head (of Apollo?) right; reverse Zeus standing slightly left, head left, long scepter vertical in right hand, ΔHMHTPIEΩN / THΣ IEPAΣ (Demetrians of the sacred [city], in downward lines), all within wreath; rare; SOLD




    




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REFERENCES

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