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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Celtic & Tribal||View Options:  |  |  |   

Celtic and Other Tribes

This page offers coins of the Celtic tribes, as well as coins of Iberian, German, Thracian, Paenonian, Illyrian, Dacian, Gaete, and other European tribes. Temple of Fortuna


Danubian Celts, West Noricum, Late 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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SH21611. Silver tetradrachm, Kugelrelter type; Göbl Noricum DnT 8 (IId/8); Lanz 111; Dembski 783; Göbl OTA 560; De la Tour 9910; Allen-Nash 55; CCCBM I -, Choice EF, weight 11.829 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, obverse wreathed, diademed, and beardless head left; reverse Celticized rider on horseback left, headdress decorated with three balls (kugeln); SOLD


Celts, Boii in Bohemia, Devil, Mid 1st Century B.C.

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The Boii first appear in history in connection with the Gallic invasion of north Italy, 390 B.C., when they made the Etruscan city of Felsina their new capital, Bononia (Bologna). They were defeated by Rome at the Battle of Mutina in 193 B.C. and their territory became part of the Roman province of Cisalpine Gaul. According to Strabo, writing two centuries after the events, rather than being destroyed by the Romans like their Celtic neighbors, "the Boii were merely driven out of the regions they occupied; and after migrating to the regions round about the Ister, lived with the Taurisci, and carried on war against the Daci until they perished, tribe and all - and thus they left their country, which was a part of Illyria, to their neighbors as a pasture-ground for sheep." The new Boian capital was a fortified town on the site of modern Bratislava, Slovakia, which is where minted their silver coins. Around 60 B.C., a group of Boians joined the Helvetians' ill-fated attempt to conquer land in western Gaul and were defeated by Julius Caesar, along with their allies, in the battle of Bibracte. Caesar settled the remnants of that group in Gorgobina, from where they sent two thousand to Vercingetorix's aid at the battle of Alesia six years later. The eastern Boians on the Danube were incorporated into the Roman Empire in 8 A.D. Devil is presumably the name of a king.
SH49961. Silver hexadrachm, Allen-Nash pl. 7, 82 (Same dies), Paulsen 779 - 781, Lanz -, Castelin Zürich -, De la Tour -, aF, weight 16.659 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 225o, Slovakia, Bratislava mint, obverse beardless male head right with short hair; reverse DEVIL, stag-headed horse right; very rare; SOLD


Celts, Southern Germany, Boii, c. 100 B.C.

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The Rainbow Cup Coin. Medieval monks finding the strange cup shaped gold coins of the Boii described them as gold coins left at the end of a rainbow by magical forest inhabitants.
SH12089. Gold stater, Castelin 1069; Kellner Type II C, VF , weight 7.563 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, obverse birds head in a torque (metal collar or armband) of crescents; reverse torque around six pellets; scarce; SOLD


Celts, Danube Region, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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Unpublished in the references and websites examined by Forum. The elegant style is very close to that of the original type. The primary indicator it is a Celtic imitative rather than a Macedonian Kingdom issue is the incomplete legend.
SH63525. Silver tetradrachm, Le Rider -, Göbl OTA -, Pink -, CCCBM -, SNG ANS -, cf. Lanz 357 ff. (incomplete legend varieties, none with bee), VF, well centered, high relief, weight 13.946 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 45o, tribal mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse ΦIΛIΠ−Π, naked youth on horse pacing right holding palm frond, bee below horse's belly; SOLD


Celtic, Senones, Gaul (Area of Sens, France), c. 100 - 60 B.C.

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About 400 B.C. the Senones crossed the Alps and, having driven out the Umbrians, settled on the east coast of Italy from Forlì to Ancona (ager Gallicus), and founded Sena Gallica (Senigallia) their capital. In 391 B.C., they invaded Etruria and besieged Clusium. The Clusines appealed to Rome, which led to war. In 390 B.C. (or 387 B.C.), the Senones routed the Roman army at Allia and then sacked Rome. For more than 100 years the Senones were engaged in hostilities with Rome. They were finally subdued in 283 B.C. by P. Cornelius Dolabella and driven from Italy. In Gaul, from 53 to 51 B.C., the Senones engaged in hostilities with Julius Caesar, brought about by their expulsion of Cavarinus, whom he had appointed their king. In 51 B.C., a Senonian named Drappes threatened the Provincia, but was captured and starved himself to death. Their chief towns were Agedincum (later Senones, whence Sens), Metiosedum (Melun?), and Vellaunodunum (site uncertain).
SH75807. Gold stater, Globular cross type; Sills 532; Delestrée-Tache 2537; Scheers 15, pl. V, 128; Cottam ABC 94 (Carnutes?); De La Tour -, aVF, weight 7.221 g, maximum diameter 12.4 mm, Agedincum? (Sens, France) mint, c. 100 - 60 B.C.; obverse small cross in center of plain globule with prominent rim; reverse plain globule with prominent rim; ex Nomos AG, obolos 1, lot 28; ex Cologny Collection; SOLD


Celts, Boii in Bohemia, Devil, Mid 1st Century B.C.

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The Boii first appear in history in connection with the Gallic invasion of north Italy, 390 B.C., when they made the Etruscan city of Felsina their new capital, Bononia (Bologna). They were defeated by Rome at the Battle of Mutina in 193 and their territory became part of the Roman province of Cisalpine Gaul. According to Strabo, writing two centuries after the events, rather than being destroyed by the Romans like their Celtic neighbors, "the Boii were merely driven out of the regions they occupied; and after migrating to the regions round about the Ister, lived with the Taurisci, and carried on war against the Daci until they perished, tribe and all - and thus they left their country, which was a part of Illyria, to their neighbors as a pasture-ground for sheep." The new Boian capital was a fortified town on the site of modern Bratislava, Slovakia, which is where minted their silver coins. Around 60 B.C., a group of Boians joined the Helvetians' ill-fated attempt to conquer land in western Gaul and were defeated by Julius Caesar, along with their allies, in the battle of Bibracte. Caesar settled the remnants of that group in Gorgobina, from where they sent two thousand to Vercingetorix's aid at the battle of Alesia six years later. The eastern Boians on the Danube were incorporated into the Roman Empire in 8 A.D. Devil is presumably the name of a king.
SH56021. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 76, Paulsen 782 ff., Forrer Keltische pl. XXXVIII, 550, De la Tour 10163, Allen-Nash -, F, weight 16.322 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 45o, Slovakia, Bratislava mint, obverse beardless male head right with short; reverse bear(?) walking right on ground line, DEVIL in exergue; scarce; SOLD


Celtic, Ambiani, North East Gaul, c. 58 - 55 B.C., Gallic War Issue

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The Ambiani occupied the Somme valley in northern France. These uniface Gallic War staters were struck to fund the war against Julius Caesar in Gaul. The blank obverse is often ascribed to a need for speed in striking this emergency war coinage. There are, however, more than a few other similar uniface Celtic coin types and one blank side would do little to speed up the mint. More likely, they just found one plain side and one detailed side "nice enough." This type is often found in Britain, many of which may have been carried there by Celtic mercenaries retreating after Caesar's victories.
SH85134. Gold stater, Delestrée-Tache 241, Cottam ABC 16, Van Arsdell 52-1, Castelin 289, De la Tour 8710, SCBC 11, EF, light scratches, weight 6.084 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, obverse plain bulge; reverse disjointed "Celticized" horse right, crescents and pellets around; ex Coins of Antiquity (Hillsborough, NC); SOLD


Eastern Celts, Audoleon Imitative, Honter type, 2nd Century B.C.

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CE40505. Silver tetradrachm, Lanz 690, Göbl OTA 381/8, gVF, weight 13.580 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 225o, obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse rider trotting right, MT above, ΛE in front, ∆ below, square countermark and test cut; SOLD


Celtic, Bastarnae(?), Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, c. 200 - 50 B.C.

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The Bastarnae, an ancient tribe, probably of Germanic and Celtic origin, inhabited the region between the eastern Carpathian mountains and the Dnieper river (Moldova and south western Ukraine). A branch of the Bastarnae, called the Peucini by Greco-Roman writers, occupied the region north of the Danube river delta.

In 179 B.C. the Bastarnae crossed the Danube in massive force (probably c. 60,000 men, both cavalry and infantry, plus a wagon-train of women and children) at the invitation of their long-time ally, King Philip V of Macedon. Philip's loss to Rome in the Second Macedonian War had reduced him from a powerful monarch to a petty client-king with a much-reduced territory and a tiny army. His kingdom was devastated by incessant raiding by the Dardani, a warlike Thraco-Illyrian tribe on his northern border, which his treaty-limited army was too small to counter. The Bastarnae, with whom Philip had forged friendly relations in earlier times, agreed to crush the Dardani and to settle in Dardania (southern Kosovo), to ensure that the region was permanently subdued. After they were ambushed en route by Thracians, about half the Bastarnae returned home, leaving c. 30,000 to press on to Macedonia. Philip died before the Bastarnae arrived, but Philip's son and successor Perseus, deployed his guests in winter quarters in a valley in Dardania, presumably to a campaign against the Dardani the following summer. In the depths of winter the Dardani attacked. The Bastarnae beat off the attackers, chased them back to their chief town, and besieged them. It was a trap. A second force of Dardani ambushed from the rear. After losing all their baggage and supplies, the Bastarnae were forced to retreat home. Most perished as they crossed the frozen Danube on foot, falling through the ice.
CE48221. Silver tetradrachm, Apparently unpublished; tentatively attributed to the Bastarnae by Dr. Ilya Prokopov, VF, weight 12.752 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 225o, obverse bearded head of Zeus right; reverse horseman riding right, star before, symbols below; SOLD


Southern Danubian Celts, c. Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

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The earliest Celtic imitations of Philip II tetradrachms are very similar to the Macedonian originals. It isn't always completely clear if a coin is a Celtic imitative or an oddly engraved Macedonian original. Fairly quickly the imitative inscriptions were shortened and then blundered. Over time the head of Zeus was increasingly "Celticized" and eventually both the head of Zeus and the horseman devolved into barely recognizable abstract forms. This coin is similar to the original but, with a rather exotic head of Zeus, could never be confused with the Macedonian prototype.
SH66568. Silver tetradrachm, CCCBM I 7 var. (very similar obv, different rev symbols), Göbl OTA 18/2 var. (similar rev), Lanz 360 var. (similar rev), VF, weight 13.957 g, maximum diameter 25.3 mm, die axis 135o, tribal mint, c. late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; obverse Celticized laureate head of Zeus right, dot border; reverse ΦIΛIΠ−Y, naked youth on horse pacing right holding palm frond, Λ over torch below, uncertain object (dolphin?) below raised foreleg, dot border; derived from the Macedonian Kingdom tetradrachms of Philip II; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Allen, D. Catalogue of Celtic Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1987-1990).
Allen, D. The Coins of the Ancient Celts. (Edinburgh, 1980).
Alvarez-Burgos, F. La Moneda Hispanica desde sus origines hasta el Siglo V. (Madrid, 2008).
Bean, S.C. The Coinage of the Atrebates and Regni. (Oxford, 2000).
Blanchet, A. Traité des monnaies gauloises. (Paris, 1905).
Castelin, K. Die Goldprägung der Kelten in den böhmischen Ländern. (Graz, 1965).
Castelin, K. Keltische Münzen: Katalog der Samlung im Schweizerischen Landesmuseum Zürich. (Zurich, 1978).
Cottam, E. Ancient British Coins. (Norfolk, 2010).
Davis, P. "Dacian and Celtic Imitations of Republican Denarii" in The Celator, May 2004.
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
de la Tour, H. Atlas de monnaies Gauloises. (Paris, 1892).
de Jersey, P. Celtic Coinage in Britain. (London, 1996).
de Jersey, P. ed. Celtic Coinage: New Discoveries, New Discussion. (2006).
de Jersey, P. Coinage in Iron Age Armorica. (Oxford, 1994).
Delestrée, L.-P. & M. Tache. Nouvel atlas des monnaies Gauloises. (Saint-Germain-en-Laye, 2002-2008).
Dembski, G. Münzen der Kelten. Sammlungskataloge des Kunsthistorischen Museums. (Vienna, 1998).
Dessewffy, M. Barbar penzei. (Budapest, 1910-1913).
Forrer, R. Keltische Numismatik: Der Rhein Und Donaulande. (Graz, 1968-1969).
Göbl, R. Die Hexadrachmenprägung der Gross-Boier: Ablauf, Chronologie und historische Relevanz für Noricum und Nachbargebiete. (Vienna, 1994).
Göbl, R. Typoligie und Chronologie der keltischen Münzprägung in Noricum. (Vienna, 1973).
Göbl, R. Ostkeltischer Typen Atlas. (Braunschweig, 1973).
Gruel, K. & E. Morin. Les monnaies celtes du Musée de Bretagne. (Rennes/Paris, 1999).
Hobbs, R. British Iron Age Coins in the British Museum. (London, 1996).
Kostial, M. Kelten im Osten. Gold und Silber der Kelten in Mittel und Osteuropa. Sammlung Lanz. (München, 1997).
Nash, D. Coinage in the Celtic World. (London, 1987).
Paulsen, R. Die Münzprägung der Boier. (Leipzig/Wien, 1933).
Pink, K. Münzprägung der Ostkelten und Ihrer Nachbarn. (Harrassowitz, 1939; reprinted 1974).
Preda, C. Monedele Geto-Dacilor. (Bucharest, 1973).
Scheers, S. La Gaule Belgique: Numismatique Celtique. (Louvian, 1983).
Scheers, S. Monnaies Gauloises de Seine-Maritime. (Rouen, 1978).
Scheers, S. Traité de numismatique celtique, II, La Gaule Belgique. (Louvain, 1983).
Sills, J. Gaulish and Early British Gold Coinage. (London, 2003).
Topalov, S. Apollonia Pontica: Contribution to the Study of the Coin Minting of the City 6th - 1st c. B.C. (Sofia, 2007).
Van Arsdell, R. Celtic Coinage of Britain. (London, 1989).
Victoor, R. Roulles Celtes et Objets Assimilés. (Rosendaël-lez-Dunkerque, 1989).
Villaronga, L. Corpus Nummum Hispaniae Anti Augusti Aetatem. (Madrid, 1994).
Ziegaus, B. Das Geld der Kelten und ihrer Nachbarn: Sammlung Josef Schörghuber. (Munich, 1994).
Ziegaus, B. Kelten Geld: Münzen der Kelten und angrenzender nichtgriechisher Völkerschaften. Sammlung Flesche. (Munich, 2010).


Catalog current as of Wednesday, October 23, 2019.
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Celtic Coins