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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Celtic & Tribal||View Options:  |  |  |   

Celtic Coins and Ancient Tribal Coinage

This page offers coins of the Celtic tribes, as well as coins of Iberian, German, Thracian, Paenonian, Illyrian, Dacian, Gaete, and other European tribes. These tribes struck coins from the late 4th century B.C. until the late 1st century B.C. They were introduced to coinage by the Greeks, with whom the traded, and for whom they sometimes worked as mercenaries. Tribal coins often copied Greek designs, especially Macedonian coins from the time of Philip II of Macedon and his son, Alexander the Great. Some became increasingly abstract over time. Map of Celtic Territiory

Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
GA99389. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Kim and Kroll 59, Van Alfen Hacksilber 53 ff.; 24.077g, 32.4mm long; perhaps cut from a disk ingot, weight 24.077 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, $200.00 (€190.00)
 


Iberian Celts, Lot of 5 Hacksilver Fragments, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Lot| |of| |5| |Hacksilver| |Fragments,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||Lot|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
CE99421. Hacksilver Lot, cf. Garcia-Bellido 393, Kim and Kroll 66; Van Alfen Hacksilber 85, $200.00 (€190.00)
 


Celtic, Pannonian, or Thracian Tribes, c. 180 - 35 B.C., Imitative of Thessalonika, Macedonia

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Celtic,| |Pannonian,| |or| |Thracian| |Tribes,| |c.| |180| |-| |35| |B.C.,| |Imitative| |of| |Thessalonika,| |Macedonia||AE| |20|
We do not know of another specimen similar to this. The identification of the prototype is clear. But the maker of this imitative is uncertain.
CE98465. Bronze AE 20, for prototype see AMNG III/2, 21; SNG ANS 804; HGC 3.1 743 (Thessalonika), VF, green patina, earthen deposits, weight 6.177 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 180 - 35 B.C.; obverse bearded Janiform head; reverse abstract design imitative of two centaurs back to back rearing outwards from center, completely abstract imitation of inscriptions above and below; $150.00 (€142.50)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
CE99424. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Gitler Hacksilber14, Kim and Kroll 55 ff.; 9.560g, 15.8mm long, $140.00 (€133.00)
 


Lot of 3 Celtic Gaul, Cast Potin Coins, c. 100 - 50 B.C.

|Celtic| |&| |Tribal|, |Lot| |of| |3| |Celtic| |Gaul,| |Cast| |Potin| |Coins,| |c.| |100| |-| |50| |B.C.||potin|
The following list was provided by the consignor and has not been verified by FORVM:
1) Celtic Gaul, Senones, 52 B.C., cast potin, AE15, 3.27g, Head right, hair divided into large curls, pulled back / Bird left, pentagram above tail, two annulets behind. Delestrée-Tache 2631, CCCBM 156-159, De la Tour 7565.
2) Northeast Gaul, Suessiones, c. 100-50 B.C., cast potin, AE22, 4.20g. Two confronted ibexes, globe between / Wolf confronting boar, annulet between. Delestrée & Tache 211.
3) Northeast Gaul, Leuci, c. 100-50 B.C. cast potin, 17mm, 3.64g. Celticized male head to left / Boar left. Delestrée-Tache 225.
LT99418. Cast potin, Lot of 3 coins, F - VF, c. 100 - 50 B.C.; no tags or flips, the actual coins in the photographs, 3 cast potin; $125.00 (€118.75)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, is ancient silver disks, bars, rods, foil, and broken and cut fragments of those forms and also of coins, jewelry or other silver items used as a medium of exchange by weight. It was common in trade beginning at the end of the Iron Age, c. 1200 B.C. in the Levant, and lasted until the first century B.C., were it was used by the Celts and other tribal people in Hispania and Gaul. It was used again in the Middle Ages by the Vikings.
CE99420. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Garcia-Bellido 393, Kim and Kroll 66, Van Alfen Hacksilber 85; cut fragment of a disk ingot, 9.655g, 21.9mm maximum length, $120.00 (€114.00)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
CE95745. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Garcia-Bellido 393, Kim and Kroll 66, Van Alfen Hacksilber 85; cut from a bar or disc ingot, 1.75g, 24.1mm long, weight 11.752 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, $110.00 (€104.50)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, are fragments of cut and bent silver items treated as bullion, either for ease of carrying before melting down for re-use, or simply used as currency by weight. It was common in trade until the first century B.C. and again in the middle ages with the Vikings.
CE97982. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Van Alfen Hacksilber 57, Kim and Kroll 59, Garcia-Bellido 393; 8.349g, 19.3mm long, $95.00 (€90.25)
 


Iberian Celts, Hacksilver, c. 300 - 150 B.C.

|Hacksilver|, |Iberian| |Celts,| |Hacksilver,| |c.| |300| |-| |150| |B.C.||fragment|
Hacksilver or hacksilber, is ancient silver disks, bars, rods, foil, and broken and cut fragments of those forms and also of coins, jewelry or other silver items used as a medium of exchange by weight. It was common in trade beginning at the end of the Iron Age, c. 1200 B.C. in the Levant, and lasted until the first century B.C., were it was used by the Celts and other tribal people in Hispania and Gaul. It was used again in the Middle Ages by the Vikings.
CE97576. Hacksilver fragment, cf. Kim and Kroll 55; Garcia-Bellido 393, fragment broken and cut from a bar or disk ingot, 9.199g, 21.2mm long, $90.00 (€85.50)
 


Gallic Tribes, Volcae-Arecomici, Nimes Area, Gaul, c. 120 - 49 B.C., Imitating Massalia

|Gaul|, |Gallic| |Tribes,| |Volcae-Arecomici,| |Nimes| |Area,| |Gaul,| |c.| |120| |-| |49| |B.C.,| |Imitating| |Massalia||obol|
Lighter cruder specimens of this head of Apollo / wheel type, have traditionally been identified as very late obols struck at Massalia. More recent research indicates finds are overwhelmingly centered in an area west of Massalia. They were almost certainly struck by the Volcae Arecomici, a Gallic tribe dwelling between the Rhône and the Hérault rivers, around present-day Nîmes.
GS99626. Silver obol, cf. Maurel 493, VF, dark toning, flow lines, flan much smaller than the dies, weight 0.540 g, maximum diameter 9.5 mm, die axis 0o, Volcae-Arecomici mint, c. 120 - 49 B.C.; obverse crude bare head of Apollo left (nose, mouth and chin off flan); reverse four-spoke wheel, between spokes M-A; ex CNG, ex Richard L. Horst Collection; $90.00 (€85.50)
 




  



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REFERENCES

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