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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis and Decline| ▸ |Volusian||View Options:  |  |  |   

Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D.

Gaius Vibius Afinius Gallus Vedumnianus Volusian was the son of Trebonianus Gallus and was given the rank of Caesar when his father became emperor. After emperor Hostilian was killed, he was raised to the rank of Augustus. He was assassinated along with his father in 253 A.D.


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria

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Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel. It is the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. Neapolis is home to about half the remaining worldwide Samaritan population of 600.
SH52130. Bronze AE 26, Rosenberger 125, Hendin 882, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, Nice aVF, weight 14.397 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse [AVT KAI Γ OVIB TPEBO VOΛOVCIANOC] (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse ΦΛ NEAC ΠOΛEΩC, Mount Gerizim surmounted by Samaritan temple and altar, stairway to temple, colonnade below, all supported by facing eagle with wings spread; rare; SOLD


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Pax, regarded by the ancients as a goddess, was worshiped not only at Rome but also at Athens. Her altar could not be stained with blood. Claudius began the construction of a magnificent temple to her honor, which Vespasian finished, in the Via Sacra. The attributes of Peace are the hasta pura, the olive branch, the cornucopia, and often the caduceus. Sometimes she is represented setting fire to a pile of arms.
SH08498. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Treb. Gallus 256a, Cohen V 74, Hunter III 32, SRCV III -, aEF/VF, fantastic obverse portrait and patina, rough areas and partial patina on reverse, weight 13.66 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse PAX AVGG (the peace of the two emperors), Pax standing left, raising olive branch in right hand, transverse scepter in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across center; SOLD


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Liberalitas coin types attest to occasions when the emperor has displayed his generosity towards the people by a distribution to them of money, provisions, or both. The first mention of Liberalitas was on coins of Hadrian. It was a type frequently repeated by the succeeding emperors. Indeed these instances of imperial generosity are more carefully recorded on coins than they are by history. Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the prosperity of the state and the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RB13707. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Treb. Gallus 254a, Cohen V 50, Hunter III 43, SRCV III 9789, VF, weight 19.898 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse LIBERALITAS AVGG, Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C flanking across lower half of field; very rare; SOLD


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Hieropolis-Castabala, Cilicia

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RP09195. Bronze AE 30, SGICV -, BMC Lycaonia -, Lindgren -, SNG Cop -, gF, weight 17.14 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 0o, Hieropolis-Castabala mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse AVT K OVOΛOVCCIANOC CEB, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse KACTABAΛEΩN IEPOΠO, city-goddess seated left on rocks in distyle shrine, river-god swimming below; attractive green patina with red earthen highlighting; very rare; SOLD


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This small shrine of Juno was possibly located in the Campus Martius. Hill however suggests Campus Martialis, a small area at the foot of Mons Caelius.
SH20392. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 253a, Cohen V 46, Hunter III 30, SRCV III 9787, VF, weight 21.118 g, maximum diameter 32.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 251 - 253 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse IVNONI MARTIALI S C, Juno seated left in distyle shrine; SOLD


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In 252, the Persian Emperor Shapur I invaded Armenia and, taken by surprise, destroyed a large Roman army at Barbalissos. He then invaded the defenceless Syrian provinces, captured all of its legionary posts and ravaged its cities, including Antioch, without any response. In 253, Uranius Antoninus (a priest and descendant of the royal house of Emesa) confronted Sapor and forced him to retreat. Uranius Antoninus also, however, proclaimed himself emperor.
SH54364. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 5124, Milne 3843, Curtis 1474, Emmett 3680, Choice VF, weight 11.688 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 252 - 253 A.D.; obverse A K Γ AΦ ΓAΛ B BOΛOYCIANOC EVC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse laureate bust of Asklepios right, himation on left shoulder, serpent staff before, LΓ (year 3) behind; very rare; SOLD


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Adventus reverse types commemorate the emperor's arrival at Rome, either at the commencement of his reign or on his return from a distance. They may also refer to his arrival in some other city or province of the empire. At their accession, emperors were not conveyed in a chariot nor in any other vehicle, but went on horseback or on foot when they made their first public entry into the capital of the Roman world.
RS79928. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 214 (R), RSC IV 1, SRCV III 9738, Hunter III - (p. cviii), F, well centered, rough areas, edge crack, weight 3.658 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch mint, 252 A.D.; obverse IMP C C VIB VOLVSIANVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse ADVENTVS AVG (arrival of the Emperor), Trebonianus Gallus on horseback left, raising right hand in salute, long scepter in left hand, horse's right foreleg raised; very rare; SOLD


Volusian, c. November 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Blaundos, Lydia

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RP51396. Bronze AE 29, BMC Lydia p. 57, 93 var.; SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, SNG Mnchen -, SNG Tb -, SNG Righetti -, aVF, weight 7.125 g, maximum diameter 28.5 mm, die axis 180o, Blaundos mint, obverse A K OY−OΛYCCIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse BΛAYN∆EΩN − EI (Γ?) AY ΠAΠIΩY, MAK, Apollo Kitharoedos standing right, plectrum in right, lyre in left, radiate, clad in long tight sleeved chiton and himation; very rare; SOLD


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Virtus was a specific virtue in ancient Rome. It carried connotations of valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Virtus applied exclusively to a man's behavior in the public sphere, that is to the application of duty to the res publica in the cursus honorum. Private business was no place to earn virtus, even when it involved courage or feats of arms or other good qualities. There could be no virtue in exploiting one's manliness in the pursuit of personal wealth, for example. It was thus a frequently stated virtue of Roman emperors and was personified as the deity Virtus.
RS17117. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 187, RSC IV 135a, Hunter III 15, SRCV III 9778, attractive aEF, weight 3.804 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Virtus standing left holding reversed spear and leaning on shield, star in right field; rare; SOLD


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Virtus to the ancient Romans included valor, manliness, excellence, courage, character, and worth, perceived as masculine strengths (from Latin vir, "man"). Curiously, despite the masculine characteristics of virtus, the personification or deity Virtus was usually depicted as a female warrior, in armor holding a spear, parazonium, victory or a shield. Virtus and Mars can usually be distinguished since Mars is usually shown nude and Virtus is always shown clothed.
RS35024. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 186 (R), RSC IV 135, SRCV III 9778, Hunter III 15 var. (star reverse right), Choice aEF, Rome mint, obverse IMP CAE C VIB VOLVSIANO AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VIRTVS AVGG (valor of the two emperors), Virtus standing half left, right hand resting on grounded shield, reversed spear vertical in left hand; rare; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CVIBIOVOLVSIANOCAES
IMCAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANAVG
IMCVAFGMVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCAECVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCCVIBVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVAFGALVENDVOLVSIANVSAVG
IMPCVAFGMVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANOAVG
IMPCVOLVSIANVSAVG


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 17, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Volusian