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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ Crisis and Decline ▸ Herennius EtruscusView Options:  |  |  |   

Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

Herennius Etruscus was the son of Trajan Decius and Herennia Etruscilla. He was made Caesar in 250 and co-emperor in early 251. Sometime in the first two weeks of June 251, Herennius Etruscus and his father Trajan Decius became the first Roman emperors to die in battle against a foreign enemy. Herennius died at his father's side, struck in battle by an enemy Goth arrow. Decius survived the initial confrontation, only to be slain with the rest of the army before the end of the day.


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Caesarea Maritima, Samaria

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Caesarea, about 30 miles north of Joppa and about 70 miles northwest of Jerusalem, was founded by Herod the Great and named for Caesar Augustus. It was the seat of the Roman procurators and the Roman military headquarters in Judaea. The Pilate Stone, discovered here in 1961, is only archaeological find that names Pontius Pilate, by whose order Jesus was crucified. After the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 A.D., Caesarea was the provincial capital of the Judaea Province. Well into Byzantine times, Caesarea remained the capital. In the 630s, Arab Muslim armies took the region, but kept Caesarea as its administrative center until early 8th century. Caesarea's ruins are a national park on the Mediterranean coast of Israel, about halfway between Tel Aviv and Haifa.
SH52173. Bronze AE 27, Rosenberger II 149 (notes otherwise unpublished), cf. Kadman 147 (Trajan Decius with same reverse die), Sofaer Collection -, aF/VF, weight 16.080 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 45o, Caesarea Maritima mint, obverse [C] MES Q EREN ETRVS[CO DECIO CAES], radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse COL PR F AVG F C[AESAREN], Nike walking left, wreath in right hand, palm frond in left; extremely rare; SOLD


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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to the Prince of Youth, Herennius Etruscus. When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RB71297. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV Decius 171a, Cohen V 28, Banti 6, Hunter III 22, SRCV III 9534, VF, nice style, green patina, squared flan typical of the period, porous, weight 18.254 g, maximum diameter 30.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, bare-headed, draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Herennius standing left in military dress, rod downward in right, transverse spear in left, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking low across field; ex Heritage Long Beach Signature Sale 3020 (6 Sep 2012), lot 25767; ex Dale Sigler (Tarzana, CA) Collection; scarce; SOLD


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D.

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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
SL89806. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV Decius 143, RSC IV 14, Hunter III 7, SRCV III 9521, NGC Ch XF, strike 4/5, surface 5/5 (2412821-154), weight 3.83 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse PIETAS AVGVSTORVM (to the piety of the Emperor), implements of the pontificate and augurate: aspergillum (sprinkler), culullus (cup) or simpulum (ladle), ewer (jug), patera (libation bowl), and lituus (augural wand); from the Martineit Collection of Ancient and World Coins; SOLD


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
SH52125. Billon tetradrachm, McAlee 1153h; Prieur 626; BMC Galatia p. 224, 610, Choice VF, weight 11.206 g, maximum diameter 26.8 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse EPENNE TPOY ME KY ∆EKIOC KECAP, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, no pellets or letters below; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing left on palm-branch, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) below; attractive earthen patina; very rare; SOLD


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This coin is dedicated to the harmony between the co-emperors, the father Trajan Decius and his son, Herennius Etruscus.
RS63689. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV Decius 138, RSC IV 4, Hunter III 1, SRCV III 9518, VF, weight 4.366 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, draped bust right; reverse CONCORDIA AVGG (harmony between the two emperors), clasped hands; rare; SOLD


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The reverse legend dedicates this coin to the Prince of Youth, Herennius Etruscus. When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RS28091. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV Decius 147c, RSC IV 26, Hunter III 13, SRCV III 9523, aEF, flat strike, weight 5.140 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Herennius in military dress, standing left holding rod and spear; scarce; SOLD


Herennius Etruscus, Early 251 - First Half of June 251 A.D., Antioch, Syria

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In 256 A.D., about six years after this coin was struck, the Persian King Shapur conquered and plundered Antioch.
SH72857. Billon tetradrachm, cf. McAlee 1153; Prieur 626; BMC Galatia p. 224, 610, VF, coppery spot on cheek, weight 13.413 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse EPENNE TPOY ME KY ∆EKIOC KECAP, bare-headed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind, officina symbol below off flan; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞOYCIAC (holder of Tribunitian power), eagle standing left on palm frond, wings spread, head left, wreath in beak, S C (senatus consulto) below; ; SOLD


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Spes was the Roman personification of Hope. In art Spes is normally depicted carrying flowers or a cornucopia, but on coins she is almost invariably depicted holding a flower in her extended right hand, while the left is raising a fold of her dress. She was also named "ultima dea" - for Hope is the last resort of men. On this coin, the Caesar, Herennius Etruscus, the designated successor of the emperor, is identified as the hope for the future of the Roman people.
RS48780. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV Decius 149, RSC IV 38, Hunter III 2, SRCV III 9526, VF, weight 3.934 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse SPES PVBLICA (the hope of the public), Spes walking left, flower in right hand, raising fold of robe with left; nice portrait; scarce; SOLD


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Pietas in traditional Latin usage expressed a complex, highly valued Roman virtue; a man or woman with pietas respected his or her responsibilities to the gods, family, other people and entities (such as the state), and understood his or her place in society with respect to others.
RS79980. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV Decius 143, RSC IV 14, Hunter III 7, SRCV III 9521, gVF, excellent portrait, choice obverse, struck with a worn reverse die, weight 4.297 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PIETAS AVGVSTORVM (to the piety of the Emperor), implements of the pontificate and augurate: aspergillum (sprinkler), culullus (cup) or simpulum (ladle), ewer (jug), patera (libation bowl), and lituus (augural wand); ex Aegean Numismatics (Mentor, OH); SOLD


Click for a larger photo
The reverse legend dedicates this coin to the Prince of Youth, Herennius Etruscus. When Augustus ruled Rome, he was not called emperor or king, he was the Princeps, the "first of men." In the empire, the designated successors to the emperor were named caesar and also given the title Princeps Juventutis, the "first of youths." This is the origin of the English word prince, meaning the son of a monarch.
RS26614. Silver antoninianus, RSC IV 24a, RIC IV 146, Hunter III 9, SRCV III 9522, VF, weight 3.404 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, as caesar, 250 - early 251 A.D.; obverse Q HER ETR MES DECIVS NOB C, radiate and draped bust right, from behind; reverse PRINCIPI IVVENTVTIS (to the Prince of Youth), Apollo seated left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, laurel branch in extended right hand, left hand at his side; scarce; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE LEGENDS

HERENETRVMESQVDECIVSCAESAR
HERENTRVMESQVDECIVSCAESAR
IMPCQHERETRMESDECIOAVG
IMPCQHERETRMESDECIVSAVG
QHERETRMESDECIVSAVG
QHERETRMESDECIVSNOBC
QHERINNIVSETRMESDECIVSNOBC


REFERENCES

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Caliců, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappťes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Wednesday, June 19, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Herennius Etruscus