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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis & Decline| ▸ |Philip I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

Marcus Julius Verus Philippus, known as Philip I "The Arab" was the Praetorian Prefect and the successor to Gordian III, whom he possibly had murdered. After signing a treaty with the Persians, he returned home. During his reign, the 1000th anniversary of the foundation of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated and magnificent games were held on a scale rarely seen. In 249 A.D., a series of rebellions occurred, both Philip and his son were killed after their army was defeated near Verona by the forces of Trajan Decius.

Kingdom of Bosporus, Rheskuporis V, 242 - 276 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Rheskuporis| |V,| |242| |-| |276| |A.D.||stater|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
RP99912. Billon stater, Frolova BAR 166 pp. 137-138, pl. IV, 1227, pl. LXXXI, 21-22; RPC Online IX 179; MacDonald Bosporus 608/1 (Rhescuporis IV); Anokhin 697 (same), VF/gVF, small edge cracks, weight 7.200 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC PHCKOYΠOPI∆, diademed and draped bust of Rheskuporis right; reverse laureate and draped bust of Roman emperor (Philip I or Trajan Decius) right, club handle upward before (control), ςMΦ ([year] 546 [of the Pontic Era]); $160.00 SALE PRICE $144.00


Kingdom of Bosporus, Rheskuporis V, 242 - 276 A.D.

|Bosporan| |Kingdom|, |Kingdom| |of| |Bosporus,| |Rheskuporis| |V,| |242| |-| |276| |A.D.||stater|
The Bosporan Kingdom (or Kingdom of the Cimmerian Bosporus) was in eastern Crimea and the Taman Peninsula on the shores of the Cimmerian Bosporus, the present-day Strait of Kerch (it was not named after the Bosphorus beside Istanbul). The mixed population adopted Greek language and civilization. The prosperity of the kingdom was based on the export of wheat, fish and slaves. The kingdom's golden age was 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. At the end of the 2nd century A.D., King Sauromates II inflicted a critical defeat on the Scythians and expanded his state to include the entire Crimea. It was the longest surviving Roman client kingdom, lasting until it was overrun by the Huns c. 375 A.D.
RP99913. Billon stater, Frolova BAR 166 pp. 138-140, pl. IV, 28-37, pl. LXXXI, 23-25; RPC Online IX 180; MacDonald Bosporus 608/2 (Rhescuporis IV); Anokhin 697a (same), VF, toned, a little off center, weight 7.015 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, 249 - 250 A.D.; obverse BACIΛEWC PHCKOYΠOPI∆, diademed and draped bust of Rheskuporis right; reverse laureate and draped bust of Roman emperor (Philip I or Trajan Decius) right, six pointed star before (control), ςMΦ ([year] 546 [of the Pontic Era]); $160.00 SALE PRICE $128.00


|Philip| |I|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.||antoninianus|
Nice gift for a lawyer or a judge. In Roman mythology, Aequitas was the minor goddess of fair trade and honest merchants. Aequitas was also the personification of the virtues equity and fairness of the emperor (Aequitas Augusti). The scales, a natural emblem of equity, express righteousness. The cornucopia signifies the prosperity which results from Aequitas and Aequitas Augusti.
RS110259. Silver antoninianus, RIC IV 27b, RSC IV 9, Hunter III 25, SRCV III 8918, Choice EF, well centered, flow lines, die wear, weight 3.172 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 30o, Rome mint, Feb 244 - 247 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse AEQVITAS AVGG (equity of the two emperors), Aequitas standing facing, head left, scales in right, cornucopia in left; ex Raffaele Negrini (Milan, Italy); $120.00 SALE PRICE $108.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Viminacium, Moesia Superior

|Viminacium|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Viminacium,| |Moesia| |Superior||provincial| |sestertius|
Viminacium was a Roman Colony founded by Gordian III in 239 A.D. The usual legend is P.M.S. COL. VIM., abbreviating Provinciae Moesiae Superioris Colonia Viminacium. The usual type is a female personification of Moesia standing between a lion and a bull. The bull and the lion were symbols of the Legions VII and IV, which were quartered in the province.
RP90243. Bronze provincial sestertius, H-J Viminacium 24 (R2); Varbanov I 132 (R2); BMC Thrace p. 16, 18; AMNG I/1 100; Moushmov 36, aVF, nice green patina, well centered, light scratches, weight 18.076 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 180o, Viminacium (Stari Kostolac, Serbia) mint, 244 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse P M S COL VIM, Moesia standing facing, head left, extending hands over bull on left standing right and lion on right standing left, AN V (year 5 of the Viminacium colonial era) in exergue; $90.00 SALE PRICE $81.00


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Antiocheia, Pisidia

|Pisidia|, |Philip| |I| |the| |Arab,| |February| |244| |-| |End| |of| |September| |249| |A.D.,| |Antiocheia,| |Pisidia||AE| |27|
For most coins, the only way to distinguish between Philip I and his son Philip II is the age of the portrait. The portrait here appears a little young for Philip I, but RPC dates it to 244 - 245, when Philip II was not yet Augustus. The "P M" at the end of the obverse legend likely means "Persicus Maximus" boasting of victory over Persia, rather than the traditional "Pontifex Maximus." In either case, victorious commander or high priest, it is appropriate only for Philip I.
RP99131. Bronze AE 27, Krzyzanowska pl. XL, I/3 (Philip II); SNG BnF 1277 (same); SNG Pfalz 110 var. (same, CHCOL in ex.); SNGvA 4975 var. (same, SR in ex.), aVF, well centered, obv. center not fully struck, green patina, light earthen deposits, porous, central dimples, weight 10.516 g, maximum diameter 27.2 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch in Pisidia (Yalvac, Turkey) mint, Feb 244 - 245 A.D.; obverse IMP N IVL PHILIPPVS P F AVG P M, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CAES ANTIOC-·H COL (dot and last four letters upside down in exergue), vexillum flanked by two standards, vexillum surmounted by an eagle facing with wings spread and open wreath in beak, standards topped by eagles turned toward the vexillum, S - R low in inner fields divided by base of vexillum; $80.00 SALE PRICE $72.00







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

IMPCAESMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPCMIVLPHILLIPVSPFAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELAVGPM
IMPIVLPHILIPPVSPIVSFELIXAVGPM
IMPMIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
IMPPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVG
MIVLPHILIPPVSAVGMIVLPHILIPPVSNC


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Bland, R. "Dr. Bland's List for Philip I and Family" - Summary on NumisWiki
Calic, X. The Roman Avrei, vol. 2: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 5: Gordian I to Valerian II. (Paris, 1885).
Gbl, R. "Rmischer Mnzhort Tulln 1966 (Septimius Severus - Gallienus)" in NZ 83 (1969). pp. 7-57, pl. 1-48.
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Muona, J. "The Antoniniani of Philip the Arab" in The Celator, Feb. 2002, p. 10.
Muona, J. "The Imperial mints of Philip the Arab" - https://www.forumancientcoins.com/Articles/Philip_Arab/index.html
vri, F. "Philippus antiochiai veretu antoninianusairl" in Numizmatikai Kzlny 88/89 (1989/90), pp. 41 - 48.
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume IV, Gordian III to Postumus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Thibaut, M. Antoniniani from the Mint of Antioch Under the Reign of Philip the Arab (244-249 AD) - http://marchal.thibaut.free.fr/e_index.htm
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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