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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Greece| ▸ |Corinth||View Options:  |  |  |   

Ancient Coins of Corinth (and Other Corinthian Type Staters)

Corinth, on the Isthmus of Corinth about halfway between Athens and Sparta, was the largest city and the richest port in ancient Greece. Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards in the city). Corinth was known as an especially "wild" city (the Las Vegas of its time). At the Temple of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, 1,000 sacred prostitutes served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or visiting the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors. Korinthiazomai was a Greek word for fornicate.

Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.|, |stater|
Athena is the Greek goddess of wisdom, courage, inspiration, civilization, law and justice, strategic warfare, mathematics, strength, strategy, the arts, crafts, and skill. She was believed to lead soldiers into battle as the war goddess Athena Promachos. The Parthenon on the Athenian Acropolis was dedicated to her, along with numerous other temples and monuments across Europe, West Asia, and North Africa. Her usual attribute is the owl and Nike is her frequent companion.
SH26890. Silver stater, Pegasi I 427, Ravel 1009, gVF, weight 8.512 g, maximum diameter 20.9 mm, die axis 270o, Corinth mint, c. 375 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse laureate and helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, aegis behind, A-P below; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.|, |stater|
In 344 B.C., the aristocracy of Syracuse appealed to their mother city of Corinth against their tyrant Dionysius II. The Corinthian general Timoleon led a liberation force to Sicily. Landing at Tauromenium (Taormina) in the summer, Timoleon faced two armies, one under Dionysius and the other under Hicetas (tyrant of nearby Leontini), who has also called in Carthaginian forces. By shrewd tactics Timoleon defeated his enemies and occupied Syracuse.
SH58242. Silver stater, Pegasi I 460, BCD Korinth 135, gVF, toned, weight 8.131 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, ∆ below chin, I and herm with kerykeion and cornucopia behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 404 - 435 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |404| |-| |435| |B.C.|, |stater|
Corinth is mentioned many times in the New Testament, largely in connection with Apostle Paul's mission there. Paul first visited the city in 51 or 52 and resided there for 18 months (Acts 18:1-18). Paul wrote at least two epistles to the Christian community, the First Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Ephesus) and the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (written from Macedonia).
SH68246. Silver stater, Pegasi I 246/2; McClean 6171; BMC Corinth -; BCD Korinth -; SNG Cop -, gVF, light toning, small flan flaw on Pegsos, weight 8.442 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 180o, Corinth mint, c. 404 - 435 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying right, pointed wings, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right wearing a plain Corinthian helmet over leather cap, aphlaston behind; scarce; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.|, |stater|
Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards that prevailed in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH46853. Silver stater, Pegasi I 457, BCD Korinth 133, Ravel 1081, HGC 4 1848, BMC Corinth -, VF, weight 8.368 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 315o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left, ∆ below chin, I and Artemis running right with torch behind; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.|, |stater|
SH46854. Silver stater, Pegasi I 385, BCD Korinth -, SNG Cop -, BMC Corinth -, weight 8.550 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Corinth mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, koppa below; reverse helmeted head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right, facing bearded ithyphallic herm (terminal) and N behind; scarce; SOLD


Anaktorion, Akarnania, Greece, c. 350 - 300 B.C.

|Peloponnesos|, |Anaktorion,| |Akarnania,| |Greece,| |c.| |350| |-| |300| |B.C.|, |stater|
Anaktorion (Anactorium) was a Corinthian colony, founded c. 630 B.C. on the south bank of the Ambracian Gulf, near modern Vonitsa. The location was favorable for trade and shipping but less so for farming. The residents engaged in trade, fishing and logging. Like the other cities of Acarnania, Anaktorion declined after the Battle of Actium when Augustus founded Nikopolis on the other side of the Ambracian Gulf and forced the its residents to move there. No archaeological excavations have yet been done at the site and few ruins remain visible above ground.Anaktorion
SH19454. Silver stater, Pegasi II 30, BCD Akarnania 89, BMC Corinth p. 118, 35, aEF, weight 8.378 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Anaktorion mint, c. 350 - 300 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with pointed wing flying right, ligate AN below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) right in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, tripod in wreath and ligate AN behind; SOLD


Syracuse, Sicily, Timoleon and Third Democracy, c. 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Timoleon| |and| |Third| |Democracy,| |c.| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |stater|
Syracuse was a colony of Corinth. Threatened by Carthage and its ally Selinos, the Syracusans asked help from their old home. Corinth sent General Timoleon, accompanied by a small group of mercenaries. Timoleon quickly put order in Syracuse' affairs and repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island with Carthage. A Corinthian leading a Corinthian army, it is not hard to imagine why Timoleon picked the classic coin types of Corinth when new coins were struck by his new city Syracuse. They were later used by Agathokles too.
SH75811. Silver stater, SNG ANS 494, SNG ANS 496-507, SNG Cop 711, VF, scratches and corrosion, weight 8.367 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 345o, Syracuse mint, c. 344 - 335 B.C.; obverse ΣYPAKOΣION, Pegasos flying left; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION, helmeted head of Athena right; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, c. 340 - 320 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |c.| |340| |-| |320| |B.C.|, |stater|
Horace is quoted as saying: "non licet omnibus adire Corinthum," which translates, "Not everyone is able to go to Corinth" (referring to the expensive living standards in the city). Corinth was renowned for the temple prostitutes of Aphrodite, the goddess of love, who served the wealthy merchants and the powerful officials living in or traveling in and out of the city. The most famous of them, Lais, was said to have extraordinary abilities and charged tremendous fees for her favors.
SH65227. Silver stater, Pegasi I 394/1, Ravel 1007, VF, nice style, weight 8.443 g, maximum diameter 22.7 mm, die axis 45o, Corinth mint, c. 340 - 320 B.C.; obverse Pegasos with a pointed wing flying left, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, ∆ within wreath behind; SOLD


Syracuse, Sicily, Time of Timoleon, 344 - 317 B.C.

|Syracuse|, |Syracuse,| |Sicily,| |Time| |of| |Timoleon,| |344| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |stater|
Syracuse was a colony of Corinth. Threatened by Carthage and its ally Selinos, the Syracusans asked help from their old home. Corinth sent General Timoleon, accompanied by a small group of mercenaries. Timoleon quickly put order in Syracuse' affairs and repelled Carthage in several wars, ending with a treaty which divided the island with Carthage.

A Corinthian leading a Corinthian army, it is not hard to imagine why Timoleon picked the classic coin types of Corinth when new coins were struck by his new city Syracuse. They were later used by Agathokles too.
GS38615. Silver stater, Pegasi II 4, SNG ANS 509, VF, weight 8.147 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 45o, Syracuse mint, obverse Pegasos flying left, AI below; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION, helmeted head of Athena right; SOLD


Corinth, Corinthia, Greece, 345 - 307 B.C.

|Corinth|, |Corinth,| |Corinthia,| |Greece,| |345| |-| |307| |B.C.|, |stater|
Corinth, on the Isthmus of Corinth about halfway between Athens and Sparta, was the largest city and richest port in ancient Greece. Corinth allied with Sparta from about 550 B.C. until the early 4th Century B.C. The city adopted an independent policy in the various wars of the 4th Century. After the Macedonian conquest of Greece, the Acrocorinth was the seat of a Macedonian garrison until 243 B.C., when the city was liberated and joined the Achaean League. In 146 B.C., Corinth was captured and destroyed by Roman armies. Re-founded as a Roman colony in 44 B.C., Corinth flourished once again and became the administrative capital of the Roman province of Achaea.
GS89061. Silver stater, Pegasi 426; BCD Corinth 101; SNG Cop 73; BMC Corinth p. 26, 258; Ravel 1008, HGC 4 1848, gVF, toned, slight roughness, weight 7.893 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 90o, Corinth mint, 345 - 307 B.C.; obverse Pegasos flying left, pointed wing, koppa below; reverse head of Athena (or Aphrodite) left in Corinthian helmet over leather cap, helmet without crest ornamented with a laurel wreath, A-P below divided by neck truncation, eagle (control symbol) standing left behind with wings closed and head turned back right; ex CNG e-auction 232 (28 Apr 2010), lot 91; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Amandry, M. Le Monnayage des Duovirs Corinthiens, Bulletin de Correspondance Hellénisque, Suppl. XV. (Paris, 1988).
Babelon, E. Traité des Monnaies Grecques et Romaines. (Paris, 1901-1932).
Bishop, J. & R. Holloway. Wheaton College Collection of Greek and Roman Coins. (New York, 1981).
Bloesch, H. Griechische Münzen In Winterthur. (Winterthur, 1987).
Brett, A. Catalogue of Greek Coins, Boston Museum of Fine Arts. (Boston, 1955).
Burnett, A., M. Amandry & P. Ripollès. Roman Provincial Coinage I: From the death of Caesar to the death of Vitellius (44 BC-AD 69). (1992 & suppl.).
Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Calciati, R. Pegasi. (Mortara, 1990).
Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber. (1922-1929).
Grose, S. Catalogue of the McClean Collection of Greek Coins, Fizwilliam Museum, Vol. II - The Greek mainland, the Aegaean islands, Crete. (Cambridge, 1926).
Head, B. Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Corinth, Colonies of Corinth, Etc. (London, 1889).
Münzen & Medaillen. Sammlung BCD: Akarnanien und Aetolien. Auction 23, 18 Oct 2007, Stuttgart.
Naville Co. Monnaies grecques antiques S. Pozzi. Auction 1, 4 Apr 1921, Geneva.
Numismatik Lanz. Münzen von Korinth: Sammlung BCD, Auction 105, Munich, 26 Nov 2001.
Price, M. Greek Bronze Coinage c. 450 - 150 B.C., its introduction, circulation, and value, with particular reference to the series of Corinth. (Dissertation, 1967).
Ravel, O. Les "Poulains" de Corinthe, I - II. (Basel, 1936-1948).
Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 1, Europe. (London, 1978).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 3: Greece: Thessaly to Aegean Islands. (New Jersey, 1982).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen: Part 3: Akarnanien-Bithynien. (Berlin, 1985).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, France, Bibliothèque National, Collection Jean et Marie Delepierre. (Paris, 1983).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection: Part 4: Peloponnese - Aeolis. (London, 1945).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections: Part 4: Acarnania - Phliasia. (London, 1956).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VIII, The Hart Collection. (Oxford, 1989).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain VII, Manchester University Museum. (London, 1986).

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