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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |before 150 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Republic, before 150 B.C.

Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, 225 - 215 B.C.

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Crawford describes obverse as the laureate janiform head of the Dioscuri and explains, "the Dioscuri had acquired the role of protectors of the Roman people as a result of their intervention on the Roman side at the Battle of Lake Regillus. Explaining the reverse, he states, "Jupiter was the god in whose honour a Roman triumph was held." The depiction is probably based on the statue of Jupiter in a quadriga erected on the ridge of the Capitoline Temple in 296 B.C.
SH76566. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 28/3, Sydenham 64, RSC I 23, SRCV I 31, Choice gVF, attractive style, well struck, light rose toning, traces of mint luster, small die crack on chin, minor flan flaws and contact marks, weight 6.800 g, maximum diameter 22.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; SOLD


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, c. 225 - 215 B.C.

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During the period this coin was struck Rome fought two major wars simultaneously: the First Macedonian War against Philip V and the Second Punic War against Hannibal. Rome would later be victorious in both conflicts and emerge as the sole superpower in the Mediterranean.
SH67900. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 30/1; Sydenham 64b; BMCRR II, p. 133, 94; SRCV I 31, aEF, attractive style, dark toning, weight 6.572 g, maximum diameter 22.8 mm, die axis 180o, Italian (Rome?) mint, c. 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, slightly curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory standing on tailboard (the drapery on her lower body visible) with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; scarce; SOLD


Roman Republic, Anonymous, Aes Formatum, 4th Century B.C.

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Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was a precursor to the issues of aes grave but later than aes rude. Presumably, molten bronze-iron alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. Broken examples are much more common than complete ones like this.
RR79287. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7, green patina with heavy earthen deposits, weight 850 g, maximum diameter 121 mm, Italian mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 234 - 231 B.C.

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In 232, despite the opposition of the Roman Senate and of his own father, the Roman political leader Gaius Flaminius won passage of a measure to distribute land among the plebeians. The Romans decide to parcel out land north of Rome (the Ager Gallicus) into small holdings for its poorer citizens whose farms have fallen into ruin during the First Punic War. In 217, during the Second Punic War, Gaius Flaminius was defeated and killed in the Battle of Lake Trasimene against Hannibal.
SH87329. Silver didrachm, RBW Collection 48 (same dies), Crawford 26/1, Sydenham 27, RSC I Pre-denarius Coinage 37, Historia Numorum Italy 306, SRCV I 28, VF, well centered, nice style, toned, light marks, very porous, tiny edge cracks, weight 6.406 g, maximum diameter 20.1 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 234 - 231 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse horse rearing left, ROMA above back and tail; rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 209 - 208 B.C.

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The Roman denarius was introduced in 211 B.C., initially weighing about 4.5 grams. The word denarius is derived from the Latin deni "containing ten," as its value was 10 asses, although in the middle of the 2nd century B.C. it was revalued to 16 asses or four sestertii. The denarius was the most common Roman coin for centuries but was slowly debased in weight and silver content until its replacement by the double denarius, called the antoninianus, early in the 3rd century A.D.
RR72151. Silver denarius, SRCV I 40, RSC I 20t, Crawford 76/1a, Sydenham 201 (scarce), BMCRR Italy II 112, VF, superb Greek style, well struck, toned, light marks and corrosion, weight 4.101 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 45o, Sicilian mint, 209 - 208 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right, in winged crested helmet with griffin head at peak, wearing necklace and drop-pendant earring, branch behind, X (mark of value) below chin, border of dots; reverse Dioscuri galloping right, wearing pilei, cloaks flying behind, and holding spears, two stars above, ROMA in a linear frame in exergue, linear border; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Pre-Denarius Coinage, 225 - 215 B.C.

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Crawford describes obverse as the laureate janiform head of the Dioscuri and explains, "the Dioscuri had acquired the role of protectors of the Roman people as a result of their intervention on the Roman side at the Battle of Lake Regillus. Explaining the reverse, he states, "Jupiter was the god in whose honour a Roman triumph was held." The depiction is probably based on the statue of Jupiter in a quadriga erected on the ridge of the Capitoline Temple in 296 B.C.
RR49952. Silver quadrigatus, Crawford 30/1; Sydenham 64b; BMCRR II, p. 133, 94; SRCV I 31, VF, toned, some pitting and scratches, weight 6.352 g, maximum diameter 22.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 225 - 215 B.C.; obverse laureate beardless head of Janus, slightly curved neck truncation; reverse Jupiter in fast quadriga right, driven by Victory standing on tailboard (the drapery on her lower body visible) with reins in both hands, Jupiter hurling thunderbolt in his right, transverse lotus tipped scepter in his left, incuse ROMA on raised rectangular tablet below; SOLD


Macedonia Prima Merida (First Region), Roman Dependent Republic, c. 168 - 149 B.C.

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In 168 B.C., Rome split Macedonia into four pseudo-autonomous republics. These republics nominally managed their own internal affairs but were denied the right to make external agreements of any kind. The Prima Merida (1st region) included the area between the Strymonas and Nestos rivers, up to the eastern lands of Nestos, without the towns of Aenos, Maroneia and Avdera. The capital was Amphipolis.
SH33195. Silver tetradrachm, SNG Ashmolean 3297 - 3298; SNG Saroglos 976; BMC Macedonia p. 8, 7; AMNG III 176; SNG Cop -, aEF, weight 16.885 g, maximum diameter 32.9 mm, die axis 0o, Amphipolis mint, 158 - 149 B.C.; obverse Macedonian shield (the whole obverse represents a shield) with bust of Artemis Tauropolos (Diana to the Romans) at the center facing right, bow and quiver at her shoulder; reverse MAKE∆ONΩN / ΠPΩTHΣ (First Macedonia) above and below club, ΣHY∆P monogram above, TKP monogram below left, TYPME monogram bottom right, all within oak wreath, thunderbolt left; SOLD


Roman Republic, Corn-Ear Cast Bronze Series, c. 216 B.C.

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On 2 August 216 B.C., at the Battle of Cannae, Hannibal with a 40,000-man army defeated a Roman force of 70,000. Fortunately, the remnants of the Roman army at Canusium saved the city of Nola and southern Campania from occupation. Rome's apparent weakness, however, led many of Rome's Italian allies defect and other enemies to attack. Capua defected and Hannibal and the Carthaginian army wintered there. Gauls near Litana ambushed and almost completely wiped out a Roman force of 25,000. Philip V of Macedon seized this opportunity to invade Illyria and sent ambassadors to visit Hannibal in Italy. Unsure of how to deal with Hannibal's victories, Rome sent the historian Quintus Fabius Pictor to consult the Oracle in Delphi.
SH76976. Aes grave (cast) quadrans, Vecchi ICC 98; Russo RBW 110 (ex. rare); Thurlow-Vecchi 66b; Crawford 40/1a; HGC 2 1732 (R1); SRCV I 585; Sydenham -, VF, weight 34.575 g, maximum diameter 35.4 mm, Sicilian mint, c. 216 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules left, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress, three pellets below; reverse war galley prow left, barley ear above, three pellets below; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Aes Formatum Large Domed Disc Ingot, 4th Century B.C.

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Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was a precursor to the issues of aes grave but later than aes rude. Presumably, molten bronze-iron alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. Broken examples are much more common than complete ones like this.
RT11424. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7; 1.196kg, 137mm, Italian mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; the denarius is included in the photograph to indicate the size, it is not included with the aes formatum, international shipping at the actual cost of postage will require additional charge; very rare; SOLD


Roman Republic, Libral Cast Series, 225 - 217 B.C.

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The prow right aes grave are common in the as to sextans denominations, but scarce for uncia. This issue was followed by the prow left series, which has no uncia.
RR88347. Aes grave (cast) uncia, Crawford 35/6; Sydenham 77; Haeberlin pl. 18, 22 ff.; Thurlow-Vecchi 56; Vecchi ICC 83; HN Italy 342; RBW Collection 90, SRCV I 589, VF, sculptural high relief, very nice for the type, bumps and marks, edge split (apparently where a casting sprue was snapped off), weight 19.201 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 225 - 217 B.C.; obverse head of Roma left, wearing a crested Attic helmet, ē (mark of value) behind; reverse prow of galley right; ē (mark of value) below; SOLD




  




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REFERENCES|

Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979
Bertol, A. & K Farac. "Aes rude and aes formatum ? a new typology" in VAMZ, 3. s., XLV (2012).
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Crawford, M. "Paestum and Rome: The form and function of a subsidiary coinage" in La monetazione di bronzo do Poseidonia-Paestum. Annali 18-19 Supp. (Naples, 1971).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Berger, F. Die MŁnzen der RŲmischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
McCabe, A. "The Anonymous Struck Bronze Coinage of the Roman Republic: A Provisional Arrangement" in Essays Russo.
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N.ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. & I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).
Vecchi, I. Italian Cast Coinage. (London, 2013).

Catalog current as of Sunday, August 25, 2019.
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Roman Republic Coins before 150 B.C.