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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Ionia| ▸ |Colophon||View Options:  |  |  | 

Colophon, Ionia

Kolophon was once the strongest of the Ionian cities and renowned both for its cavalry and for the inhabitants' luxurious lifestyle until Gyges of Lydia conquered it in the 7th century B.C. Kolophon then went into decline and was eclipsed by neighboring Ephesus and by the rising naval power, Miletus. After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon, including the family of Epicurus, who joined them there after completing his military service. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered and the name was eventually transferred to the port village of Notium. Kolophon was one of several cities that claimed to be the birthplace of the poet Homer.

Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus and Alexander IV, 323 - 317 B.C.

|Macedonian| |Kingdom|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Philip| |III| |Arrhidaeus| |and| |Alexander| |IV,| |323| |-| |317| |B.C.|, |drachm|
Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SH95391. Silver drachm, Price P48, Müller P137, gem EF, lustrous, flow lines, centered on a tight flan, weight 3.987 g, maximum diameter 16.34 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, (ΠA monogram) left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right, B under throne; ex Forum (2006); $320.00 SALE |PRICE| $288.00
 


Kolophon, Ionia, c. 375 - 360 B.C.

|Colophon|, |Kolophon,| |Ionia,| |c.| |375| |-| |360| |B.C.|, |diobol|
Colophon, founded around the turn of the first millennium B.C., was one of the oldest of the twelve cities of the Ionian League. Located between Lebedos (19km to the west) and Ephesus (11 km to its south), today its ruins are south of Degirmendere Fev in Izmir Province, Turkey. Colophon was once the strongest of the Ionian cities and renowned both for its cavalry and for the inhabitants' luxurious lifestyle. After Gyges of Lydia conquered it in the 7th century B.C., Colophon went into decline and was eclipsed by neighboring Ephesus and by the rising naval power of Ionia, Miletus.
GS94269. Silver diobol, cf. SNG Cop 141; SNGvA 2006; SNG Kayhan 372; SNG Mun 539; SNG Tub 2900; Milne Colophon 57; BMC Ionia p. 37, 11 (none this magistrate), aVF, well centered, porosity, edge cracks, weight 1.035 g, maximum diameter 10.5 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 375 - 360 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse Kithara with six strings, KOΛOΦΩ upward on left, obscure magistrate's name downward on right; ex Numismatik Naumann Auction 78 (2019), lot 282; $150.00 SALE |PRICE| $135.00
 


Kolophon, Ionia, 330 - 285 B.C.

|Colophon|, |Kolophon,| |Ionia,| |330| |-| |285| |B.C.|, |dichalkon|
After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos, c. 285 B.C. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered.
GB89577. Bronze dichalkon, Milne Kolophon 114(a); SNG Cop 154; cf. BMC Ionia p. 38, 20 ff. (various magistrates), VF, very nice style, dark green patina, pitting, obverse off center, weight 1.873 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 330 - 285 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of a galloping, bridled and saddled horse right, KONNIΣ (magistrate's name) upward on left, KO below; ex Forum (2010); $75.00 SALE |PRICE| $67.50
 







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REFERENCES|

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