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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Ionia| ▸ |Colophon||View Options:  |  |  | 

Colophon, Ionia

Kolophon was once the strongest of the Ionian cities and renowned both for its cavalry and for the inhabitants' luxurious lifestyle until Gyges of Lydia conquered it in the 7th century B.C. Kolophon then went into decline and was eclipsed by neighboring Ephesus and by the rising naval power, Miletus. After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon, including the family of Epicurus, who joined them there after completing his military service. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered and the name was eventually transferred to the port village of Notium. Kolophon was one of several cities that claimed to be the birthplace of the poet Homer.

Kolophon, Ionia, 330 - 285 B.C.

|Colophon|, |Kolophon,| |Ionia,| |330| |-| |285| |B.C.||dichalkon|
After the death of Alexander the Great, Perdiccas expelled the Athenian settlers on Samos to Kolophon. Antigonus controlled Kolophon until general Prepelaus sized the area for Lysimachus in 302 B.C. Lysimachus destroyed Kolophon (and Lebedos) and forced the survivors to emigrate to Ephesos, c. 285 B.C. After his death in 281, Kolophon was reestablished, but it never fully recovered.
GB89577. Bronze dichalkon, Milne Kolophon 114(a); SNG Cop 154; cf. BMC Ionia p. 38, 20 ff. (various magistrates), VF, very nice style, dark green patina, pitting, obverse off center, weight 1.873 g, maximum diameter 14.8 mm, die axis 0o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, 330 - 285 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right; reverse forepart of a galloping, bridled and saddled horse right, KONNIΣ (magistrate's name) upward on left, KO below; ex Forum (2010); $75.00 (€69.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus I Monophthalmus, 323 - 301 B.C., In the Name of Alexander the Great

|Colophon|, |Macedonian| |Kingdom,| |Antigonus| |I| |Monophthalmus,| |323| |-| |301| |B.C.,| |In| |the| |Name| |of| |Alexander| |the| |Great||drachm|
Antigonos I Monophthalmos ("the One-eyed") (strategos of Asia, 320 - 306/5 B.C., king, 306/5 - 301 B.C.) was a nobleman, general, and governor under Alexander the Great. Upon Alexander's death in 323 B.C., he established himself as one of the successors and declared himself King in 306 B.C. The most powerful satraps of the empire, Cassander, Seleucus, Ptolemy, and Lysimachus, answered by also proclaiming themselves kings. Antigonus found himself at war with all four, largely because his territory shared borders with all of them. He died in battle at Ipsus in 301 B.C. Antigonus' kingdom was divided up, with Seleucus I Nicator gaining the most. His son, Demetrius I Poliorcetes, took Macedon, which the family held, off and on, until it was conquered by Rome in 168 B.C. -- Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
SH64151. Silver drachm, Price 1810, Müller Alexander 263 var. (slight variation of monogram), SNG Munchen 522 var. (same), SNG Cop 922 var. (same), SNG Alpha Bank -, Choice gVF, light toning, weight 4.239 g, maximum diameter 17.9 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, c. 310 - 301 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY, Zeus seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, crescent horns left over TI monogram in left field, Π under throne; SOLD


Kolophon, Ionia, Late 5th Century B.C.

|Colophon|, |Kolophon,| |Ionia,| |Late| |5th| |Century| |B.C.||drachm|
The term "colophony" for rosin comes from the term colophonia resina, that is, resin from the pine trees of Colophon, which was highly valued for the strings of musical instruments.
GS57816. Silver drachm, De Luynes 2590 (same dies), Milne Kolophon, period II, group F, 45 (refs De Luynes); cf. SNG Cop 136; SNGvA 2003; BMC Ionia p. 36, 3, VF, toned, weight 4.969 g, maximum diameter 14.6 mm, die axis 45o, Kolophon (near Degirmendere Fev, Turkey) mint, obverse head of Apollo left wearing taenia, hair short and curly; reverse KOΛO−Φ−ΩNION, Kithara, within incuse square; struck with a worn obverse die, scratches; SOLD







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REFERENCES|

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Kim, H.S. & J.H. Kroll. "A Hoard of Archaic Coin of Colophon and Unminted Silver (CH I.3)" in AJN 20 (2008).
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Waggoner, N.M. Early Greek Coins from the Collection of Jonathan P. Rosen (ANS ACNAC 5). (New York, 1983).

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