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Ancient Roman Coins

The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins

|Special| |-| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Coins|, |The| |Handbook| |of| |Roman| |Imperial| |Coins|
First published in 1991, Van Meter's Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins (HRIC) quickly became a cult classic among collectors. In 1999, used copies were trading in excess of $100 on eBay. This was no surprise, really..the book remains the most comprehensive, and yet easy-to-use one-volume reference on Roman Imperial Coins! With over 330 large-format pages, and 1000 illustrations, the HRIC provides the collector with both an expansive overview of the history of the coinage, and a particularly thorough catalogue of the coin types. Numerous charts, tables, and a lexicon make identifying, attributing and understanding your coins a pleasure. This book is quite simply the best value in reference literature on Roman Imperial coins!

SPECIAL OFFER! Order The Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins and a coin at the same time - $10 will be automatically deducted from your order at checkout!
BKBHRIC. Handbook of Roman Imperial Coins by David Van Meter, $34.95 SALE PRICE $31.46


Marcus Junius Brutus, Most Famous of Caesars Assassins, 44 - 42 B.C.

|The| |Tyrannicides|, |Marcus| |Junius| |Brutus,| |Most| |Famous| |of| |Caesars| |Assassins,| |44| |-| |42| |B.C.||stater|
This type, traditionally attributed to an otherwise unknown Dacian or Sythian king Koson, was struck for Brutus, c. 44 - 42 B.C., with gold supplied by the Senate to fund his legions in the Roman civil war against Mark Antony and Octavian. The obverse imitates a Roman denarius struck by Brutus in 54 B.C. depicting his ancestor L. Junius Brutus, the traditional founder of the Roman Republic. The reverse imitates a Roman denarius struck by Pomponius Rufus in 73 B.C. The meaning of the inscription "KOΣΩN" is uncertain. KOΣΩN may have been the name of a Dacian king who supplied mercenary forces to Brutus, or BR KOΣΩN may have been intended to mean "[of] the Consul Brutus."
SL99231. Gold stater, BMCRR II p. 474, 48; RPC I 1701A (Thracian Kings); HGC 3.2, 2049; BMC Thrace p. 208, 1 (same); SNG Cop 123 (Scythian Dynasts), ICG MS64 (4944620127, Thracian kings, Koson, c. 54 BC), weight c. 8.45 g, maximum diameter 19 mm, die axis 0o, military mint, 44 - 42 B.C.; obverse Roman consul L. Junius Brutus (traditional founder of the Republic) in center, accompanied by two lictors, BR (Brutus) monogram left, KOΣΩN in exergue; reverse eagle standing left on scepter, wings open, raising wreath in right talon; ICG Verify ; $2600.00 SALE PRICE $2340.00


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Ephesos|, |Severus| |Alexander,| |13| |March| |222| |-| |March| |235| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia||AE| |36|
See this type online:
RPC Online VI
Asia Minor Coins
ANS Mantis (No photo on ANS, but photo of this specimen is available on RPC Online.)
SH87621. Bronze AE 36, Karwiese MvE 5.2 p. 164, 750b (O3/R3, only 1 spec. of this variety); RPC Online VI T4956 (5 spec.); ANS Mantis 1972.185.5, Choice EF, excellent centering, olive green patina, some legend weak, small flaw/punch on reverse, porous, weight 25.344 g, maximum diameter 36.3 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesos mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYP CEB AΛEΞAN∆POC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse M-ONΩN - ΠPΩTΩN - ACIAC, on left: cult statue of Artemis standing facing, wearing ornate kalathos, flanked on each side by a stag, arms with supports; on right: Demeter enthroned left, wreathed in grain, two stalks of grain in right hand, long torch vertical in left hand; EΦECIΩN in exergue; only the second known of this variety with stags flanking Artemis, fantastic HUGE 36mm provincial bronze!; $1900.00 SALE PRICE $1710.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |25|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99308. Bronze AE 25, Mildenberg 112 (O10/R76); SNG ANS 570 - 572 (same dies); cf. BMC Palestine p. 307, 31; Sofaer 144; Meshorer TJC 292a; Hendin 6464, gVF, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 10.201 g, maximum diameter 24.5 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon", seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1100.00 SALE PRICE $990.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |25|
The Bar Kokhba revolt, led by Simon bar Kokhba, was the last of the major JewishRoman wars. The Roman army suffered heavy losses. It took six full legions, auxiliaries, and elements from as many as six more legions three years to crush the revolt. The Romans annihilated much of the Judean population. In 134, the they captured Jerusalem and Simon bar Kokhba was killed in 135. Legio VI Ferrata rebuilt the legionary fortress in Jerusalem and constructed a Roman temple at Golgotha. An altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple. The Jewish diaspora began as Hadrian barred Jews from Jerusalem and had survivors of the massacre dispersed across the Roman Empire. Many were sold into slavery. The Jewish people remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.
JD99310. Bronze AE 25, Mildenberg 53 (O3/R18); cf. BMC Palestine p. 308, 48; Sofaer 70; Meshorer TJC p. 250, 260; Hendin 6436, VF, well centered, green patina, highlighting earthen deposits, small edge split, weight 9.563 g, maximum diameter 25.4 mm, die axis 180o, year 2, 133 - 134 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "S-M/A" (abbreviating Simon), seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Year 2 of the freedom of Israel", vine leaf on tendril; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1000.00 SALE PRICE $900.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |27|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99312. Bronze AE 27, Mildenberg 132 (O10/R96); cf. Meshorer TJC 292a; BMC Palestine p. 312, 80; SNG ANS 572; Hendin 6464, gVF, green patina, earthen deposits, slightly off center, weight 8.558 g, maximum diameter 26.7 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon", seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $1000.00 SALE PRICE $900.00


Otho, 15 January 69 - 17 April69 A.D., Antioch, Seleucis and Pieria, Syria

|Antioch|, |Otho,| |15| |January| |69| |-| |17| |April69| |A.D.,| |Antioch,| |Seleucis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria||as|
Otho ruled for only three months. The imperial mint at Rome did not issue bronze in his name, but two provincial mints did. Alexandria issued bronzes with Greek legends, and Antioch issued bronzes with Latin legends.
RY99147. Bronze as, McAlee 321c; RPC I 4318; cf. BMC Galatia p. 176, 207; SNG Cop -, gVF, excellent portrait, attractive toning with highlighting earthen deposits, flan adjustment marks, especially on rim, obverse edge beveled, weight 14.384 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 15Jan69-17Apr69A.D.; obverse IMPMOTHO CAES AVG (inwardly, clockwise from upper right), laureate headright, dot (control symbol) behind head; reverse large SC (senatus consulto), within a laurelwreath with eight bunches of leaves, no linear circle, no dot (control symbol) in field; scarce; $900.00 SALE PRICE $810.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |21|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99307. Bronze AE 21, Mildenberg 112 (O10/R76); SNG ANS 570 - 572 (same dies); cf. BMC Palestine p. 307, 31; Sofaer 144; Meshorer TJC 292a; Hendin 6464, VF, dark green patina, earthen deposits, tight flan, small edge cracks, weight 7.709 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon", seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $900.00 SALE PRICE $810.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |23|
In 134, the Romans captured Jerusalem. Simon bar Kokhba was killed in 135, at Betar, a fortress where he had taken refuge. Jerusalem, largely destroyed, was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina. Legio VI Ferrata rebuilt the legionary fortress in the city and constructed a Roman temple at Golgotha. An altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple in Jerusalem. Although, resistance continued in Galilee, the Jewish diaspora began as Emperor Hadrian barred Jews from Jerusalem and had survivors of the massacre dispersed across the Roman Empire. Many were sold into slavery. The Jews remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.

Obverse legend:      Reverse legend:
JD99309. Bronze AE 23, Mildenberg 31 (O2/R10); SNG ANS 580; BMC Palestine p. 3, 93; Meshorer TJC 297a; Sofaer p. 283, & pl. 236, 16; Hendin 6463 (S), VF, well centered on a tight flan, thin blue-green patina, earthen deposits on reverse, light marks, weight 6.840 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, undated, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription counterclockwise from lower right: for the freedom of Jerusalem, upright palm branch within laurel wreath, wreath with four groups of three leaves on each side, a medallion at the top and ribbon ties at the bottom; reverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription counterclockwise from lower right: Shimon, kithara-lyre with a long soundbox, three strings, and horn-like protrusions; from a private collector in New Jersey; scarce; $900.00 SALE PRICE $810.00


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

|Bar| |Kochba|, |Judaea,| |Bar| |Kochba| |Revolt,| |132| |-| |135| |A.D.||AE| |25|
After the defeat of Bar Kochba rebellion, Judea would not be a center of Jewish religious, cultural, or political life again until the modern era, although Jews continued to sporadically populate it and important religious developments still took place there. Galilee became an important center of Rabbinic Judaism, where the Jerusalem Talmud was compiled in the 4th-5th centuries. In the aftermath of the defeat, the maintenance of Jewish settlement in Palestine became a major concern of the rabbinate. The Sages endeavored to halt Jewish dispersal, and even banned emigration from Palestine, branding those who settled outside its borders as idolaters.
JD99314. Bronze AE 25, Mildenberg 114 (O10/R78); SNG ANS 569 (same dies); cf. BMC Palestine p. 311, 70; Meshorer TJC 292; Sofaer 82; Hendin 6464, VF, green patina, light corrosion, light earthen deposits, weight 9.817 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "Shimon" (possibly due to die break, mem irregular with two horizontal parallel strokes), seven branched palm tree with two bunches of dates; reverse paleo-Hebrew inscription: "for the freedom of Jerusalem", five-lobed vine-leaf with strongly accentuated ribs, hanging from curved branch, short tendril right; from a private collector in New Jersey; $900.00 SALE PRICE $810.00




  







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