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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Provincial||View Options:  |  |  |   

Roman Provincial Coins

The Roman Empire allowed many areas and cities to mint coins for local use, those coins are refered to as Roman Provincial or Greek Imperial coins. All the coins listed below are also listed under the emperor in power at the time of mintage. If you are looking for coins of a specific emperor, use the menu on the left. If you are looking for coins from a specific region, these coins are organized geographically under Greek Imperial in our Greek Coins catalog. The link to the Greek Coins catalog is in the header above. In this folder all provincial coins are listed from most expensive to least expensive. Start on page one to see the best or on the last page to find the bargains.

Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Nicomedia, Bithynia

|Bithynia|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Nicomedia,| |Bithynia|, |cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
 
SH25882. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Metcalf Type B1, 3 (dies 2/3); BMCRE III 1099 note; RSC II 240b, VF, weight 10.410 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse IMP CAES TRA HADRIANO AVG P P, laureate bust right; reverse COM - BIT, octastyle temple on podium of three steps, ROM S P AVG in entablature in pediment; Forum purchased from Harlan Berk for $1680; SOLD


Antioch, Seleukis and Pieria, Syria, 13 - 14 A.D., The "Star of Bethlehem Coin"

|Decapolis,| |Arabia| |&| |Syria|, |Antioch,| |Seleukis| |and| |Pieria,| |Syria,| |13| |-| |14| |A.D.,| |The| |"Star| |of| |Bethlehem| |Coin"|, |AE| |20|
Michael Molnar, an astronomer, believes this coin depicts Jupiter's occultation of Aries in 6 B.C., the most probable "Star of Bethlehem."
RY09127. Bronze AE 20, McAlee 99; RPC I 4269; SNG Cop 98; BMC Galatia p. 159, 65, VF, weight 6.32 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, Legatus Augusti Pro Praetore Silanus, 13 - 14 A.D.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse EΠI ΣIΛANOY ANTIOCEΩN, ram running right, looking back, star above, ∆M (year 44 Actian Era) below; SOLD


Judean Kingdom, Herod the Great, 37 - 4 B.C.

|Herod| |the| |Great|, |Judean| |Kingdom,| |Herod| |the| |Great,| |37| |-| |4| |B.C.|, |8| |prutot|
The eight prutot was Herod's largest denomination. The style of this scarcer variety is somewhat schematic. The vertical legends are also unusual. This is an appendage group type (O2/R3) as discussed in the Feb '05 Celator.
SH08332. Copper 8 prutot, Hendin 1169, Meshorer AJC 1a, MCP O-I-04, Fontanille Celator Feb '05 O2/R3, VF, weight 10.14 g, maximum diameter 28.0 mm, die axis 0o, Samaria mint, 40 B.C.; obverse HPΩ∆OY BAΣIΛEΩΣ (of King Herod), in 3 strait lines, tripod, ceremonial bowl (lebes) above, LΓ - P (year 3 of the tetrarchy = 40 B.C.) across fields; reverse military helmet facing with cheek pieces and straps, wreathed with acanthus leaves, fillets and star above, flanked by two palm-branches; areas not fully struck, nice green patina highlighted by buff earthen fill; scarce; SOLD


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 86 - 84 B.C., New Style Tetradrachm, Issued by Sulla

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |86| |-| |84| |B.C.,| |New| |Style| |Tetradrachm,| |Issued| |by| |Sulla|, |tetradrachm|
On 1 March 86 B.C., after a 5 month siege, Sulla began his midnight sack of Athens. The city had been occupied by the forces of Mithridates VI of Pontus under the command of Archelaus. Blood was said to have literally flowed in the streets, it was only after the entreaties of a couple of his Greek friends (Midias and Calliphon) and the pleas of the Roman Senators in his camp that Sulla decided enough was enough. This issue was struck for Sulla, either at Athens or outside Athens during the siege, to pay his legions and expenses during the war against Mithradates. The silver was collected from Greeks who supported the Romans against Mithradates and requisitioned from the sacred temple treasuries at Epidaurus, Olympia and Delphi. The ancients admired these Roman-Athenian coins and called them "flats of Lucullan." The MARKOY monogram may refer to Marcus the brother of the Roman general and politician Lucullus.
SH70948. Silver tetradrachm, cf. Thompson Athens 1293; Svoronos Athens pl. 78, 11; Dewing 1653; Boehringer AMUGS V, pp. 28-31 and pl. 9, 10; Kraay-Hirmer pl. 120, 366, gVF, attractive style, well struck, nicely toned, centered on a crowded slightly irregular shape flan, weight 16.581 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, c. 86 - 84 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Athena Parthenos right, triple-crested helmet decorated with a griffin right above the raised earpiece, and protomes of horses above visor; reverse owl standing right on amphora on its side right, head facing, MARKOY monogram left, TAMIOY monogram right, A on amphora, all within olive wreath; ex John Jencek; rare; SOLD


Elagabalus, 16 May 218 - 11 March 222 A.D., Philippopolis, Thrace

|Philippopolis|, |Elagabalus,| |16| |May| |218| |-| |11| |March| |222| |A.D.,| |Philippopolis,| |Thrace|, |medallion|
Nomos described this coin as, "An extraordinary piece, especially with remains of its original silver plating. Some marks from cleaning, otherwise, about extremely fine."
SH85458. Bronze medallion, okatassarion or quinarius; SNG Cop 784; Varbanov III 1721 (R8); Mionnet I, p. 419, 358 (R6); Mouchmov 5428 (all same dies), aEF, cleaning marks, areas of light corrosion, weight 38.718 g, maximum diameter 40.8 mm, die axis 15o, Philippopolis mint, 218 - 222 A.D.; obverse AYT K M AYPΛ ANTΩNEINOC CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed three-quarter length bust of Elagabalus left; reverse MHTPOΠOΛEΩC ΦIΛIΠΠOΠOΛEΩC NEΩ KOPOY, youthful Herakles standing left, nude but for lion's skin draped around his left forearm, resting his right hand on the handle of a club set on the ground and holding an apple in his left hand; big 40.8mm bronze!, ex Nomos AG, auction 10 (18 May 2015), lot 115 (realized approximately $4686 including buyers fee); extremely rare; SOLD


Athens, Attica, Greece, c. 132 - 131 B.C., New Style Silver Tetradrachm

|Athens|, |Athens,| |Attica,| |Greece,| |c.| |132| |-| |131| |B.C.,| |New| |Style| |Silver| |Tetradrachm|, |tetradrachm|
In 1961, Margaret Thompson completed her brilliant study, "The New Style Coinage of Athens." At that time, she estimated there were fewer than 8000 new style tetradrachms "above ground."

The letter on the amphora may indicate the month of production.
SH28914. Silver tetradrachm, Thompson Athens 388d var. (same obverse die; different control letters), superb EF, weight 16.912 g, maximum diameter 29.9 mm, die axis 0o, Athens mint, 132 - 131 B.C.; obverse head of Athena Parthenos right, wearing crested ornamented helmet; reverse A−ΘE ∆ΩP/OΘE NIKO/∆O ∆IOΦ, owl stands right on amphora, lion forepart right, H on amphora, ΣΦ below, all within olive wreath; far nicer than any new-style tetradrachm FORVM has handled to date; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt|, |drachm|
The sparse references for this type do not note the strong resemblance of the reverse figure to Antinous, as found on this example. We were unable to find even a single plate example of this type from this year to determine if other examples bear the same resemblance to Antinous.

Antinous probably joined the entourage of Hadrian when it passed through Bithynia in about 124. He became Hadrian's constant companion and lover but in October 130 Antinous drowned in the Nile. Hadrian's grief knew no bounds; he enrolled him among the gods, erected a temple, and founded a city in his honor. Artists vied with each other in immortalizing his beauty. Temples and statues to his memory were erected all over the Empire, and there began a Cult of Antinous. On this coin he is depicted in the guise of Hermanubis.
SH17103. Bronze drachm, Emmett 986, year 18: cf. BMC Alexandria p. 91, 770 (year 19), Choice VF, weight 23.873 g, maximum diameter 33.5 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, regnal year 18, 133 - 134 A.D.; obverse AVT KAIC TPAIANA A∆PIANOC CEB, laureate and draped bust right; reverse bust of Antinous as Hermanubis right, diadem and modius ornamented with lotus on head, bare chest, himation on back, L - IH, palm right; very rare; SOLD


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

|Cistophori|, |Augustus,| |16| |January| |27| |B.C.| |-| |19| |August| |14| |A.D.|, |cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
The cistophorus was first struck by the Pergamene Kingdom was a tetradrachm (four-drachms coin) struck on a reduced Asian standard of about 3 grams per drachm. Its name was derived from the cista, a Dionysian cult snake basket that frequently appeared on the obverse. After the Pergamene Kingdom was bequeathed to Rome in 133 B.C., the Romans continued to strike cistophori for the Asia province, with a value equal to three denarii. The portrait of Augustus and later emperors replaced the cista on the obverse.
SH85435. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, Sutherland Group VI, RPC I 2213, RSC I 16, RIC I 477, BnF I 916, BMCRE I 696, BMCRR East 263, SRCV I -, VF, well centered, toned, light marks and scratches, weight 11.796 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 30o, Ephesus mint, c. 25 - 20 B.C.; obverse IMP CAE-SAR (counterclockwise below), bare head right, linear border; reverse capricorn right, head turned back left, cornucopia on its back, AVGVSTVS below, all within laurel wreath; SOLD


Claudius, 25 January 41 - 13 October 54 A.D., Ephesos, Ionia

|Claudius|, |Claudius,| |25| |January| |41| |-| |13| |October| |54| |A.D.,| |Ephesos,| |Ionia|, |cistophorus|
This issue celebrated their marriage and Agrippina Junior's elevation to Augusta. Julia Agrippina was a great-granddaughter of Augustus, great-niece and adoptive granddaughter of Tiberius, sister of Caligula, niece and fourth wife of Claudius, and mother of the Nero. She is described by the ancient sources as ruthless, ambitious, violent and domineering, but also beautiful and reputable. According to Pliny the Elder, she had a double right upper canine, a sign of good fortune. Many ancient historians accused Agrippina of poisoning Claudius. A soothsayer prophesied if Nero became emperor, he would kill his mother, Agrippina replied "Let him kill me, only let him rule!" Nero had her executed in 59 A.D.
SH79841. Silver cistophorus, RPC I 2223, RIC I 117 (R), BMCRE I 234, BnF II 294, RSC II 2, SRCV I 1887, VF, excellent portraits, toned, nice surfaces, highest points flatly struck, reverse slightly off-center, weight 11.054 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, 50 - 51 A.D.; obverse TI CLAVD CAESAR AVG P M TR P X IMP XIIX (counterclockwise), laureate head of Claudius right; reverse AGRIPPINA AVGVSTA CAESARIS AVG (counterclockwise), draped bust of Agrippina Jr. right, hair in queue at back, hair in three rows of curls above ear and long curly strand below ear; rare; SOLD


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

|Hadrian|, |Hadrian,| |11| |August| |117| |-| |10| |July| |138| |A.D.|, |cistophoric| |tetradrachm|
Bacchus was the Roman god of agriculture, wine and fertility, equivalent to the Greek god Dionysus. He carried a pinecone-topped staff, and his followers were goat-footed Satyrs and Maenads, wild women who danced energetically during his festivals. Bacchus was the child of Jupiter and Semélé, a human. Juno tricked her into asking to see Jupiter as he really was. Since she was a mortal, she was burned up by the sight of his divine form. So Jupiter sewed the infant Bacchus into his thigh, and gave birth to him nine months later. Before he took his place at Olympus, Bacchus wandered the world for many years, going as far as India to teach people how to grow vines. In myth, Dionysius was the last god to join the twelve Olympians. Hestia gave up her seat for him.
SH32539. Silver cistophoric tetradrachm, RIC II 485; Metcalf Type 101/Type 98 (unidentified mint D), Choice gVF, weight 10.161 g, maximum diameter 29.1 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain Asia Minor mint, obverse HADRIANVS AVGVSTVS P P, bare-headed bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse COS III, Bacchus standing facing, nude, head left, thyrsus in left hand, oenochoe in right hand over panther left at feet; SOLD




  




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