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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy| ▸ |Galerius||View Options:  |  |  |   

Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D.

Galerius was caesar and a tetrarch under Maximianus. His capital was Sirmium (modern Sremska Mitrovica, Serbia). Although a talented general and administrator, Galerius is better known for his key role in the "Great Persecution" of Christians. He stopped the persecution under condition the Christians pray for his return to health from a serious illness. Galerius died horribly shortly after.

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||argenteus|
The Sarmatians were a large confederation of Iranian people during classical antiquity, flourishing from about the 5th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D. They spoke Scythian, an Indo-European language from the Eastern Iranian family. The Sarmatians moved to an area called Sarmatia; east of Germania and north of the immediate vicinity of the Danube. These barbarous and little know tribes also occupied the vast tracts of modern Russia. In the autumn of 285, in the Balkans, Diocletian encountered a tribe of Sarmatians who demanded assistance. The Sarmatians requested he either help them recover their lost lands or grant them pasturage rights within the empire. Diocletian refused and fought a battle with them, but was unable to secure a complete victory. The Sarmatians would have to be fought again. In 288, Diocletian managed what was probably another rapid campaign against the resurgent Sarmatians. No details survive, but surviving inscriptions indicate that Diocletian took the title Sarmaticus Maximus after 289.
SH21636. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Roma 29b (R2), RSC V 219a, Hunter V 14, SRCV IV 14264, EF, weight 3.494 g, maximum diameter 19.3 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA SARMAT (victory over the Sarmatians), the four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod in front of turreted enclosure with gate; scarce; SOLD


Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.,| |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt||tetradrachm|
Missing from almost all the major collections and we found no examples online or listed in recent auctions.
SH57426. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari 6163, Kampmann 122.31, Sommer 122.31, Emmett 4239 (R5), Milne -, Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Hunterian -, SNG Milan -, gVF, attractive style, well centered, weight 7.756 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, as caesar, 29 Aug 294 - 28 Aug 295 A.D.; obverse ΓAΛ MAΞIMIANOC K, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Tyche reclining left on lectisternium, tiller in right with rudder behind visible under the couch, kalathos on head, head resting on left hand, L Γ above; extremely rare; SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||argenteus|
Galerius was Caesar and tetrarch under Maximianus. Although a talented general and administrator, Galerius is better known for his key role in the "Great Persecution" of Christians. He stopped the persecution under the condition the Christians pray for his return to health from a serious illness. Galerius died horribly shortly after.
SH91317. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Roma 29b (R2), RSC V 219a, Hunter V 14, SRCV IV 14264, Choice VF, well centered, flow lines, nearly as struck but with die wear, weight 3.286 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 294 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four tetrarchs sacrificing over tripod in front of gated enclosure with six turrets; rare; SOLD


DIVO Galerius, 1 March 305 - 5 May 311 A.D., Struck Under Maximinus II

|Galerius|, |DIVO| |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.,| |Struck| |Under| |Maximinus| |II||follis|
This DIVO Galerius posthumous type struck under Maximinus II is published for the Alexandria mint (RIC VI 133). This is the only Antioch mint example known to Forum.
RT79563. Billon follis, Apparently unpublished; RIC VI -, Hunter V -, Cohen VII -, VF, dark green patina, light earthen deposits, weight 6.510 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Antioch mint, posthumous, 311 - 313 A.D.; obverse DIVO MAXIMIANO MAXIMINVS AVG FIL, laureate head right; reverse AETERNAE MEMORIAE GALERI MAXIMIANI, lighted altar, garlanded, ornamented on front panel with eagle standing left on garland, head right, wreath in beak, B right, ANT in exergue; ex CNG e-auction 233 (26 May 2010), lot 398 (realized $310 plus fees); extremely rare; SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis|
In 301 A.D., Diocletian issued his Edict on Maximum Prices in an attempt to curb inflation.
SH30365. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 167b, Choice EF, sharp and attractive, on a nice nearly round flan, weight 12.837 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 301 - 303 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, spear in right over shoulder hand; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genio, wearing modius, naked but for chlamys, standing left, offering from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, altar left, A right, PLG in exergue; rare; SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||argenteus|
Providentia is the ability to foresee and to make provision for the future. This coin is dedicated to the foresight of the two emperors. Providentia was one of the embodiments of virtues that were part of the imperial cult. Cicero said that providentia is one of the three main components of prudentia, "the knowledge of things that are good or bad or neither," along with memoria (memory) and intellegentia (understanding).
RS84481. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Roma 35b (R3), RSC V 183b, Sisak Hoard 85, SRCV IV 14243, Hunter V 15 var. (7th officina), Choice EF, excellent centering and strike, light die wear, flow lines, edge cracks, weight 3.180 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Rome mint, as caesar, c. 295 - 297 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIA AVGG (foresight of the two emperors), the four tetrarchs (two emperors and two princes) sacrificing over tripod in front of gate of a turreted enclosure, Γ in exergue; from the Dr. Sam Mansourati Collection; very rare; SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis|
In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
SH53626. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 4b, SRCV IV 14350, Cohen VII 74, aEF, weight 8.352 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 295 A.D.; obverse C VAL MAXIMIANVS NOB C, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, LB in exergue; extensive silvering; SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis|
"This reverse is modeled after the famous statue of the Spirit of the Roman People in the Roman Forum. It is unclear when this statue was last seen as it is now lost. Although the coins celebrate a wide range of spirits (e.g., Rome, Augustus, the Army, etc.), the basic design comes from the same statue...The act of pouring the libation to the emperor illustrates what the Christians were required to do in order not to be persecuted." -- Roman Bronze Coins From Paganism to Christianity 294-364 A.D. by Victor Failmezger
SH14025. Billon follis, RIC VI Treveri 226b, VF, weight 7.513 g, maximum diameter 27.6 mm, die axis 0o, Treveri (Trier) mint, as caesar, 296 - 297 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust left, hold spear in right over shoulder, shield in left; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, naked except chlamys over shoulder, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, A - Γ at sides, TR in exergue; very rare; SOLD


Roman Provincial Egypt, Terracotta "Coin Mold," c. 316 - 320 A.D.

|Roman| |Egypt|, |Roman| |Provincial| |Egypt,| |Terracotta| |"Coin| |Mold,"| |c.| |316| |-| |320| |A.D.|
Some call these counterfeiter's molds. However, Malloy notes on his tag for this specimen, "Originally thought to be molds for producing coins, now it is thought that these terracotta impressions themselves were used as a crude medium of exchange."
AS85456. Unofficial pseudo coin used for small change, VF, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, c. 316 - 320 A.D.; obverse retrograde impression of: IMP C GAL VAL MAXIMINVS P F AVG, laureate head of Galerius right (obverse of Galerius follis, c. 308 A.D.); reverse retrograde impression of: IOVI CONSER-VATORI AVGG, Jupiter standing facing, head left, Victory on globe in right hand, long scepter vertical in left hand, eagle left at feet on left, K above eagle on left, wreath over X over A right in right field, ALE in exergue (reverse of Alexandria mint follis, 316 - 317 A.D., RIC VII Alexandria 17 - 19); SOLD


|Galerius|, |Galerius,| |1| |March| |305| |-| |5| |May| |311| |A.D.||follis|
In 301 A.D., Diocletian issued his Edict on Maximum Prices in an attempt to curb inflation.
SH30362. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 164b, EF, Genio's head flatly struck, weight 9.361 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 301 - 303 A.D.; obverse MAXIMIANVS NOB C, laureate and cuirassed bust right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genio, wearing modius, naked but for chlamys, standing left holding patera and cornucopia, altar left, A right, PLC in exergue; sharp and very attractive; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

DIVOGALVALMAXIMIANO
DIVOMAXIMIANOMAXIMINVSAVGFIL
GALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
GALVALMAXIMIANVSNOBC
GALVALMAXIMIANVSNOBCAES
IMPCGALVALMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCGALVMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPCMAXIMIANVSPFAVG
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOMAXIMIANOSOCERO
IMPMAXIMIANVSPFAVGMAXIMIANVSCAESAR
MAXIMIANVSAVG
MAXIMIANVSCAES
MAXIMIANVSNC
MAXIMIANVSNOBC
MAXIMIANVSNOBCAES
MAXIMIANVSPFAVG


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de I'atelier de Lyon, Diocletien et ses coregents avant la reforme monetaire (285 - 294). Numismatique Romaine VII. (Wetteren, 1972).
Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Réforme Monétaire de Dioclétien à la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). Numismatique Romaine XI. (Wetteren, 1980).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cloke, H. & L. Toone. The London Mint of Constantius & Constantine. (London, 2015).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien à Constantin I (284-337). Moneta 1. (Wetteren, 1995).
Gnecchi, F. I Medaglioni Romani. (Milan, 1912).
Jelocnik, A. The Sisak Hoard of Argentei of the Early Tetrarchy. (Ljubljana, 1961).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, |Part| II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

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