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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ Roman Coins ▸ The Tetrarchy ▸ Constantius IView Options:  |  |  |   

Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

Constantius I, a brilliant general, was selected on 1 March 293 by Diocletian and Maximianus to be one of the two Caesars in the First Tetrarchy. Constantius successfully reclaimed the Western provinces from the separatist empire of Carausius and Allectus based in Britain and Gaul. He was Constantine the Great's father. Constantius died of natural causes at York in 306 and his son Constantine succeeded him as Tetrarch.


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SH34978. Silver argenteus, RIC VI 42a, RSC V 314a, Cohen VII 314 (12 Fr.), Choice EF, weight 3.545 g, maximum diameter 19.0 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Rome mint, as caesar, 295 - 297 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four tetrarchs sacrificing in front of six-turreted enclosure (city or castrum), A in exergue; full circles strike, fine style portrait, mint luster, die damaged below bust, ex Glenn Woods; scarce; SOLD


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SH20382. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Rome 42a, RSC V 314a, EF, weight 2.743 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 0o, 6th officina, Rome mint, as caesar, 295 - 297 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS CAES, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four tetrarchs sacrificing in front of six-turreted enclosure (city or castrum), Z in exergue; fine style portrait, mint luster; scarce; SOLD


Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

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SH18891. Silver argenteus, RIC VI Cyzicus 4, Choice VF+, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 19.5 mm, die axis 0o, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, c. 294 - 295 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse PROVIDENTIA AVGG (the foresight of the two emperors), the four tetrarchs sacrificing in front of six-turreted enclosure (city or castrum), CM in exergue; full circle strike on both obverse and reverse; rare (RIC R4); SOLD


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In 294, Constantius campaigned against Allectus the usurper-emperor in Britain and northern Gaul; Maximian held the Rhine; Galerius campaigned on the Danube; and Diocletian accompanied by the young Constantine I besieged the pretender Achilleus in Alexandria.
SH62385. Silver argenteus, Sisak Hoard 9a, RIC VI Siscia 44a, RSC V 315c, VF, grainy, weight 2.557 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Siscia (Sisak, Croatia) mint, as caesar, 294 - 295 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTI-VS CAESAR, laureate head right; reverse VIRTVS MILITVM (courage of the soldiers), the four tetrarchs sacrificing over alter before front of the open gate of an eight-turreted enclosure (city or castrum walls); scarce (RIC R2); SOLD


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
SH27729. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 167a, Bastien XI 311, EF, weight 10.215 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon) mint, as caesar, 301 - 303 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand over altar, cornucopia in left hand, B right, PLC in exergue; SOLD


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman people. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT71563. Billon follis, RIC VI Serdica 4a, Cohen VII 89, SRCV IV 14058, Choice aEF, perfect bold full-circles strike on a broad flan, some light corrosion, weight 9.729 g, maximum diameter 29.5 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Serdica (Sofia, Bulgaria) mint, as caesar, 303 - 305 A.D.; obverse FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing left, modius on head, naked except for chlamys over shoulder, pouring liquor from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, A right, •SM•SD• in exergue; fantastic!; SOLD


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RT17199. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 251, Bastien XI 436, aEF, weight 6.952 g, maximum diameter 25.1 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, posthumous, 307 A.D.; obverse DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO, laureate head right; reverse CONSECRATIO, eagle standing right, looking up, wings spread, on decorated altar, PLC in exergue; very scarce; SOLD


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RT17200. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 264, Bastien XI 499, gVF, weight 5.888 g, maximum diameter 27.0 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, posthumous 307 A.D.; obverse DIVO CONSTANTIO PIO, laureate, veiled and cuirassed bust right; reverse MEMORIA FELIX, two eagles with wings spread, flanking and looking at lighted altar, PLC in exergue; scarce; SOLD


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
SH53262. Billon follis, RIC VI Lugdunum 167a, Bastien XI 311, EF, weight 10.473 g, maximum diameter 28.1 mm, die axis 0o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 301 - 303 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding spear over shoulder; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand over altar, cornucopia in left hand, A right, PLC in exergue; SOLD


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This coin is dedicated to the goddess Fides for her good quality of preserving the public peace by keeping the army true to its allegiance.
RT83498. Billon follis, RIC VI Ticinum 55a, Cohen VII 44, SRCV IV 14170, VF, well centered and struck, weight 8.300 g, maximum diameter 28.2 mm, die axis 0o, 3rd officina, Ticinum (Pavia, Italy) mint, 305 A.D.; obverse IMP C CONSTANTIVS P F AVG, laureate head right; reverse FIDES MILIT (the loyalty of the soldiers), Fides seated left, standard in each hand, TT in exergue; SOLD




  




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OBVERSE LEGENDS

CONSTANTIVSAVG
CONSTANTIVSCAES
CONSTANTIVSCAESAR
CONSTANTIVSNC
CONSTANTIVSNOBC
CONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
CONSTANTIVSPFAVG
DNCONSTANTIONOBC
FLVALCONSTANTIVSNOBC
FLVALCONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
IMPCCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
IMPCONSTANTIVSAVG
IMPCCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOCONSTANTIOADFINI
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOCONSTANTIOCOGN
DIVOCONSTANTIOAVG
DIVOCONSTANTIOPIO
DIVOCONSTANTIOPIOPRINCIP


REFERENCES

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de I'atelier de Lyon, Diocletien et ses coregents avant la reforme monetaire (285 - 294). Numismatique Romaine VII. (Wetteren, 1972).
Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Réforme Monétaire de Dioclétien à la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). Numismatique Romaine XI. (Wetteren, 1980).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien à Constantin I (284-337). Moneta 1. (Wetteren, 1995).
Gnecchi, F. I Medaglioni Romani. (Milan, 1912).
Jelocnik, A. The Sisak Hoard of Argentei of the Early Tetrarchy. (Ljubljana, 1961).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, Part II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, May 21, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Constantius I