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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Tetrarchy| ▸ |Constantius I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Constantius I, May 305 - 25 July 306 A.D.

Constantius I, a brilliant general, was selected on 1 March 293 by Diocletian and Maximianus to be one of the two Caesars in the First Tetrarchy. Constantius successfully reclaimed the Western provinces from the separatist empire of Carausius and Allectus based in Britain and Gaul. He was Constantine the Great's father. Constantius died of natural causes at York in 306 and his son Constantine succeeded him as Tetrarch.


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT91230. Silvered follis, RIC VI Heraclea 20a, SRCV IV 14061, Cohen VII 89, Hunter V -, Choice EF, full border centering, much silvering, excellent portrait, attractive reverse, round flan, weight 10.614 g, maximum diameter 27.3 mm, die axis 180o, Heraclea (Marmara Ereglisi, Turkey) mint, 297 - 283 A.D.; obverse FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, HTΓ in exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 76 (7 Apr 2019), part of lot 942; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


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In Roman religion, every man has a genius, a presiding spirit. In De Die Natali, Censorinus says, from the moment we are born, we live under the guard and tutelage of Genius. Cities, organizations, and peoples also had a genius. On coins, we find inscriptions to the Genius of the Army, of the Senate, of the Emperor, etc. The legend GENIO POPVLI ROMANI dedicates this coin to the Genius of the Roman People. Genius' image is of a man with a cloak half covering the shoulders leaving the rest of his body naked, holding a cornucopia in one hand, and a simpulum or a patera in the other.
RT91629. Billon follis, Hunter V 16 (also 1st officina), RIC VI Lugdunum 167a, Bastien XI 311, Cohen VII 122, SRCV IV -, Choice VF, centered on a broad flan, brown tone with scattered small green encrustations, flow lines, light marks, parts of legends weak, weight 8.225 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, as caesar, 301 - 303 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate and cuirassed bust left, holding scepter in right hand over right shoulder; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, flaming altar at feet left, A right, PLC in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $130.00 (€114.40)
 


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In 303, Diocletian, Maximian, Galerius, and Constantius issued a series of edicts rescinding the legal rights of Christians and demanding that they comply with traditional religious practices. About 3,000 Christians died in the persecutions, many more were imprisoned and tortured, but most Christians avoided punishment.
RT91849. Billon follis, Hunter V 35 (also 3rd officina), RIC VI Rome 112a, SRCV IV 14085, Cohen VII 263, VF, well centered on a broad flan, brown tone with highlighting light earthen deposits, Moneta's head not fully struck, edge crack, weight 9.287 g, maximum diameter 30.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 303 - 305 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse SAC MON VRB AVGG ET CAESS NN, Moneta standing slightly left, head left, scales in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, R crescent T in exergue; $45.00 (€39.60) ON RESERVE


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The K - V mark of value probably indicates a value 20 (K) denarii communes and a value of 5 (V) folles equal one silver argenteus.
RT91847. Billon follis, RIC VI Antiochia 55a, SRCV IV 14069, Cohen VII 89, Hunter V 59 (3rd officina), F, well centered, green patina in fields, light deposits, weight 9.132 g, maximum diameter 27.9 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 300 - 301 A.D.; obverse FL VAL CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, head laureate right, larger head variety; reverse GENIO POPVLI ROMANI (to the guardian spirit of the Roman People), Genius standing slightly left, head left, nude but for chlamys over shoulders and left arm, kalathos on head, pouring libations from patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, I upper right, K - V (mark of value) across lower field, ANT in exergue; $40.00 (€35.20) ON RESERVE


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Certificate of Authenticity issued by David R. Sear.

This type depicts Hercules holding the golden apples of the Hesperides. Diocletian and Maximian had placed themselves under the divine protection of Jupiter and Hercules respectively, Diocletian and Galerius calling themselves "Jovians' and Maximian and Constantius 'Herculians.'
SH08930. Gold aureus, RIC VI Antiochia 8; Calico 4833a; Depeyrot p. 139, 9/4; Cohen VII 145, aVF/VF, traces of mounting at 12 o'clock, weight 5.29 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 293 - 295 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTIVS NOB CAES, laureate head right; reverse HERCVLI CONS CAES (Hercules protector of Caesar), Hercules standing facing, head left, leaning on club and holding apples, lion skin over shoulder, SMAΞ* in exergue; very rare (RIC rarity R4, Calico rarity R1), conservative Sear grading; SOLD







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

CONSTANTIVSAVG
CONSTANTIVSCAES
CONSTANTIVSCAESAR
CONSTANTIVSNC
CONSTANTIVSNOBC
CONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
CONSTANTIVSPFAVG
DNCONSTANTIONOBC
FLVALCONSTANTIVSNOBC
FLVALCONSTANTIVSNOBCAES
IMPCCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
IMPCONSTANTIVSAVG
IMPCCONSTANTIVSPFAVG
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOCONSTANTIOADFINI
IMPMAXENTIVSDIVOCONSTANTIOCOGN
DIVOCONSTANTIOAVG
DIVOCONSTANTIOPIO
DIVOCONSTANTIOPIOPRINCIP


REFERENCES|

Bastien, P. Le monnayage de I'atelier de Lyon, Diocletien et ses coregents avant la reforme monetaire (285 - 294). Numismatique Romaine VII. (Wetteren, 1972).
Bastien, P. Le Monnayage de l'Atelier de Lyon, De la Réforme Monétaire de Dioclétien à la fermeture temporaire de l'Atelier en 316 (294 - 316). Numismatique Romaine XI. (Wetteren, 1980).
Calicó, X. The Roman Avrei, Vol. Two: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 7: Carausius to Constantine & sons. (Paris, 1888).
Depeyrot, G. Les monnaies d'or de Diocletien à Constantin I (284-337). Moneta 1. (Wetteren, 1995).
Gnecchi, F. I Medaglioni Romani. (Milan, 1912).
Jelocnik, A. The Sisak Hoard of Argentei of the Early Tetrarchy. (Ljubljana, 1961).
King, C. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume V, Carausius to Romulus Augustus. (London, 1987).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & P. Webb. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol V, |Part| II, Probus to Amandus. (London, 1933).
Paolucci, R. & A. Zub. La monetazione di Aquileia Romana. (Padova, 2000).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. IV. Valerian I to Allectus. (Oxford, 1978).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. V. Diocletian (Reform) to Zeno. (Oxford, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. IV: The Tetrarchies and the Rise of the House of Constantine...Diocletian To Constantine I, AD 284 - 337. (London, 211).
Sutherland, R. & C. Carson. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol VI, From Diocletian's reform to the death of Maximinus. (London, 1967).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 15, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Constantius I