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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Caracalla||View Options:  |  |  | 

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, better known as Caracalla, was the son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna, born in 188 A.D. He was named Caesar in 196 and Augustus in 198. Shortly before his death, Severus advised his sons, "Agree with each other, give money to the soldiers and scorn all other men." But the brothers hated each other and soon Caracalla had Geta murdered and massacred thousands suspected of supporting him. Although a capable military commander, the actual running of the government was left to his mother. He gradually slipped more and more into paranoia and delusions of grandeur before being murdered on his way to an Eastern campaign aimed at fulfilling his belief that he was the reincarnation of Alexander the Great.

Lot 20 Roman Provincial Coins from Parium, Mysia, 3rd Century A.D.

|Parium|, |Lot| |20| |Roman| |Provincial| |Coins| |from| |Parium,| |Mysia,| |3rd| |Century| |A.D.||Lot|
Mostly or all Caracalla with Capricorn (9), wolf suckling twins (3), Genius sacrificing (8) reverses.
LT96128. Bronze Lot, Lot 20 Roman provincial coins from Parium, Mysia, mostly or all Caracalla, 198 - 217 A.D., c. 21 - 23 mm, aVF or better, unattributed to type, no tags or flips, actual coins in the photograph, as-is, no returns; $630.00 (€579.60)
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Seleucia Pieria, Syria

|Roman| |Syria|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Seleucia| |Pieria,| |Syria||tetradrachm|NEW
"The importance of the Thunderbolt [to Seleucia Pieria] is explained by Appian, who tells how a clap of thunder preceded the founding of the city, wherefore Seleucus mad thunder the divinity of the Seleucia...When, therefore, the coins show a thunderbolt resting on a throne it is not a mere symbol of Zeus but is itself the object to which, as Appian reports, the inhabitants continued to direct their worship and hymns." -- Alfred Bellinger in The Syrian Tetradrachms of Caracalla and Macrinus
RX97449. Billon tetradrachm, Bellinger Syrian 76, Prieur 1188 var. (obv. legend arrangement), aEF, well centered on a tight round flan, light tone, weight 13.049 g, maximum diameter 26.0 mm, die axis 180o, Seleucia Pieria (Cevlik, Hatay Province, Turkey) mint, 215 - 217 A.D.; obverse AYT K M A - ANTΩNIN-OC CEB, laureate head right, exaggerated pupil; reverse ∆HMAPX EΞ YΠA TO ∆ (holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time, ∆ appearing as Λ on all spec.)), eagle standing facing on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, wreath in beak; $225.00 (€207.00)
 


|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Libertas (Latin for Liberty) was the Roman goddess and embodiment of liberty. The pileus liberatis was a soft felt cap worn by liberated slaves of Troy and Asia Minor. In late Republican Rome, the pileus was symbolically given to slaves upon manumission, granting them not only their personal liberty, but also freedom as citizens with the right to vote (if male). Following the assassination of Julius Caesar in 44 B.C., Brutus and his co-conspirators used the pileus to signify the end of Caesar's dictatorship and a return to a Republican system of government. The pileus was adopted as a popular symbol of freedom during the French Revolution and was also depicted on some U.S. coins. On the Seated Liberty dollar, Liberty raises up a pileus (freedom cap) on a rod (liberty pole). Seated Liberty
RS97471. Silver denarius, RIC IV 161, RSC III 143, BMCRE V 511, SRCV III 6817, Hunter III -, VF, excellent portrait, radiating flow lines, light toning, edge ragged with splits and cracks, weight 3.769 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 208 - 210 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse LIBERTAS AVG, Libertas standing half left, head left, pileus in right hand, long rod vertical in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 96 (01 Nov 2020), lot 864 (part of); $150.00 (€138.00)
 


|Caracalla|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.||denarius|NEW
Liberality is personified by the image of a woman, holding in one hand a counting board, or square tablet with a handle on which are cut a certain number of holes. These boards were used to quickly count the proper number of coins or other items for distribution to each person. It appears they were held over a container, covered with coins and the excess swept away back into the container. The proper number of coins would fill the holes and then would be dumped out to the recipient. On coins this symbol indicated the prince had given to the people money, grain, or other articles of consumption. In the other hand she holds a cornucopia, to indicate the abundance of wheat contained in the public graineries.
RS97470. Silver denarius, RIC IV 158, RSC III 128, BMCRE V 257, SRCV II 6815, VF, nice portrait, well centered, light toning, long closed flan cracks, weight 2.833 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 209 A.D.; obverse ANTONINVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse LIBERALITAS AVG VI (the 6th liberality [distribution of gifts to the people] by the Emperor), Liberalitas standing half-left, coin counting board in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 96 (01 Nov 2020), lot 864 (part of); $120.00 (€110.40)
 







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

ANTONINVSAVGVSTV
ANTONINVSAVGVSTVS
ANTONINVSPIVSAVG
ANTONINVSPIVSAVGBRIT
ANTONINVSPIVSAVGGERM
ANTONINVSPIVSFELAVG (ALSO USED BY ELAGABALUS)
DIVOANTONINOMAGNO
IMPCAEMAVRANTAVGPTRP
IMPCAESMAVRELANTONINVSAVG
IMPANTONINETGETACAESAVGFIL
IMPCMAVRANTONAVGPTRP
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSAVG
IMPCMAVRANTONAVGPTRP
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSAVG
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSPONTAVG
IMPMAVRANTONINVSPIVSAVGPMTRPXIII
MAVRANTCAESPONTIF
MAVRANTONCAESPONTIF
MAVRANTONINVSCAES
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVG
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVGBRIT
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVGGERM


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
The Barry P. Murphy Collection of Severan Denarii - http://bpmurphy.ancients.info/severan/severanhome.htm
Bickford-Smith, R. "The imperial mints in the east for Septimius Severus: it is time to begin a thorough reconsideration" in RIN XCVI (1994/1995), pp. 53-71.
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) - http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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