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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Severan Period| ▸ |Caracalla||View Options:  |  |  | 

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D.

Marcus Aurelius Antoninus, better known as Caracalla, was the son of Septimius Severus and Julia Domna, born in 188 A.D. He was named Caesar in 196 and Augustus in 198. Shortly before his death, Severus advised his sons, "Agree with each other, give money to the soldiers and scorn all other men." But the brothers hated each other and soon Caracalla had Geta murdered and massacred thousands suspected of supporting him. Although a capable military commander, the actual running of the government was left to his mother. He gradually slipped more and more into paranoia and delusions of grandeur before being murdered on his way to an Eastern campaign aimed at fulfilling his belief that he was the reincarnation of Alexander the Great.

Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Tyana, Cappadocia

|Cappadocia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Tyana,| |Cappadocia||AE| |29|NEW
Under Caracalla the city became Antoniana colonia Tyana. After having sided with Queen Zenobia of Palmyra it was captured by Aurelian in 272, who would not allow his soldiers to sack it, allegedly because Apollo appeared to him, pleading for its safety. The ruins of Tyana are at modern Kemerhisar, three miles south of Nigde. There are remains of a Roman aqueduct and sepulchral grottoes.
RP97247. Bronze AE 29, SNGvA 8732, SNG Cop -, BMC Galatia -, Ganschow -, F, mild smoothing, small edge crack, weight 17.290 g, maximum diameter 29.3 mm, die axis 0o, Tyana (Kemerhisar, Turkey) mint, 212 - 213 A.D.; obverse A KAI M AYP ANTΩNINOC, laureate head right; reverse ANT KOΛΩNIAC, emperor, radiate and togate, globe in extended right hand, plow in left hand, plowing left, marking the pomerium (sacred boundary) to found the new colony, TVANΩN / ET Iς (year 16) in in two lines in the exergue; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 87 (1 Mar 2020), lot 345; this is the first example of this type handled by FORVM; only five sales of this type listed on Coin Archives in the last two decades, including the Naumann auction for this coin; very rare; $140.00 SALE |PRICE| $126.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |23|NEW
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94893. Bronze AE 23, Spijkerman pl. 51, 43a (same dies), cf. Sofaer 45 (normal style, legends), BMC Arabia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, SNG Hunterian -, Rosenberger IV -, aVF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, barbaric style and epigraphy, weak incomplete legends, weight 10.894 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 209 A.D.; obverse ANTEINO M AVP - AVTOKRATO (or similar), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from the front, barbaric style; reverse MHTPOΠO A∆P ΠETPO (or similar), Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, extending right hand, trophy over shoulder in left, barbaric style; from the Ray Nouri Collection; very rare; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Petra, Arabia

|Roman| |Arabia|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Petra,| |Arabia||AE| |24|
Petra, the capital of the ancient Nabatean Kingdom, is a famous archaeological site in Jordan's southwestern desert. UNESCO describes Petra as "one of the most precious cultural properties of man's cultural heritage." The BBC selected Petra as one of "the 40 places you have to see before you die." Accessed via a narrow canyon called Al Siq, it contains tombs and temples carved into pink sandstone cliffs, earning its nickname, the "Rose City." Perhaps its most famous structure is 45m-high Al Khazneh, a temple with an ornate, Greek-style facade, and known as The Treasury. After the last Nabataean king, Rabbel II, died in 106 A.D., Trajan incorporated Nabataea into the Roman province Arabia Petraea. One of the latest known Nabataean language inscriptions, from 191 A.D., records "...This in the year 85 of the Eparchy [Roman Rule], in which Arabs destroyed the land." It seems likely that raiding Arab tribes extinguished what remained of a weakened Nabataean culture. In 747 A.D. what was left of the Nabataean cities was destroyed in a major earthquake.Treasury
RY94944. Bronze AE 24, Sofaer 45, Spijkerman 42; Rosenberger IV -, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, SNG Hunterian -, BMC Arabia -, aF, near black patina, orange earthen fill, weight 7.676 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Petra (Jordan) mint, 28 Jan 198 - 8 Apr 217 A.D.; obverse K M AVP ANTWN CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse A∆PI ΠETPA MHT, Tyche seated left on pile of rocks, wearing turreted crown, extending right hand, trophy in left hand; from the Ray Nouri Collection; rare; $130.00 SALE |PRICE| $117.00
 


Caracalla, 28 January 198 - 8 April 217 A.D., Stobi, Macedonia

|Stobi|, |Caracalla,| |28| |January| |198| |-| |8| |April| |217| |A.D.,| |Stobi,| |Macedonia||AE| |24|
Stobi (now Gradsko, Macedonia) was an ancient town of Paeonia, conquered by Macedonia, and later made the capital of the Roman province of Macedonia Salutaris. Stobi prospered under Rome and in 69 A.D. was designated a municipium. Citizens of Stobi enjoyed Ius Italicum and were citizens of Rome.
RP97500. Bronze AE 24, Josifovski Stobi 391 (V87/R103), Varbanov III 3992 (R3), Mionnet Supp. III 704, BMC Macedonia -, SNG Cop -, SNG ANS -, F, well centered, scratches, scrapes, reverse die damage on reverse, weight 6.776 g, maximum diameter 23.8 mm, die axis 45o, Stobi mint, c. 211 - 217 A.D.; obverse PIVS AVGV ANTONINVS, laureate bearded head right; reverse MVNIC STOBE, Victory advancing right, wreath extended in right, palm frond in left hand over left shoulder; from the Michael Arslan Collection; $50.00 SALE |PRICE| $45.00
 







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OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

ANTONINVSAVGVSTV
ANTONINVSAVGVSTVS
ANTONINVSPIVSAVG
ANTONINVSPIVSAVGBRIT
ANTONINVSPIVSAVGGERM
ANTONINVSPIVSFELAVG (ALSO USED BY ELAGABALUS)
DIVOANTONINOMAGNO
IMPCAEMAVRANTAVGPTRP
IMPCAESMAVRELANTONINVSAVG
IMPANTONINETGETACAESAVGFIL
IMPCMAVRANTONAVGPTRP
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSAVG
IMPCMAVRANTONAVGPTRP
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSAVG
IMPCMAVRANTONINVSPONTAVG
IMPMAVRANTONINVSPIVSAVGPMTRPXIII
MAVRANTCAESPONTIF
MAVRANTONCAESPONTIF
MAVRANTONINVSCAES
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVG
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVGBRIT
MAVRELANTONINVSPIVSAVGGERM


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
The Barry P. Murphy Collection of Severan Denarii - http://bpmurphy.ancients.info/severan/severanhome.htm
Bickford-Smith, R. "The imperial mints in the east for Septimius Severus: it is time to begin a thorough reconsideration" in RIN XCVI (1994/1995), pp. 53-71.
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. II: From Didius Julianus to Constantius I, 193 AD - 335 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. IV: From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 5: Pertinax to Elagabalus. (London, 1950).
Online Coins of the Roman Empire (OCRE) - http://numismatics.org/ocre/
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & Sear, D. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

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