Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Expert Authentication - Accurate Descriptions - Reasonable Prices - Coins From Under $10 To Museum Quality Rarities STORE WIDE SALE!!! 10% OFF EVERYTHING!!! WE ARE OPEN AND SHIPPING!!! We Are Working From Home, Social Distancing, Wearing Masks, And Sanitizing To Pack Orders!!! Please Call Us If You Have Questions 252-646-1958 Explore Our Website And Find Joy In The History, Numismatics, Art, Mythology, And Geography Of Coins!!!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show Empty Categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
My FORVM
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
zoom.asp
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Adoptive Emperors| ▸ |Lucilla||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

Lucilla was the daughter of Marcus Aurelius and Faustina II and was born in 149 A.D. She was married to the co-emperor Lucius Verus in 164 A.D and bore him several children. She was exiled then executed after being implicated in a conspiracy to assassinate her brother Commodus in 182 A.D.

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
Lucina is the Roman name for the Greek goddess, Eileithyia, who was the protectress of midwives and who assisted during birth. She was later identified with Hera or Artemis. On Roman coins, Lucina is identified as an aspect of the goddess Juno associated with light and childbirth, during which she eased the pain and made sure all went well. Coins portraying Lucina may commemorate a birth in the Imperial family or that the help of the goddess had been invoked. She is usually portrayed with or holding children. A variety of objects may accompany her, sometimes a patera and scepter--attributes of Juno--or more commonly, a flower.
SH69929. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1747, Cohen III 37, BMCRE 1154, Banti III 18, SRCV II 5504, VF, big attractive bronze!, weight 29.187 g, maximum diameter 31.2 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, c. 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG M ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse IVNONI - LVCINAE, Juno seated left on throne with back, feet on footstool, flower in right, swaddled child cradled in left arm, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
The story of Commodus and Lucilla in the movie Gladiator was not historically accurate but the characters were based, in part, on the real emperor and his sister. Lucilla did plot to assassinate her brother Commodus and the plot did fail. Commodus actually did fight as a gladiator. But Maximus, entirely fictional, was not there to save Lucilla. Commodus won every time. Lucilla was banished to Capri and executed a year later.
SH08499. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1746, Cohen III 35, SRCV II 5501, Hunter II -, VF, weight 24.04 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse IVNO, Juno seated left holding patera and scepter, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; reverse struck flat, very nice multi-color patina, excellent portrait; SOLD


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||denarius|
Juno was the chief female divinity in the Roman pantheon. She was the wife of Jupiter and a member of the Capitoline Triad. She had many different aspects, such as Juno Moneta, Juno Sospita, and Juno Lucina, but here she is depicted as Juno Regina, "Juno the Queen." Juno is usually shown holding a patera, scepter or a statuette of Athena, and is often accompanied by a peacock.
SH77007. Silver denarius, RIC III 772, RSC II 41, BMCRE IV 339, Hunter II 16, MIR 18 35, SRCV II 5487, Choice gVF, fine style, toned, well centered on a tight flan, small flan flaw on neck, weight 3.350 g, maximum diameter 18.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse IVNO REGINA, Juno Regina standing left, patera in right hand, long scepter in left hand, peacock at feet left; from the Jyrki Muona Collection; ex Freeman & Sear, Manhattan Sale II (4 Jan 2011), lot 263; ex Classical Numismatic Auctions XX (25 Mar 1992), lot 762; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
For Roman wives, piety often meant accepting neglect. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
RB92463. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1756, BMCRE IV 1161, Cohen III 54, Hunter II 27, SRCV II 5505, VF, nice portrait, flow lines, well centered on a squared flan, light bumps and scratches, weight 26.206 g, maximum diameter 30.2 mm, die axis 330o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse PIETAS, Pietas standing left, veiled, right hand extended over flaming altar at feet on left, incense box in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across field; from the Errett Bishop Collection; SOLD


Lucilla, Augusta c. 164 - 182 A.D., Wife of Lucius Verus, Nysa-Scythopolis, Decapolis

|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus,| |Nysa-Scythopolis,| |Decapolis||AE| |26|
Spijkerman cites four examples of this type. We did not find it listed in any other references, nor were we able to find any examples for sale or sold online. Our coin is nicer than the Spijkerman plate coin.
RY11676. Bronze AE 26, Spijkerman 15, BMC Galatia -, SGICV -, SNG ANS -, Lindgren -, SNG Cop -, VF, weight 11.89 g, maximum diameter 25.9 mm, die axis 0o, Nysa-Scythopolis (Beth-Shean, Israel) mint, 175 - 176 A.D.; obverse ΛOYKIΛΛA AYΓOYCTA, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse NVC•T•CK• - •T•EΛEV•T•Π, Tyche standing right, foot on half-figure of swimming river god, scepter in right hand, scepter in left hand, Θ - ΛC (year 239) across fields; very rare; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||denarius|
Concordia, the goddes of marital harmony, was not particulary generous to Lucilla. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
SH56880. Silver denarius, RIC III 759; BMCRE IV 333; RSC II 7; MIR 18, 26-4/10, Choice EF, weight 3.391 g, maximum diameter 17.6 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, patera in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; a few deposits, nice surfaces, excellent centering on a nice round flan, attractive bold portrait; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||denarius|
Concordia, the goddes of marital harmony, was not particulary generous to Lucilla. It was not considered adultery for a Roman husband to have sex with slaves or unmarried women. The historian Spartianus wrote that after Lucilla complained, Lucius Verus reproached her: "Uxor enim dignitatis nomen est, non voluptatis" (Wife is the name of dignity, not bliss).
SH21697. Silver denarius, RIC III 758, SRCV II 5479, BMCRE IV 306, RSC II 6a, aEF, weight 3.158 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 164 - 166 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVG ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse CONCORDIA (harmony), Concordia seated left, patera in extended right hand, resting left elbow on small statue of Spes; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||denarius|
Sulla in a dream first saw Venus with the weapons of Mars as Venus Victrix and made her his personal patroness. In the night before the battle of Pharsalus 48 B.C. Pompey dreamed of Venus Victrix - seemingly a lucky sign. Caesar sacrificed to Venus Genetrix, but issued as watchword 'Venus Victrix', and defeated Pompey!
RS85213. Silver denarius, RIC III 786, RSC II 89, BMCRE IV 353, Hunter II 18, SRCV II 5492, Choice EF, well centered and struck, edge cracks, weight 3.282 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse VENVS VICTRIX (victorious Venus), Venus standing half left, right breast bare, Victory in right hand, left hand on grounded shield; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
Although many coin references classify Fecunditas as a personification of fertility rather than as an actual deity, Fecunditas was recognized as a Roman divinity by Nero, who erected a statue to her. Tacitus notes that upon the birth of Claudia Neronis, the senate decreed the construction of a temple of Fertility to be built at Antium. Fecunditas is always portrayed as a female figure holding a child, or children and often a scepter, cornucopia, palm branch or caduceus. Sometimes the children are depicted standing at her feet. Coins portraying her usually advertise the fertility of the imperial family.
SH11005. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1736, BMCRE IV 1197, Cohen III 21, Hunter II 48, MIR 18 29, SRCV II 5499, VF, very nice multi-color patina, excellent portrait, reverse struck flat, small edge crack, weight 23.878 g, maximum diameter 31.27 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 166 - 169 A.D.; obverse LVCILLA AVGVSTA, draped bust right, hair elaborately waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse FECVNDITAS, Fecunditas (fertility) seated right, nursing child, one boy behind and one before her, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; scarce; SOLD


|Lucilla|, |Lucilla,| |Augusta| |c.| |164| |-| |182| |A.D.,| |Wife| |of| |Lucius| |Verus||sestertius|
Venus was a major Roman goddess principally associated with love and beauty, the rough equivalent of the Greek goddess Aphrodite.
SH22820. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC III 1776, SRCV II 5508, VF, weight 28.749 g, maximum diameter 32.5 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 164 A.D.; obverse LVCILLAE AVG M ANTONINI AVG F, draped bust right, hair waived and knotted in chignon low at back; reverse VENVS, Venus enthroned left, holding Victory and scepter, S - C (senatus consult) flanking across field; grainy surfaces; SOLD




  




You are viewing a SOLD items page.
Click here to return to the page with AVAILABLE items.
The sale |price| for a sold item is the private information of the buyer and will not be provided.



OBVERSE| LEGENDS|

LVCILLAAVGANTONINIAVGF
LVCILLAAVGVSTA
LVCILLAEAVGANTONINIAVGF
LVCILLAEAVGVSTAE


REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Calicó, E. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. III: De Marco Aurelio a Caracalla (Del 161 d.C. al 217 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 3: Marcus Aurelius to Clodius Albinus. (Paris, 1883).
Mattingly, H. & E. Sydenham. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. III: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1930).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 4: Antoninus Pius to Commodus. (London, 1940).
Robinson, A.S. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet. II. Trajan to Commodus (London, 1971).
Szaivert, W. Die Münzprägung der Kaiser Marcus Aurelius, Lucius Verus un Commodus (161-192). (Wien, 1984).
Seaby, H. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Vol. II: The Accession of Nerva to the Overthrow of the Severan Dynasty AD 96 - AD 235. (London, 2002).
Strack, P. Untersuchungen zur römischen Reichsprägung des zweiten Jahrhunderts, Teil III: Die Reichsprägung zur Zeit Antoninus Pius. (Stuttgart, 1937).
Toynbee, J. Roman medallions. ANSNS 5. (New York, 1944).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Thursday, October 22, 2020.
Page created in 0.469 seconds.
All coins are guaranteed for eternity